You are on page 1of 10

 

 

QualityPro Training 
May 3, 2016 

PROJECT EVALUATION REPORT 
 
 
 
 
 

Project Evaluation Report 
 
Project title 
QualityPro Training 
 
Project manager 
Aaron Spann and Michelle Rudolph 
 
Sponsor 
Terminix, a division of ServiceMaster 
 
Date 
May 3, 2016 
 
Project goal 
Create up­to­date asynchronous eLearning modules based on current ILT programs which can 
be delivered via LMS on mobile devices. 
 
Project objectives and results 
Using the objectives from your Project Charter and Plan, list your objectives and results for each 
objective. If not embedded in your objectives, list your critical success factors and the results. 
 
Objectives  

 Results 

Learners can access training via LMS on 

 

mobile devices 

 
 
 
 

Learners can navigate training intuitively, 
without need of instructors 

 

Learners demonstrate preparedness for the 
QualityPro technician and salesperson exam 

 

Scope comparison 
 
Planned Scope 
 
This project will provide Terminix with updated training that considers the learning styles and 
abilities of a cross​
­generational sales force by delivering a modern appearance with easy­​
to­ 
navigate interactive eLearning modules. Modules will be based on the existing instructor­led 
QualityPro training to accelerate the preparation time necessary for new­hires to become 
successful sales managers and technicians. More details can be found in the​
 ​
appendix​
. This 
project will: 
 

Create an online curriculum for the existing QualityPro Training 

Create eLearning modules for chapters 1 and 4 of QualityPro Training 

Chapter 1 ­ 5 modules 

Chapter 4 ­ 4 modules 

Develop eLearning modules using appropriate software 

Develop eLearning modules that can be uploaded to Service Master’s LMS 

Allow learners the ability easily navigate modules via mobile device 

Provide practice tests 

 
Additional Scope 
 

Create eLearning modules for chapters 2 and 3 of QualityPro Training 

Chapter 2 ­ 12 modules 

Chapter 3 ­ 5 modules 

 
Decreased Scope 
N/A 
 
 

Cost performance 
 
Using the estimates from your project plan, list the actual costs.  Then explain any variances. 

Cost Categories 

 

 
Estimated 
 
Role 

Cost Breakdown 

Total 

Project Management 

100 Hours at $100/hr 

$10,000 

Analysis 

50 Hours at $100/hr 

$5,000 

Instructional Design 

100 Hours at $150/hr 

$15,000 

Instructional Development 

100 Hours at $180/hr 

$18,000 

Resource Fee 

1 at $5,000 

$5,000 
TOTAL 

$53,000 

 
Actual 
 
Role 

Cost Breakdown 

Project Management 

87 Hours at $100/hr 

$8,700.00 

Analysis 

97.5 Hours at $100/hr 

$9,750.00 

Instructional Design 

159 Hours at $150/hr 

$23,850.00 

Instructional Development 

201 Hours at $180/hr 

$36,180.00 

Resource Fee 

1 at $5,000 

$5,000.00 
TOTAL 

 
 
 

Total 

$83,480.00 

 
Internal Labor hours 
 
Team Member 

Labor Hours 

Aaron 

107 Hours total 
 
Project Management: 58 hours 
Analysis: 5 hours 
Instructional Design: 10 hours 
Instructional Development: 10 hours 
Web Resource Development: 24 hours 
 

Billie 

114 Hours total 
 
Project Management: 2 hours 
Analysis: 31 hours 
Instructional Design: 22 hours 
Instructional Development: 59 hours 

James 

131.5 Hours total 
 
Project Management: 5.0 hours 
Analysis: 14.5 hours 
Instructional Design: 82.5 hours 
Instructional Development: 29.5 hours 
 

Michelle 

123.30 hours total 
 
Project Management: 20 hours 
Analysis: 15 hours 
Instructional Design: 17 hours 
Instructional Development: 71 hours 
 
 

Sarah 

119.5 hours total 
 
Project Management: 2 hours 
Analysis: 32 hours 
Instructional Design: 27.5 hours 
Instructional Development: 58 hours 

Wanda 

200.75 hours total 
 

Project Management: 2 hours 
Analysis: 8.75 hours 
Instructional Design: 10.5 hours 
Instructional Development: 180 hours 
 
 
External costs 
N/A 
 
Labor (consultants, contract labor) 
N/A 
 
Equipment, hardware or software 
N/A (team owned the equipment/hardware/software being used 
 
List other costs such as travel & training 
N/A 
 
Explanation of cost variances 
The addition to two more team members resulted in a higher cost for labor. 
 
 

Schedule performance 
Estimated 

 

 

 

 
 
DATE 

PROJECT MILESTONE 

February 2, 2016 

Initial client meeting: define project needs/goals 

February 8, 2016 

Submission of confidentiality agreements and viates for BYTS 
DESIGN 

February 21, 2016 

Analysis Report 

February 28, 2016 

Project Plan 

March 20. 2016 

Content Analysis (objective and assessments) 

March 28, 2016 

Instructional Strategy, Treatment Description, and Rationale 

April 3, 2016 

Treatment Design and template (storyboard) 

April 10, 2016 

Formative Evaluation Plan 

April 21, 2016 

Showcase Presentation 

May 3, 2016 

Treatment Report 

May 3, 2016 

Formative Evaluation 

 
 
Actual 
 
DATE 

PROJECT MILESTONE 

February 2, 2016 

Initial client meeting: define project needs/goals 

February 8, 2016 

Submission of confidentiality agreements and viates for BYTS 
DESIGN 

February 21, 2016 

Analysis Report 

February 28, 2016 

Project Plan 

March 20. 2016 

Content Analysis (objective and assessments) 

March 28, 2016 

Instructional Strategy, Treatment Description, and Rationale 

April 3, 2016 

Treatment Design and template (storyboard) 

April 10, 2016 

Formative Evaluation Plan 

April 21, 2016 

Showcase Presentation 

May 3, 2016 

Treatment Report 

May 3, 2016 

Formative Evaluation 

 
Project completion date 
May 6th, 2016 
 
Explanation of schedule variance 
Adding two new team members required all team members to take on extra workload 
responsibilities. We were able to keep with the originally proposed scheduled and did not miss 
any deadlines. 
 
