You are on page 1of 22

Get into the game Modified League tag

Stage 3

Term planner
Week

Equipment needed

Whistle
Witches hats
Footballs
Grass oval/field
Braids

Whistle
Witches hats
Tag belts and tags
Hoops
Footballs
Grass oval/field

Whistle
Witches hats
Tag belts and tags
Footballs
Grass oval/field

Focus

Syllabus content

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Locomotor skills
running variations
- accelerate, decelerate
- stop, start
dodging

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Locomotor skills
running variations
- accelerate, decelerate
- stop, start
dodging
Manipulative skills
Catching
- attacking/defensive

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Locomotor skills
running variations
- accelerate, decelerate
- stop, start
dodging
Manipulative skills
Catching
- attacking/defensive

Playing the game


competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- tag games
Playing the game
competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
rules/tactics/strategies
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- ball games
Modified games
Playing the game
competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
rules/tactics/strategies
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- tag games
- ball games
Modified games

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 1 of 22

Week

Equipment needed

Whistle
Witches hats
Tag belts and tags
Hoops
Footballs
Grass oval/field

Whistle
Witches hats
Beanbags
Footballs
Grass oval/field

Whistle
Witches hats
Tag belts and tags
Footballs
Grass oval/field

Focus

Syllabus content

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Locomotor skills
running variations
- accelerate, decelerate
- stop, start
dodging
Manipulative skills
Catching
- attacking/defensive

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Manipulative skills
Kicking
- punt
Playing the game
competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
rules/tactics/strategies

Dodging
Tagging
Catching
Throwing
Kicking

Locomotor skills
running variations
- accelerate, decelerate
- stop, start
dodging
Manipulative skills
Catching
- attacking/defensive
Kicking
- punt

Playing the game


competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
rules/tactics/strategies
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- ball games
Modified games
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- tag games
- ball games
Modified games

Playing the game


competition
fair play
effort and participation
teamwork
rules/tactics/strategies
Games
Spatial awareness
- tactics/strategies
Minor games
- tag games
- ball games
Modified games

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 2 of 22

League tag explained


Modified from: www.sydneyoztag.com.au/oztag
It is a game designed to be a non-contact form of Rugby League. What makes this game different to others is that a tackle is achieved
when a strip of cloth attached by velcro, known as a tag, is removed from the side of a player's shorts. This means there is more room to
move because you have to remove a tag on the side of the shorts instead of tipping anywhere on the body as happens in Touch
Football.
All skills are utilised in League tag including kicking. Passing becomes an attacking weapon, and if a player is put into a gap, there is a
high probability they will make a clean break. When attacking the line, fancy moves such as around the corner passes work well, often
making the defender stoop low to remove the tag.
The game is non-contact and the rules are designed to encourage this. As an attacker you cannot run straight at a defender, you must
run at the gaps. As a defender you cannot impede the progress of an attacker, so if you try to get a tag and miss you may well be
penalised, whoever initiates contact will be penalised.
The rules are very similar to Rugby League with the ball being allowed to go to the ground with the play-on rule applying provided the
ball goes back the attacking team can continue to play-on. Teams kick off as in League and drop-outs are also taken from one's own ingoal area. Kicking in general play is allowed but it must be below shoulder height.
Websites for League tag for teacher information or student perusal during wet weather
www.oztag.com.au
www.sydneyoztag.com.au

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 3 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
Week 1 Dodging (4-5 sessions)

GSS3.8
Applies movement
skills in games and
sports that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and
observation of rules.
develops ideas
around defensive
strategies
MOS3.4
Refines and applies
movement skills
creatively to a variety
of challenging
situations.
varies running
patterns to cater for
side stepping,
dodging and
tagging
INS3.3
Acts in ways that
enhance the
contribution of self and
others in a range of
cooperative situations.
demonstrates
consideration for
and cooperation
with others in
tagging games

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Glue. Students work in pairs. Students will be moving within the area by running and dodging. Student A must free
themselves from student B who follows student A as closely as possible. When the teacher blows a whistle all students
stop. Student B then sees if they can take one step and touch student A. Reverse the roles.
Ice and sun. Two students are 'Ice' and wear blue braids. Two children are the 'Sun' and wear yellow braids. The 'Ice'
must chase other student, [apart from the 'Sun'] touch them so they freeze. Children can only become defrosted when
they are touched by the 'Sun'. Play the game for a designated amount of time.

Teaching notes
The game of League tag is
similar to rugby league but
instead of tackling you rip
tags off the side of a players
body.
It involves various skills such
as dodging, tagging, passing
catching and kicking.

Monkeys and baboons. Students work in two groups, one with tags or braids, one without. Explain that monkeys have
tails (tags or braids tucked in at their waists) and baboons do not. The baboons get tails by pulling the tags away from
the monkeys. Monkeys who lose their tails become baboons.

Dodge
1. Changes direction by
bending knee and pushing
off the outside foot.
2. Change of direction
occurs in one step.
3. Body lowered during
change of direction or in
the direction of travel.
4. Eyes focused forward.
5. Dodge repeated equally
well on both sides.

Skill Development
Outline the skills that students will need to learn in order to play the game of League tag
dodging, tagging, passing, catching, kicking.

Refer to Get skilled: Get


active for further teaching
and learning information
about dodging.

Stone, bridge, tree. Students work in groups of four and adopt the role of a runner, a stone (crouched down), a bridge
(standing legs wide apart) and a tree (standing hands raised). The runner jumps over the stone, crawls under the bridge,
runs around the tree and returns to take the place of the stone, who as the next runner repeats all three activities.

Revise the components of the dodge:


Look straight ahead
Use the outside of your foot
Lower body height down and then up when changing direction
Use your knees to change direction
Use only one step to change direction
Lower body height and transfer body weight.
Ask students;
- When would you use the dodge in a game?
- Why would you use the dodge in a game of League tag?

Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students
performing the dodge
Asks questions in
regards to dodging and
tagging
Assessment criteria
The student:
Uses light springing
steps
Takes off and lands on
the front of their foot
Keeps their eyes

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 4 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Shadow tag. In pairs, one partner stands behind the other. On the go signal the front partner, the dodger jogs around
the court, making quick changes of direction. The other partner is the shadow chaser and tries to follow as closely as
possible to the dodger without touching him or her. The shadow chaser needs to see how many times they can step on
their partners shadow in the time given. On the whistle both partners stop and freeze. If the shadow chaser is standing
in the dodgers shadow, then they get a bonus two points. Play for one minute and then swap roles.
Ask students:
- Was it easy to catch your partner? Why or why not?
- What made it more difficult to tag your partner? What did they do that made it difficult?
- What did you do to catch your partner?
- How do these skills relate to a game of League tag? E.g. when you run with the ball you try to dodge so you dont
get tagged.

focused straight ahead


Suggests ideas about
how to tag players or
make it difficult for them
to dodge past a defender
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8, MOS3.4
and INS3.3

Off the tight rope. Students line up in groups in front of a 20 metre straight line marked on the field. On the whistle, one
student at a time jogs along the line. On the call of right or left the student places their corresponding foot and weight
off the line and steps back to the line again in one movement. They continue to jog along the line repeating this with the
call of left or right. The next student in line starts when the student in front of them is five metres away. The activity
continues until all students have made it to the end of the line. Students repeat, increasing the speed at which they run.
Ask students;
- What were you doing in the activity off the tight rope?
- What foot felt more comfortable to step off?
- Why would you use this action in a game of League tag? E.g. to get around a defender or to avoid being tagged.
Skill development Game Play
Chain tag. Mark out a 20m x 20m area. Two students are taggers, the remainder line up on one end of the field. On the
whistle all students try to get from one end of the field to the other without being tagged. If a student is tagged they must
join hands or link up with the student who tagged them (form a chain). Once all students have made it to the end of the
field the teacher blows the whistle again and so on until one student is left (the winner). Whenever a chain gets longer
than six people the chain must split in to two. Only the ends of the chain are allowed to tag someone. The aim of the
game is for the chains to work together to tag as many students as they can and for the free students to dodge the chain
taggers.
Ask students:
Runners
- What did you do to make it harder for a tagger to get
you?
- How did you do this?
- Do you think these skills could be used in a game of
League tag? When?

Taggers
- What did you do to make it harder for a runner to get
to the other side?
- How did you work together as a team to make a
successful tag?
- What did you need to do as a team to be able to tag

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 5 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes
-

someone? E.g. communicate.


What did you do as an individual to help your team?
Do you think these skills could be used in a game of
League tag? When?

Finishing off
Dogs and dolphins. Set up an area 20m x 20m with a line marked down the centre. Students line up in two lines near
the centre line, standing next to a partner. All students have League tag belts and tags on. One line is named Dogs and
the other line is named dolphins. The teacher calls out one of the names and that line has to run away from their partner
trying to get to the sideline of the marked area without being tagged by their partner (students run to the sideline closest
to their line). All students return to the centre line on the whistle to start again.
Beat the Ball. In groups of 8-10, students stand in a circle with one ball. The ball is passed across or around the circle.
On freeze the student caught with the ball runs around the circle and the remaining players try to pass the ball around
the circle before the runner returns to their position. (Ball can be rolled, underarm pass, bounced and difficulty can be
increased by adding extra balls).
Tag Tails. In pairs, students form two lines facing each other approx. 20 metres apart. one player has a tag/tail. On go,
the players without the tags/tails attempt to cross their opponents lines without losing their tag/tail. Points are scored for
the number of tags/tails stolen. Players swap roles.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 6 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
Week 2 Dodging and tagging (4-5 sessions)

GSS3.8
Applies movement skills
in games and sports
that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and observation
of rules.
participates in
games combining
strategy and
dodging and tagging
skills
explains particular
strategies for use
within team games
MOS3.4
Refines and applies
movement skills
creatively to a variety of
challenging situations.
varies running
patterns to cater for
sprinting, dodging
and tagging

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Follow the leader. In groups of 8-10, students form a line one behind the other. Students move around following
playground or court markings copying the leaders actions. Encourage the leader to use fundamental skills such as
hopping, skipping, leaping and side galloping. Continue the game until all students have a turn of being the leader.
Skill development - Dodging and tagging
Revise the components of the dodge:
Look straight ahead
Use the outside of your foot
Lower body height down and then up when changing direction
Use your knees to change direction
Use only one step to change direction
Lower body height and transfer body weight.
Demonstrate effective tagging technique and highlight the key teaching points:
Maintain good balance
Position feet shoulder width apart
Stay controlled and ready to move
Keep your eyes on the tags
Try to get in front of the attacker
Defensive Demons. In pairs, students practise shadowing an opponent. Score points for each time the attacker
breaks free of their opponent. Compete for 20 seconds and swap roles (player to player defence). Progressively
introduce equipment carry a ball, wearing tags while shadowing/following a partner.
Staying alive (individual). Mark out a 20m x 20m area. Every student has a belt and two tags.
All students spread out in the marked area. On the whistle, each student needs to try to collect
as many tags as they can in 30 seconds to one minute.
Skill development Practising the skill
Over the line. In pairs, students number themselves one or two. Give student number one two tags
and a ball in their hands. Both students jog along either side of a marked line about ten metres
long. Student number one needs to dodge student two by trying to get past the try line without
being tagged. This involves student one placing one foot over the line and then sprinting away.
Give student number one five attempts and then swap positions. (Refer to diagram).

