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T.O.

1B-52H-1

Flight Manual
USAF SERIES B-52H AIRCRAFT
THE BOEING COMPANY
F33657-79-C-0416
F34601-03-D-0066

This manual contains unverified procedures. Refer to the validation/verification status
page(s) prior to performing any operation or maintenance procedure.

THIS PUBLICATION INCORPORATES OPERATIONAL SUPPLEMENT -1S-19.
THIS PUBLICATION IS USED WITH T.O. 1B-52H-1-12 AND T.O. 1B-52H-1-13. SUPPLEMENTARY PUBLICATIONS ARE PROVIDED TO
SUPPLY OPERATIONAL COVERAGE IN NONSTANDARD CONFIGURATIONS. SEE T.O. 0-1-CD-1 FOR NUMERICAL INDEX OF
BOMBER TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS.
SEE T.O. 0-1-CD-1 FOR CURRENT STATUS OF FLIGHT MANUALS, SAFETY SUPPLEMENTS, OPERATIONAL SUPPLEMENTS, AND
FLIGHT CREW CHECKLISTS.
COMMANDERS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR BRINGING THIS PUBLICATION TO THE ATTENTION OF ALL AIR FORCE PERSONNEL
CLEARED FOR OPERATION OF SUBJECT AIRCRAFT.
DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT E – Distribution authorized to the Department of Defense Components only, due to Direct Military Support, 29
October 1996. Other requests shall be referred to 327 BMSG/EN, Tinker AFB, OK 73145-3021.
WARNING –This document contains technical data whose export is restricted by the Arms Export Control Act (Title 22, U.S.C., Sec 2751, et seq.)
or the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended, Title 50, U.S.C., App. 2401 et seq. Violations of these export laws are subject to severe
criminal penalties. Disseminate in accordance with provisions of DoD Directive 5230.25.
HANDLING AND DESTRUCTION NOTICE – Comply with distribution statement and destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of
contents or reconstruction of the document. Demil code D.

PUBLISHED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE

31 AUGUST 1996
CHANGE 22 – 1 JUNE 2006

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Technical orders are normally distributed promptly after printing. Date(s) shown on the title page (lower right corner) are for identification only. These
are not distribution dates. Processing time sometimes causes distribution to only appear to have been delayed.

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES

INSERT LATEST CHANGED PAGES. DESTROY SUPERSEDED PAGES.
NOTE:

The portion of the text affected by the changes is indicated by a
vertical line in the outer margins of the page. Changes to illustrations
are indicated by miniature pointing hands. Changes to wiring
diagrams are indicated by shaded areas.

Dates of issue for original and changed pages are:
Original
Change
Change
Change
Change
Change

0
1
2
3
4
5

31 Aug 96
1 Dec 97
15 Aug 98
30 Oct 98
30 Dec 98
1 Jun 99

Change
Change
Change
Change
Change
Change

6
7
8
9
10
11

30 Jul 99
1 Oct 99
30 Nov 99
15 Feb 00
1 Mar 00
1 Aug 00

Change
Change
Change
Change
Change
Change

12
13
14
15
16
17

30 Dec 00
30 Jun 01
30 Nov 01
1 Mar 02
1 Sep 02
1 Apr 03

Change
Change
Change
Change
Change

18
19
20
21
22

1 Dec 03
1 Apr 04
1 Dec 04
1 Jul 05
1 Jun 06

TOTAL NUMBER OF PAGES IN THIS PUBLICATION IS 1422 CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING:
Page
No.

Change
No.

* Title . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
* A – D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
E Blank Added . . . . . . . . . . 20
V/VS-1 – V/VS-2 Added . . 21
* Flyleaf-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Flyleaf-2 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 0
i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
* ii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
iii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
iv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
vi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
* vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
viii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
ix – x Deleted . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1-1 – 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-5 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-8 – 1-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-10 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-12 – 1-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-20 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-21 – 1-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-24 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-28 – 1-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Page
No.

Change
No.

1-32 – 1-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-37 – 1-39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-41 – 1-42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-43 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-44 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-45 – 1-50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-51 – 1-52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1-53 – 1-56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-56A – 1-56B Added . . . . 12
1-57 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-58 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
* 1-58A Added . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
* 1-58B Blank Added . . . . . . 22
1-59 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-60A – 1-60B Added . . . . 12
1-61 – 1-63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-65 – 1-66 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-66A – 1-66B Added . . . . 12
1-67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-68 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-70 – 1-73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-74 – 1-77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-78 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-79 – 1-80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-81 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-82 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-83 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-84 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-84A Added . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-84B Blank Added . . . . . . 20
1-85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-86 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Page
No.

Change
No.

1-87 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-88 – 1-89 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-91 – 1-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-96 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-97 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-98 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-100 – 1-101 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-102 – 1-103 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-104 – 1-107 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-108 – 1-109 . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-110 – 1-113 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-114 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-115 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-117 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-118 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-119 – 1-121 . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-122 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-123 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-124 – 1-127 . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-129 – 1-133 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-134 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-135 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-136 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-136A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-136B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-136C – 1-136E . . . . . . . . 17
1-136F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-136G – 1-136H . . . . . . . . 17
1-136J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-136K – 1-136L . . . . . . . . . 17
1-136M Added . . . . . . . . . . 12
* 1-137 – 1-138 . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Page
No.

Change
No.

1-139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-141 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-142 – 1-144 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-145 – 1-146 . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-146A – 1-146C . . . . . . . . 21
1-146D Blank Added . . . . . 20
1-147 – 1-149 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-150 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-151 – 1-164 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-165 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-166 – 1-167 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-168 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-169 – 1-174 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-176 – 1-177 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-178 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-179 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-182 – 1-183 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-184 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-185 – 1-186 . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-187 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-188 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-189 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-191 – 1-192 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-193 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-194 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-196A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-196B Blank Added . . . . . . 4
1-197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1-199 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

CURRENT FLIGHT CREW CHECKLISTS
Pilot’s Abbreviated Checklist
Ground Crew Procedures

T.O. 1B-52H-1CL-1
T.O. 1B-52H-1CL-2

31 Aug 96
31 Aug 96

Change 14 - 1 Jun 06

Upon receipt of the second and subsequent changes to this technical order, personnel responsible for maintaining this publication in current
status will ascertain that all previous changes have been received and incorporated. Action should be taken promptly if the publication is
incomplete.
*The asterisk indicates pages changed, added, or deleted by the current change.

ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE OBTAINED BY USAF ACTIVITIES IN ACCORDANCE WITH T.O. 00-5-1.

A

Change 22

USAF

T.O. 1B-52H-1

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES (continued)
Page
No.

Change
No.

1-200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1-201 – 1-205 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-207 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1-208 – 1-209 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-212 – 1-219 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1-221 – 1-223 . . . . . . . . . 21
1-224 – 1-226 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-227 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1-228 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-229 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-230A – 1-230B Added 21
1-231 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-232 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-232A – 1-232C Added 21
1-232D Blank Added . . . 21
1-233 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-234 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-234A Added . . . . . . . . . 21
1-234B Blank Added . . . 21
1-235 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-237 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-238 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-239 – 1-241 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-242 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-243 – 1-244 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-244A – 1-244C Added . 4
1-244D Blank Added . . . . 4
1-245 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-246 – 1-247 . . . . . . . . . . 1
1-248 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-249 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-250 – 1-251 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-252 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-253 – 1-256 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-257 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-258 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-259 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-260 – 1-262 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-263 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1-264 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-265 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1-266 – 1-267 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-268 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-269 – 1-279 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-280 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-281 – 1-282 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-283 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-284 – 1-285 . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-286 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-287 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-288 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-290 – 1-297 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-298 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-299 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-300 – 1-301 . . . . . . . . . 0
1-302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-303 – 1-307 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-308 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-309 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-311 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-312 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-313 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Page
No.

*
*
*
*

Change
No.

1-314 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-315 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-316 – 1-317 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-318 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-319 – 1-325 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-327 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-328 – 1-333 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-334 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-336 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-337 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-338 – 1-339 . . . . . . . . . 10
1-340 – 1-342 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-344 – 1-347 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-348 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-349 – 1-353 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-354 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-355 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-356 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-357 – 1-358 . . . . . . . . . 16
1-358A Added . . . . . . . . . 10
1-358B Blank Added . . . 10
1-359 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-360 – 1-361 . . . . . . . . . 19
1-362 – 1-367 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-368 – 1-369 . . . . . . . . . 20
1-370 – 1-377 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-378 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-379 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-380 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-381 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-382 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-383 – 1-387 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-388 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-389 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-390 – 1-393 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-394 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1-395 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-396 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-397 – 1-399 . . . . . . . . . 18
1-400 – 1-401 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-402 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-403 – 1-405 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-406 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-407 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-408 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1-409 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-411 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-412 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1-413 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-414 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-415 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-416 – 1-417 . . . . . . . . . . 3
1-418 – 1-419 . . . . . . . . . 21
1-420 – 1-421 . . . . . . . . . . 3
1-422 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-423 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-425 – 1-427 . . . . . . . . 21
1-428 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-428A – 1-428C . . . . . . 22
1-428D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-428E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-428F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-428G – 1-428H . . . . . 22
1-428J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-428K – 1-428M Added . 3

Page
No.

Change
No.

1-428N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-428P – 1-428U . . . . . . 21
1-428V – 1-428Y Added . 3
1-428Z Blank Added . . . . 3
1-429 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-430 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-431 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-432 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-433 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-434 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-435 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-436 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-437 – 1-438 . . . . . . . . . 19
1-439 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-441 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1-442 – 1-443 . . . . . . . . . 0
1-444 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-444A – 1-444B
Deleted . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-445 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-446 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-446A – 1-446B
Deleted . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-446C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-446D – 1-446E Added . 8
* 1-446F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1-446G – 1-446N Added . 8
1-446P . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-446Q – 1-446U Added . 8
1-446V Blank Added . . . . 8
1-447 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-448 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-449 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-450 – 1-452 . . . . . . . . . . 8
1-452A – 1-452C Added . 8
1-452D Blank Added . . . . 8
1-453 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1-454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1-455 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-456 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-457 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-458 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-458A – 1-458G . . . . . . 21
1-458H Blank . . . . . . . . . 21
1-459 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-460 – 1-464 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-464A – 1-464H Added . 8
1-464J – 1-464N Added . 8
1-464P – 1-464R Added . 8
1-465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-466 – 1-468 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-469 – 1-470 Deleted . . . 4
1-471 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-472 – 1-477 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-478 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-478A Added . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-478B Blank Added . . . . 4
1-479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-480 – 1-483 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-484 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-485 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-486 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-486A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-486B Blank Added . . . . 2
1-487 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-488 – 1-492 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-493 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-494 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-495 – 1-496 . . . . . . . . . . 2

Page
No.

Change
No.

1-497 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-498 – 1-501 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-502 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1-503 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-504 – 1-505 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-506 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-506A – 1-506B Added . 2
1-507 – 1-508 . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-509 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-510 – 1-514 . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-514A Added . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-514B Blank Added . . . . 2
1-515 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-516 – 1-526 . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-526A – 1-526C Added . 2
1-526D Blank Added . . . . 2
1-527 – 1-528 . . . . . . . . . 19
1-529 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-530 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-532 – 1-533 . . . . . . . . . 19
1-534 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-535 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-536 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
1-537 – 1-538 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-538A Added . . . . . . . . . 16
1-538B Blank Added . . . 16
1-539 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-540 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-541 – 1-542 . . . . . . . . . 21
1-543 – 1-545 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-546 – 1-547 . . . . . . . . . 20
1-548 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-549 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-550 – 1-559 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-560 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-561 – 1-567 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-568 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-569 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-570 – 1-574 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-575 – 1-578 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-579 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-580 – 1-585 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-586 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-587 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-589 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1-590 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-590A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1-590B Blank Added . . . 10
1-591 – 1-593 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-594 – 1-596 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-597 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1-598 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-599 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-600 – 1-601 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-602 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-603 – 1-606 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-607 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-608 – 1-610 . . . . . . . . . 17
1-610A – 1-610B
Deleted . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1-611 – 1-612 . . . . . . . . . 11
1-612A – 1-612B Added 11
1-613 – 1-615 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-616 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-617 – 1-618 . . . . . . . . . 22
* 1-618A – 1-618B . . . . . . 22
* 1-619 – 1-621 . . . . . . . . . 22

Change 22

B

T.O. 1B-52H-1

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES (continued)
Page
No.

Change
No.

1-622 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 1-623 – 1-624 . . . . . . . . . 22
1-625 – 1-626 . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-627 –1-628 . . . . . . . . . . 21
1-628A Added . . . . . . . . . 21
1-628B Blank Added . . . 21
1-629 – 1-630 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-631 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1-632 – 1-634 . . . . . . . . . . 0
1-635 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1-636 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-2 – 2-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2-13 – 2-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2-21 – 2-23 . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-24 – 2-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-28 – 2-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-31 – 2-32 . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2-32A – 2-32B Deleted . 17
2-33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2-34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2-36 – 2-37 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2-39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2-40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
* 2-41 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-42 – 2-43 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-44 – 2-46 . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-47 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2-49 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-50 – 2-51 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-52A Added . . . . . . . . . . 3
2-52B Blank Added . . . . . 3
2-53 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-54 – 2-59 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-61 – 2-62 . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-65 – 2-66 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-68 – 2-73 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-74 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-75 – 2-78 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

C

Change 22

Page
No.

*

*
*

*
*

*

*

Change
No.

2-79 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2-80 – 2-84 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-84A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2-84B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-84C – 2-84H . . . . . . . . 16
2-84J Added . . . . . . . . . . 16
2-84K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-84L – 2-84N Added . . 16
2-84P – 2-84Q Added . . 16
2-84R – 2-84T . . . . . . . . . 21
2-84U – 2-84AB Added . 16
2-84AC – 2-84AD . . . . . . 21
2-84AE – 2-84AH Added 16
2-84AJ – 2-84AN Added 16
2-84AP – 2-84AV . . . . . . 16
2-84AW – 2-84AX . . . . . 22
2-84AY – 2-84BC . . . . . . 16
2-84BD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-84BE – 2-84BH . . . . . . 16
2-84BJ – 2-84BN . . . . . . 18
2-84BP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2-85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2-86 – 2-87 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-88 – 2-89 . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-90 – 2-91 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-92 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-93 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-96 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-97 – 2-99 . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2-102 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2-103 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2-105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2-107 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-108 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2-109 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-110 – 2-112 . . . . . . . . . 21
2-113 – 2-115 . . . . . . . . . 17
2-116 – 2-135 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-136 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-137 – 2-144 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-145 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2-146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-146A – 2-146D Added 17
2-147 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-148 – 2-150 . . . . . . . . . 12
2-151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-152 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2-152A – 2-152B
Deleted . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2-153 – 2-155 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-156 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-157 – 2-158 . . . . . . . . . 12
2-159 – 2-162 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-163 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2-164 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-165 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Page
No.

Change
No.

2-166 – 2-169 . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-171 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2-172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2-174 – 2-177 . . . . . . . . . 17
2-178 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-179 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2-183 – 2-184 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-185 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2-186 – 2-195 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-196 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-197 – 2-201 . . . . . . . . . . 0
2-202 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-2 – 3-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3-8 – 3-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3-12 – 3-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-14 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-15 – 3-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-22 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-23 – 3-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-26 – 3-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
3-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3-33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3-35 – 3-36 . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3-36A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3-36B Blank Added . . . . . 1
3-37 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
3-38 – 3-42 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-43 – 3-44 . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-44A Added . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-44B Blank Added . . . . 12
3-45 – 3-46 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-47 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3-48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-49 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
3-50 – 3-51 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3-52A Added . . . . . . . . . . 13
3-52B Blank Added . . . . 13
3-53 – 3-58 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-59 – 3-60 . . . . . . . . . . . 10
3-61 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-62 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3-63 – 3-65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-66 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-66A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
3-66B – 3-66H Added . . 16
3-66J – 3-66K Added . . . 16
3-67 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Page
No.

Change
No.

3-68 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3-70 – 3-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 3-95 – 3-96 . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3-97 – 3-102 . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-103 – 3-104 . . . . . . . . . 12
3-104A Added . . . . . . . . . 12
3-104B Blank Added . . . 12
3-105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3-106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3-107 – 3-108 . . . . . . . . . 12
3-108A Added . . . . . . . . . 12
3-108B Blank Added . . . 12
3-109 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-110 – 3-113 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-114 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-115 – 3-116 . . . . . . . . . . 1
3-116A – 3-116B Added . 1
3-117 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
3-118 – 3-119 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-120A Added . . . . . . . . . 12
3-120B Blank Added . . . 12
3-121 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-122 – 3-126 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-127 – 3-128 . . . . . . . . . . 1
3-129 – 3-139 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3-140A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3-140B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3-140C – 3-140D . . . . . . . 8
3-140E – 3-140G Added 21
3-140H Blank Added . . . 21
3-141 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3-142 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-143 – 3-144 . . . . . . . . . 12
3-145 – 3-149 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3-151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-152 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3-153 – 3-155 . . . . . . . . . 21
3-156 – 3-163 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-164 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-164A Added . . . . . . . . . 12
3-164B Blank Added . . . 12
3-165 – 3-167 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-168 – 3-170 . . . . . . . . . . 4
3-171 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3-173 – 3-179 . . . . . . . . . 0
3-180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3-181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-183 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-184 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3-185 – 3-186 . . . . . . . . . . 0
3-187 – 3-188 . . . . . . . . . 12
3-188A – 3-188B Added 12
3-189 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3-190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3-191 – 3-193 . . . . . . . . . 0
3-194 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

T.O. 1B-52H-1

LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES (continued)
Page
No.

