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PSU

TEACHER WORK SAMPLE


TEMPLATE
Modified for TCHL825-99

Your First and Last Name:


Lillian Michaels
Date Submitted:
District where you completed
the TWS: Olathe District 233
Name of School Building
where you completed the
TWS: Olathe Northwest High
School
Content Area of your TWS:
English/Language Arts /
Social Studies
TWS Unit Topic: The Lemon
Tree
Grade Level of the
Classroom / Students in
Which the TWS Unit Was
Completed: 11-12
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II. Instructional Design


A. Narrative Description of Range of Objectives and Rationale for Selection (limited to 1 page)
This unit is designed to introduce the students to a historical text describing the conflict between the Israeli and Palestinian communities in the territory known
alternatively as Israel and Palestine. I selected this book because it tells the story from many different sides, in particular from the perspective of an Israeli woman
and a Palestinian man. The Palestinian man, Bashir, and his family are forced from their home and proceed to live as refugees in a country their family has
occupied for many generations. Meanwhile, the Israeli woman, Dalia, and her family are forced from their home in Bulgaria and wind up moving into the house
built by Bashirs father and in which he has grown up. After many years, Dalia and Bashir meet and begin a relationship which spans several decades and which
allows each to see the conflict through the eyes of the other.
This book will challenge the students reading comprehension and language skills as they work to sort out the complicated events and their own feelings about the
conflict and the people involved. Students will attempt to synthesize the views of 2 very sympathetic characters on polar opposite sides of the conflict. The
journal questions are designed to prompt the students to relate the events and circumstances of the characters to their own lives and events affecting their
communities.
The final project in the unit will require the students to create an original presentation illustrating what they have learned from the story. Students will be allowed
to join a group of their choice, based upon the format of the projects being created.

B. State Objectives Here: Focus should be on student performance not activities. What will students know or be able to do? (limited to 1 page)
Obj.
No.
1
2
3
4

Level(s)
(e.g. Blooms
Taxonomy)

Unit Objectives
The students will learn the basic history behind the conflict, including its causes and consequences.

Comprehension
The students will develop an understanding of the impact of the conflict from many perspectives.
The students will relate the experiences of the storys characters to contemporary events and their own
experiences.
The students will design and create an original project representing the main ideas of the story or their
interpretation of a main theme of the story.
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Analysis
Evaluation
Synthesis
2

5
etc

C. Identify State Standards Benchmarks Addressed by Unit Objectives How do objectives address these standards? (limited to 1 page)
Common Core:
1. Reading Standards for Informational Text 6-12: Key Ideas and Details (Std. 3); Craft and Structure (Stds. 4,5,6); Range of Reading and Level of Text
Complexity (Std. 10) The objectives address these standards by presenting complex text and challenging the students to analyze and assimilate it.
2. Writing Standards 6-12: (Stds. 1-6) The objectives address these standards by requiring the students to respond to a series of journal prompts which
involve the use of a variety of writing techniques.
3. Speaking and Listening Standards 6-12: Comprehension and Collaboration (Std. 1); Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas (Stds. 4-6) The objectives
address these standards by requiring the students to participate in a series of group discussions prompted by the text and to create an original presentation
which will convey one or more important ideas from the text or an interpretation of the central themes of the text.
4. Language Standards 6-12: Conventions of Standard English (Stds. 1,2); Knowledge of Language (Std. 3); Vocabulary Acquisition and Use (Stds. 4-6)
The objectives address these standards by requiring the students to participate in group discussions and to maintain a journal in which they respond to
questions about the text and relating the text to their own lives and circumstances.
5. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-12: Key Ideas and Details (Stds. 1,3); Craft and Structure (Stds. 4-6); Integration of
Knowledge and Ideas (Std. 7); Range of Reading and Level of Complexity (Std. 10) The objectives address these standards by presenting a challenging
historical text and asking the students to read and respond to issues and prompts in discussion groups as well as journal entries.
Kansas Standards:
1.