Process perspectives 
 
Michelle’s perspective: ​
 Having both teams work together on the same project was the best 
approach to take. By working together we had the same unity for every chapter. This helps the 
learner see each chapter as a whole series. By having one team take on 2 and 3 ­ it could have 
created a disconnect with the learner based on different design, wording, and image choices. I 
would recommend in the future making a bigger team if it is a big project. 
 
Aaron’s perspective: ​
 This project took an unexpected, but good, turn in the middle of the 
semester. We took on two extra team members from Memphis Designs, as that team was 
dissolved. This meant that the entire QualityPro training would be completed by a single team. I 
feel we, as a combined team, rose to the challenge and achieved our goal. For me, personally, I 
would suggest trying to find a way for students to better understand that they will perform better 
if they have a non­student mentality. My better successes came when I treated the project as 
real life instead of a school project. I think it is a very thin line to balance between student and 
professional. 
 
James’ perspective:​
  For most of the team members, this was the first time they have actually 
had to create something for an actual client.  It was very important in the beginning for each 
team member to have roles targeted toward their strengths.  Once roles were identified and 
accepted, the individuals were committed to fulfilling their responsibilities to make the team 
successful.  As we began working through the different phases of the project, each person’s role 
and project deliverables relied on or was impacted by something that was completed previously. 
It was important to have constant updates on the status, concerns, and questions on assigned 
tasks. 
 
Constant and flexible communication was an integral part of our team since we covered 
multiple timezones.  It was decided to by the team to post all team communication within the G+ 

Community so that anyone can provide input to questions, comments, and concerns with the 
project.  The G+ Community also allowed for us to have one location for group communication, 
made it possible for responding to multiple team members at once, and easy retrieval previous 
discussion threads for reference later.  Our weekly meetings in Hangouts helped us meet 
project deadlines by summarizing events or activities, working through ideas or strategies, and 
discussing upcoming events or activities.  Gmail was used only to communicate with client, 
SMEs, and professor for specific information relative to completing project. 
 
Wanda’s perspective: ​
This was the first time since beginning the degree that we worked 
through the ID process while filling a particular role. In the past, we were responsible for all 
aspects of a simulated project. I believe this made such a large project more manageable and 
able to be completed in such a short period of time. While a huge amount of my duties came 
late in the project, I feel I could have accomplished more early on had we received the client’s 
template at the beginning of the project. The fact we did not can be attributed to issues in clarity 
of communication. The combining of the two teams doubled my work as the eLearning 
Developer but the team helped tremendously by putting in many hours organizing the content 
on storyboards and by proofreading the modules. If my Storyline skills had been more polished, 
the number of hours would likely have been lower. I have learned much about the program and 
look forward to using it in the future.  
 
Sarah’s perspective: ​
This process was a very beneficial experience.  It was the first time we 
worked with a client to design eLearning and there were many elements that were new.  We 
had some hiccups along the way, but combining teams was a great experience.  The team that 
was created by the merge worked very well together and accomplished a lot.  I learned a lot 
about the processes involved in analysis, design, development, and evaluation through this 
course, and my knowledge and abilities were expanded within the supportive team environment. 
Our Google Plus communications and weekly meetings were invaluable and really helped the 
team to connect and work together. 
 
Billie’s perspective:​
  This entire process was a new scary experience for me since I have 
never completed a project of this magnitude for a client. Once I overcame my fears of this group 
project, things started to come together. I had a very supportive team and I learned from each 
one of them. This was a great learning experience for me.  
 
Lessons learned 
 

 
Lessons Learned 

How to improve 

Communication ­ it is critical to keep open 
communication with team members, know 
how to reach team members, where people 
are in the design process, and deadlines. 

Stronger understanding of deadlines ­ maybe 
have the final due date for tasks AND dates 
for when the client needs to review files. 

Deadlines ­ The deadlines on the schedule 
are not the deadlines to present work to the 
client. 

I think we need deadlines within deadlines. 
Deadlines for the team to complete a specific 
task, deadline for getting feedback from the 
client, and the deadline to present the task to 
Dr. Weaver and the class. 

Scope ­ it is important to have a balance 
between creativity, design, development, and 
actual timeframe to complete project by 
deadline. 

Rely upon the previous experience others in 
creating similar tasks, focus more on the 
client’s specific requirements, and examine 
how much it takes to actually create certain 
e­learning objects. 

Risks ­ Losing team members 

Stress the importance of working throughout 
the week, communicate with fellow team 
members when life happens, follow deadlines 
closely. 

Project Management ­ Skills necessary to 
lead a team throughout the process are very 
important to success. 

I would offer a bootcamp for those in this role. 
While I have lead many projects in my own 
professional life, they were within an existing 
culture. In this project a culture must be 
created and maintained. 

 
 
References 
Lynch, M.M. & Roecker, J. (2007).  ​
Project managing e­learning:  A handbook for successful 
design, delivery and management​
.  New York: Routledge. 

 
Verzuh, E. (2005).  ​
The fast forward MBA in project management:  Quick topics, speedy 
solutions, cutting­edge ideas.​
  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.