Change
No.

4-1 – 4-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
4-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
4-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
4-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
* 4-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
4-8 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-1 – 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
* 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
5-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
5-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5-12A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
5-12B Blank Added . . . . 10

Page
No.

Change
No.

5-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
5-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
5-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
5-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5-18 – 5-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-25 – 5-28 . . . . . . . . . . . 12
5-29 – 5-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
5-32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
5-33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
5-34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
5-35 – 5-36 . . . . . . . . . . . 12
* 5-37 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
5-38 – 5-42 Added . . . . . 12
6-1 – 6-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

Page
No.

Change
No.

6-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
6-16A Added . . . . . . . . . . . 1
6-16B Blank Added . . . . . 1
6-17 – 6-42 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
6-43 Added . . . . . . . . . . . 12
6-44 Blank Added . . . . . . 12
7-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
7-2 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-4 – 7-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
7-6 – 7-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
7-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-10 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-11 – 7-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Page
No.

Change
No.

* 7-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
7-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
7-18 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-20 Blank . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
7-21 – 7-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Glossary-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
* Glossary-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
* Index-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Index-2 – Index-5 . . . . . . 21
Index-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Index-7 – Index-8 . . . . . . 21
Index-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
* Index-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Index-11 – Index-13 . . . . 21
Index-14 Blank . . . . . . . . . 0

Change 22

D/(E blank)

BLA

WARNING
This manual contains unverified procedures. Unverified procedures shall only be performed during verification, in accordance with TOs 00-5-1 and 00-5-3. Performance of unverified procedures may result in injury to personnel or damage to
equipment.

TECHNICAL ORDER VALIDATION/VERIFICATION STATUS PAGE
BASIC DATE

CHANGE NO. – DATE

31 AUG 96

DATA ELEMENT

DATE
VALIDATED

CHANGE 21 1 JUL 05

VALIDATION
METHOD

T.O 1B-52H-1

(B)

(A)

TCTO Listings (P, PG vii)
Electrical Loads
(F: 1-69, Sheet 14/16, PG 1-221)
Electrical Loads
(F: 1-69, Sheet 15/16, PG 1-222)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 6A/15, PG 1-230)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 6B/15, PG 1-230A)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 8A/15, PG 1-232)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 8B/15, PG 1-232A)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 9A/15, PG 1-232C)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 12/15, PG 1-234A)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 12A/15, PG 1-235)
Circuit Breaker Panels
(F: 1-70, Sheet 15/15, PG 1-238)
MFD Control Panel (S, PG 1-428)
Mission Route Screen/Moving
Map Display (S, PG 1-428A)
Identifying Bullseyes on the
Mission Route Map (P, PG1-428B)
Chg Level of Declutter on Mission
Route Screen (P, PG 1-428C)
GPS IU/TACAN Emulation
Data Flow (F: 1-127A, PG 1-428D)
GPS IU/TACAN Emulation Mode
Data (F: 1-127B, PG 1-428E)
Msn Route Scrn/Mov Map Display
(F: 1-127D Sheet1/3, PG 1-428G)
Msn Route Scrn/Mov Map Display
(F: 1-127D Sheet2/3, PG 1-428H)
GPS IU/TACAN Annunciator
Messages (F: 1-127F, PG 1-428N)
GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 1/9,PG 1-428P)

12/01/04

A

9/01/02

A

6/01/03

A

9/01/02

A

12/01/04

A

6/01/03

A

12/01/04

A

12/01/04

A

9/01/02

A

9/01/02

A

9/01/02

A

9/01/02

A

6/01/03

A

6/01/03

A

6/01/03

A

9/01/02

A

9/01/02

A

12/01/04

A

12/01/04

A

9/01/02

A

9/01/02

A

DATE
VERIFIED

VERIFICATION
METHOD

T.O. NO.

PTO CHANGE NO. – DATE

AMI

REMARKS

(B)

LEGEND:
(A) DATA ELEMENT:

(S) = SECTION, (PG) = PAGE, (P) = PARAGRAPH, (F) = FIGURE, (T) = TABLE

(B) VALIDATION OR VERIFICATION METHOD:

(P) = PERFORMANCE, (S) = SIMULATION, (A) = ANALYSIS (TABLE-TOP)

V/VS-1

WARNING
This manual contains unverified procedures. Unverified procedures shall only be performed during verification, in accordance with TOs 00-5-1 and 00-5-3. Performance of unverified procedures may result in injury to personnel or damage to
equipment.

TECHNICAL ORDER VALIDATION/VERIFICATION STATUS PAGE
BASIC DATE

CHANGE NO. – DATE

31 AUG 96

DATA ELEMENT

DATE
VALIDATED

CHANGE 21 1 JUL 05

VALIDATION
METHOD

T.O 1B-52H-1

(B)

(A)

GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 2/9,PG 1-428Q)
9/01/02
GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 3/9,PG 1-428R)
9/01/02
GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 4/9,PG 1-428S)
9/01/02
GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 5/9,PG 1-428T)
9/01/02
GPS IU/TACAN Abnrm Ops/Faults
(F: 1-127G, Sheet 6/9,PG 1-428U)
9/01/02
OAS Circuit Protection & Location
(F: 1-153, Sheet 1/6,PG 1-539)
9/01/02
OAS Circuit Protection & Location
(F: 1-153, Sheet 4/6,PG 1-542)
12/01/04
Pilot’s Station Bombing System Controls & Indicators
(F: 1-176, Sheet 1/2, PG 1-618)
12/01/04
Authorized Mixed External Weapon Loads
(F: 1-176A, PG 1-618B)
12/01/04
Authorized Weapons
(F: 1-177, Sheet 3/3,PG 1-621)
12/01/04
Navigators Compartment - Aft
(F: 1-181, Sheet 2/2, PG 1-628)
9/01/02

DATE
VERIFIED

VERIFICATION
METHOD

T.O. NO.

PTO CHANGE NO. – DATE

AMI

REMARKS

(B)

A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A

LEGEND:
(A) DATA ELEMENT:

(S) = SECTION, (PG) = PAGE, (P) = PARAGRAPH, (F) = FIGURE, (T) = TABLE

(B) VALIDATION OR VERIFICATION METHOD:

V/VS-2

(P) = PERFORMANCE, (S) = SIMULATION, (A) = ANALYSIS (TABLE-TOP)

T.O. 1B-52H-1

STATUS OF SAFETY AND OPERATIONAL SUPPLEMENTS
This supplement status page is based on information available to the manual editor as of the date of
this publication. The information may not be current as it must be updated by any subsequent supplement status pages and by reference to T.O. 0-1-CD-1.
SUPPLEMENTS IN THIS CHANGE

Number

S-19

Date

Short Title

31 Mar 06

Section Affected

GBU-38

I

OUTSTANDING SUPPLEMENTS

Number

Date

Short Title

SS-18 (I)

03 Oct 05

Fuel Enrichment Valve
Equipped Aircraft Cold
Weather Operations

Change 22

Flyleaf-1/(Flyleaf-2 blank)

BLA

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Table of Contents

PAGE
SECTION I

Systems Description and Operation

1-1

SECTION II

Normal Procedures

2-1

SECTION III

Emergency Procedures

3-1

SECTION IV

Crew Duties

4-1

SECTION V

Operating Limitations

5-1

SECTION VI

Flight Characteristics

6-1

SECTION VII

All Weather Operation

7-1

Alphabetical Index

APPENDIX 1

Performance Data

Index 1
T.O. 1B-52H-1-1

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS - Titles included in alphabetical index

Change 15

i

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Before operating the B-52 aircraft
read the following pages carefully!
SCOPE. This manual provides the aircrew with a general knowledge of the aircraft, its characteristics, and

specific normal, abnormal, and emergency operating procedures. Your flying experience is recognized; therefore, basic flight principles are avoided. Instructions in this manual are for a crew inexperienced in the operation of this aircraft. This manual provides the best possible operating instructions under most circumstances, but it is a poor substitute for sound judgment. Multiple emergencies, adverse weather, terrain, etc
may require modification of the procedures.
COMPLEMENTARY MANUALS. This manual must be used with one or more of the following manuals to obtain

all the information necessary for safe and efficient operation of the B-52H aircraft. These manuals have been
separated from this manual for your convenience in handling information which may be classified, applicable
only to certain aircraft configurations, or used only by certain crewmembers.
T.O. 1B-52H-1-1
T.O. 1B-52H-1-12
T.O. 1B-52H-1-13
T.O. 1B-52H-5
T.O. 1B-52H-25-1
T.O. 1B-52H-25-2
T.O. 1B-52H-25-3
T.O. 1B-52H-30-1
T.O. 1B-52H-30-4
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-1
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-5
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-6
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-7
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-8
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-9

ii

Change 22

B-52H Flight Manual – Appendix 1, Performance Data
B-52H Radar Navigator’s/Navigator’s Manual
B-52H Electronic Warfare Officer’s Manual
B-52H Basic Weight Checklist and Loading Data
B-52H Nuclear Bomb Delivery Technical Manual – Basic Information
(SECRET RESTRICTED DATA) (Title Unclassified)
B-52H Nuclear Bomb Delivery Basic Information and Operating Procedures
B-52H Nuclear Bomb Mission Planning Manual
(SECRET RESTRICTED DATA) (Title Unclassified)
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual – AGM-129
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Technical Manual – AGM-86B
B-52H Aircrew Conventional Weapons Delivery Manual
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual (Nonnuclear) – WCMD
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual (Nonnuclear) – JDAM
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual (Nonnuclear) – AGM-154 JSOW
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual (Nonnuclear) – AGM-158 JASSM
B-52H Aircrew Weapon Delivery Manual (Nonnuclear) – AGM-86C/D

T.O. 1B-52H-1
PERMISSIBLE OPERATIONS. The Flight Manual takes a ‘‘positive approach’’ and

normally states only what you can do. Unusual operations or configurations are
prohibited unless specifically covered herein. Clearance from the using command
must be obtained before any questionable operation, which is not specifically permitted in this manual, is attempted. Before granting the clearance, the using command may request coordination or engineering assistance/approval from Oklahoma
City ALC. Request should be made through the Flight Manual Manager.
HOW TO BE ASSURED OF HAVING LATEST DATA. Refer to T.O. 0-1-CD-1 for a listing of

all current flight manuals, safety, or operational supplements, and checklists. Also,
check the flight manual cover page, the title block of each safety and operational
supplement and all status pages attached to formal safety and operational supplements. Clear up all discrepancies before flight.
ARRANGEMENT. The manual is divided into seven fairly independent sections to simplify reading it straight through or using it as a reference manual.
SAFETY SUPPLEMENTS. Information involving safety will be promptly forwarded to
you in a safety supplement. Urgent information is published in interim safety supplements and transmitted by teletype. Formal supplements are mailed. The supplement title block and status page (published with formal supplement only) should be
checked to determine the supplement’s effect on the manual and other outstanding
supplements.
OPERATIONAL SUPPLEMENTS. Information involving changes to operating proce-

dures will be forwarded to you by operational supplements. The procedure for handling operational supplements is the same as for safety supplements.
CHECKLISTS. The flight manual contains itemized procedures with necessary ampli-

fications. The checklist contains itemized procedures without the amplification. Primary line items in the flight manual and checklist are identical. If a formal safety or
operational supplement affects your checklist, the affected checklist page will be attached to the supplement. Cut it out and insert it over the affected page but never
discard the checklist page in case the supplement is rescinded and the page is needed.
FLIGHT MANUAL BINDERS. Looseleaf binders and sectionalized tabs are available for
use with your manual. They are obtained through local purchase procedures and are
listed in the Federal Supply Schedule (FSC Group 75, Office Supplies, Part 1).
Check with your supply personnel for assistance in procuring these items.

Change 16

iii

T.O. 1B-52H-1
WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, AND NOTES. The following definitions apply to ‘‘Warnings,’’
‘‘Cautions,’’ and ‘‘Notes’’ found throughout the manual.

Operating procedures, techniques, etc, which could result in personal
injury or loss of life if not carefully followed.

Operating procedures, techniques, etc, which could result in damage to
equipment if not carefully followed.
NOTE

An operating procedure, technique, etc, which is considered essential to
emphasize.
SHALL, WILL, SHOULD, and MAY. The following definitions apply to the words:

SHALL or WILL

The instructions or procedures prefaced by ‘‘shall’’ or ‘‘will’’
are mandatory.

SHOULD

Normally used to indicate a preferred but nonmandatory
method of accomplishment.

MAY

An acceptable or suggested means of accomplishment.

CHANGE SYMBOLS. Changes to existing material and addition of new material are
indicated by one of three types of symbols determined by the nature of the material
affected. Text material utilizes a vertical line in the margin adjacent to the affected
area. New illustrations (figures) utilize a vertical line in the outer margin of the
page. Photographs and line drawings use a miniature pointing hand to highlight the
affected area. Diagrams and schematics utilize a grey tone (screening) to highlight
the affected area. Change symbols are not used for blank space resulting from deletions, indexes, and tabular data where changes cannot be identified, relocation of
material, or correction of minor inaccuracies unless such correction changes the
meaning.
YOUR RESPONSIBILITY – TO LET US KNOW. Every effort is made to keep the Flight

Manual current. Review conferences with operating personnel and a constant review
of accident and flight test reports assure inclusion of the latest data in the manual.
However, we cannot correct an error unless we know of its existence. In this regard,
it is essential that you do your part. Comments, corrections, and questions regarding
this manual, supplementary manuals, checklists, or any phase of the Flight Manual
program are welcomed. These should be submitted on an AF Form 847 through
channels established by major commands as directed by AFI 11-215 to 327 BMSG/
EN, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma 73145-3021.

FLYING SAFETY
Every effort has been made to provide flight crews with the safest possible procedures and techniques to be used during all phases of air refueling operations. These
procedures and techniques will be followed by all flight crews concerned. If occasions
or unusual situations arise which are not specifically covered in this manual, flying
safety will be the prime consideration in determining the action to be taken.

iv

Change 21

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Aircraft Coding

The information contained in this manual covers all B-52H aircraft. USAF Serial numbers
are used to distinguish information related to one aircraft or group of aircraft from that
which is applicable to the other aircraft. When serial numbers appear by a paragraph or
illustration, the information applies only to the aircraft represented by the serial numbers.
Where no serial numbers appear on a paragraph or illustration, the information is applicable
to all B-52H aircraft.
• Symbol means ‘‘thru’’ or ‘‘on.’’ Example:
60-001 60-015 – Identifies B-52H AF60-001 thru AF60-015
– Identifies B-52H AF61-016 and on
61-016
• AIRCRAFT NO LONGER IN SERVICE


CS Aircraft modified by TCTO 1B-52H-756 (Integrated Conventional Stores
Management System)

# Aircraft not CSRL capable

USAF B-52H Serial No.

60-001

CS

60-022

CS

60-043

CS

61-001

60-002

#

60-023

CS

60-044

CS

61-002

60-003

CS

60-024

#

60-045

CS

60-004

CS

60-025

CS

60-046

CS

60-005

#

60-026

CS

60-047

60-006
60-007

CS

60-008

61-021

CS

CS

61-022

CS

61-003

CS

61-023

CS

61-004

CS

61-024

CS

61-005

#

61-025

#

60-027

60-048

#

61-006

CS

61-026

60-028

60-049

CS

61-007

CS

61-027

60-050

CS

61-008

CS

61-028

60-051

CS

61-009

CS

61-029

CS

61-010

CS

61-030

60-029

CS

CS

60-009

CS

60-030

60-010

CS

60-031

CS

60-052

60-011

CS

60-032

CS

60-053

61-011

CS

61-031

CS

60-012

#

60-033

CS

60-054

61-012

#

61-032

CS

60-013

CS

60-034

CS

60-055

61-013

CS

61-033

60-014

CS

60-035

CS

60-056

61-014

#

61-034

#

60-015

CS

60-036

#

60-016

CS

60-037

60-017

CS

60-038

60-018

CS

60-019

CS

60-057

CS

61-015

#

61-035

CS

60-058

CS

61-016

CS

61-036

CS

60-059

CS

61-017

CS

61-037

60-039

60-060

CS

61-018

#

61-038

CS

CS

60-040

60-061

CS

61-019

CS

61-039

CS

60-020

CS

60-041

60-062

CS

61-020

CS

61-040

60-021

#

60-042

CS

Change 10

v

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Personnel Coding

Where necessary to distinguish
crewmembers, the following
code letters will be used

(P)
(CP)
(N)
(G)
(RN)
(EW)

Pilot
Copilot
Navigator
Gunner
Radar Navigator
EW Officer

(IP)
(IN)
(DI)
(GC)
(10th)

Instructor Pilot
Instructor Navigator
Defense Instructor
Ground Crew
Tenth Crewmember

The amplified checklist describes in detail the steps to be completed. Each major
part of multi-crewmember checklists has been assigned to a crewmember to be read
by that crewmember, and to be accomplished by others in the crew. When necessary
to show which crewmember will accomplish certain steps, the normal crew coding is
used and the code letters will appear after the response to each step. Where a dash
(-) is used in crew coding, such as P-CP, P-CP-RN, or any combination of crewmembers, each crewmember will accomplish the step. Where a slash (/) is used, such as
P/CP, either crewmember will accomplish the step. A verbal response will be given
by the crewmember(s) performing the action. There are exceptions to the verbal response as some of the checklists are to be accomplished silently. When a single crewmember is responsible for a checklist and accomplishment of all items, no crew coding will appear. All duties and responsibilities of the aerial gunner are deleted. Any
crew member occupying the gunner’s ejection seat will continue to be referred to as
“Gunner”.