Reading Standards for Informational Text: RI.11-12.1, 11-12.3, 11-12.5, 11-12.6, 11-12.10: The objectives address these standards by presenting a
challenging text and requiring the students to read and analyze the text, discuss questions from the authors website as a group, and respond to journal
prompts individually. These exercises will allow the student to demonstrate proficiency in each of the areas addressed in these standards.
2. Writing Standards: W.11-12.1, 11-12.1d, 11-12.2, 11-12.3, 11-12.4, 11-12.6, 11-12.9: The objectives address these standards by requiring the students to
respond to a series of journal prompts which call for analysis of the text as well as assimilation of information from the students own life and the students
feelings and emotions about the issues presented.
3. Speaking and Listening Standards: SL.11-12.1a-d, SL.11-12.4, SL.11-12.5, SL.11-12.6: The objectives address these standards by requiring the students
to participate in a series of group discussions prompted by the text and to create an original presentation which will convey one or more important ideas
from the text or an interpretation of the central themes of the text.
4. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies: RH.11-12.1, RH.11-12.2, RH.11-12.3, RH.11-12.4, RH.11-12.5, RH.11-12.6, RH.11-12.8: The
objectives address these standards by presenting a challenging historical text and asking the students to read and respond to issues and prompts in

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discussion groups as well as journal entries.

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Pre-Assessment:
Lesson

Date

8/25
(50
min)

A six question multiple choice test designed to gage the students knowledge about the history of the conflict and the people
involved.

T
R
I

T/R/I

Instructional Activities/
Strategies
Power Point: The Middle East/Middle
Eastern Conflicts/The Middle East Today by
Sarah Moje
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bz9eBjqfJlf
DYUNZS2l2U3Ezdkk/edit
Introduction to The Lemon Tree. Examine
the introductory notes and maps; preassessment.
Read chapters 1 and 2 for next class.
Review Journal Question from last class.

Formative
Assessment
(formal/informal)

Describe Specific Adaptations/


Differentiation

Journal Questions:
What do you hope to
learn from reading The
Lemon Tree?
Based on your prior
knowledge, who do
you feel is mostly
responsible for the
conflict?

As needed, students will be provided with a copy of


the Power Point presentation as well as a copy of my
notes on todays lesson.

Chapters 1,2 Discussion Questions:

From:
http://www.litlovers.com/readingguides/14-non-fiction/544-lemon-treetolan?start=3

8/26
(50
min)

T/R/I

The book opens with the journey of


Bashir and his cousins on a bus to their
childhood homes in al-Ramla. What must
have been going through their minds
during that time? Can you imagine the
internal dialogue in their heads, as they
rode the bus, then walked around their
old hometown? How would you have felt
if you were Bashir, approaching the old
home, and pressing the bell?

Journal Question:
Have you ever gone
back to a place which
was once familiar to
find that it had
changed? What was
that like?
Compare/contrast with
Bashirs return to the
house in Ramla.

Students who require it will be allowed to read


chapter summaries and respond to modified journal
questions.

Read chapters 3 and 4 for next class.

Review Journal Question from last class.


Chapters 3,4 Discussion Questions:

From:
http://www.litlovers.com/readingguides/14-non-fiction/544-lemon-treetolan?start=3

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Dalias very existence, and her arrival as


an infant to Israel in November 1948, is
the result of remarkable circumstances
that combined to save some 47,000
Bulgarian Jews from the Holocaust. How
much importance would you put on the
actions of Dimitur Peshev,
the
University
Teacher
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parliamentarian, or Bishops Kiril and
Stephanand how much to other
Journal Question:
factors? Finally, the book (p. 43)

Table 2.1 Instructional Design Unit Plan


T- Lesson integrates technology; R- Lesson uses reading strategies; I- Lesson demonstrates integration of content across and within content fields

Table 2.2: Narrative Description of Pre-assessment, Formative Assessments, and Summative Assessment (limited to 2 pages)
Which
objectives Identify how the assessment will be
Describe the assessment to be Explain rationale for choosing
II. D, H, and K
does this
scored and/or the criteria to be
used
this assessment
assessment used for evaluation.
address?
A six question multiple choice quiz
designed to gage the students
knowledge of the events and
people involved in the conflict.