Teaching notes

Dodge
1. Changes direction by
bending knee and pushing
off the outside foot.
2. Change of direction
occurs in one step.
3. Body lowered during
change of direction or in
the direction of travel.
4. Eyes focused forward.
5. Dodge repeated equally
well on both sides.
Refer to Get skilled: Get
active for further teaching
and learning information
about dodging.
Tips for tagging
1. Maintain good balance
2. Position feet shoulder
width apart
3. Stay controlled and ready
to move
4. Keep your eyes on the
tags
5. Try to get in front of the
attacker
Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students
performing dodging and
tagging skills
Asks questions in
regards to attacking and
defending
Assessment criteria
The student:
Performs the dodge

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 7 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Variation: students can try to place the ball down over the try line (score a try).
Defensive demon pairs. In pairs, students practise dodging and marking without equipment. Progressively introduce a
stationary opponent (marker cones) then passive defenders then active defenders.
Staying alive (teams). Similar to staying alive (individual) activity. Mark out a 20m x 20m area. Students work in two
teams and colour code their tags. Each team starts at different ends of the marked area. Both teams need to divide into
two groups, a group of attackers and a group of defenders. On the whistle, the attackers in each team have to try and
get through to the other side of the marked area (try line), while the defenders need to try to stop (tag) the attackers on
the other team from getting through. If an attacker is tagged they must run back to the start line and try again.
Ask students:
Attackers
- What did you need to do to get to the other side?
- Where did you need to run? E.g. into space.

Defenders
- How did you stop attackers from getting to the line?
- What could you do to help your team mates to tag an
attacker?
- Did you work as a team or individually? What worked
better?

proficiently
Demonstrates good
tagging technique
Uses tagging and
dodging skills to defend
and attack in modified
games
Explains strategies to
use when attacking and
defending in team
games
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8 and
MOS3.4

Skill development Game play


Explain the game Rob the nest (details below) and then ask students some or all of the following lead up questions.
- How can you work together as a team in order to get a ball from one end of the field to the other?
- If you have a ball what are your options? E.g. pass or run.
- When should you pass to a team mate?
- When should you run?
- How can you help a team mate who has a ball?
- Where should you run to avoid being tagged?
- Is it better to try to tag a player one on one or to work as a team?
- How can you stop an attacker from stealing a ball?
Rob the nest. Mark out a 20m wide x 30m long area (playing field). The class works in two teams. Each student wears
a belt and two tags. Each team lines up at one end of the field (their try line). Place three footballs in a hoop in the
middle of each try line. Teams need to divide into a group of attackers and a group of defenders. On the whistle, the
attackers in each team have to try to steal the footballs from the other teams try line and return it to their own hoop.
While the defenders need to try to stop (tag) the attackers on the other team from stealing their footballs. If an attacker
is tagged they must drop the ball and return to their try line before starting again. If a defender tags someone they can
return the ball back to their own hoop or pass the ball to an attacker on their team to return the ball. After about two
minutes stop the game. Only those balls in the hoops are counted as points. Return the three footballs to each hoop
and repeat the activity. If students seem to be playing well then lengthen the time in play.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 8 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Rules include:
Players can run with the ball
Players are allowed to pass to other team mates before getting tagged
Players can pass in any direction
If the ball is dropped a player can pick it up and play on.
Finishing off
Staying alive (individual). Mark out a 20m x 20m area. Every student wears a belt and two tags. Students spread out in
the marked area. On the whistle each student needs to try to collect as many tags as they can in the given time, about
30seconds to one minute.
Crusts and crumbs. Students line up in two lines approximately two metres apart wearing tags. One line is called
crusts and the other line is called crumbs. The teacher calls out a name if crumbs is called that line skips away and
the crusts chase. If crusts is called that line skips away and the crumbs chase. Anyone caught before crossing a given
line changes sides.
Alarm. Mark out a playing area with two end lines. Choose three students to be taggers. They move to the middle of
the area and the other students stand behind one of the end lines. The taggers call out Alarm to signal for all of the
other students to run to the opposite end of the playing field. The taggers try to tag as many students as they can. A
tagged student joins the taggers. The last three students tagged become the taggers for the next game.
Ask students:
- What do you need to think about when going for a tag?
- What can you do to make a successful tag?
- How can you avoid being tagged?
- What movements can you make to make it more difficult for someone to tag you? E.g. dodge, spin, or run fast.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 9 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Week 3 Catching and Passing (4-5 sessions)


GSS3.8
Applies movement skills
in games and sports
that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and observation
of rules.
combines a series of
skills for use in a
game, e.g. run,
catch and pass
MOS3.4
Refines and applies
movement skills
creatively to a variety of
challenging situations.
adapts passing
action to cater for
distance, accuracy
and speed
INS3.3
Acts in ways that
enhance the
contribution of self and
others in a range of
cooperative situations.
demonstrates
cooperation and
encourages other
class mates

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Scissors, paper, rock. Students stand on a line facing each other, with their fists touching in the dodge ready position
(down low) facing the teacher. On the call scissors, paper, rock students move their arms to reflect the action. If
students win the hand they chase their partner to the end lines. If there is a tie students keep playing until someone
wins.
Scissors, paper, rock. Students stand on a line facing each other with their fists touching in the dodge ready position
(down low). On the call scissors, paper, rock students move their arms to reflect the action. If students win the hand
they chase their partner to the end lines. If there is a tie students keep playing until someone wins.
Tag steal. Students work in two teams, lined up on opposite sides of a large marked space. Each team selects two
players to be It. Each player has a braid or tag tucked into their pants or pocket. Players run from one side of the
space to the other, trying not to be tagged. The aim is for It to grab as many tags as they can within a set time limit.
Change It until each team member has participated. Teams keep score of how many tags are collected.
Skill Development for the catch and pass
Revise with students the components of the catch:
Watch the object move into your hands
Move to the ball
Relax your hands
Bend elbows to absorb the force of the object
Ask students;
- What options do you have after you have caught a ball in a game of League tag? e.g. pass, or run.
- How is passing in League tag different to passing in Netball or Basketball? e.g. ball is different, must pass
backwards.
Demonstrate or ask a student to demonstrate a football pass. Teaching instructions include:
Place two hands on the side of the ball
Place one hand at the front and one hand at the back of the ball (depending on the side you pass to will depend on
the position of the hands passing to your left you need your left hand at the front, passing to your right you need
your right hand at the front)
Keep your eyes focused on the target
Step towards the target and throw the ball away from the body
Move your arms across your body during the action