Software Coding

The information contained in this manual covers all the available versions of the B-52H OAS
software. The following coding applies:

vi

[CS] –

Applies when Coventional Weapon (Integrated Convential Stores Management
System (ICSMS)) Software is loaded on the aircraft.

[NS] –

Applies when Nuclear Weapon (Block II) Software is loaded on the aircraft.

Change 21

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Retrofit Coding
The following code symbols along with the word ‘‘Less’’ are used to distinguish information
related to aircraft that have the described retrofit change incorporated from that which is
applicable to aircraft not yet retrofitted. This list contains only TCTO’s currently active.
Those known to be completed are not included.
CODING EXAMPLE: DR T.O. 1B-52H-792, Installation of IU/TACAN Replacement on
B-52H aircraft. Information applicable to aircraft until they are modified in accordance with
T.O. 1B-52H-792 will be coded Less DR . Information applicable to aircraft modified in accordance with T.O. 1B-52H-792 will be coded DR .
SYMBOL

CS

T.O. NO.

⎧1B-52H-753

⎩1B-52H-756

TITLE
Installation of Global Positioning System (GPS) on B-52H
Aircraft (ECP 0109).
Installation of Integrated Conventional Stores Management System (ICSMS) on
B-52H Aircraft (ECP 0109).

CH
DJ

1B-52H-749

Installation of AN/ARC-210(V) V/UHF Radio on B-52H Aircraft.

CH
DL

1B-52-2422

Installation of Dual Modem II AFSATCOM Radio System on B-52H Aircraft.

CH
DQ

1B-52H-785

Installation AN/ARC-210 Retrofit.

CH
DT

1B-52H-798

Installation of Electronic Countermeasures Improvement on all B-52H Aircraft.

CH
DU

1B-52H-803

Installation of Demand Assigned Multiple Access (DAMA) System for the ARC-210
Radio and Advanced Narrowband Digital Voice Terminal (ANDTV) KY-100 System
Capability for the ARC 210/ARC-164 Radios on B-52H Aircraft.

[EV]

1B-52H-815

Installation of Engine Fuel Enrichment Valve on B-52H Aircraft.

CH
EA

1B-52H-823

Installation of Pilot EVS Monitor Input switch on B-52H Aircraft.

[AMI]

1B-52H-830

Replacement of Ballistics Computer Set AN/AYQ-10 and Inertial Navigation System
AN/ASN-136 on B-52H Aircraft. Baseline for [AMI] includes DJ .

[TP]

1B-52H-851

Installation of Targeting Pod on B-52H Aircraft.

Change 22

vii

T.O. 1B-52H-1

The B-52H Stratofortress

All data on pages ix and x deleted.

viii

Change 6

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Systems Description and Operation

table of contents
THE AIRCRAFT

section I

page
1-3

DOORS AND WINDOWS

1-21

OXYGEN SYSTEM

1-25

EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT

1-37

ESCAPE SYSTEMS

1-51

ENGINES

1-81

FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM

1-99

CENTER OF GRAVITY/FUEL LEVEL ADVISORY SYSTEM

1-151

REFUELING SYSTEMS

1-163

ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

1-185

LIGHTING EQUIPMENT

1-243

HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

1-257

LANDING GEAR SYSTEM

1-277

STEERING AND CROSSWIND CRAB SYSTEMS

1-289

WHEEL BRAKE SYSTEM

1-299

DRAG CHUTE SYSTEM

1-307

BOMB DOOR SYSTEM

1-309

FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS

1-319

AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS

1-337

PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS

1-355

1-1

T.O. 1B-52H-1

1-2

table of contents

page

ANTI-ICING SYSTEMS

1-379

INSTRUMENTS

1-389

FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM

1-407

NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT

1-423

COMMUNICATION AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

1-437

OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM

1-537

DEFENSIVE SYSTEMS

1-545

TERRAIN AVOIDANCE SYSTEM

1-549

ELECTRO-OPTICAL VIEWING SYSTEM (EVS) (AN/ASQ-151)

1-587

BOMBING SYSTEM

1-617

MISSILE SYSTEM

1-623

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT

1-625

T.O. 1B-52H-1

THE AIRCRAFT
DESCRIPTION
The Boeing B-52 ‘‘Stratofortress’’ aircraft is of the
land based heavy bombardment class designed for
long range flight at high speed and altitude. The
tactical mission is the destruction of surface objectives by bombs and missiles. The aircraft has provisions for ten crewmembers: a basic crew of five,
three instructors and two additional crewmembers.
The basic crew consists of pilot, copilot, radar navigator, navigator and electronic warfare officer. The
instructor crew includes an instructor pilot, instructor navigator and instructor electronic warfare officer. Finally, the gunner and tenth man positions are
also available for additional seating. A highly variable weapons load may be carried on external pylons in combination with internal cluster rack or
CSRL mounted weapons loads. Up to 12 cruise missiles may be carried externally.
NOTE

AGM-86C/D missiles will not be carried in
mixed loads with AGM-86B or AGM-129.
The CSRL can carry up to eight AGM-86B/86C/86D,
B-61, or B-83 weapons internally. These weapon
loads cannot be mixed on the CSRL.
The aircraft can suspend a variety of gravity weapons internally on cluster rack assemblies (three
cluster rack assemblies, up to 27 weapons total).
Externally, the B-52 can suspend weapons using an
AGM-28 pylon under each wing with standard rack
adapter beams attached to each pylon and two sets
of multiple ejector racks (MER) giving a total external carriage capability of 24 weapons. The heavy
stores adapter beam (HSAB) can be attached to a
stub pylon and up to nine MAU-12 bomb racks can
be attached to each HSAB for a total external carriage capability on the HSAB of up to 18 weapons.
SPECIAL FEATURES

The aircraft is characterized by swept wings and
empennage, four underslung nacelles housing eight
turbofan engines, a quadricycle main landing gear,
and a tip gear near each outboard engine nacelle.
Engine bleed air provides the air supply for air conditioning and anti-icing. Cartridge starters are installed to provide for engine starts without assistance from an auxiliary air cart or auxiliary electrical power cart. Primary electrical power is 205-volt
ac and is provided by four engine-driven generators. Hydraulic pressure is supplied by six enginedriven hydraulic pumps and two electric motordriven hydraulic pumps. Primary pitch and yaw
control is maintained by hydraulically actuated

rudder and elevators. Lateral control is maintained
by operation of hydraulically actuated spoilers. By
varying the method of control, these same spoilers
serve as airbrakes. The entire horizontal stabilizer
is moved by a hydraulic mechanism to provide pitch
trim. A steering and crosswind crab system provides steering of the forward main landing gear and
also properly positions both forward and rear main
landing gear for crosswind landings. A hydraulically driven revolver-type launcher installation in the
bomb bay provides umbilical and ejector rack connections for the weapons which may be launched/
released automatically or manually by the navigators. The weapon/missile equipment interfaces with
the AN/ASQ-176 offensive avionics system, AN/
APN-224 radar altimeter, and the aircraft electrical, bleed air, and body hydraulic systems. Weapon
selective jettison capability is available to the navigator and radar navigator. Either the Weapons
Control Panel (WCP) or backup MFD display and
the keyboard may be used for computer controlled
safe jettison of individual or multiple weapons. The
pilot is provided with an ejector unlock consent
switch and a prearm consent switch (cooperative
with the WCP on the navigators’ front panel), a
launcher hydraulic system selector switch, and a
bomb bay and missile jettison control which will jettison all weapons from the aircraft. The pilot is also
provided with pylon jettison switches and pylon jettison consent switches. The Radar Navigator is provided with a bomb bay and missile jettison switch,
which will jettison only conventional gravity weapons. This switch is inoperative for all CSRL gravity
weapons and all nuclear and conventional missiles.
For additional information with weapons installed refer to:
T.O. 1B-52H-25-2 – Nuclear gravity weapons
T.O. 1B-52H-30-1 – ACM (AGM-129)
T.O. 1B-52H-30-4 – ALCM (AGM-86B)
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-1 – Conventional gravity weapons
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-5 – WCMD (CBU-103/104/105/107)
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-6 – JDAM (GBU-31/38)
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-7 – JSOW (AGM-154)
T.O. 1B-52H-34-2-8 – JASSM (AGM-158)
T.O. 1B-52-H-34-2-9 – CALCM (AGM-86C/D)
An electro-optical viewing system (EVS) is installed
to provide pilots and navigators with a visual presentation of the area ahead of the aircraft during
both day and night missions.
A GPS Navigation System which provides position
updates and emulated TACAN data to the crew and
a moving map display to the pilots has been added.

Change 22

1-3

T.O. 1B-52H-1
An Air Force Satellite Communications System
(AFSATCOM) terminal is installed and is a half-duplex UHF terminal providing communications in
both line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite modes. A dual
modem capability DL has been added to the
AFSATCOM. The Airborne Miniature Receive Terminal (MRT) AN/ARR-85(V) is installed to provide
reliable VLF/LF reception and printout of secure
and nonsecure messages at extended ranges in nuclear and/or jamming environments.
DIMENSIONS

Wing Span
Fuselage Length
Height
To top of fin
Fin folded
Tread
Centerline outboard
main tires
Centerline tip gear
to tip gear

185 feet
159 feet 4 inches
40 feet 8 inches
21 feet 6 inches

MOVEMENT OF FLIGHT PERSONNEL
11 feet 4 inches
148 feet 5 inches

For aircraft turning radius and minimum ground
clearance, see figure 2-2.
GROSS WEIGHT

The aircraft is in the 400,000 pound gross weight
class. For specific weight and loading information,
see WEIGHT LIMITATIONS, Section V.
INTERIOR ARRANGEMENT

All crewmembers perform their normal crew duties
in the crew compartment. This compartment is divided into upper and lower decks. The pilots’ stations (sheet 3, figure 1-1) are located at the forward
end of the upper deck while the EW officer and gun-

1-4

Change 19

ner are stationed in aft-facing seats at the aft end
of the upper deck. The radar navigator’s and navigator’s stations (sheet 4, figure 1-1), left and right
respectively, are on the lower deck forward of the
main entry door. In addition to the basic crew of
five, the following crewmembers are provided for:
an instructor pilot seated between and immediately
aft of the pilots, a defense instructor seated on the
right side of the upper deck ahead of the EW officer
facing aft, a tenth crewmember position located
next to the crew bunk facing aft utilizing the forward ditching hammock, and an instructor navigator seated at the aft end of the lower deck for takeoff and landing. The crew compartment extends
from a pressure bulkhead forward of the pilots’ stations to a pressure bulkhead aft of the EW officer’s
and gunner’s stations.

Movement of the crew between the upper and lower
deck is facilitated by a ladder forward of the main
entry door. Movement through the equipment deck,
forward wheel well, bomb bay, aft wheel well, and
aft equipment compartment is possible during
flight via a crawlway (figure 1-1) on the right side
of the fuselage which extends from the pressure
bulkhead door (9, sheet 4, figure 1-1) in the crew
compartment aft pressure bulkhead to the aft
equipment compartment. Windows are provided in
bulkhead doors along the crawlway to allow inspection of the equipment deck, forward wheel well,
bomb bay, and aft equipment compartment during
flight. Access to the unpressurized portion of the fuselage is not generally required for normal flight
operations and will be avoided, particularly at high
altitudes since the crew compartment must be depressurized. An inflight emergency may require
such movement.

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T.O. 1B-52H-1

General Arrangement Diagram (Typical)

Figure 1-1 (Sheet 1 of 4)

(1-5 blank)/1-6

T.O. 1B-52H-1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

CREW COMPARTMENT
AFT EQUIPMENT
COMPARTMENT
DRAG CHUTE
COMPARTMENT
FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT
COMPARTMENT
AFT ECM ANTENNA
COMPARTMENT
AFT WHEEL WELL
BOMB BAY
DOPPLER ANTENNA
COMPARTMENT
FORWARD WHEEL WELL
EQUIPMENT DECK
FORWARD ECM ANTENNA
COMPARTMENT
NOSE RADOME
COMPARTMENT
COPILOT’S EJECTION
HATCH
PILOT’S EJECTION HATCH
EW OFFICER’S EJECTION
HATCH
GUNNERS EJECTION
HATCH
CHAFF DISPENSERS

18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

VORTEX GENERATORS
MISSILE SAFEING PINS AND
STREAMERS STOWAGE
MISSILE GROUND SAFETY
PIN INSTALLATION AND
REMOVAL TOOL STOWAGE
AFT TRANSFORMERRECTIFIER UNITS (3)
AFT EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT HATCH
DELETED
STARTER CARTRIDGE
STOWAGE
FORWARD TRANSFORMERRECTIFIER UNITS (5)
EXTERNAL POWER
RECEPTACLE (3)
AFT BATTERY
FORWARD BATTERY
MAIN ENTRY DOOR
RADAR NAVIGATOR’S
EJECTION HATCH
EVS STV TURRET
NAVIGATOR’S EJECTION
HATCH
FLIR TURRET

Figure 1-1 (Sheet 2 of 4)

Change 4

1-7

T.O. 1B-52H-1

General Arrangement Diagram (Typical)(Cont)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16

THERMAL CURTAIN
AISLE STAND
COPILOT’S SIDE PANEL
EYEBROW INSTRUMENT PANEL
HOT CUP
FOOD AND DATA BOX
COPILOT’S EJECTION SEAT
SIGNAL LIGHT
NIGHT FLYING CURTAIN
FOOD STORAGE CHEST
TOILET
FOOD WARMING OVEN
DEFENSE INSTRUCTOR’S SEAT
EW OFFICER’S FOOD STOWAGE BOXES
OXYGEN BOTTLE
PERISCOPIC SEXTANT MOUNT

17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

EW OFFICER’S SIDE PANEL
DEFENSE STATION INSTRUMENT PANEL
MAIN REFUEL VALVE EMERGENCY CONTROL
LEVER
GUNNER’S FOOD STOWAGE BOX
GUNNER’S EJECTION SEAT
EW OFFICER’S EJECTION SEAT
STANCHION
CREW BUNK
PILOT’S EJECTION SEAT
PILOT’S SIDE PANEL
INSTRUCTOR PILOT’S SEAT
PERISCOPIC SEXTANT CARRYING CASE
PILOTS’ OVERHEAD PANEL
PILOTS’ INSTRUMENT PANEL

Figure 1-1 (Sheet 3 of 4)

1-8

T.O. 1B-52H-1

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT SHELF
NAVIGATOR’S INSTRUMENT PANEL
OXYGEN BOTTLE
NAVIGATORS SIDE PANEL
HOT CUP
DRINKING WATER CONTAINER
LADDER
RIGHT EQUIPMENT RACK
PRESSURE BULKHEAD DOOR
LEFT EQUIPMENT RACK
CENTRAL URINAL
INSTRUCTOR NAVIGATOR’S TAKEOFF AND
LANDING SEAT
POWER SUPPLY RACK
RADAR NAVIGATOR’S EJECTION SEAT
FOOD STOWAGE BOX
RADAR NAVIGATOR’S SIDE PANEL
NAVIGATOR’S EJECTION SEAT

Figure 1-1 (Sheet 4 of 4)

1-9/(1-10 blank)

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Figure 1-2 Change 20 1-11 . windows 6L and 6R not anti-iced.T.O. 1B-52H-1 Pilots’ Station 1 2 3 4 5 6 SLIDING WINDOW HANDLE CHART HOLDER OVERHEAD PANEL EYEBROW INSTRUMENT PANEL COPILOT’S AERP BLOWER MOUNTING BRACKET AND ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR COPILOT’S SIDE PANEL 7 8 9 10 11 12 CONTROL COLUMN DISCONNECT LEVER AISLE STAND PILOTS’ INSTRUMENT PANEL ALTIMETER CORRECTION CARD AND HOLDER PILOT’S SIDE PANEL PILOT’S READINESS SWITCH ASSEMBLY NOTE Numbers in circles denote window numbers.

1B-52H-1 Pilot’s Side Panel (Typical) 1 2 3 4 5 CONTROL COLUMN DISCONNECT LEVER PYLON JETTISON CONSENT PANEL DR FACE PLATE DEFOG PANEL PILOT’S LIGHTING PANEL MUNITIONS CONSENT PANEL 6 7 8 9 INTERPHONE POWER SWITCH PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL IFF ANTENNA SWITCH PANEL OXYGEN REGULATOR Figure 1-3 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-12 Change 21 .T.O.