Pre-Assessment
(Diagnostic)

This assessment was chosen as a


means for assessing the students
prior knowledge of the important
events portrayed in the book. It also
will provide students with a forecast
of the issues to be examined during
the unit.

Common
Core #5
above,
Kansas
Standard #6
above

This assessment provides an


opportunity for the instructor to
measure each students progress in
the reading and level of
understanding. The group discussion
also provides an interactive
opportunity for the students to learn
from one another.

Common
Core #3,4,5
above;
Kansas
Standards
#1,3,4 above

Formative Assessment
- Informal

For each reading assignment, the


class will discuss questions from
the authors website.

Formative Assessment
- Formal

For each reading assignment,


students will be required to write a
journal entry responding to a
specific prompt.

This assessment requires each


student to use his/her writing skills
to analyze a portion of the text
and/or to connect events from the
book to real-life situations.

The students will be divided into


groups and each group will report
on the book in a creative format.
Students will be grouped
according to their individual
interest in the available formats.

This assessment will afford each


student the opportunity to participate
in a project in a creative format of
their choosing and to cooperate with
classmates to produce a quality
presentation. The rubric will require

Summative
Assessment

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Common
Core #2,4,5
above;
Kansas
Standards
#2,4 above
Common
Core #2,3,4
above;
Kansas
Standards
#1-4 above

This assessment will be used only as a


diagnostic guide for the instructor and
will not be taken for a grade. The
instructor will use the responses to
discuss with the class their prior
knowledge as a whole and to expose any
common misconceptions about the
situation.
This assessment will be scored on the
basis of each students participation in
each discussion. Students will be given 3
points for a contribution which moves
the learning forward for the class; 2
points for a contribution which correctly
answers the question presented or an
issue raised during the discussion; 1
point for responses to other students
contributions/questions; 0 points for nonparticipation.
This assessment will be scored on the
basis of the Journal Response and
Comprehension Rubric attached in
Appendix B. There will be 20 points
possible for each journal entry.
This assessment will be scored on the
basis of each students participation in
the group, according to his/her assigned
position. Points will also be given based
on the presentation to be made to the
class by the entire group. Evaluation of

Each student within the group will


be assigned a specific task and will
be assessed on his/her performance
of that task as well as on the
groups overall performance of the
project.

the students to demonstrate a group


as well as an individual knowledge
of the important aspects of the book.

the group performance will be based on


the rubric attached in Exhibit B.

Narrative for Instructional Design


II. E.
Why are the lessons sequenced in this
manner?

The lessons are sequenced in this way to correspond with the text. Each lesson corresponds with one or
more chapters addressed in sequence.

II. F.
What learning strategies were incorporated
into this unit?
How do the instructional strategies/activities
address the learning objectives for this unit?

The unit incorporates direct and indirect learning strategies including individual reading, group discussion,
journal writing and group collaboration.
The learning objectives call for the students to read and respond to the text and also to assimilate their own
knowledge and experience into the discussions and journal responses on which they will be assessed. The
instructional strategies provide opportunities for the students to demonstrate each of these competencies
throughout the unit via reading, group discussions, journal activities and a comprehensive group project.

II. G.
How will critical thinking and problem
solving strategies be implemented? Give
specific examples of use.
II. I.
Explain the reading strategies that will be
used throughout the unit. Give specific
examples. (Remember that using text is not a
reading strategy)
How will technology be integrated within the
unit? Explain both teacher use and student
use.
How does the unit demonstrate integration of
content across and within content fields?
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Each of the questions presented to the group for discussion requires the students to use problem solving
strategies to participate effectively in the discussion. The journal prompts also require the students to use
critical thinking and problem solving strategies in order to respond in an appropriate fashion. Finally, the
group project will require each student to use these skills in order to cooperate with the other members of
the group in producing and presenting a cohesive project to the class.