Catching
1. Eyes focused on the
object throughout the
catch.
2. Feet move to place the
body in line with the object.
3. Hands move to meet the
object.
4. Hands and fingers relaxed
and slightly cupped to catch
the object.
5. Catches and controls the
object with hands only (welltimed closure).
6. Elbows bend to absorb
the force of the object.
Refer to Get skilled: Get
active for further teaching
and learning information
about catching.
Tips for Two handed
passing (Football pass)
1. Ball is held on the sides;
one hand at the back, one
hand at the front, thumbs up,
fingers spread, elbows in.
2. Contact with the ball is on
the fingers, not the whole
hand.
3. Ball is brought forward
toward the chest area, then
arms straighten across the
body towards the target
5. At the same time that the
arms extend, step with one
foot towards the target.
Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 10 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
*Note: Depending on the level of student ability, vary the direction of the pass in any of the following activities, e.g.
passing from left to right or right to left.
Hit the target. Draw circle targets on a wall at waist height. Alternatively attach hoops to a fenced area. In groups of
three, students stand about one metre away from the target and practice passing. Students should be trying to get the
ball to land within the target. Each student has five attempts and then the next student has a turn. Each time a student
lands three or more passes in the target they take a step back. While one student is practicing the other students
should be retrieving the footballs. Students can practice passing from both sides of the body, right to left and left to
right.
Beat the Ball. In groups of 8-10, students stand in a circle with one ball. The ball is passed across or around the circle.
On freeze the student caught with the ball runs around the circle and the remaining players try to pass the ball around
the circle before the runner returns to their position. Difficulty can be increased by adding extra balls.
Catch or Run relay. Students work in two teams. Team A forms a circle and team B forms a line near the circle marked
with a witches hat. All students on team A must face outside the circle. On the whistle, team one passes a ball around
the circle from one student to the next, counting the number of catches they make on the full. Team B runs around the
outside of the circle one at a time, tagging the next person in line like a relay race. Once every student in team B has
been around the circle the team yells stop. Team A tells team B the number of catches they made in that time and
then the teams swap. Team B has to try to catch more balls than team A. Only catches that are made on the full are
counted.
Ask students:
- What do you need to remember when passing the ball to another player?
Revise the teaching components of the two handed pass:
- hold the ball on the sides with one hand at the front and one hand at the back
- bring the ball forward toward the chest area
- straighten arms across the body towards the target
- extend arms towards the target as you step towards the target

Teaching notes
performing the football
pass
Observes students
actions towards others in
a variety of activities
Assessment criteria
The student:
holds the ball on the
sides with one hand at
the back and one hand
at the front
Contacts the ball with
their fingers rather than
the whole hand
Straightens their arms
across their body
towards the target
Extends their arms as
they step with one foot
towards the target
Encourages others in a
positive manner
Cooperates well as part
of a team
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8, MOS3.4
and INS3.3

Skill development Game play


Keep away. Students work in four teams. The aim of this game is for each team to keep as many balls away from the
other teams as they can. Students spread themselves out on a marked area 25m x 25m. Two students from each team
start with a football. On the whistle, any student holding a ball must throw the ball into the air to start the game.
Students must work together as a team to keep as many balls away from the other team as possible, passing and
catching the football. Students are not allowed to hold onto a ball for longer than five seconds, and cannot grab a ball
off any student. Students are allowed to run with the ball, but if they get tagged with the ball they must pass it within five
seconds, or the tagger gains possession. After two minutes the teacher blows the whistle for everyone to freeze. Any
student with a ball must hold it up in the air. The teacher counts how many balls each team is holding and keeps a

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 11 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

score. Repeat for another minute until students get the hang of the game. Extend the time to two minutes, three
minutes and play until students reach a certain number. E.g. at the start of the game the teacher can tell students the
first team to get to ten wins. Variation: if students are proficient at passing and catching, change the rule to only passing
backwards/behind them.
Stealing Space. Students form teams of 6-8 players facing each other approx. 10 metres apart. The aim of the game is
for students to pass the ball/Frisbee back to their own home line without being tagged. Each team member has a
number. When numbers are called the players with those numbers run to the ball and pass between their team mates
until they reach their home line. If they are tagged, possession goes to the other team. For example, teacher calls 2, 3
and 4. Students with these numbers run from their home line collect the ball from the centre of the space and pass
between themselves until they reach their home line. Their opponents try to intercept the ball and/or tag them.
Ask students:
- What did you have to do to keep the ball away from the other team?
- Did your team mates help you in any way?
- What did they do to help?
- What were your options if you didnt have the ball? E.g. run into space, defend or tag, or intercept the ball.
Finishing off
Numbers for fun. Students work in two equal teams in a circle. Students number themselves e.g. one, two, three etc.
The numbers cannot go in order around the circle. Student number one starts with the ball and on the whistle passes it
to student number two, who then passes to student number three and so on. Students should practice holding the ball
with two hands and catching the ball without dropping it. If a student doesnt catch it cleanly the team starts again at
student number one. Repeat with students passing in reverse order.
Hot potato. Students work in groups of five or six. Each group stands in a circle and passes a football randomly across
and around the circle like it is a hot potato. The aim is for the group to make as many catches as they can in one
minute, without dropping the ball.
Running circle catch. In groups of 6-8, a leader stands in the middle of the other players who form a circle. Players in
the circle run in a clockwise direction whilst the leader throws the ball at each in turn. They catch and return the ball as
they run. Speed increases as the students catching skills and accuracy improve.
Extension: Count how many catches the group can make without dropping the ball.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 12 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
Week 4 Catching and Passing