O. 1B-52H-1 10 11 12 13 14 15 ANTISKID SWITCH MACH INDICATOR SWITCH GYRO POWER SWITCH HYDRAULIC CONTROL PANEL IFF CONTROL PANEL PILOTS MFD DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL 16 17 18 19 20 21 FLARE EJECTOR POWER OXYGEN QUANTITY TEST SWITCH OXYGEN QUANTITY GAGE AIR OUTLET KNOB INTERPHONE MIXER PANEL INTERPHONE CONTROL PANEL Figure 1-3 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 21 1-13 .T.

1B-52H-1 Copilot’s Side Panel (Typical) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CONTROL COLUMN DISCONNECT LEVER TEMPERATURE CONTROL SWITCH AC CONTROL PANEL VOLTMETER FREQUENCY METER MANIFOLD TEMPERATURE GAGE FREQUENCY & VOLTMETER SELECTOR SWITCH FLUTTER ADVISORY PANEL 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 INTERPHONE MIXER PANEL INTERPHONE CONTROL PANEL FACE PLATE DEFOG PANEL COPILOTS MFD DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL CG/FLAS CONTROL PANEL AHRS CONTROL PANEL ANTISKID CONTROL PANEL COPILOT’S LIGHTING PANEL AIR OUTLET KNOB Figure 1-4 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-14 Change 21 .O.T.

1B-52H-1 18 19 20 21 22 23 ENGINE OIL TEMPERATURE GAGE OIL TEMPERATURE SELECTOR GAM-72 FIRE WARNING PANEL MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH [EV] FUEL ENRICHMENT VALVE SWITCH Less [EV] BLANK ENGINE START CONTROL PANEL 24 25 26 27 28 DU Z-AVH REMOTE CONTROL PANEL Less DU Z-ANP REMOTE CONTROL PANEL LIAISON RADIO CONTROL PANEL COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL OXYGEN REGULATOR DC POWER SYSTEM CONTROL PANEL Figure 1-4 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 20 1-15 .T.O.

1B-52H-1 Overhead Panel (Typical) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 OVERHEAD LIGHTING PANEL GAM-72 (LAUNCH GEAR) JETTISON SWITCH DJ AN/ARC-210(V) SWITCH PANEL DJ V/UHF (ARC-210) RADIO CONTROL PANEL UHF COMMAND RADIO CONTROL PANEL TACAN RADIO CONTROL PANEL VOR CONTROL PANEL AIR REFUELING PANEL REFUEL PANEL PYLON JETTISON CONTROL PANEL BOMB BAY & MISSILE JETTISON CONTROL SWITCH Less DJ UHF LINE-OF-SIGHT (LOS) RADIO CONTROL PANEL DQ NVIS LIGHT SWITCH Figure 1-5 1-16 Change 16 .T.O.

O. 1B-52H-1 Aisle Stand 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 AIRBRAKE LEVER STABILIZER TRIM CUTOUT SWITCH STABILIZER TRIM WHEEL AND INDICATOR THROTTLES THROTTLE BRAKE LEVER THRUST GATE STEERING RATIO SELECTOR LEVER PARKING BRAKE LEVER AIR CONDITIONING PANEL Figure 1-6 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 DRAG CHUTE LEVER WARNING HORN SHUTOFF BUTTON (BEHIND) AUTOPILOT TURN AND PITCH CONTROLLER WING FLAP LEVER NAVIGATION SYSTEM SELECT PANEL TERRAIN DISPLAY CONTROL PANEL EMERGENCY ALARM MONITOR LIGHT EMERGENCY ALARM SWITCH RUDDER TRIM KNOB AND INDICATOR CROSSWIND CRAB CONTROL CENTERING BUTTON CROSSWIND CRAB CONTROL KNOB LANDING LIGHTS PANEL AUTOPILOT SWITCH PANEL LATERAL TRIM CUTOUT SWITCH 1-17 .T.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Pilots’ Instrument Panel (Typical) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 LOW OIL PRESSURE WARNING LIGHTS AIR REFUELING LIGHTS ACCELEROMETER MAGNETIC STANDBY COMPASS CORRECTION CARD MAGNETIC STANDBY COMPASS CABIN ALTIMETER OIL PRESSURE GAGES ANTI-ICE CONTROL PANEL EVS CONTROL PANEL CLOCK FLIGHT COMMAND INDICATOR ALTIMETER 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 INDICATED AIRSPEED INDICATOR HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR MARKER BEACON LIGHT ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATOR AHRS ATTITUDE SELECT SWITCH MASTER CAUTION LIGHT EVS MONITOR VERTICAL VELOCITY INDICATOR MACH INDICATOR RADAR ALTIMETER STANDBY ALTIMETER INDICATOR RADAR ALTIMETER CAUTION LIGHT ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO (EPR) GAGES Figure 1-7 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-18 Change 4 .

T.O. 1B-52H-1 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 WING FLAP POSITION INDICATOR LANDING GEAR POSITION INDICATORS PANEL EXHAUST GAS TEMPERATURE (EGT) GAGES FUEL FLOWMETERS ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCHES TACHOMETERS CENTER OF GRAVITY/FUEL LEVEL ADVISORY SYSTEM (CG/FLAS) DISPLAY UNIT FUEL SCAVENGE SYSTEM PANEL FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT PANEL TOTAL FUEL FLOW INDICATOR LANDING GEAR LEVER CROSSWIND CRAB POSITION INDICATOR TOTAL FUEL QUANTITY INDICATOR 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 SAS CONTROL PANEL CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL RESET SWITCH OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE BOMB DOORS SWITCH LATERAL TRIM INDICATOR AUTOPILOT TURN CONTROL SELECTOR SWITCH WINDSHIELD WIPER SWITCH ENGINE FIRE DETECTION SYSTEM TEST SWITCH HEADING INDICATOR (GYRO) TRUE AIRSPEED INDICATOR LANDING GEAR CONTROL PANEL Figure 1-7 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-19/(1-20 blank) .

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This door can be opened from either side. 1B-52H-1 DOORS AND WINDOWS DESCRIPTION MAIN ENTRY DOOR One main entry door (figure 1-8) provides normal crew access into the aircraft. An entry light switch is located directly forward of the door at the head of the ladder. This door can be locked from the crew compartment side by disabling the door handle. the door will be closed and latched and the lockpin removed. To unlock the pressure bulkhead door.T. figure 1-1) at the aft end of the lower deck is provided for inflight access to the unpressurized portion of the fuselage. Rotating the door handle on either side of the door with the pin in place lifts the latching bar to the unlatched position and the door can be opened. To prevent injury to ground crewmembers. Entrance To Aircraft Figure 1-8 1-21 . The crew compartment will be depressurized before opening the door. This action disconnects the door handle from the vertical latching bar. To lock the pressure bulkhead door. The inside operating handle is located outside the ladder structure near the right front corner of the door (door closed) and is moved aft to unlatch and forward to latch the door. The locking handle is located inside the ladder structure near the left front corner of the door (door closed) and is moved to the left to lock and to the right to unlock the door. The door is located on the lower centerline of the fuselage ahead of the forward landing gear wheel well. The door can be opened and closed from both the inside and outside but can be locked and unlocked from the inside only. one of the pilots’ sliding windows will be opened approximately 2 inches before the main entry door is opened or closed.O. An entry ladder is installed on the inner side of the door. the handle is rotated until the hole in the door handle extension lines up with the holes on the end of the latching bar and the lockpin is inserted. The outside operating handle is flush with the surface of the door and is rotated laterally to latch or unlatch the door. The entry light operates on direct battery power. PRESSURE BULKHEAD DOOR A pressure bulkhead door (9.

Close the window by rolling it forward along the tracks to the forward stop and rotating the latching handle upward until the seal is pressed against its seat. and landings. rotate the handle downward and pull the window aft.O. To open the hatch. this section. Open the window by releasing the handle lockbolt. PILOTS’ SLIDING WINDOWS Pilot’s and copilot’s sliding windows (figure 1-9) may be opened or closed (as required) while on the ground. The sliding window assembly is made up of an electrically heated window. LOWER DECK FOLDING HATCH A lower deck folding hatch (16. tubular window frame. The hatch is held closed by two spring-loaded locking pins. the locking pins are withdrawn and the door is slid aft along permanent tracks. figure 1-183) is provided to cover the opening between the upper and lower decks. rubber seal. 1B-52H-1 AFT EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT HATCH An aft equipment compartment hatch (22. figure 1-181) is located over the main entry door and is used to prevent crewmembers from stepping on the main entry door while moving about on the lower deck. See ESCAPE HATCHES. A lockbolt within the handle retains the window in the closed position. penetration. UPPER DECK SLIDING HATCH An upper deck sliding hatch (10. planned unusual maneuvers. takeoff. the locking pin is withdrawn and the door is folded up to its stowed position under the instructor navigator’s seat where it is held in place by a spring-loaded latch. air refuelings. latching mechanism. . for description of the door. To open the hatch. The hatch is held closed by a spring-loaded locking pin.T. and an electrical plug connector. low level activity. 1-22 The upper deck sliding hatch will be opened and locked prior to starting engines. figure 1-1) also serves as an escape hatch for bailout.

T. 1B-52H-1 Pilots’ Sliding Windows 3 WINDOW IN OPEN POSITION 2 1 1 3 2 WINDOW IN CLOSED POSITION A31629 4 NOTE Pilot’s window shown copilot’s opposite 1 2 3 4 HANDLE LOCKBOLT WINDOW HANDLE FORWARD STOP ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Figure 1-9 1-23/(1-24 blank) .O.

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Check valves at each regulator isolate a ruptured line or converter to minimize the amount of oxygen which will be lost. A supply line from each converter connects with all oxygen regulators and portable oxygen bottle rechargers. However. Frost should not appear on the body of the converter but may appear on the hose where the pressure. CRU-69/A. When converter No. The instructor pilot. Oxygen system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-16. Converter No. 1 is located on the forward left side of the aft equipment compartment. After a converter has been filled and stabilized. This frost would appear due to liquid oxygen being supplied to the supply lines or oxygen being vented overboard due to excessive pressure. is provided at crew stations. and supply lines connect to the converter. When a converter is being filled. this section). defense instructor. 2. The oxygen system is supplied by three 25-liter 300 psi liquid oxygen converters (see SERVICING diagram. or CRU-73/A oxygen regulators are used at all crew stations. Flow equalizer check valves are provided in the interconnecting lines between the two converter supply lines to balance the demand on each converter. 1 normally supplies oxygen to all stations on the left side of the aircraft while converter No. 3 will provide oxygen to all stations connected to either or both systems. 1B-52H-1 OXYGEN SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The aircraft is equipped with a 300 psi liquid oxygen system. This system supplies all crew stations and the portable oxygen bottle rechargers. Converter No.T. 1 on the left side of the aft equipment compartment directly opposite converter No. CRU-69/A. a simulator is installed in the gaging circuit to simulate zero liters of liquid oxygen at the No. A pressure breathing portable oxygen bottle recharger (figure 1-10) is located near each of the six regular crew stations. in the event of malfunction in either or both systems. tenth crewmember. figure 1-12. pressure vent. A relief valve having a high pressure setting of 395 (±25) psi governs system pressure. the frost will remain until all liquid oxygen is lost. If the converter is malfunctioning due to no vacuum between the converter walls. An automatic pressure breathing diluter demand oxygen regulator. Converter No. converter No. 3 position.O. An oxygen converter and/or its fittings may frost over under certain conditions. See figure 1-11 for oxygen duration. 1 and 2 to provide additional oxygen in accordance with mission requirements. This frost or moisture should dissipate after the converter has stabilized. 3 is connected to the supply lines of converters No. or CRU-73/A regulator installed. 3 is located aft of converter No. the body of the converter and overboard vent line may be covered with frost or moisture due to the converter being warm or high moisture content in the air. NOTE Pressure indications as high as 420 psi may be attained due to pressure buildup in the heat exchanger line downstream of the liquid oxygen converter and check valve prior to use of oxygen. the allowable leakage due to evaporation loss is 2 liters per converter per 24-hour period. 2 supplies those stations on the right side. converter No. thus creating two separate systems. Also. Change 4 1-25 . and instructor navigator stations each have a panel with a type CRU-68/A. 3 is not installed. Type CRU-68/A.

O. 1B-52H-1 Oxygen Bottles and Recharger Points 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 RECHARGER HOSE CARRYING SLING ALTITUDE SELECTOR KNOB OXYGEN MASK HOSE CONNECTION OXYGEN PRESSURE GAGE A-6 OXYGEN BOTTLE PRESSURE DEMAND REGULATOR OXYGEN BOTTLE FILLER PORT Figure 1-10 1-26 .T.

2 11.1 3.0 26.4 68.1 25.7 17.4 12.6 12.5 65.1 1.1 60.9 25.6 14.4 31.1 41.5 5.5 5.000 40.4 11.8 26.2 40.5 28. Table values in bold print indicate diluter lever “normal oxygen”.4 31.2 50.8 5.3 13.4 47.1 68.8 45.9 70.6 18.7 50.9 62.2 5.9 16.1 15.6 24.3 29.0 15.4 73.7 32.O.1 47.3 60.8 7.2 7.4 17.1 2.2 30.1 62.9 62.0 35.5 21.4 47.2 21.7 28.9 41.0 21.9 57.9 19.7 15.0 BELOW 5 EME ERGE ENCY – DESC D CEND D TO ALT TITUDE NOT REQUIRIING O OXYGEN 70 NOTE • • • • Duration for crew of N crewmembers = 6 X duration for 6 crewmembers.000 31.2 26.8 31.7 10.2 4.4 11. N Table values in italics indicate diluter lever “100 oxygen”.5 7.1 2.5 17.4 22.3 24.0 21.7 20.5 22.9 36.4 44.4 68.0 44.1 32.3 18.1 1.1 20.1 41.4 15.3 15.3 15.4 35.1 20.0 23.4 27.7 20.5 10.000 73.8 35.4 40.6 26.0 56.2 36.4 8.5 10.4 26. 1B-52H-1 Oxygen Duration CREW MEMBER OXYGEN DURATION – HOURS CREW: 6 CABIN ALTITUDE – FEET TOTALIZER GAGE QUANTITY – LITERS 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 40. Three 25-liter liquid oxygen converters.6 42.0 45.2 21.8 3.8 36.5 30. Figure 1-11 Change 4 1-27 .5 55.7 15.5 11.0 70.9 36.7 3.T.2 7.4 15.5 19.4 14.8 10.9 57.4 16.5 45.2 40.9 36.7 10.0 35.8 36.5 15.0 54.3 2.4 5.0 15.6 48.2 8.1 47.4 73.7 8.1 68.6 30.7 37.5 5.2 35.2 22.6 23.2 31.5 19.6 57.3 11.9 25.7 10.1 4.6 55.0 15.2 26.2 50.000 53.3 11.000 73.9 47.2 8.2 5.6 52.8 52.2 5.4 52.6 7.4 52.5 10.1 65.2 4.5 29.6 41.8 38.4 20.5 17.4 46.1 62.2 6.000 24.5 37.5 14.0 10.9 3.8 34.4 40.4 26.0 14.6 18.6 57.8 31.4 10.8 51.4 25.2 8.4 49.000 20.4 12.2 33.9 41.6 52.7 23.0 30.2 5.

1B-52H-1 Oxygen System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 OXYGEN FLOW INDICATOR OXYGEN PRESSURE GAGE OXYGEN SUPPLY SHUTOFF LEVER REGULATOR DILUTER LEVER NO. 5 6 7 OXYGEN EMERGENCY TOGGLE LEVER OXYGEN QUANTITY GAGE PRESS-TO-TEST SWITCH LIQUID OXYGEN QUANTITY GAGE CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Oxygen FLOW Indicator A white blinker-type oxygen flow indicator which appears in the window with each inhalation to indicate the flow of oxygen.O. Figure 1-12 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-28 . 2 Oxygen Pressure Gage Calibrated in psi and indicates oxygen system pressure available at the regulator regardless of supply lever position. If no oxygen flows the white panel will not appear.T.

oxygen is supplied to the regulator. the lever should be placed in 100% OXYGEN position as a safety precaution. With the lever in 100% OXYGEN position. the regulator diluter lever should automatically move to 100% OXYGEN position or it may only move halfway between the NORMAL and 100% OXYGEN positions. the oxygen supply to the regulator is shut off to prevent any flow of oxygen from the regulator when not in use.O. NOTE For regulators other than the CRU-73/A. The lever should be left in 100% OXYGEN position at the end of a flight to prevent dust and lint from entering the regulator. on the CRU-73/A. With the lever in OFF position. a continuous flow of oxygen will result if the oxygen regulator is not being used and the oxygen supply shutoff lever is left in ON position above 30. 4 Regulator Diluter Lever With the lever in NORMAL OXYGEN position. When the supply shutoff lever is positioned OFF. With the diluter lever in 100% (CRU-73/A regulator off) neither cabin air nor oxygen will be available at the mask. At cabin altitudes above 30. NOTE Due to the automatic pressure breathing feature of the oxygen regulator.000 feet cabin altitude. but the crewmember will be breathing cabin air only and hypoxia will occur as cabin altitudes that require oxygen are reached. if the oxygen supply lever is off and the diluter lever is in normal. the regulator automatically supplies the proper mixture of oxygen and air at all altitudes. 3 CONTROLINDICATOR Oxygen Supply Shutoff Lever FUNCTION With the lever in ON position. The interlock feature automatically places the diluter valve in the 100% OXYGEN position when the supply lever is positioned to OFF.T. there is no restriction to breathing. do not force regulator diluter lever to NORMAL as this will break the diluter lever. 1B-52H-1 NO. When the oxygen supply shutoff lever is positioned OFF. the air intake port is closed and pure oxygen is supplied for emergencies regardless of the altitude. If a CRU-73/A regulator is installed. This condition will cause a rapid loss of oxygen.000 feet. it will incorporate an interlock between the oxygen supply shutoff lever and the regulator diluter valve. Figure 1-12 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-29 .