The SQ3R and SRQ2R strategies will be used to provide the students opportunities to preview material and,
after reading one or more chapters, to review the material by way of the group discussion questions and the
journal entry prompts.
The students will begin the unit with a power point presentation regarding the history of the conflict. Later,
they will use discussion questions obtained from the authors website and, finally, they will have the option
of producing a multi-media presentation as their final project in the unit.
This unit is anchored by a text which is at once a challenging work of non-fiction and a decidedly historical
account of an important event in history as well as contemporary social struggle. For this reason, it is
necessarily a unit based in English/language arts as well as social studies.

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II. J.
What specific adaptations or differentiated
activities were used to accommodate
individual learning needs?

This unit is designed for an upper-level high school English class, but has been accommodated to provide
for differentiated learning by providing chapter summaries and modified journal questions for those
students requiring adapted instruction. The rubric for group discussions and group projects will also be
modified for those students.

Provide a copy of two complete detailed lesson plans in Appendix A.

Provide a copy of pre-assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix B.
Provide a copy of one formal formative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix B.
Provide a copy of one informal formative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix B.
Provide a copy of the summative assessment document and the corresponding scoring key/rubric in Appendix B.

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APPENDIX A

Lesson #1 Plan:
Objectives: The students will learn some basic facts about the conflict between the Israeli and Palestinian people, including the
origins of the conflict and the implications for the security of each community. The students will gain a working knowledge of the
location of Israel/Palestine and its position relative to other middle eastern countries and key locations in Europe and North America.
The students will become familiar with the layout of The Lemon Tree and identify some personal learning goals for the unit.
Anticipatory Set: The students will complete the Pre-Assessment in order to determine their level of knowledge regarding the conflict
in Israel/Palestine.
Activity I: The students will watch the Power Point presentation , The Middle East/Middle Eastern Conflicts/The Middle East Today
by Sarah Moje https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bz9eBjqfJlfDYUNZS2l2U3Ezdkk/edit
Activity II: (Teaching / Input) The instructor will guide the students through an examination of the beginning of The Lemon Tree,
including the introductory notes and maps, as well as a variety of other maps intended to orient the students to the position of
Israel/Palestine with respect to other middle eastern countries and locations in Europe and North America.
Activity III: (Teaching / Input) The instructor will introduce the journal writing activity to the students, including the rubric to be
used in evaluating the students entries.
Activity IV: (Teaching / Input) The instructor will walk through the remainder of the unit with the students, including the formative
and summative assessments.
Activity V: (Guided practice / monitoring) The instructor will lead a group discussion about the following questions: What do
you hope to learn from The Lemon Tree? and, Based on your prior knowledge, who do you feel if mostly responsible for the
conflict?
Closing: Assign Chapters 1 and 2 for next class meeting.

Lesson #3 Plan:
Objectives: The students will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the plight of the Jewish people in Eastern Europe
(particularly Bulgaria) during World War II. Students will compare/contrast the circumstances of the Jewish and
Palestinian people with respect to the War of Independence or Catastrophe, as it is alternately known.
Activity I: (Guided practice / monitoring / check for understanding) The students will lead a discussion about Chapters 3
and 4 of the text, using the discussion questions presented in the Unit plan. Grading will be by rubric as described in
Appendix B.
Activity II: (Guided practice / monitoring / check for understanding) The class will be separated into groups and each
group will assume the role of either Bashir or Yitzhaki. Each group will then present to the class their interpretation of the
position of their character with respect to the War of Independence / The Catastrophe.
Activity III: (Independent Practice) Students will have an opportunity to work on the journal question, What is meant by
the fragility of goodness? What did this mean to the Bulgarian Jews?
Closing: Q&A. Assign chapters 5, 6 for next class.

