You are on page 1of 15

Contextual Factors Analysis 

 
Spencer Hodge 
Spring 2016 
Noble High School ­ 11th Grade 
North Berwick, ME  

 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Introduction  
 
As an educator of the twenty­first century, I understand that, in order to give children the best 
education possible, it is important for me to know each and every child to the best of my ability. I need 
to make the most out of the educational resources that I am offered as a teacher. I must also to be 
aware of the environmental factors in which my students were raised and how they were previously 
educated. Obtaining this information prepares me for offering the best education I can for each student. 
For this reason, I have created a contextual factors analysis in which I learn about the about the 
students in my classroom, the school in which my classroom resides, and the greater community 
around the school.   
The focus of this paper is Noble High School in North Berwick, Maine. More specifically, this 
paper focuses on Mrs. Perkin’s 11th grade social studies classroom. This semester, I will be a student 
teacher in Mrs. Perkin’s classroom. The research found in this analysis will help me to be the best 
teacher that I can be.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Community, District, and School Factors  
 
Geographic Location­ 
 

Noble High School is located in North Berwick, Maine. However, the high school is a central 
school for three Maine towns, including North Berwick, Berwick, and Lebanon. All three towns are 
located in York County. According to the United Census Bureau, the three towns have a combined 
total area of 131.85 square miles, of which 130.54 consist of land, and 1.31 square miles consists of 
water.  
Neighboring towns include Wells, South Berwick, and Sanford. (Maine Demographics)  
 

Community Population­ 
 

The 2010 census reports that there were 17,857 people residing in the towns of North Berwick, 
Berwick, and Lebanon at the time. The average racial makeup of the three towns was 96.8% White, 
0.9% Asian, 0.5% Black, 0.3% Native American, and 0.2% other. 24.4% of people living in North 
Berwick, Berwick, and Lebanon were under the age of 18. 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24, 
25.4% were 25­44, 31.1% were 45­64, and 11.9% were 65 years of age of older. The average age of 
the people living in these three towns was 40 years old. Females make up 50.4% and males make up 
49.6% of the population. In the 2012 Presidential Election, 57% of voters voted democrat, 42% voted 
republican, and 1% voted other. (City­Data) 
 

Socio­Economic Factors­  
 

The estimated median household income in 2013 was $59,609. This number is high, compared 
to state median of $46,974. The estimated per capita income in 2013 was $24,496 (City­Data). As of 

2013, 5.4% of North Berwick residents were living below the poverty level. This was significantly 
lower than the two other towns in the district, with 10.4% of Lebanon residents and 17.5% of Berwick 
residents living below the poverty level in 2013. The whole state poverty rate was 10.9 at the time. In 
the three towns,  4.0% of residents over the age of 25 are currently unemployed. (City­Data)   
Education in North Berwick,  Maine­  
 

 
(city­data.com) 
 
 

Educational Attainment (%) of All Residents 

North Berwick (2013) 

State Average (2013) 

Less than High School 

5.0 

8.2 

High School or Equiv. 

34.7 

33.8 

Less than 1 year of College 

3.2 

6.1 

1 or more years of College 

24.8 

14.1 

Associate Degree 

9.6 

9.6 

Bachelor’s Degree 

14.1 

18.1 

Master’s Degree 

8.4 

7.1 

Professional Degree 

0.0 

1.7 

Doctorate Degree 

0.0 

1.4 

 
The town of North Berwick is part of Maine School Administrative District 60 (MSAD 60). The schools 
in North Berwick include ​
North Berwick Elementary School (K­5),  Noble High School (8­12), and 
Mary Hurd Academy (6­12). Mary Hurd Academy is an alternative school that combines core 
academics, experiential learning opportunities, and positive behavior support.   
 
 
Education in Berwick,  Maine­  

 
                ​
(City­Data) 

 

Educational Attainment (%)  of All Residents 

Berwick (2013) 

State Average (2013) 

Less than High School 

6.0 

8.2 

High School or Equiv. 

30.5 

33.8 

Less than 1 year of College 

9.0 

6.1 

1 or more years of College 

13.8 

14.1 

Associate Degree 

7.5 

9.6 

Bachelor’s Degree 

28.8 

18.1 

Master’s Degree 

4.4 

7.1 

Professional Degree 

0.0 

1.7 

Doctorate Degree 

0.0 

1.4 

 
The town of Berwick is part of Maine School Administrative District 60 (MSAD 60). The schools in 
Berwick include ​
Vivian E. Hussey Elementary (K­3),  Eric L. Knowlton Elementary School (4­5), and 
Noble Middle School (6, 7).  
Education in Lebanon,  Maine­  

 
                                                         ​
(City­Data) 

 

Educational Attainment (%) of All Residents 

Lebanon (2013) 

State Average (2013) 

Less than High School 

24.8 

8.2 

High School or Equiv. 