This condition could also result in extremely cold oxygen flowing to the mask. 1B-52H-1 Oxygen System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO.-TEST MASK positions. unless an unscheduled pressure increase is required. 6 Oxygen Quantity Gage Press-To-Test Switch When switch is pressed and held. When positive pressures are required. EMERGENCY position supplies oxygen at a continuous positive pressure for emergency use. the quantity gage needle should move to the 0 liter position. Figure 1-12 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-30 . oxygen flow is controlled automatically by the regulator. The dial is graduated from 0 to 75 liters in increments of 5 liters. AC power failure will render the gaging system inoperative. 3 converter position when that converter is not installed in the aircraft. The emergency toggle lever should remain in the NORMAL position at all times. the quantity gage needle should return to the initial position. The lever has EMERGENCY. when switch is released. TEST MASK position supplies positive oxygen pressure for checking the oxygen mask. it is mandatory that the oxygen mask be well fitted to the face.O. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 5 Oxygen Emergency Toggle Lever Used to supply a positive oxygen pressure to the mask for emergency use. 7 Oxygen Converter Quantity Gage The gage indicates the total quantity of liquid oxygen in the converters.T. Capacitance probes in the converters are utilized in a manner similar to the capacitance probes in the fuel quantity gaging system.-NORMAL . continued use of positive pressure under these conditions will result in the rapid depletion of the oxygen supply. Unless special precautions are taken to ensure no leakage. A capacitance simulator is installed in the system to provide an empty capacitance reading from the No. In NORMAL position.

The handle of this valve is stamped with PULL TO VENT-PUSH TO BLD-UP. Both types of valves are springloaded in such a manner that as the handle is moved over center. Functionally however. the vent line is blocked. On one type valve. NOTE Oxygen system buildup requires approximately 30 minutes for system stabilization. the converted gas and liquid lines are connected. With this valve installed. 1B-52H-1 BUILDUP AND VENT VALVE HANDLE A buildup and vent valve handle (figure 1-13) located in three places on the underside of the aft equipment compartment controls a dual purpose two-position three-port valve. When the handle is in SERVICE or PUSH TO BLD-UP position. When this handle is installed. Buildup and Vent Valve Handles Figure 1-13 1-31 . the valves are the same. the converter is vented to the atmosphere when being filled from the oxygen service cart. and system pressure builds up to deliver oxygen to each of the crew station regulators. Any excess oxygen introduced during filling or excess oxygen pressure will escape through the vent. The other type valve is different in that the handle rotates in a vertical plane (to the centerline of the valve). Servicing should be accomplished at least 30 minutes prior to engine start. the handle will travel to stop in the direction of travel.O. the exterior surface of the aircraft is appropriately stenciled with SERVICE and FILL positions. the handle rotates in a horizontal plane (to the centerline of the valve) through 120° from SERVICE to FILL position. Two types of valves are optional on the aircraft. exterior aircraft markings are not required.T. With the appropriate valve handle in either FILL or PULL TO VENT position.

2. position oxygen supply shutoff lever OFF and the regulator diluter lever to 100% OXYGEN. Pilot will ensure that oxygen is used as required. and a pressure demand regulator (13. and may have a clothing clip. 3.000 feet. NOTE During turbulent flight conditions. and IV. . The pressure demand regulator delivers 100% oxygen on all positions. The altitude selector knob has NORM.-30M. The bottle must be recharged within 2 hours after landing or purging will be necessary prior to recharging. figure 1-10). This position delivers oxygen under the higher pressure required to sustain life at these altitudes. resulting in a lowered gas pressure. figure 1-10). This position delivers oxygen under a slight positive pressure which is intended to combat mask leaks and possible altimeter lag. 1-32 Change 4 • If the oxygen bottle supply is depleted inflight and not recharged. Check connection of oxygen mask hose to oxygen supply hose and bailout bottle hose.000 feet.-EMER positions. Passive physical activity provides approximately twice this duration. crewmembers will wear Nomex flight gloves and the helmet with visor down. 5.-42M.000 feet.000 to 40. into a flash fire. figure 1-10). Regulator position. recharge the bottle above 50 psi prior to landing if time/conditions permit. when recharging a portable oxygen bottle. and physical activity will affect the duration of the oxygen supply. III. Dirt.000 to 42. to a maximum of 14 minutes at cabin pressure of 30. Therefore. 4. This time can vary from a minimum of 4 minutes at a cabin pressure of SL to 12.000 feet. and hand lotion all can act as fuel to the fire. cylinder carrying sling (8. altitude selector knob (9. Lowering of the gas pressure is not detrimental to crew consumption as long as the pressure remains above 150 psi. Place oxygen supply shutoff lever in ON position.O. NOTE • If the oxygen bottle supply is depleted inflight. figure 1-10). 1. make an AFTO Form 781 entry. The NORM position is used on all cabin altitudes up to 30. The 30M position is used at cabin altitudes from 30. NOTE Requirements for use of oxygen while performing various activities will be in accordance with current directives. The regulator consists of an oxygen pressure gage (11. Use of 100% oxygen will be as outlined in Sections II.000 feet and delivers oxygen only on demand. the 42M position is used. OXYGEN SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION Use the following procedure when the use of oxygen is required during flight: Crewmembers using upward ejection seats will ensure that oxygen supply hose is under seat armrest before hookup with the mask hose. regulator position of 30M – all with moderate physical activity.000 feet.T. NOTE At cabin altitudes above 30. Place oxygen regulator diluter lever in NORMAL or 100% OXYGEN as required. such as a spark. Frequently check the oxygen flow indicator.000 feet. figure 1-10). When flight is completed. This cools the gas and allows part of it to return to the liquid state. These gloves should be free of oil and grease. grease.000 to 45. the pressure gage should be monitored continuously when the bottle is in use. Therefore. Oxygen will rapidly accelerate any ignition source. regulator position of NORM. The EMER position further increases the pressure of the oxygen and should be used any time the cabin altitude exceeds 45. cabin altitude. The portable oxygen bottle assembly consists of a low pressure cylinder (12. The pressure gage is calibrated from 0 to 500 psi and is red-lined at 450 psi. From 42. 1B-52H-1 PORTABLE OXYGEN BOTTLES A portable oxygen bottle and recharger are located near each of the regular crew stations (figure 1-10). the lever should be placed in 100% OXYGEN position as a safety precaution. liquid oxygen sloshes inside the converter.

have been installed for use by the radar navigator. a hanging strap for the blower hose has been installed on the overhead floor beam at each position. communication. on the shelf on the radar navigators side panel. The PIHM will be connected to the aircraft communication system as soon as practical after boarding the aircraft. In addition. Navigator and Radar Navigator Stations The blower mounting bracket and electrical connector for the navigator’s system is located on the shelf just aft of the hot cup on the navigators side panel. When the blower is connected to the aircraft electrical source. blower assembly. The PIHM electrical connector and blower mounting for the copilot’s system is located on the copilot’s food and data storage box (5. The blower mounting bracket and electrical connector for the pilot’s system is located on the right side of the pilot’s ejection seat fixed rail assembly. and an electrical connector located on the lower side of the upper equipment rack just above the blower mounting bracket and just aft of the conventional weapon panel. and a ground intercommunication unit.O. NOTE • • The blower is to be used at all times when crewmember is wearing the integrated hood/mask subassembly. The Intercommunication Unit (IU) is for ground use only. 1B-52H-1 AIRCREW EYE/RESPIRATORY PROTECTION (AERP) SYSTEM BLOWER MOUNTING BRACKETS AND ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS The Aircrew Eye/Respiratory Protection (AERP) equipment is designed to protect the aircrew member from toxic chemical exposure to the head. The equipment is intended to provide protection without imposing operational or physiological burdens. figure 1-2). A blower mounting bracket. and respiratory tract. Pilot and Copilot Stations The AERP equipment. a strap assembly has been added next to the mounting bracket and electrical connector to hold the blower hose in place. chemical-biological filter and pigtail adapter hose assembly. EW Officer’s Station The electrical connector for the EW officer’s equipment is located on the lower edge of the diagonal rack.T. Blower mounting brackets and electrical connectors. neck. eyes. A hose modification kit has been added to the oxygen hose system on the outboard side of the navigator and radar navigators seats. it operates on 28 Vdc current. and oxygen systems. The equipment is designed to be used with the existing aircrew chemical defense ensemble. (14 figure 1-22). face. In addition. This allows the PIHM to be connected to the aircraft electrical. (figure 1-14) consists of a Protective Integrated Hood/ Mask (PIHM) assembly which integrates a pressure-demand oxygen mask. oxygen regulator. The blower mounting bracket is located on the floor below the electrical connector and near the food storage box. hood. Change 4 1-33 . degrading mission capability or combat effectiveness. (figure 1-15) have been installed at each crew position.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Protective Integrated Hood/Mask (PIHM) Assembly .Ground Configuration 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 HOOD/MASK SUBASSEMBLY COMMUNICATION CORD EXTERNAL DRINKING TUBE BAYONET CONNECTOR NECK DAM OXYGEN HOSE MANIFOLD SUBASSEMBLY SELECTOR KNOB INTERCOMMUNICATION UNIT(GROUND USE) QUICK DISCONNECT TO BLOWER CARRYING STRAP 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Figure 1-14 1-34 Change 4 QUICK-DISCONNECT TO AIRCRAFT OXYGEN/ BLOWER ARMORED QUICK DISCONNECT C2 FILTER EMERGENCY OXYGEN CONNECTOR FILTER BLOWER/MOUNT RELEASE LEVER BLOWER ASSEMBLY BLOWER ASSEMBLY BATTERY COMPARTMENT BLOWER FAN SPEED CONTROL ELECTRICAL CORD .

1B-52H-1 Blower Installation and Mounting Provisions 1 2 3 4 5 28 VDC CONNECTOR WITH DUST COVER BLOWER ELECTRICAL PLUG OXYGEN HOSE BLOWER BATTERY COMPARTMENT LATCH BLOWER BATTERY COMPARTMENT 6 7 8 BLOWER MOUNTING BRACKET AND SPRING LOADED RELEASE AIRCRAFT MOUNTING BRACKET BLOWER FILTER Figure 1-15 Change 4 1-35 .T.O.

ESS PCBP/E14 AC Bus 3 OXY QTY IND The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. ESS PILOT LLC/E9 Left ESS RADAR NAVIGATOR ABNS/B23 Rt. ESS EWO RLC/B22 Rt. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. 1B-52H-1 Oxygen System Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Aircrew Eye/Respiratory Protection (AERP) System Blowers Oxygen Quantity Indicator 11 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE CHEMICAL DEFENSE BLOWER COPILOT RLC/B21 Rt. ESS GUNNER LLC/E8 Left ESS NAVIGATOR ABNS/B22 Rt. ABNS LLC AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RLC Figure 1-16 1-36 Change 20 PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL .T. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.O.

Engine Fire Warning Lights Eight red engine fire warning lights (3. ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCHES Eight two-position pull-push fire shutoff switches (3. 5. Engine Fire Detector System Test Switch An engine fire detector system test switch (47. and is used to test continuity of the engine fire detection system. Pulling a switch to FIRE SHUTOFF position closes the engine firewall fuel shutoff valve for the corresponding engine regardless of throttle position. A fire warning light will illuminate when a fire detector unit on the affected engine is thermally actuated. The generator circuit breaker will open and. The engine firewall hydraulic shutoff valves use essential dc power for operation. illumination of the warning lights indicates that the warning light circuits have continuity. The aircraft is equipped with an electrically operated fire detection system. 1. Each engine is protected by thermally actuated fire detectors wired in parallel. 3. It is necessary to restart the generator as given in this section under GENERATOR OPERATION. figure 1-7) is located on the left side of the pilots’ instrument panel. See THROTTLES under ENGINE FUEL CONTROL SYSTEM. the respective generator control relay is tripped. this section. ENGINE FIRE DETECTION SYSTEM The aircraft is not equipped with an engine fire extinguishing system. or 7 opens the engine firewall hydraulic shutoff valve but does not restore generators on No. Pushing in the switch for engine No. The firewall fuel shutoff valves utilize essential dc power for operation. The switch is of the rotary type. the remaining battery automatically switches to supply power to all the fuel shutoff valves. figure 1-33) are an integral part of the fire shutoff switches on the pilots’ instrument panel. or 7.O.T. 5. has two positions TEST. the circuits are armed to fire warning.-NORMAL. on engine 1. 4. 6. 4. 1-37 . that bus tie circuit breaker will be closed. or 7 switch is pulled. 1B-52H-1 EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION ENGINE FIRE DETECTION SYSTEM ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCHES HAND FIRE EXTINGUISHERS FIREFIGHTING GLOVE CONTAINERS AXE FIRST AID KITS PARACHUTE STATIC LINE ESCAPE ROPES CENTRAL CAUTION SYSTEM MASTER CAUTION LIGHTS EMERGENCY ALARM SYSTEM ESCAPE HATCHES CRASH LANDING – DITCHING STATIONS DESCRIPTION For location of emergency equipment. 3. deenergizing the generator. The fire detector system uses left essential dc power. The system consists of separate fire detection circuitry for each engine and a test switch for simultaneous test of all circuits. In addition. 1. if the respective generator bus tie circuit breaker is open. when No. which provide fire warning signals through a light on the pilots’ instrument panel. Emergency equipment circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-21. 5. the respective engine firewall hydraulic shutoff valve is closed and. figure 1-33) on the upper portion of the pilots’ instrument panel control engine fire shutdown. In NORMAL position. 6. see figure 1-17. The outboard engines use left essential dc power from the left essential start bus and the inboard engines use right essential dc power from the right essential start bus. 5. failure of the lights to illuminate indicates that the warning light circuits are broken provided the bulbs glow on 1-37 1-37 1-37 1-38 1-40 1-40 1-40 1-40 1-40 1-40 1-41 1-43 1-43 1-47 press-to-test. Each of the T-shaped switches has a red press-to-test engine fire warning light in the end of the handle. 1. In the spring-loaded TEST position. 3. or 7 to normal operation. 3. When no other power is on the aircraft and one of the batteries goes dead. Conversely. Pushing a fire shutoff switch in to the NORMAL position restores the engine firewall fuel shutoff valve to normal control by the throttle.

Should the bottle be depleted due to a leakage problem the extinguisher should be replaced in its bracket and reported for replacement in the AFTO Form 781. The Halon bottles are 8 lbs in weight. even in small concentrations. NOTE In the event the HALON 1211 extinguisher starts to leak. noncorrosive agents are needed to prevent contamination. and is intended for use on board all aircraft where clean. The supply of extinguishing agent will last approximately 12-15 seconds of continuous use. the extinguishers are effective within a 7 to 8 foot range in combating all types of fires. 100% oxygen is recommended until after the extinguisher is rendered safe. bags of clothing.T. On decomposition. generators on engines 1 and 7 use left essential dc power and generators on engines 3 and 5 use right essential dc power. The closer the extinguisher is to the source of the fire. 1B-52H-1 Left wing engines use left essential dc power and right wing engines use right essential dc power. which in turn displaces the oxygen where the gas is present. the other extinguisher is located on the left equipment rack immediately behind the radar navigator. HALON 1211 has a low level of toxicity. seat cushions. When serviced. The pressure gage should be in the green zone.e. Inverting the extinguisher and depressing the trigger will only expend the extinguishing agent and deplete the bottle of its contents. 125 (±50) psi. 1-38 • Although HALON 1211 has a low level of toxicity. leaves no residue.O. The fire extinguishing agent is 3 to 4 times more effective and less toxic than chlorobromomethane (CB) type fire extinguisher agents. however the decomposed by-products of the fire are no less toxic and should be avoided when possible. it is most likely due to overpressurization and should stop leaking after normal pressure is reached. its decomposition products can be hazardous. especially deep seated fires (i. faintly sweet smelling. One extinguisher is located below the instrument console between the EW officer and gunner. The generator control power is the same as for normal control. If the extinguisher leaks. acrid odor. Normal precautions should be taken to include the use of 100% OXYGEN immediately. large amounts of plastic/rubber compounds) the greater its effectiveness. when fully charged the extinguisher holds 5 lbs of agent in liquid form because of pressurization. The agent is colorless. The agent turns to a gaseous state when exposed to air. figure 1-17) are installed in the crew compartment. HALON 1211 has a characteristic sharp. Procedures for the use and safety precautions are indicated on the fire extinguishers. . • HAND FIRE EXTINGUISHERS Two type HALON 1211 bromochlorodifloromethane (BCF) fire extinguishers (14. with the emergency toggle lever on the oxygen panel to the NORMAL position. A trigger-type handle located on top of the extinguisher permits the extinguisher to be operated with one hand. The portable oxygen bottle will be set at 30M or higher commensurate with aircraft altitude when used.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Emergency Equipment 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 COPILOT’S ESCAPE HATCH PILOT’S ESCAPE HATCH EW OFFICER’S ESCAPE HATCH GUNNER’S ESCAPE HATCH RADAR NAVIGATOR’S ESCAPE HATCH NAVIGATOR’S ESCAPE HATCH LIFERAFT DEFLATION TOOL (2 PLACES) ESCAPE ROPES (4 PLACES) 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 FIREFIGHTING GLOVE CONTAINER (2 PLACES) EMERGENCY ALARM LIGHT (3 PLACES) FIRST AID KITS (3 KITS. 2 PLACES) EMERGENCY KNIFE (PROVISIONS FOR) HAND AXE HALON 1211 FIRE EXTINGUISHER (2 PLACES) PARACHUTE STATIC LINE CONTAINER (ON RH RAIL) Figure 1-17 1-39 .