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APPENDIX B
Pre-Assessment:
The Lemon Tree Pre-Assessment Quiz
1.
a)
b)
c)
d)

The region containing Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip is also known as:
The Middle East
The United Arab Emirates
Palestine
Jerusalem

2.
a)
b)
c)
d)

The conflict between the Jewish and Palestinian people dates back approximately how far?
10 years
65 years
90 years
More than a century

3.
a)
b)
c)
d)

The word Diaspora refers to:


The 6 days War
The dispersal of a population of people across many lands
A Jewish holiday
A Muslim holiday

4.
a)
b)
c)
d)

The Palestinian people are primarily:


Muslim and Christian
Jewish
Terrorists
Buddhist

5.
a)
b)
c)
d)

The word Zionist refers to:


People who live on Mt. Zion
People who favor the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine
People who discriminate against Jews based on their religion
People who favor a two-state solution to the conflict in the region

6. Since the United Nations Partition Plan of 1947, the territory controlled by the Palestinian
people has:
a) Grown larger
b) Stayed the same
c) Grown smaller
d) Been eliminated

The Lemon Tree Pre-Assessment Quiz


Answer Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

C
D
B
A
B
C

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This assessment will be used only as a diagnostic guide for the instructor and will not be taken for a grade. The
instructor will use the responses to discuss with the class their prior knowledge as a whole and to expose any
common misconceptions about the situation.

Informal Formative Assessment:


The Arab-Israeli war of 1948 is known as the War of Independence to Israelis, and the Nakba, or Catastrophe, to
Palestinians. Chapter Four describes how Bashirs family, and Dalias cousin, Yitzhak Yitzkaki, experienced the war. Take the
point of view of Bashir, during the first several months of 1948, and tell the group how you experienced those times. Now,
do the same with Yitzhaki. This question will be answered in a group activity where each group of students will
discuss the question from the point of view of one character and present that experience to the class.
Rubric for grading this assessment:

This assessment will be scored on the basis of each students participation in each discussion. Students will be
given 3 points for a contribution which moves the learning forward for the class; 2 points for a contribution
which correctly answers the question presented or an issue raised during the discussion; 1 point for responses to
other students contributions/questions; 0 points for non-participation.

Formal Formative Assessment:


Journal Question for Lesson No. 7:
The Lemon Tree was first published in 2006. Based on what you know about the current state of affairs in Israel/Palestine, does it
appear as if the words in Dalias and Bashirs letters have taken hold there?
Rubric for grading Journal Entries:
1. The student writes journal responses in complete sentences.
2. The student writes three or more sentences to answer questions.
3. The student responds to questions by self-questioning, retelling, predicting,
or assuming the role of a character.
4. The students experiences and opinions are clear.
5. The student works with a peer to share journal responses and to develop a
combined response when requested.
Scale:
Excellent 4
The student completes
the task with no major
errors
The student
demonstrates a full
understanding of the
concepts

Very Good 3
The student completes
the task with only a
few major errors and
some minor errors
The student
demonstrates a strong
understanding of the
concepts

Fair 2
The student completes
the task with some
major errors and many
minor errors
The student has
difficulty
understanding the
concepts

_____
_____
_____
_____
_____

Poor - 1
The student fails to
complete the task
The student does not
understand the
concepts

Summative Assessment:
As a final project for this unit, you will get together with one or more of your classmates to produce a representation of a
main theme/themes of The Lemon Tree in a format of your collective choice. Some options to consider are: a narrative
book report; a theatrical adaptation of a pivotal scene/scenes; a story board depicting a pivotal scene/scenes or
comparing/contrasting the events of the story with a contemporary event; a multi-media presentation summarizing the
major lessons of the story, etc. BE CREATIVE!
Timeline: Concepts must be presented to me on or before 9/12 and projects will be presented to the class between 9/26
and 10/3.
Grading: Each student will be assigned a specific role within his/her group and will be graded based on his/her
collaboration with the group (see Collaboration Rubric below) as well as on the presentation of the group project as a
whole. The project rubric will vary depending on the nature of the project approved.

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Collaboration Rubric
CATEGORY
Focus on the
Task and
Participation

Exemplary

Proficient

Partially
Proficient

Unsatisfactory POINTS

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Consistently
stays focused
on the task
and what
needs to be
done. Very
self-directed.

Focuses on
the task and
what needs to
be done most
of the time.
Other group
members can
count on this
person.

Focuses on
the task and
what needs to
be done some
of the time.
Other group
members
must
sometimes
remind this
person to keep
on task.