37.9 

33.8 

Less than 1 year of College 

6.7 

6.1 

1 or more years of College 

14.0 

14.1 

Associate Degree 

7.3 

9.6 

Bachelor’s Degree 

7.3 

18.1 

Master’s Degree 

1.5 

7.1 

Professional Degree 

0.0 

1.7 

Doctorate Degree 

0.6 

1.4 

 
The town of Lebanon is part of Maine School Administrative District 60 (MSAD 60). The schools in 
Lebanon include ​
Hanson Elementary (K­3),  Lebanon Elementary School (4­5). 
 
 
Noble High School­ 
Students from all of the elementary schools in North Berwick, Berwick, and Lebanon all filter 
into the same school for grades 8 through 12, Noble High School. There are about 1,100 students and 
91 full time teachers. In the 2013­2014 school year the student to teacher ratio was 11.8:1. In the same 
school year, 34.3% of the students at Noble High School were eligible for free lunch and 8.7% were 
eligible for reduced price lunch. (NCES) 
 
Race/Ethnicity Breakdown for the school year 2013­2014 at Noble High School: 
White 

96% 

Asian/ Pacific Islander 

1.5% 

Hispanic 

1.3% 

Black 

0.9% 

Other 

0.3% 

 

    (NCES) 

 
Classroom Factors: 
Physical Features –  
Mrs. Perkin’s classroom is located on the first floor of Noble High School. Her classroom is 
located in the 11th grade pod in the far left corner of the building. Each pod is divided up by grade 
level and has a social studies, science, math, and language arts classroom. In her classroom, there are 

personal desks and chairs for each student laid out in the shape of a “U”. The classroom is a nearly 
perfect square in shape. One of the walls is full of windows and low bookshelves (shown on the right 
side of the graphic on the next page). There is a large white board and projector screen located at the 
front of the classroom. One of the best features of the classroom is the back wall which is occupied by 
student work. These works range from posters to timelines, and are updated with every passing unit. 
 
 

 
Map created at ​
http://classroom.4teachers.org/​
 ​
(4 Teachers) 
 
Technology –  
Noble High School has a 1­to­1 laptop program where each student is issued a laptop for school 
work during the academic year. Students can only receive their laptop with permission from their 
parents, and can be monitored by administrators at anytime. Both teachers and students are connected 

virtually through google classroom and can communicate through email. The classroom is also 
equipped with a projector and projector screen that is used daily. 
 
Extent of Parental Involvement​
 ​
–  
Parent involvement in the high school does not seem to play a huge factor in the student’s 
education. Noble High School hosts parent teacher conferences bi­annually. Based solely on 
discussions with other teachers, it appears that only about twenty five percent of parents attend the 
meetings. The majority of those parents who go to the parent teacher conferences have students who 
are already achieving from average to high levels. Very few of the students that struggle meeting the 
standards have parents who attend the parent teacher conferences.  According to Mrs. Perkins, parents 
are not very active through email either, getting on average one email per week. However, email 
involvement does increase if a student’s progress report shows they are not meeting the standards. 
 
Scheduling –  
Noble High School’s schedule is setup to accommodate eight academic blocks per semester. 
Days alternate with four blocks a day, referred to as “Day One” and “Day Two”. Within those blocks 
each student has at least one guided study block where they can work freely on assignments for any 
class. In addition to these four blocks there is additional time for students to work on assignments for 
classes and go to their teachers to receive extra help. This is referred to as Knight Time, and it is a 
common time throughout the whole school everyday with the exception of Thursday. Every Thursday, 
students have a two hour late start which is designed to break up their schedule and let them rest, as 
well as give teachers professional development time. Thursday’s schedule alternates between Day One 
and Day Two from week to week. Below is a chart depicting the schedule for Mrs. Perkins class.  

 
Regular Schedule 
Block 

Time 

Day One 

Day Two 

7:40­9:00 

Team Meeting 

U.S. History 

9:05­10:25 

U.S. History 

Prep 

Knight Time 

10:30­11:15 

KT 

KT 

11:20­12:40 

U.S. History 

Sociology 

Lunch 

12:40­1:00 

Lunch 

Lunch 

1:05­2:25 

Guided Study 

U.S. History 

 
Thursday Schedule 
Block 

Time 

9:55­10:55 

11:00­11:59 

Lunch 

12:02­12:22 

12:27­1:23 

1:28­2:25 

 
 
 
 
Student Characteristics: 
Day 1 Block 3 U.S. History has 20 students. Of these 20 students, 5 are female and 5 are male. 
The majority of the class is Caucasian. Two students are Chinese and are on an exchange program 
from China. All of the students are either sixteen or seventeen years old.  There is a vast span of 

abilities in my classroom during this block. These abilities range from students in the Academic Excel 
program to students with IEPs, 504s, or RTI. Two students are in the Excel program (gifted and 
talented), one student has an IEP (speech and language), one student has a 504 for her epilepsy, and 
one student receives small group intervention for both math and reading once a day. Through personal 
conversations with students as well as conversations with Mrs. Perkins, I have found that many of 
these students (not limited to those receiving special education services) have poor parental 
sponsorship and/or poor home lives. 
Below is a cumulative class Multiple Intelligence grid, compiled from the results of the 
Birmingham Multiple Intelligence test that the students took in January 2016. This grid demonstrates 
the multiple intelligences of the the 20 students in Day 1 Block 3 US History. 