GSS3.8
Applies movement skills
in games and sports
that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and observation
of rules.
participates in
passing games
combining strategy,
teamwork,
movement skill and
fair play
combines a series of
skills for use in a
game, e.g. run, kick,
catch and pass
MOS3.4
Refines and applies
movement skills
creatively to a variety of
challenging situations.
adapts passing
action to cater for
distance, accuracy
and speed
varies running
patterns dodging
and tagging
DMS3.2
Makes informed
decisions and accepts
responsibility for
consequences.
applies decision
making processes to
develop attacking

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Team Tag. Class is divided into two even groups. Group one chases group two attempting to tag all the members in a
time frame of 30 seconds, which is counted aloud by the teacher. Groups change over. Count the number of students
remaining for each group at the end of the time allowed. Repeat.
0 to 5. Students find their own space. Teacher explains that 0= freeze, 1 = walk, as slowly as possible, 2= a slow walk,
3= medium pace walk, 4= jog, 5= run as fast as possible. Teacher calls out numbers in any order, while students
respond by moving at various speeds.
Rescue. The class works in teams of four. Set up two markers about ten metres apart in front of each team. On a
whistle student one runs to the marker and back again to collect student two. Linking arms, they both run around the
marker and back to collect student three. This continues until the whole team runs around the marker and back
together. Repeat the relay but as a drop off relay.
Pass and tag. Students form pairs. The pairs scatter around the field with a beanbag. On the signal Pass, the students
jog around the field, passing the beanbag to each other. When they hear the call Tag, the player holding the beanbag
chases their partner trying to tag them with it. If they tag their partner, the students change roles and keep playing until
the next Tag signal.
Skill Development - catch and pass
Revise the components of the two handed pass (football pass) from previous lessons.
Ask students;
- How do you hold the ball with your hands when passing the football?
- Where do your arms move if you want to pass from left to right? Or from right to left?
V- Captain ball. Students work in two groups. The captains of each group stand next to
each other and the rest of the students line up on an angle forming a V formation (refer to
diagram). The teacher will need to use witches hats to mark out where students need to
stand. Students stand two metres apart and face their backs to the other team. The ball
starts at the captain and on the whistle students pass the ball to the next player in the line,
once the ball gets to the end of the line the last student runs with the ball up to the captains
spot and students move down one. The ball must be passed backwards and the activity
ends when all students have been the captain. Have teams swap positions and repeat the
activity so students practice passing in both directions. Get students to pass the ball firstly
while standing still and then secondly while stepping towards the target.

Teaching notes
Students should be able to
demonstrate the
components of the catch
proficiently by year three.
Catching
1. Eyes focused on the
object throughout the
catch.
2. Feet move to place the
body in line with the object.
3. Hands move to meet the
object.
4. Hands and fingers relaxed
and slightly cupped to catch
the object.
5. Catches and controls the
object with hands only (welltimed closure).
6. Elbows bend to absorb
the force of the object.
Refer to Get skilled: Get
active for further teaching
and learning information
about catching.
Two handed Passing
(Football pass)
1. Ball is held on the sides;
one hand at the back, one
hand at the front, thumbs up,
fingers spread, elbows in.
2. Contact with the ball is on
the fingers, not the whole
hand.
3. Stance is square on to the
target, feet shoulder width
apart.
4. Ball is brought forward
toward the chest area, then
arms straighten, and fingers

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 13 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators
strategies in small
group activities
INS3.3
Acts in ways that
enhance the
contribution of self and
others in a range of
cooperative situations.
demonstrates fair
play and
encouragement of
others

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Square pass outside, in. In groups of five or more students stand in a square formation,
set out with witches hats. One student starts with the ball there must be two students
standing at the corner where the ball starts for this activity to work. The student with the
ball runs anti-clockwise, towards the student on their right, when they get about three
quarters of the way down the line they pass the ball to the student who leads off towards
the next corner and repeats the same action. The idea is that as they pass the ball the
students hands/arms will move from the outside of the square (the right hand side of their
body) to the inside of the square (the left hand side of their body). Remind students that
they run in a straight line, but their hands/arms move from outside to inside the square.
(Refer to diagram).

push the ball away.


5. At the same time that the
arms extend, a step forward
is taken.
6. Arms follow through in the
line of direction, with fingers
extended and back of hands
facing each other.

Variation: change direction of travel to clockwise and practice passing from the other
side of the body still passing outside to inside the square.
Ask students:
- What was more difficult, standing still and passing, stepping and passing or running and passing?
- When do you think you would step and pass in a game of League tag?
- Why is it important to learn how to run and pass?
- What made it easier to pass the ball to the next person? E.g. looking at the target, extending arms, stepping toward
the target
- How did you correct any mistakes for example if the ball was passed to hard, or too soft, if the ball went over the
head of the person you were passing to etc?
Gauntlet (two on one). In pairs, students line up at one end of the field, they are called
attackers. They must pass, catch and run with the ball while trying to get to the other end of
the field without being tagged by the defenders. Once they make it to the end attackers need to
place the ball over the line without dropping it (score a try). After the attackers score a try they
jog around the outside of the field back to the start. The teacher selects three or four students
to be defenders. The defenders are restricted to one area of the field and can only move
sideways along their line (refer to diagram). Each attacking pair move through the gauntlet one
after each other. Swap defenders after each pair has been through twice.
Ask students:
- How did you know when it was best to pass the ball to your partner?
- How did you know when it was best not to pass the ball to your partner?
- What did you need to do so you could you and your partner could get the ball past the defender?
- Would it be easier or more difficult if you did not have a partner in this activity? Why?
- How will you use this knowledge in a game of League tag?

Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students
performing the football
pass
Observes students
decision making skills
Observes students
attitude in a variety of
games
Assessment criteria
The student:
Performs the football
pass proficiently
On most occasions,
selects the most
appropriate option when
attacking
Encourages others in a
positive manner
Plays by the rules of the
game
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8, MOS3.4
DMS3.2 and INS3.3

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 14 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Skill development Game play


End ball. Students work in two teams. Each team has to try to get the ball to their end person, who stands behind the
try line at the end of the field and can move along the try line to catch the ball. To score a point the end person must
catch the ball on the full behind the try line. Students can only pass the ball backwards. If the ball is passed forward the
other team gets possession. Students are allowed to run with the ball, but if they are tagged with the ball in their
possession they must stop running and pass it within five seconds to another team mate. There are an unlimited
number of tags allowed. The only way a team can gain possession of the ball is if they either intercept a pass, pick the
ball up when the other team has dropped it or a point is scored. When the end person catches a pass (scores a point)
they must swap positions with another team mate. To start the game and after every point each team must be standing
in their half of the field, the ball must be at half way and one student from the non scoring team must tap it on their foot
and pass the ball to another team mate.
Ask students;
- What did you have to do to keep the ball away from the other team?
- Did your team mates help you in any way?
- What did they do to help?
- What were your options if you didnt have the ball? E.g. run into space, defend or tag, or intercept the ball.
- How did your team get the ball to the end person? What difficulties did you face when doing this?
Finishing off
Down the line. Students work in two teams. Each team stands in a straight line with students side by side. Each team is
given a ball at one end of their line. On the whistle teams race to see who can pass the ball down their line and back
again in the quickest time.
Dishes and domes. Students form two even teams. One team are the dishes (flexi cones are put on their narrow ends
to look like a dish) and the other teams are domes (flexi cones on their wide end to look like a dome). The aim of the
game is for the dishes to turn all the domes into dishes, whilst the domes team turn all the dishes into domes. Each
student is given a cone and they put the cone in a marked area whichever way up indicates their team. Once all the
cones are in the playing area the students move to the outside of the area and wait for a signal/whistle. They then have
three minutes to change the cones to their teams way. They are not allowed to protect cones, move them or stand on
cones to stop them being changed. At the end of a designated amount of time the whistle is blown again and all
students move back to the edge of the playing area and observe the cones. The process can then be repeated.
25-Up. Students form teams of six students and form a large circle. Each group has a ball. The aim of the game is to
complete twenty five consecutive two handed passes by passing to a team mate across the circle. Students count the
score out loud. If the ball is dropped the counting starts from zero again. Challenge students to see how many
consecutive passes they can get in a row.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 15 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
Week 5 Place kick and punt kick (4-5 sessions)

GSS3.8
Applies movement skills
in games and sports
that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and observation
of rules.
combines a series of
skills for use in a
game, e.g. run, kick,
catch and pass
INS3.3
Acts in ways that
enhance the
contribution of self and
others in a range of
cooperative situations.
demonstrates fair
play and
encouragement of
class mates in group
activities

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Shadow tag. Mark out a playing area and scatter a number of bases/discs on the ground. Students work in pairs, one is
the leader and the other is the shadow. The shadow follows the leader and imitates all of their movements, keeping as
close to the leader as possible. The leader challenges their shadow by trying to get away from them. Change roles and
repeat. Variation: Start off in the same way again but, on a given signal the leader tries to get to one of the bases/discs
before their shadow tags them. Change roles and repeat, but this time with fewer bases/discs spread out across the
area.
Warlocks and Wizards. Mark out a large playing area. Choose two students to be Warlocks and two students to be
Wizards. The Warlocks and Wizards try to tag the other students to add them to their team. Give each Warlock and
Wizard a set of coloured braids. There should be enough braids for all students. The Warlocks and Wizards stand in the
middle of the playing area and the other students scatter around the playing area. On the signal Go the Warlocks and
Wizards start chasing the other students. When students are tagged they jog on the spot until they are given a braid
and then they help their team. Continue playing until all players are tagged.
North, South, East and West. Set up a playing area with four corners. Remind students where North, South, East and
West are in relation to the play area. When a direction is called out students move in that direction using a given
method of travel, for example hop West, skip East, run North and jump South.
Glue. Students work in pairs. Students will be moving within the area by running and dodging. Student A must free
themselves from student B who follows student A as closely as possible. When the teacher blows a whistle all students
stop. Student B then sees if they can take one step and touch student A. Reverse the roles.
Skill Development - kick
Demonstrate the place kick and point out the major components
Keep your eyes on the ball
Place your foot beside the ball before you kick
Step forward and kick
Swing the arm opposite to your kicking leg
Follow through
Demonstrate the punt kick. The punt kick involves dropping the ball on to your foot and kicking through. The
components are similar to the stationary kick. Although instead of the ball starting on the ground, the ball is dropped
from the hands.
Keep your eyes on the ball
Step forward onto your non kicking foot

Teaching notes
Students should be
proficient at performing a
stationary place kick by the
end of year 5. Students at
this level can continue to
practice the stationary place
kick, but the more proficient
kickers should be
encouraged to practice the
punt kick.
Accuracy or direction of the
punt kick is not vital at this
stage of development.
Kicking
1. Eyes focused on the
ball throughout the kick.
2. Forward and sideward
swing of arm opposite
kicking leg.
3. Non-kicking foot placed
beside the ball.
4. Bends knee of kicking leg
at least 90 degrees during
the back-swing.
5. Contacts ball with top of
the foot (a shoelace kick)
6. Kicking leg follows
through high towards target
area.
Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students
performing the place
kick or punt kick
Observes students
attitude in a variety of
games
Assessment criteria