1-40 Change 12 A signal from any of these systems will cause both the master caution lights and central caution panel lights to illuminate. figure 1-17) is located at each of the upper deck escape hatches. ESCAPE ROPES An escape rope (8. If the reset switch adjacent to the central caution panel is pushed. The systems monitored through the master caution controllers with the exception of the flap warning horn (which is a ground function only) have caution lights on the central caution lights panel and are as follows: • Autopilot Disengaged • Main Tank Low • Tip Protection Gear Position Warning • Bomb Doors Not Latched • Hatches Not Locked Warning • Engine Oil Overheat • SAS Pitch Axis • SAS Yaw Axis • Generator Drive Overheat (4 generator drives) • Hydraulic Low Pressure (8 airplane system pumps and a rotary launcher pump) • Battery Not Charging (2 TR units) • AC Circuit Breaker Open (8 circuit breakers) • Bleed air overheat AXE A hand axe (13.000 feet). the master caution controllers will then continue to monitor the remaining systems. The ropes are provided to help personnel from the aircraft in any normal or crash attitude. If the condition that caused the signal is corrected. At high altitudes (above 14. The line is used to facilitate bailout of an injured crewmember through the navigator’s hatch. At lower altitudes. Both the master caution and central caution controllers will continue to monitor the remaining circuits for that system. The other container is located on the aft side of the navigator’s seat. figure 1-17) is provided for emergency escape by the crew and is stowed on the front of the defense instructor’s seat. Each rope is approximately 22 feet long. the light would continue to burn in the central caution panel. The master caution lights are reset by pressing the face of the lights. all the lights will go out and the signal will be locked out until the cause for the signal is corrected. a central caution lights panel having word warning lights. The system is so designed that both pilots are warned simultaneously and consists of two master caution lights. The ropes are designed to be of sufficient length to reach the ground when thrown through escape hatches.T. If the master caution light only were reset. two are located on the sidewall outboard of the EW officer’s seat and one on the upper right front corner of the right hand equipment rack near the navigator’s seat. figure 1-17) are installed in the aircraft. the master caution and central caution lights will continue to illuminate until the lights are reset. Reset- . the line should be connected directly to the ripcord T-handle of the parachute. The central caution system (figure 1-18) provides a centrally located means for monitoring all caution and warning indicators in the pilots’ compartment except the engine low oil pressure warning lights. figure 1-17) ejection seat rails. If the condition that caused the signal is not corrected.O. the master caution and central caution lights will go out and the master caution controllers will again monitor all of the systems. A signal from one of the system circuits will cause the respective central caution lights and the two master caution lights to illuminate. 3/4 inches in diameter. The ropes at the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations are contained within flaps of the lining which are snap-fastened and are marked ESCAPE ROPE. with approximately six inches of the free end painted yellow. the line should be connected to the automatic parachute arming lanyard. and a series of controllers that monitor various systems and control the various lights. PARACHUTE STATIC LINE A parachute static line is stowed in a pouch installed on the aft side of the radar navigator’s (15. figure 1-17) with asbestos gloves for firefighting are installed in the crew compartment. The ropes at the pilots’ stations are contained in canvas bags having zipper openings and are installed below the outboard side of the escape hatch aft of the side windows. FIRST AID KITS Three first aid kits (11. The ropes are located on the sidewalls just below the hatches. The last four systems are also monitored through four central caution controllers which control four malfunction lights on the central caution panel. A chopout area is marked with yellow-orange paint on the sidewall outboard of the EW officer’s seat. One container is located on the copilot’s ejection seat fixed rail cross tube on the aft side of the seat. 1B-52H-1 FIREFIGHTING GLOVE CONTAINERS CENTRAL CAUTION SYSTEM Two containers (9.

The lights have a ‘‘word warning’’ panel which. at which time. The amber and green lights have translucent colored lettering on a black background. PUSH TO RESET on an amber background. A signal from either one of the wing tank level warning lights will cause only the wing tanks caution light to illuminate. 1B-52H-1 ting the controllers and resetting the lights in either the master caution or central caution panel will not affect the indicators located on the individual control panels for these systems. The wing tanks caution light will continue to monitor the other wing tank level light. but does not cause the master caution lights to illuminate. All caution panel lights may be tested by pressing the central caution test switch located to the left of the central caution panel. the four bottom lights are green. The master caution lights can be reset by pressing the face of the lights. Pressing the test switch also causes the marker beacon indicator lights to illuminate. These systems are as follows: • Bomb Release • Bomb Doors Open • Aft Battery End of Life • Forward Battery End of Life • Fuel in Cabin Manifold • Fuel in Main Manifold • Starter Not Off (switch in START) • Stores Jettison • Time to Go = 0 • IFF Mode 4 • [EV] Fuel Enrichment Valve Open MASTER CAUTION LIGHTS Two rectangular amber indicator lights (18. The red lights have black lettering on a red translucent background. they cannot be reset by either master caution or central caution. For further information on the origination and cause of malfunction signal to these lights. Consequently. The reset switch is a pushbutton type and is spring-loaded to the release position. Central Caution Panel Test Switch A central caution panel test switch below the central caution panel reset switch provides a means of testing the central caution panel lights. see the respective systems discussions. figure 1-7) with an integral push-to-reset switch are installed on the pilots’ instrument panel directly in front of each pilot. is monitored by a central caution controller which controls a light on the central caution panel. One system.O. The master caution lights will not indicate malfunction on the reset channel until the malfunction has been remedied. Depressing the reset switch will send dc power to the controllers. shows black letters MASTER CAUTION. when illuminated. Central Caution Panel Reset Switch A central caution panel reset switch (41. The switch is a pushbutton type and spring-loaded to the release position. they will go out and be ready for additional indication of malfunction in the remaining monitored systems. the wing tank level warning system. The lights are designed to show no lettering when not illuminated. The panel contains 30 caution lights with each light being covered by lens denoting systems nomenclature. supplying a ground for the lights. A signal to one of these lights will cause the light to illuminate until the cause for the signal is corrected. For further information on origination and cause of malfunction signal to these lights. refer to the respective system descriptions. The master caution light bulbs may be checked by pressing on the face of the lights.T. Depressing the test switch causes all lights on the central caution panel to illuminate except the battery end of life lights. Central Caution Panel The central caution panel (figure 1-18) located in the center of the pilots’ instrument panel provides a visual indication to the pilots of a malfunction or a certain condition in a particular system. The pilots should note the malfunctioning lights since resetting the central caution panel will cause all resettable lights to go out. The top four lights on the panel are red. The master caution lights illuminate at the same time as the indication in the malfunctioning system occurs and remain on as long as the malfunction continues unless it is reset. figure 1-7) adjacent to the central caution panel provides a means of resetting the resettable lights on the central caution panel. Change 20 1-41 . The battery end of life lights will illuminate provided the interphone power switch is placed in ON position. causing all resettable lights on the caution panel and the master caution lights to go out. and the remaining lights are amber in color. The master caution lights serve to warn that one of the systems which they monitor (figure 1-18) has a malfunction. There are 13 systems which have indicator lights on the central caution panel that are not monitored through any controller. Pushing the reset switch will cause the wing tanks caution light to go out and the signal will be locked out until the cause for the signal is corrected.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Central Caution System MASTER CAUTION PUSH TO RESET MASTER CAUTION PUSH TO RESET MASTER CAUTION LIGHT CONTROLLER MASTER CAUTION LIGHT CONTROLLER WING FLAP WARNING TO RESET CAUTION CONTROLLERS CENTRAL CAUTION LEGEND LIGHT RESET TEST NONFUNCTIONAL SPARE TEST ALL LIGHTS SAS YAW AXIS AUTOPILOT SYSTEM MAIN TANK QUANTITY SYSTEM TIP GEAR WARNING BOMB DOOR SYSTEM HATCH POSITION WARNING STARTER SWITCHES CABIN MANIFOLD SCAVENGE SYSTEM MAIN MANIFOLD SCAVENGE SYSTEM ENGING OIL TEMPERATURE SELECTOR SWITCH SPARE SPARE YAW SAS OFF PITCH SAS OFF AUTO PILOT DISENGAGED GENERATOR OVERHEAT−RESET MAIN TANK LOW TPG NOT IN TRAIL BOMB DOORS NOT LATCHED HATCHES NOT LOCKED STARTER NOT OFF FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD FUEL IN MAIN MANIFOLD ENGINE OIL OVERHEAT SPARE MISSILE AND SPECIAL WEAPONS JETTISON SYSTEMS STORES JETTISON TIME TO GO = 0 OAS SPARE WING TANKS RESET HYDRAULICS RESET BATTERY RESET HOT AIR AC CIRCUIT BKR OPEN−RESET FWD BATTERY END OF LIFE AFT BATTERY END OF LIFE IFF MODE 4 FEV OPEN BOMB RELEASED BOMB DOORS OPEN SAS PITCH AXIS DRIVE OVERHEAT GENERATOR DRIVE CAUTION CONTROLLER DETECTOR (4 TOTAL) WING TANK QUANTITY SYSTEMS (2 TOTAL) HYDRAULIC LOW HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS PRESSURE (8 PUMPS 7 ROTARY LAUNCHER CAUTION CONTROLLER PUMP) BATTERY BATTERY NOT CHARG− ING RELAYS (2 TOTAL) CAUTION CONTROLLER WING TANKS CAUTION CONTROLLER BLEED AIR OVERHEAT WARNING LIGHT AC CIRCUIT BKR AC CIRCUIT BREAKERS (8 TOTAL) CAUTION CONTROLLER FORWARD BATTERY DETECTOR AFT BATTERY DETECTOR IFF TRANSPONDER FUEL ENRICHMENT VALVE BOMB RELEASE SYSTEM [EV] BOMB DOOR SYSTEM RED LIGHTS YELLOW LIGHTS GREEN LIGHTS B62843 Figure 1-18 1-42 Change 20 .

Removing a hatch without first disconnecting the arming link will fire the catapult safety pin pull initiator and leave the ejection seat catapult in an armed condition. will unlatch and open the respective hatch. 2. in the pilots’ PREPARATION FOR FLIGHT checklist. 1B-52H-1 EMERGENCY ALARM SYSTEM NOTE The interphone is considered the primary means for crew warning. a flasher mechanism flashes all alarm lights at a frequency of approximately 30 to 60 times a minute. EVS monitor optical light filters stowage provisions are installed on the pilot’s and copilot’s escape hatches. The light circuits in the pressurized compartment are separate from those in the unpressurized part of the aircraft. figure 1-17) in the aircraft are located at each crew station equipped with ejection seats. The lights are controlled by a guarded ALERT. In ABANDON position. Hatch release handles. The hatches are of metal construction and have conventional lining. All lights normally use power from the aft battery bus and therefore operate regardless of battery switch position. The hatches are part of the various seat ejection systems and will be opened automatically by a gas-powered thruster when the appropriate seat ejection mechanism is actuated. The navigator’s and radar navigator’s escape hatches have EVS sensor turret fairings attached to the lower side. This light will not press-to-test. Section II. Footrests with mike switches are installed on the inside of the lower deck hatches. Change 16 1-43 . 3. 5. figure 1-17) are equipped with aerodynamic hatch Ground emergency egress handles have been installed at the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations. red alarm lights are located in the forward part of the bomb bay. Crew Compartment Hatches The escape hatches (1.-OFF. for information concerning use of the lights. only the pilots’ hatches have windows which provide side vision when the aircraft is in a banked attitude and provide better vision during air refueling. the emergency alarm system is designed to warn personnel while off interphone. and aft equipment compartment. ESCAPE HATCHES lifters which are projected into the windstream as the hatch is unlocked during the automatic ejection sequence. The aft upward escape hatches (3 and 4. painted yellow-orange. The aerodynamic hatch lifters ensure hatch jettisoning during automatic ejection sequence regardless of crewmember order of ejection. NOTE Use of the ground emergency egress handle unlocks the escape hatch. The hatches may be released manually for use in emergency exit or entrance. NOTE At airspeeds in excess of 300 knots IAS.T. The hatches (figure 1-19) are designed to facilitate pressurization of the crew compartment. In addition. on the upper part of the instrument console at the defense station. See EMERGENCY SIGNALS. Red emergency alarm lights are located on the upper part of the forward instrument console at the navigators’ station. 4.-ABANDON emergency alarm switch (figure 1-6) on the right side of the aisle stand. yet be jettisonable to allow the ejection seat to be catapulted through the hatch opening for emergency escape. When the switch is in ALERT position. It does not cause the hatch to fall away from the aircraft at speeds less than 90 knots. and 6. and on the upper part of the right electronic rack in the upper deck walkway in the pressurized crew compartment. when pulled away from the hatch. It does not affect the functional reliability of the escape system. The lights also glow continuously when either the pilot’s or copilot’s control column is stowed during the ejection sequence. This condition is considered normal and does not constitute a hazard to crewmembers. All lights use forward battery power when the emergency battery switch is in EMERGENCY. the aft upper escape hatch lifter(s) may extend approximately 2 inches. figure 1-17) and the downward escape hatches (5 and 6. are provided on the inside of all upper hatches and.O. Activation of the handle unlocks the escape hatch above the respective crew positions without the crew member rotating the arming lever thus exposing the catapult firing trigger to inadvertent activation (see figure 1-22). aft wheel well. An emergency alarm monitor light (figure 1-6) for the pilots is provided on the right side of the aisle stand. the lights glow continuously.

A lockpin inspection window is provided in each hatch to allow checking of the lockpin. and the latch hooks rotate as the hatch is forced away from the fuselage. Gas expansion fires the hatch jettisoning initiator (33. a signal is also sent to the master caution light controller causing the master caution light to illuminate. when pulled upward. Rotation of the handle will fire an initiator in the ground emergency egress handle assembly. The light has a ‘‘word warning’’ panel which.O. Release handles for the aft upper hatches are flush-mounted to the side of the lifters. The energizing circuit for the flight loads data recorder uses the hatch warning light circuit so that when the hatches not closed and locked light is out (hatches all closed) the recorder operates. Flush-mounted external hatch release handles are provided for the forward upper hatches. for additional information. during actuation of the gaspowered thruster mechanism on those hatches provided with hatch lifters. a pair of latch pins is driven into the throat of each latch hook by rotation of torque tubes within the hatch. The inside handles for the upper deck hatches are inside a transparent flap of the lining. the torque tube rotates to withdraw the latch pin from the latch hooks. or MASTER CAUTION LIGHT. Aft Equipment Compartment Hatch The aft equipment compartment hatch (22. When in proper position. pulls the hinge pins and forces the forward end of the hatch into the airstream causing the hatch to jettison. At all stations. pushrods on the torque tubes force the hatch lifter into the windstream to ensure positive jettisoning of the hatch. thus unlocking the escape hatch. shows amber letters HATCHES NOT CLOSED AND LOCKED on a black background. figure 1-24) and the hatch jettisoning thruster (10. figure 1-24). The assembly is illuminated by red background/ edge lights that operate on essential dc power. when illuminated. The hatch door is hinged at the forward end and serves as an access door for the aft equipment compartment. 6. the lockpin will be disengaged from the torque tube. a paint stripe shows on the lockpin adjacent to its spring cartridge. actuation of any of the hatch 1-44 Change 12 release handles or the gas-powered thruster mechanism will perform the same function to unlock the hatch. A flush-mounted handle on the outside of the door is used for normal opening and closing of the door during ground operations. A hatch jettison handle (figure 1-19) painted orange-yellow. . and pulling and rotating the ground emergency egress handle clockwise (cw) for the handle at the EW officer’s station and counterclockwise (ccw) for the handle at the gunner’s station. In addition. The battery will be depleted if the GROUND EGRESS circuit breakers remain IN for an extended period without aircraft or external power. A spring-loaded lockpin retains the torque tube in the latched position. When the latch hooks are in the latched position. as applicable. 1B-52H-1 Activation of the ground emergency egress system to unlock the escape hatch is accomplished by removing safety pin No. A safety lockpin is provided to securely retain the handle in the stowed position. is installed near the aft right side of the hatch and. Hatches Not Closed and Locked Light An amber light on the central caution panel (figure 1-18) warns when any of the six escape hatches or the main entrance door in the crew compartment or the aft equipment compartment hatch is not closed and locked. The latch pins overlap the lip of the latch hook approximately 1/8 inch when properly latched. Each hatch is provided with six rotary latch hooks which engage latch arms on the fuselage. sheet 2 of figure 1-1) serves as an escape hatch for bailout. When the light illuminates.T. These handles may be used for emergency entrance by pulling away from the hatch (figure 3-1). The hatch release handles at the radar navigator’s and navigator’s stations may be painted with yellow and black stripes or a solid gray color. See CENTRAL CAUTION SYSTEM. this section.