 
Multiple Intelligences Class Breakdown: 
Student 
Number 
1. EB 

IEP/ELL/Other Info 
none 

MI Strength 
Musical 

MI Weakness 
Logical 

Interests 
School band 

2. KB 

none 

Logical 

Interpersonal 

Sports 

3. TB 

Academic Excel  

Kinesthetic, Linguistic  Naturalistic 

Learning, history 

4. AB 

Parental Alert 

Kinesthetic  

Intrapersonal 

Softball 

5. CC 

none 

Intrapersonal 

Linguistic 

Video games 

6. RC 

IEP 

Visual, Intrapersonal 

Linguistic 

Video games 

7. BD 

Bee Allergy 

Kinesthetic  

Visual 

Basketball 

8. DD 

none 

Musical 

Visual, Logical 

Binging on Netflix 

9. JH 

none 

Visual, Interpersonal 

Naturalistic 

Deep conversations 

10. SH 

none 

Kinesthetic 

Linguistic 

Working on cars 

11. KK 

none 

Kinesthetic, 
Naturalistic 

Logical 

Video games 

12. RL 

Exchange student from 
China 

Musical, Intrapersonal 

Naturalistic 

Listening to music 

13. JM 

none 

Musical 

Intrapersonal 

Science 

14. KR 

none 

Visual 

Musical 

Wrestling, art 

15. TS 

none 

Musical  

Naturalistic 

Listening to music 

16. AT 

RTI, Parental Alert, 
Bee Allergy 

Kinesthetic 

Musical 

Volunteer Firefighting 

17. CT 

Academic Excel, 
Asthma  

Interpersonal, 
Linguistic 

Logical 

Video games, History 

18. PW 

Shellfish Allergy 

Kinesthetic 

Naturalistic 

Drawing 

19. BW 

504 Plan, Epilepsy 

Visual, Logical 

Interpersonal, 
Linguistic 

Reading 

20. SW 

Exchange student from 
China 

Intrapersonal, Logical 

Linguistic, Visual 

Math team 

 

 
 Students were asked to go to the Birmingham Multiple Intelligence website and answer about 
forty questions. After answering the questions, the students’ individual multiple intelligence graphs 
were immediately generated for the students to view. Students were pleased to see their own results 

and compare them to what they had previously thought of themselves and many were excited to share 
and compare their results with their friends’. When the students created their graphs, they were each 
given a unique code (example: ​
hz76gf77704mf). I asked all of the students to send me their codes via 
email. I was then able to compile all codes using the “class results” feature on the ​
Birmingham 
website.  
After compiling all of the student results, I noticed clear strengths and weaknesses within this 
class as a whole. Among these twenty students, there seems to be a weakness in visual and spacial 
skills and also naturalistic skills. As a whole, the class strengths are kinesthetic, musical, and 
intrapersonal. Interestingly, the results did seem to match up with my previous observations of the 
class, as I notice that the students in this class generally do their best work when they work alone.  
Using the data from the multiple intelligence test, I can develop lessons that can play on student 
strengths, but build on their weaknesses as well. All of these contextual factors will have a direct affect 
on how I will need to plan and assess the learning that happens in my classroom. Considering these 
factors while planning will ultimately give balance in the students’ learning as well as aid them to 
become well­rounded citizens.  
Although planning lessons around the strengths of the class as a whole is important, I must 
remember that there are several students in my class who’s strengths and weaknesses do not match up 
with the class “average.” It is important that I design lessons with all students in mind, not just the 
majority. I always attempt to touch on as many multiple intelligences as possible in every lesson I 
create so that each student feels excited about the learning. 
 
References: 
 

City Data (2016). ​
North Berwick, ME.​
 Retrieved on January 10, 2016, from 
http://www.city­data.com/city/North­Berwick­Maine.html 
 
City Data (2016). ​
Berwick, ME.​
 Retrieved on January 10, 2016, from 
http://www.city­data.com/city/Berwick­Maine.html 
 
City Data (2016). ​
Lebanon, ME. ​
Retrieved on January 10, 2016, from 
http://www.city­data.com/city/Lebanon­Maine.html 
 
NCES "Search for Public Schools ­ School Detail for Noble High School." ​
Search for Public Schools ­ 
School Detail for Noble High School​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Jan. 2016. 
 
"Birmingham Grid for Learning ­ Multiple Intelligences (Secondary)."Birmingham Grid for Learning ­ 
Multiple  
Intelligences (Secondary). N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Jan. 2016.