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 16 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience
Drop the ball down toward the inside of the non kicking foot
Swing your leg through
lean forward as you make contact with the ball
Kicking leg follows through towards the target area
Practice the movement. Each student stands in their own space at least 3 metres from other students. Use witches hats
to mark one metre away from each student and get them to practice the kicking action. The witches hat represents
where the ball would be. Students should demonstrate the components of the place kick.
Beanbag balls. Once students can demonstrate the above movement smoothly, students use a beanbag to practice the
same kicking action while holding the bean bag with two hands at waist height throughout the action. The beanbag
should remain in front of their body and they should keep their eyes on the beanbag throughout the action. Once
students are comfortable with this movement get them to practice dropping the beanbag straight down onto the witches
hat while they perform the action. Students should be aiming to kick the beanbag before it lands on the marked area.
Students should be pointing their kicking foot during this action. Tell students that the bean bag should contact their foot
in line with their shoelaces.
Provide students with some feedback during this activity to assist them in developing this skill.
Feedback points:
If the ball lands on the marked area this means they have dropped it too early
if any part of the students leg or knee hits the beanbag then they have dropped the beanbag too late
If the beanbag misses their body altogether then they have not dropped the ball straight down and should focus
more on this during their action.

Teaching notes
The student:
Focuses their eyes on
the ball throughout the
kick
Swings the arm opposite
kicking leg forward and
sidewards
Bends the knee of their
kicking leg at least 90
degrees during the
back-swing
Contacts the ball with
the top of their foot (
shoelace)
Encourages others in a
positive manner
Plays by the rules of the
game
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8 and
INS3.3

Dog and bone. Mark out a 15m x 15m square area. Students work in two equal teams. Each team stands in a straight
line about ten metres away from the square, facing each other. Spread the teams about three metres apart and place
two footballs in the centre. Every student in each team is given a number that corresponds with another player in the
opposite team. The teacher calls out a number and the two students with the same number get up, move to the middle
to pick up a ball and kick it into the square. If the ball lands in the square that student scores a point for their team. If a
student is finding it hard to kick from their hands then they can kick from the ground.
Variation: the teacher can place a number of hoops in the square area and if the ball lands directly in one of the hoops
it counts as a bonus point.
Ask students;
- Is there anything you do differently when you kick from the ground compared to kicking out of your hands?
- What are some of the major points you need to remember when kicking a ball?
Revise the components of the kick:
Keep your eyes on the ball
Drop the ball from the hands straight down on the inside of the non kicking foot

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 17 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Step forward and kick


Lean forward slightly as you make contact with the ball.
Swing the arm opposite to your kicking leg
Swing your kicking leg back
Follow through
Skill development Game play
Kick into a space. Mark out a 20m x 20m square area and place one witches hat about ten metres in front of the
square. Students work in groups of seven or eight. One student stands at the witches hat and is called the kicker. The
rest of the group spread out in the square area and are called rovers. The kicker aims to kick the ball into the square
area. They can kick the ball from the ground or from their hands whichever they feel more comfortable at performing.
The rovers try to catch the ball while it is in the square. The student who catches the ball then has to run to the
witches hat to swap places with the original kicker. If the ball stops dead in the square the first student to pick it up
becomes the kicker. If the ball is not caught and it goes out of the square area the same kicker stays at the witches
hat and kicks again.
Ask students:
- What did you need to do to get the ball to land in the square?
- How did you know when it wasnt going to land in the square?
- What specific things do you do to perform a kick successfully?
- What things could you say to a person who may be performing the kick incorrectly?
Create a game. In groups of four or five, students design a kicking game that could be played in the playground. Ask
each group to explain their game. Pair the groups up and get them to play each others game.
Ask students:
- Do you think you could play some of these kicking games in the playground during your break times? Why or
why not?
- How could you include some kicking in to the games you currently play during your recess and lunch breaks?
Finishing Off
Skittle Guard. Students divide into teams of five-six. Each team forms a circle. The aim of
the game is for students to knock over the skittle in the centre of the circle with a ball. One
player from the opposing team is protecting the skittle in their opponents circle. Players
may retrieve the ball from within the circle but must pass/kick the ball from outside the
circle. Change guards regularly.
Triangle Ball. Students form teams of eight-ten players. Players form a square with each
team representing two adjacent sides of the square (see diagram). The aim of the game is
for two active players to kick/pass the ball through the defence. After each 3 points

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 18 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

scored, active players are swapped.


Target ball. Students work in teams of five-six in half of the court for each team. Each team must stay within their half of
the court during the game. The aim of the game is to knock over the four markers that are placed at the back of the
other teams area. Both teams kick their ball to try to hit the other teams markers OR hit the students in the other
team below the knee safely. If a student is hit, they join the other team to help them to knock over markers.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 19 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

Week 6 Kicking and modified game (4-5 sessions)


GSS3.8
Applies movement skills
in games and sports
that require
communication,
cooperation, decision
making and observation
of rules.
participates in tag
activities combining
strategy, teamwork,
movement skill and
fair play
combines a series of
skills for use in a
game, e.g. run, kick,
catch and pass
MOS3.4
Refines and applies
movement skills
creatively to a variety of
challenging situations.
varies running
patterns to cater for
sprinting, dodging
and defensive
marking
PSS3.5
Suggests, considers
and selects appropriate
alternatives when
resolving problems.
selects appropriate
solutions to a
attacking and
defending situations
reflects on the
outcomes of