O. 1B-52H-1 Escape Hatches LATCH HOOK − TYPICAL SIX PLACES HATCH RELEASE HANDLE HATCH LOCKPIN INSPECTION WINDOW THERMAL CURTAIN EVS MONITOR OPTICAL LIGHT FILTER STORAGE STRAPS INBD FWD PILOT’S HATCH (Copilot’s Opposite) SUNSHADE IN BD LATCH HOOK − TYPICAL SIX PLACES FWD HATCH LOCKPIN INSPECTION WINDOW HATCH RELEASE HANDLE EW OFFICER’S HATCH (Gunner’s Opposite) A31636 Figure 1-19 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-45 .T.

T. 1B-52H-1 Escape Hatches (Cont) HATCH JETTISON HANDLE SAFETY LOCKPIN AFT EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT HATCH WALKWAY HATCH FOOTREST INTERPHONE FOOT SWITCH RADAR NAVIGATOR’S HATCH (Navigator’s Opposite) HATCH LOCKPIN INSPECTION WINDOW HATCH RELEASE HANDLE LATCH HOOK − TYPICAL SIX PLACES LATCH PIN TB U O FW LATCH HOOK (LONG LIP) D LOCK ARM D LOCKPIN LATCH PIN PAINT STRIPE MINIMUM OVERLAP 1/8" BETWEEN HOOK AND PIN LATCH HOOK DETAIL Typical All Hooks − Shown Locked LATCH ARM LOCKPIN SIGHTING SHIELD LOCKPIN DETAIL Typical All Crew Compartment Hatches − Shown Locked A31637 Figure 1-19 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-46 .O.

the upper end of the aft hammock will be hooked to a shackle mounted over the upper deck access hatch marked DITCHING HAMMOCK ATTACHMENT & HOIST FITTING. each is marked AFT on the aft side and FWD on the forward side. The center hammock is stowed within a flap of the lining adjacent to the air refueling receptacle marked DITCHING STATION HAMMOCK STOWAGE. having a single attachment point at the top and two attachment points at the bottom. The three crash landing – ditching hammocks are normally stowed when not in use. the lower attachment fitting on the hammock and the receptacle in which it fits on the left side of the aircraft are both painted yellow-orange to aid in correct matching. For installation. To facilitate correct installation of the hammock. The fittings on the bottom of the hammock are studs which snap into flush receptacles on the walkway floor.T. three crash landing and ditching hammocks (figure 1-20) are provided for use of lower deck crewmembers when necessary. but may be installed in the upper deck walkway between the pilots’ station and the defense station for crash landing or ditching. All three hammocks are of nylon webbing construction. NOTE • • Care should be taken when inserting the studs in the receptacles that the correct installation is being made since once the fittings are inserted. marked FWD DITCHING STATION HAMMOCK STOWAGE. In addition. The forward hammock is stowed within a flap of the lining. The hammocks are designed to withstand ultimate load factors of 8 g’s forward and down and 4 g’s up and aft when properly installed. The forward and center hammocks remain fastened at their upper ends at all times and are stowed within the compartment lining above the installation location. The crew bunk is not stressed for high g loads and should not be occupied during crash landing or ditching. The upper deck access hatch grating should be closed to allow easy access to the receptacles for the aft hammock. The aft hammock is stowed separately in a box marked DITCHING HAMMOCK STOWAGE next to the defense instructor’s seat and will be fastened at both upper and lower ends when installing. snap-fastened on the aft edge of the flap. The hammocks are designed for the occupant to sit on the aft side and are provided with a manual safety belt to secure the occupant in position. snap-fastened on the inboard edge of the flap. This gives provisions for nine crewmembers. 1B-52H-1 CRASH LANDING – DITCHING STATIONS All crew seats on the upper deck of the crew compartment have been stressed for use as ditching and crash landing stations.O. it is necessary to use a screwdriver in the screw aft of the fitting in order to release the fitting. In addition. 1-47 .

1B-52H-1 Crash Landing – Ditching Hammocks 1 2 3 4 5 FORWARD HAMMOCK STOWAGE CRASH LANDING – DITCHING HAMMOCKS CENTER HAMMOCK STOWAGE AFT HAMMOCK SUPPORT SHACKLE AFT HAMMOCK STOWAGE BOX 6 7 8 9 10 Figure 1-20 1-48 SAFETY BELT (TYPICAL) UPPER DECK SLIDING HATCH ATTACHMENT RECEPTACLE RELEASE SCREW HAMMOCK ATTACHMENT STUD .O.T.

ESS Caution Lights for Wing Tanks. ESS Start Bus Rt. ESS Start Bus Rt. ESS Start Bus Left ESS Start Bus Left ESS Start Bus CPCBP/B7 CPCBP/B8 CPCBP/B9 CPCBP/B10 CPCBP/B11 CPCBP/B12 Left ESS Left ESS Left ESS Rt.T. Batteries. ESS Rt. Generators. 1B-52H-1 Emergency Equipment Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Central Caution System Master Caution Lights and Controllers CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE MISCELLANEOUS – MA CAUTION LIGHT CPCBP/E12 Rt. ESS Start Bus Rt. ESS Rt. TR EMER ALARM SYS – BAILOUT WARN CONTR PCBP/E24 Aft Batt (Fwd Batt when emergency battery switch is set to EMERGENCY) ENGINE – FIRE DET INBD ENG FIRE DET OUTBD ENG RLC/C13 LLC/D22 Rt. Hydraulics and Associated Controllers CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL TR DC CPCBP/E11 Rt. ESS Emergency Alarm System Engine Fire Detectors and Fire Warning Lights Engine Fire Shutoff Switches and Firewall Shutoff Valves Fuel Firewall Shutoff Valves FIREWALL FUEL SHUTOFF VALVES – ENGINE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Hydraulic Firewall Shutoff Valves FIREWALL HYDRAULIC SHUTOFF VALVES – ENGINE 1 3 4 5 6 7 Figure 1-21 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-49 . ESS Caution Lights for AC Generator Circuit Breakers. and Associated Controllers CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL ESS DC CPCBP/E9 Rt. ESS Left ESS CPCBP/D1 CPCBP/D2 CPCBP/D3 CPCBP/D4 CPCBP/D5 CPCBP/D6 CPCBP/D7 CPCBP/D8 Left ESS Start Bus Left ESS Start Bus Rt.O.

ESS Gunner Position LEFT ESSENTIAL DC POWER – GROUND EGRESS LLC/E7 Left ESS MISCELLANEOUS – HATCH WARN PCBP/E16 Left TR Hatches Not Closed and Locked Light 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list.O. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.T. 1B-52H-1 Emergency Equipment Circuit Protection and Location (Cont) EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Ground Emergency Egress Handle Assembly Lights EWO Position DC – GROUND EGRESS RLC/E32 Rt. LLC PCBP LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-21 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-50 .

However. can be found under INTEGRATED HARNESS in this section for both upward ejection seats and downward ejection seats.T. These hazards are: LIGHTWEIGHT • • • Increased injury risk as ejection speed increases. These risks increase as body weight increases above 201 pounds. HEAVYWEIGHT • Increased injury risk at low altitude/adverse attitude conditions. ejection in excess of 400 KIAS increases the risk of injury from limb flail and seat structural failure. • • For aircrew members with body weights below 132 pounds.O. For step-by-step procedures and minimum altitudes for operating the escape systems. Also. Increased risk of spinal compression injury. Although operation is simple. ejecting the seat. Ejection seat systems. increase the airspeed and the high and low extremes of altitude at which safe bailout can be accomplished. spinal compression injury risk increases for all ejections with aircrew members weighing below 132 pounds. Seat is less stable with lightweight crewmember. Automatic operation of a system includes stowing the control column. Use of these systems will greatly increase the crewmember’s chances of safe escape from the aircraft in time of emergency. Release from the seat and opening the parachute can be accomplished manually by overriding the automatic system. releasing the occupant from the seat. Section III. The downward ejection seat systems and the EW and gunner seats also provide automatic controlled man-seat separation. The ejection seats are qualified for nude body weights from 132 to 201 pounds (5th to 95th per- centile male population -1950 Database). Additionally. These risks increase as body weight decreases below 132 pounds. fully automatic operation can greatly reduce the time required for seat separation and chute deployment at low altitudes and make safe descent from high altitudes possible even if loss of consciousness occurs. jettisoning the hatch. A detailed description of the automatic opening parachute. For aircrew members with body weights above 201 pounds. Change 13 1-51 . and activating the automatic parachute opening device. with their automatic features. Every crewmember who might possibly be in a position to use an automatic escape system should be familiar with the system and have confidence in it. parachute landing fall injuries increase for all ejections with aircrew members weighing above 201 pounds. if you do not know the system well enough to operate it quickly and correctly or if distrust of the automatic features causes you to manually override them. which should be considered a part of each escape system. see BAILOUT. Certain hazards are associated with ejections at or near the extremes of the qualified weight range. • Increased injury risk at high speeds due to possible seat structural failure. deployment of a drogue parachute. you may lessen your chances in an already dangerous situation. 1B-52H-1 ESCAPE SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION UPW ARD EJECTION SEATS DOWNW ARD EJECTION SEATS INTEGRA TED HARNESS SYSTEM AUTOMA TIC PARACHUTE GLOBAL SURVIV AL KITS LIFERAFT DEFLATION TOOL SAFETY BELT 1-51 1-52 1-64 1-74 1-74 1-78 1-79 1-80 DESCRIPTION The aircraft escape systems utilize ejection seats. ejection attempts above 340 KIAS can result in an increased injury risk due to limb flail and drogue chute opening shock. • Increased injury risk from parachute landing fall.

Escape systems circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-29. 1B-52H-1 Figures 1-22. Figure 1-24 shows a schematic of the upward ejection seat system along with a sequence of events relative to the ejection operation. jettison the hatch. unlatch the pilot and copilot seat drogue parachute arms. An integrated harness release mechanism provides a means for separating the safety belt and parachute harness from the seat automatically after ejection. Each seat can be positioned electrically up and down. and ballistic lines are equipped with disconnects to permit separation of the lines when the seat is ejected. in addition. See INTEGRATED HARNESS. The alarm system is energized to signal ‘‘abandon’’ when either the pilot’s or copilot’s control column stows. the seat has gathered such momentum that excessive impact is produced when the seat initially lifts the seat occupant. Do not use any form of shock absorbing device other than the survival kit and/or seat cushion designated as standard equipment for the ejection seat. A modified parachute and a specially designed manual safety belt is installed in the harness release fittings.O. A series of ballistic devices and mechanical linkages incorporated in the seat when initiated by either arming lever will lock the inertia reel. Additional cushioning may also raise the seat occupant to such a height that his arms will not be held by the arm retainers on either armrest. stow the control column. this section. When utilizing the ejection seat in these circumstances. Manual operation of the integrated harness release will disengage the safety belt and parachute and. this section. The EW officer and gunner are provided with upward ejection seats. For a detailed discussion of seat ejection sequences. and tilted by seat positioning switches. UPWARD EJECTION SEATS NOTE For description of downward ejection seats. the arms and container swing aft of the seat and deploy the drogue parachute. the parachute is located in a container mounted above the seat on spring-loaded swinging arms.T. fore and aft. Chance of vertebral injury is increased considerably by the seat occupant sitting on too thick a compressible mass. 1-52 Change 13 Each seat is equipped with folding armrests which may be folded by releasing the armrest catch (11. Color coding makes it possible to correlate the actuation of controls and mechanisms with the sequence of events. On the pilot’s and copilot’s seat. Sequence of operation of the seat ejection system is the same as the pilots’ with the exception of having no control column stowage thruster and having a man-seat separator. see DOWNWARD EJECTION SEATS. 1-23. The seat controls are operated in the same manner as the pilot’s and copilot’s seat controls. are used to prepare the seat for ejection. . As the seat leaves the rails. one in each armrest. A catapult is incorporated to eject the seat from the aircraft and is fired by squeezing either of the firing triggers located inside of each arming lever. The action is fully automatic and requires no action on the part of the crewmember. The seats are located at the aft of the upper deck and face to the aft of the aircraft. figure 1-22). Arming levers. thus separating the seat from the occupant. Provisions are made to accommodate a survival kit and back-type automatic opening parachute and integrated harness. the numbers correspond to the callouts on other sheets of the illustration. thus exposing them to possible injury from flailing in the windblast following ejection. Electrical. will disengage the parachute arming lanyard. One sheet of each illustration contains a detailed sequence of events and is numbered. Each seat is equipped with a headrest and an inertia reel which assist the occupant in maintaining position during ejection. After this amount of travel. On the EW and gunners seat the drogue parachute is attached to the bottom of the seat and is deployed by a lanyard attached to the intermediate rail which allows drogue parachute deployment. oxygen. Utilizing the wrong seat cushions and/or survival kit or too much cushioning material creates a definite injury hazard and may position the seat occupant where it is difficult to reach the controls. To do so would create a definite possibility of serious injury during ejection and/or crash landing/ditching. see figure 1-24. The seat is equipped with a drogue parachute and deployment mechanism to positively separate the seat from the seat occupant after the seat leaves the rails. and arm the seat for ejection. Figure 1-26 gives the same information for the downward seats. The pilots’ positions in the crew compartment are equipped with forward-facing bucket-type ejection seats designed to provide a safe and effective means of bailout from the aircraft. it will not exert a direct force on the occupant until the seat has traveled 2 or 3 inches upward. and 1-25 show the configuration of the seats and the component parts with which the crewmember should be familiar in order to properly check his seat. for additional information.

2) INSPECTION DOOR AND WINDOW DROGUE PARACHUTE CONTAINER ASSEMBLY HEADREST ARMRESTS FLIGHT SAFETY PINS NO. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat INBOARD 3 BLOWER MOUNTING BRACKET 4 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR OXYGEN HOSE RETAINER STRAP 5 DETAIL 1 6 14 SEE DETAIL 1 13 7 8 9 PILOT/COPILOT SEAT 1 5 2 6 2 INITIATOR SAFETY PIN 12 11 1 A R M I N I T I I N G A T O R 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 10 ARMING INITIATOR (ACCOMMODATES MAINTENANCE SAFETY PIN NO.O.T. 1 FLIGHT SAFETY PINS (INBOARD SIDE OF SEAT BUCKET) AERP BLOWER MOUNTING BRACKET AND ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR (INBOARD EJECTION SEAT RAIL OF PILOT’S SEAT ONLY) Figure 1-22 (Sheet 1 of 8) Change 12 1-53 . 1 (ARMING LEVERS) CATAPULT FIRING TRIGGER ARMING LEVER RELEASE ARMING LEVER SEAT POSITIONING SWITCHES ARMREST CATCH A31640 SURVIVAL KIT RELEASE HANDLE POUCH FOR NO.

T. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat (Cont) 3 15 PILOT/COPILOT SEAT 17 (TYPICAL) 16 20 15 16 17 18 19 20 PARACHUTE INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE HANDLE SURVIVAL KIT CATAPULT INITIATOR SAFETY PIN MANUAL INITIATOR CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL LEVER CATAPULT INITIATOR SAFETY PIN-PULL CYLINDER 19 Figure 1-22 (Sheet 2 of 8) 1-54 Change 12 18 A31641 .O.

23 5 6 8 9 7 21 1 2 10 2 INITIATOR SAFETY PIN 22 EW OFFICER/GUNNER SEAT A R M I N I T I I N G A T O R 21 22 23 24 A31642 INERTIA REEL CONTROL HANDLE DRAG PLATE MAN-SEAT SEPARATOR STRAPS INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE INITIATOR (ACCOMMODATES MAINTENANCE SAFETY PIN NO. 1 Flight Safety Pins not shown.T.O. 1B-52H-1 NOTE: 4 Both No. 5) Figure 1-22 (Sheet 3 of 8) Change 12 1-55 .