Rarely focuses
on the task
and what
needs to be
done. Lets
others do the
work. .

A true team
member who
contributes a
lot of effort,
and
encourages
and supports
the efforts of
others in the
group.

A strong
group
member who
tries hard!

Sometimes a
satisfactory
group
member who
does what is
required

Sometimes
chooses not to
participate
and does not
complete
assigned
tasks.

2 points

1 point

0 points

Usually
punctual for
group
meetings,
turns in most
work on time.

Sometimes
late for group
meetings,
frequently
turns in work
after the
deadline.

Late for all or


most group
meetings,
misses all
deadlines for
turning in
work.

Follows
through on
most assigned
tasks.

Does not
follow through
on most
assigned tasks
and
sometimes
depends on
others to do
the work.

Seldom or
never follows
through on
assigned
tasks.
Depends on
others to do
all of the
work.

Dependability 3 points
and Shared
Responsibility Consistently
punctual for
group
meetings,
turns in all
work on time.

Follows
through on
assigned
tasks and
does not
depend on
others to do
the work,
responsibility
for tasks is
shared
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12

evenly.

Listening,
3 points
Questioning
Respectfully
and Discussing
listens,
interacts,
discusses and
poses
questions to
all members
of the team
during
discussions
and helps
direct the
group in
reaching
consensus.

2 points

1 point

0 points

Respectfully
listens,
interacts,
discusses and
poses
questions to
others during
discussions.

Has some
difficulty
respectfully
listening and
discussing,
and tends to
dominate
discussions.

Has great
difficulty
listening,
argues with
teammates,
and is
unwilling to
consider other
opinions.
Impedes
group from
reaching
consensus.

Research and 3 points


InformationRoutinely
Sharing
gathers
research and
shares useful
ideas when
participating
in the group
discussion.
Defends/
rethinks
ideas relating
to the groups
project goals.

2 points

1 point

0 points

Usually
provides
useful
research and
ideas when
participating
in the group
discussion.

Sometimes
provides
useful
research and
ideas when
participating
in the group
discussion.

Rarely
provides
useful
research or
ideas when
participating
in the group
discussion.

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

Actively looks
for and
suggests
solutions to
problems.

Refines
solutions
suggested by
others.

Does not
suggest or
refine
solutions, but
is willing to
try out
solutions

Does not try to


solve
problems or
help others
solve
problems.

ProblemSolving

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suggested by
others

Group/Partner 3 points
Teamwork
Consistently
makes
necessary
compromises
to accomplish
a common
goal.

2 points

1 point

0 points

Usually makes
necessary
compromises
to accomplish
a common
goal.

Occasionally
makes
compromises
to accomplish
a common
goal, and
sometimes
helps keep the
group working
well together.

Rarely makes
compromises
to accomplish
a common
goal and has
difficulty
getting along
with other
group
members.

Always has a
positive
attitude
about the
task(s) and
the work of
others.

Usually has a
positive
attitude about
the task(s)
and the work
of others.

Occasionally
is publicly
critical of the
task(s) or the
work of other
members of
the group.

Is often
negative and
publicly
critical of the
task(s) or the
work of other
members of
the group.

All team
members
contributed
equally to the
finished
project.

Assisted
group/partner
in the finished
project.

Finished
individual
task but did
not assist
group/partner
during the
project.

Contributed
little to the
group effort
during the
project.

Performed all
duties of
assigned
team role and
contributed
knowledge,
opinions, and
skills to share
with the
team. Always
did the
assigned
work.

Performed
nearly all
duties of
assigned team
role and
contributed
knowledge,
opinions, and
skills to share
with the team.
Completed
most of the
assigned
work.

Performed a
few duties of
assigned team
role and
contributed a
small amount
of knowledge,
opinions, and
skills to share
with the team.
Completed
some of the
assigned
work.

Did not
perform any
duties of
assigned team
role and did
not contribute
knowledge,
opinions or
skills to share
with the team.
Relied on
others to do
the work.

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

___/3

14

https://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/secondaryteamworkrubric.html

Pittsburg State University

Teacher Work Sample

15