Getting started - Huff and puff activity


Snatch the treasure. Set out six hoops. Place one hoop in the middle of the area and five hoops ten metres away in a
circle formation. Students work in five teams. Place all beanbags (treasure) in the middle hoop. Teams line up beside
an outside hoop. When the whistle is blown the first student from each team runs to the middle hoop to get a piece of
treasure. Students then return the treasure to their hoop. The next student collects a piece of treasure and this
continues until all treasure has been snatched from the middle hoop. When there are no pieces of treasure left in the
middle hoop, students may snatch treasure from other groups hoops but still only one person at a time is collecting the
treasure. The winning group is the one with the most treasure at the end of the time.
Skill Development - punt kick
Ask students to demonstrate their kicking motion without a ball.
Remind students of the skill components of the kick:
Keep your eyes on the ball
Step forward onto your non kicking foot
Drop the ball down toward the inside of the non kicking foot
Swing your leg through
lean forward as you make contact with the ball
Kicking leg follows through towards the target area
Defend your line. Students work in two teams in an area 20m x 20m. Team line up along opposite try lines, facing each
other. Use witches hats to mark another line about ten metres in front of each team. Teams are only allowed between
the ten metre marked line and their try line. The aim is to score a point by kicking the football past or over the try line of
the other team. Each team starts three footballs. On the whistle teams kick their footballs. The rest of the students must
move around and try to stop any balls from being kicked over their try line. A student who stops a ball is allowed to kick
it back across the field or pass to another team mate to kick. Continue play for about two to three minutes or until one
team reaches a set amount of points.
Ask students:
- What did you need to do to score a point?
- Did the ball always travel in the same way when you kicked it?
- What were the different ways the ball travelled? e.g. rolled, bounced, in the air.
- Did any of the kicks make it harder for defenders to stop the ball?
- How did you stop a ball that was rolling? That was bouncing? That was in air?
- How did you know where the ball was going to be kicked? e.g. watch the direction of the kickers leg.

Kicking
1. Eyes focused on the
ball throughout the kick.
2. Forward and sideward
swing of arm opposite
kicking leg.
3. Non-kicking foot placed
beside the ball.
4. Bends knee of kicking leg
at least 90 degrees during
the back-swing.
5. Contacts ball with top of
the foot (a shoelace kick)
or instep.
6. Kicking leg follows
through high towards target
area.
Assessment strategy
The teacher:
Observes students
movement skills and
participation in league
tag
Observes students
problem solving skills in
a variety of games
Ask questions with
regards to options for
attacking and defending
Assessment criteria
The student:
Encourages others in a
positive manner
Selects appropriate
options when attacking
and defending
Comments on the
decisions that need to
be made when attacking
e.g. how do you know

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 20 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators
decisions made in
game like situations
INS3.3
Acts in ways that
enhance the
contribution of self and
others in a range of
cooperative situations.
demonstrates fair
play and
encourages team
mates

Learning experience
Grid games. Students work in groups of 8. Each group is made up of a team of three (defending team) and a team of
five (attacking team). Using a designated grid space of about ten metres by ten metres the attacking team attempts to
score a try over the end line of the grid by running with the ball and passing to their team mates. The defending team
tries to stop the attacking team from scoring by tagging the player with the ball or intercepting a pass. The attacking
team is given five attempts to try to score. If the player with the ball on the attacking team is tagged the team starts
again and it counts as an attempt. If a pass is intercepted by a defending player the attacking team starts again and it
counts as an attempt. The aim of the game is to get students thinking about when to pass the ball and when to run with
the ball. After five attempts three students in the attacking team swap with the defending players.
The teacher should stop the grid games every few minutes and ask students questions (refer to questions over the
page). Give students time to think of tactics to make their team more successful, both attacking and defending. Give
students the opportunity to make up new rules to the game and see how they affect the success of each team i.e. no
running with the ball, only allowed to defend one player each, every attacker must touch the ball before you can score.

Teaching notes
when you should pass
the ball, when is the
best time to run?
Plays by the rules of the
game and encourages
team members in a
positive manner
The above criteria relates to
outcomes GSS 3.8,
MOS3.4, PSS3.5 and
INS3.3

Ask students throughout the grid game:


- What options do you have if you are the attacking team?
- What do you need to do if you are a defender?
- If you are the player with the ball what options do you have? E.g. pass or run
- When would you choose to pass the ball?
- When is the best time to run with the ball?
- How do you know when you should pass the ball to another team mate?
- What should team mates without the ball be doing?
- How can you make it easier for the player with the ball to pass it to you?
- What did you need to do to get the ball past the defenders?
- What isnt working and why isnt it working?
- What is working and why is it working?
- What can you do to be more successful?
Modified game play
Revise all the skills that students have learnt that relate to the game of League tag dodging, tagging, defending,
passing, attacking, kicking, scoring a try.
Modified League tag. Mark a field out 40metres long by 30 metres wide. Students work in teams of eight to ten. Play
ten minute games. Any extra players can be put in charge of scoring or refereeing with teacher assistance and should
be substituted throughout the game. Alternatively the teacher can set up more than one game and ask a student to
referee one of the games.
Rules include:
Unlimited number of tags, this means players can be tagged over and over until the team either scores a try, loses
control of the ball or kicks the ball to a player on the other team.
Players are only allowed to kick after five tags have been made but risk losing the ball to the other team if they

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 21 of 22

Outcomes and
indicators

Learning experience

Teaching notes

choose to kick.
The ball can only be passed backwards, a forward pass results in the ball being given to the opposition.
If the ball is dropped back it is play on, and if the ball is dropped forward the opposite team gains possession.
When a player gets tagged they have five seconds to pass the ball.
When a team gains possession of the ball a player must tap the ball on their foot before running or passing it to
another team mate.
To score a try the player must have contact with the ball when it touches the ground past the end line of the marked
area.
When a player is tagged every player in the defending team must be five steps back from the tagged player before
they can defend again. This may mean some students need to move back five steps.
Variation: the more developed the students skills are the more rules you can introduce in regards to defending e.g. after
each tag is made the defending team needs to run back wards ten steps before they can start defending again.
Finishing off
Touch up. In pairs students explore each of the League tag skills learnt over the previous weeks and practice those
skills they are less proficient in.
Fast Break. Students work in teams of six to eight
players. The aim of the game is for the team at one end
of the court/ field to pass the ball to other team members
on the other side of the neutral zone. No players are
allowed in the neutral zone. Opposing team members try
to intercept the ball before successful passes can be
made. Points are scored for each successful pass across
the neutral zone.

State of New South Wales through the NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2012. All rights reserved.
http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/
Page 22 of 22