1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat (Cont) NOTE: Modified parachute and survival kit not shown. 23 13 6 5 24 7 EW OFFICER/GUNNER SEAT 10 21 11 16 22 20 19 18 A31643 Figure 1-22 (Sheet 4 of 8) 1-56 Change 12 .O.T.

and an egress system technician is not available. 1B-52H-1 NOTE Items not requiring description. Actuation of the catapult firing trigger will result in an ejection of the seat. The seat can be considered completely safe only after the arming levers have been stowed. 1 (Arming Levers) Each upward ejection seat is provided with two flight safety pins. the catapult is fired and the seat is ejected. 1 safety pins is removed. Caution will be used to avoid inadvertent actuation of the catapult firing trigger. NO. 1 pin has been removed arms the seat. 6 Flight Safety Pins. The two pins (lockpins) are attached to each end of a single red streamer and are inserted in the arming levers through holes in the armrest structure. Figure 1-22 (Sheet 5 of 8) Change 12 1-56A . or those described elsewhere are not included in the following sheets. In addition. each upward ejection seat is provided with three safety pins (numbered 2.O. However. Attempting to stow the arming levers should be done only as a last resort. to be used by the flight crew member to prevent inadvertent initiation of the seat ejection sequence. • • • 7 Catapult Firing Trigger The seat can be armed any time one of the two No.) Lowering the armrests will deactivate the firing triggers by adjusting a series of mechanical linkages. Allows both visual observation and installation/removal of the No. No. (The catapult safety pin-pull pin cannot be reinserted into the catapult initiator in flight. No. A catapult firing trigger is installed in each arming lever and maintains a 25° lag as the arming lever is moved to the armed position. only qualified maintenance technicians should stow rotated arming levers unless combat or emergency conditions require the crewmember to accomplish this step. The firing triggers are locked and cannot be actuated until the hatch is jettisoned. These two pins should be in place in the arming levers during preflight and postflight on the ground and whenever the crewmember leaves his seat in flight. and the armrests lowered (in this sequence). 1 safety pins inserted. When a trigger is pulled. and 5) to be used for maintenance operations only. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 2 Inspection door and window Hinged door with a small round window. the seat cannot be safetied until the arming levers have been stowed. 3. Rotation of the arming lever from which the No. 2 (arming initiator) safety pin.T. located on the inboard side of the ejection seat immediately aft of the inboard armrest. numbered 1. Installation of the safety pins with the arming levers rotated to the up position will not prevent the seat from firing if either trigger is squeezed. The three pins are attached to a single red streamer and are stowed in the box provided when the seat is on flight status. In the event either or both arming levers have been rotated.

Rotation of the arming lever on a stowed armrest will not fire the arming initiator. If an armrest will not stow. The arming levers are stowed and latched beneath the armrests and will operate only when the armrests are in the raised position. NOTE If the arming levers have been rotated for any other reason than ejection. visible through the inner armrest skin just below the arming lever pivot. Firing the arming initiator actuates the control column stowage thruster and the escape hatch thruster. figure 1-23). Figure 1-22 (Sheet 6 of 8) 1-56B Change 12 . The link connected to the hatch fires the catapult pin-pull initiator. The use of both levers is recommended whenever possible since the levers provide a suitable handgrip. used to prepare the seat for ejection. the arming levers may be stowed using a pointed instrument (such as a pencil). FUNCTION 8 Arming Lever Release A mechanical latch incorporated in the arming lever. Squeezing the arming lever release unlocks the arming lever and enables it to be rotated from the stowed position to the arming position. See figure 1-23 for arming lever sequence of operation. Rotate the arming lever to the fully stowed position. at least one armrest will be raised from the stowed position and the arming lever on that armrest will be rotated to the up position. • • • To accomplish ejection.T. thus arming the seat. raising the armrest will fire the arming initiator Attempting to stow the arming levers should be done only as a last resort. The arming levers also provide a grip to help keep the occupant’s hands and arms in place during ejection. To stow an arming lever. When the arming lever release (8) is squeezed and the arming lever is rotated from the stowed position toward the arming locked position.O. depress the forward lockpin (5. Each lever operates independently and either lever can be used to arm the seat. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. the arming initiator is fired and the inertia reel is locked. Caution will be used to avoid inadvertent actuation of the catapult firing trigger. The control column thruster stows the control column and the hatch thruster unlocks the hatch and lifts the hatch lifter (aerodynamic flap) into the airstream which separates the hatch from the aircraft and unlatches the pilot and copilot drogue parachute support arms. 9 Arming Lever Levers installed in the armrests of each seat. Actuation of the catapult firing trigger will result in an ejection of the seat. Lowering the armrests will deactivate the ejection controls. lower the armrest by depressing the release tab on the armrest support fitting. If the arming lever has been rotated on a stowed armrest.

The pouch on the opposite seat will be utilized by each upward seat occupant for stowage of the No. a 5-minute rest must follow before another actuation of any degree. Ensure the survival kit is locked by pulling on the parachute strap adjusters. A full actuation in one direction should be followed by at least a 30-second rest. The armrest catches for the two side armrests work independent of each other. Figure 1-22 (Sheet 7 of 8) Change 17 1-57 . making it difficult to raise or lower the armrests. • • Excessive operation of the positioning motors will shorten their normal duty cycle. Located on the inboard side of each upward ejection seat. 1 safety pins from his seat. In this condition. 12 Survival Kit Release Handle A handle located on the right side of the survival kit. A stowage pouch for the No. as this may cause the arming initiator to fire. If the kit release handle is pulled with the plunger depressed. This permits stowage of the pins without unstrapping from the seat. Certain malfunctions of the seat actuators may cause the seat to twist and misalign. an arming plunger (12. Do not use the survival kit release handle to lift or carry the kit. If another full actuation of that positioning motor is required after the 30-second delay. located at the base of the telescoping portion of the armrest supports that serves both as a latch and a release for the armrest.T. Ensure that the plunger is fully depressed into the seat before occupying an ejection seat. the armrests should not be forcibly lowered. the adjusters move the release handle to the locked position. To do so may cause the kit to open. 10 CONTROLINDICATOR Seat Positioning Switches FUNCTION Three independently operated seat positioning switches are located on the right front corner of the seat. 1 Flight Safety Pins (Inboard side of seat bucket) NOTE Do not allow the arming plunger to drop down before the release handle and parachute strap adjuster have been reset.O. When the armrest is lifted up from its lowered (stowed) position. The lid will not open and the dropline will remain attached to the kit. Depressing the armrest catch when the armrest is upright unlocks the armrest and allows the occupant to lower (stow) the armrest. reinstalling the parachute strap adjusters and while pushing firmly down. the fore and aft switch is mounted horizontally. thus jettisoning the hatch and arming the seat. figure 1-28) located on the bottom of the kit is depressed. and the tilt switch is mounted on a 45° slant. It is operated by pulling up against the handle latch until the handle pulls free from the container. The kit release handle may then be reset by replacing the handle in the socket. • • • 13 Pouch for No. It is possible to install the survival kit in the ejection seat with the arming plunger extended. thus severing the survival kit from the parachute harness. the switch is pushed in the direction movement is desired to electrically position the seat. 1 flight safety pins. the armrest catch engages and locks the armrest in the upright position. the parachute strap adjuster will be disconnected. Misalignment may cause the arming levers to contact other parts of the ejection seat. To obtain seat movement. The electrical positioning actuators are 118 volt ac powered and contain limit switches to stop motor operation at the extremes of travel. The up and down switch is mounted vertically. 1B-52H-1 NO. 11 Armrest Catch A small combination handle and mechanical catch. When the survival kit is in the seat.

This handle enables the seat occupant to manually detach the parachute harness and the safety belt from the seat in lieu of automatic release. The lever is held in the locked position when both arming levers are stowed and can be pulled only after an arming lever is raised to the up position. provided to manually disengage the catapult pin-pull cylinder in the event the catapult pin-pull initiator does not fire when the hatch is jettisoned from the aircraft. Lock the inertia reel before actuating the integrated harness release handle to assure complete release of the integrated harness before leaving the seat. On the upward ejection seats. and the parachute arming lanyard.T. Pulling the release handle upward disengages the two safety belt fittings. CONTROLINDICATOR 16 Integrated Harness Release Handle FUNCTION Located on the left side of each seat and painted yellow with black stripes. the parachute harness shoulder straps. aft. the reel harness strap will extend to allow the crewmember to lean forward. 19 Manual Initiator Catapult Safety Pin-Pull Lever A lever. When the handle is in RELEASED position. 21 Inertia Reel Control Handle A handle. with LOCKED – RELEASED positions. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat (Cont) NO. the release mechanism is reset by pushing the handle down. If the release handle is pulled and the parachute and survival kit are worn during such movement. The integrated harness release handle should be pulled directly upward since any fore. The pin is removed from the catapult initiator by lifting the lever and manually withdrawing the catapult pin-pull cylinder. LOCKED position is used for ditching and crash landing. NOTE • • The integrated release handle should not be used to free the occupant from the seat for normal inflight or postflight movement. the parachute will have to be removed to reinstall the shoulder straps in the inertia reel fitting without assistance. LOCKED position may be used as an additional safety feature over the automatic operation of the inertia reel system. The arming lever used for seat ejection also locks the inertia reel. however.O. Figure 1-22 (Sheet 8 of 8) 1-58 Change 12 . When the reel is locked in this manner. thus completely freeing the occupant from the seat. located on the left side of each seat. A detent is provided for retaining the handle at either position of the quadrant. the reel harness strap is manually locked so the crewmember is prevented from bending forward. or side loads can cause the handle to bind resulting in excessive force required to pull the handle. the reel harness strap will automatically lock when an impact force of 2 to 3 g’s is encountered. it will remain locked until the handle is moved to LOCKED and then returned to RELEASED position. When the handle is in LOCKED position.

O. 1B-52H-1 EWO OFFICER/GUNNER SEAT Figure 1-22A Change 22 1-58A/(1-58B blank) .T.

.

3 Rotate the arming lever (3) forward and upward to the locked position. arming the seat.O. Squeeze the firing trigger (4) to fire the seat catapult. 4 It is necessary to partially release grip on the arming lever to grasp the firing trigger. The firing trigger (4) rotates to the firing position. The alarm system is energized to signal ABANDON when either the pilot’s or copilot’s control column stows. 2 Squeeze the arming lever to release (2).T. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection Seat Arming Lever and Trigger Sequence (EITHER OR BOTH ARMING LEVERS) 1 1 2 2 3 2 3 1 Raise the armrest (1) to the locked position. A31639 Figure 1-23 A31639 1-59 . Hatch jettisoning fires initiator. 4 Stow arming lever by depressing lockpins (5) and (6) in order while rotating the arming lever forward and downward. 5 NOTE • • • 4 6 4 Rotating the arming lever stows the control column and jettisons the escape hatch.

T. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System Figure 1-24 (Sheet 1 of 6) 1-60 Change 12 .O.

1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System (Cont) abcd Figure 1-24 (Sheet 2 of 6) Change 12 1-60A .O.T.

or both. As this thruster extends. ARMING LEVERS (4) forward and upward until locked. the SHOULDER STRAP RELEASE FITTING (9). thus illuminating all the bailout warning lights and firing the HATCH JETTISON BOOSTER INITIATOR (14). As the ejectable rails move upward on the intermediate rails. and the PARACHUTE ARMING LANYARD (3). Gas expansion from the CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL INITIATOR will also fire the DROGUE PARACHUTE SUPPORT ARM RELEASE INITIATOR. thus jettisoning the hatch. stowing the control column. it will stabilize and decelerate the ejectable rail and seat. the drogue parachute assembly will rotate aft.O. ejectable rails. NOTE The seat may be armed any time the maintenance pins and either one of the No. it closes the automatic bailout switch. allowing the occupant to separate from the seat. which unlocks and opens the hatch. in tandem with the integrated harness release (0. 1 pin has been removed. As the ejection seat moves up the rails. Rotation of the arming lever(s) locks the INERTIA REEL (10). and intermediate rails to move up the fixed rails. Gas expansion from the integrated harness release zero delay initiator. Gas expansion from the catapult initiator fires the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE (0.P-CP SEATS PRE-EJECTION PREPARATION At least one of two FLIGHT SAFETY PINS 1 and three MAINTENANCE SAFETY PINS 2 . 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System (Cont) NOTE release initiator operates the DROGUE PARACHUTE SUPPORT ARM RELEASE PIN-PULL CYLINDER. pull the assembly forward to withdraw the pin from the catapult initiator. Reposition for ejection and squeeze trigger. Gas expansion from the drogue parachute arm FIRING SEQUENCE Squeezing either or both triggers will fire the CATAPULT INITIATOR (2). and 5 must be removed prior to accomplishing ejection sequence. Seat deceleration induces man-seat separation and automatic personnel parachute activation. As the drogue parachute inflates. Withdrawing the pin allows the drogue parachute support to pop up and lock into the pre-ejection position. 3 .3 second delay) INITIATOR (11) and the CATAPULT (13). since the GOLD KEY is still attached to the seat. Gas expansion from the arming initiator fires the CONTROL COLUMN STOWAGE THRUSTER. A linkage attached to the hatch and connected to the CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL INITIATOR (12) pulls the shear pin out of the initiator as the hatch departs the aircraft. locks the shoulder straps (harness). Firing the catapult causes the seat. Gas expansion from the catapult safety pin-pull initiator operates the CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL CYLINDER (16). firing the catapult safety pin-pull initiator. EJECTION SEQUENCE . Squeeze arming lever release and rotate either. and at the same time. the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE ZERO DELAY INITIATOR (1) firing lever contacts a STRIKER mounted on the fixed rail assembly firing the integrated harness release zero delay initiator. pull the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE HANDLE (6). allowing deployment sprints to force the drogue parachute out into the air stream. If the integrated harness release initiator fails to fire. reach under the armrest and lift the MANUAL CATAPULT INITIATOR SAFETY PIN-PULL LEVER (15). Action of linkage unlocks the SAFETY BELT RELEASE FITTINGS (5). This is the key for sheets 5 and 6. ARMING SEQUENCE Raise armrests to the up position. Aft rotation of the support assembly pulls the drogue parachute safety pin. Gas expansion from the hatch jettison booster initiator fires the HATCH JETTISON THRUSTER (17). Repositioning the integrated harness release pin-pull cylinder releases the safety belt attachment points the upper harness attachment fittings.T. Figure 1-24 (Sheet 3 of 6) 1-60B Change 12 . and fires the ARMING INITIATOR (8). withdrawing the pin from the CATAPULT INITIATOR (2) and thus arming the seat. 1 flight safety pins have been removed by rotation of same arming lever from which No.3 second) delay initiator. MANUAL EMERGENCY OPERATION If the catapult initiator fails to fire when trigger is squeezed. operates the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE PIN-PULL CYLINDER.

A linkage attached to the hatch and connected to the CATAPULT SAFETY PINPULL INITIATOR (12). which aids in lifting the hatch into the air stream. the sliding panel extends from the drag panel. PREFLIGHT STATUS AND LOCATION OF SAFETY PINS PIN NO. ejectable rails. tightening the separation harness and throwing the occupant from the seat. Initial movement of the hatch jettison thruster forces the hatch lifter open. and fires the ARMING INITIATOR (8). 5 On LH Ejectable Rail (Integrated Harness Release Initiator) No. Gas expansion from the arming initiator fires the HATCH JETTISON BOOSTER INITIATOR (14). the parachute lanyard pulls the parachute pack away from the drogue parachute. and at the same time. FIRING SEQUENCE NOTE Squeezing either or both firing triggers fires the CATAPULT INITIATOR (2). thus deploying the drogue parachute. 1 pin has been removed. NOTE The seat may be armed any time the maintenance pins and either one of the No. Gas expansion from the hatch jettison booster initiator fires the HATCH JETTISON THRUSTER (17). ARMING LEVERS (4) forward and upward until locked. Gas expansion from the catapult initiator fires the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE (0. the drogue parachute lanyard (attached to the intermediate rails) becomes taut. The lanyard then releases a latch. thus allowing the occupant to leave the seat. Rotation of the arming lever(s) locks the INERTIA REEL (10). pull the assembly forward to withdraw the pin from the catapult initiator. 6 EW and Gunner’s Ground Emergency Egress Handle Assembly REMOVED BY GROUND CREW REMOVED BY FLIGHTCREW Figure 1-24 (Sheet 4 of 6) Change 12 1-61 . it unlocks and opens the hatch. Action of linkage unlocks the SAFETY BELT RELEASE FITTINGS (5).3 second delay) INITIATOR (11). 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System (Cont) EJECTION SEQUENCE . reach under the armrest and lift the MANUAL CATAPULT INITIATOR SAFETY PIN-PULL LEVER (15).O. LOCATION No. 2 RH Ejectable Rail (Arming Initiator) No. Squeeze arming lever release and rotate either. retracting the pin from the initiator.EW-G SEATS PRE-EJECTION PREPARATION At least one of two FLIGHT SAFETY PINS 1 and three MAINTENANCE SAFETY PINS 2 . Reposition for ejection and squeeze trigger.T. 6 for the ground emergency egress handle at the gunner’s station can be installed either in the pin receptacle on the front of the assembly. As the seat moves upward. allowing the occupant to separate from the seat. in tandem with and the integrated harness release (0. pull the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE HANDLE (6).3 second delay) initiator. and intermediate rails to move up the fixed rails. thus arming the seat. Operation of the integrated harness release pin-pull cylinder releases both safety belt attachments and the upper harness attachment fitting. and fires the CATAPULT (13). When the bridle lines become taut. 3 . As the seat and ejectable rails continue to move further up the intermediate rails. If the integrated harness release initiator fails to fire. Gas expansion from the catapult safety pin-pull initiator operates the CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL CYLINDER (16). the SHOULDER STRAP RELEASE FITTING (9). 3 Mounted on instrument panel upper mounting structure (Catapult Safety Pin-Pull Initiator) No. and the PARACHUTE ARMING LANYARD (3). The drag panel and sliding panel rotates downward until the restraint cables become taut. fires the catapult safety pin-pull initiator by pulling the shear pin out of the initiator as the hatch is jettisoned. if the pin interferes with the crew seat at the gunner’s position. 1 flight safety pins have been removed by rotation of same arming lever from which No. and the drogue parachute bridle lines are pulled from their stowage containers. As the thruster continues to extend. or in a pin receptacle on the right side of the assembly. Firing the catapult causes the seat. Gas expansion from the integrated harness release zero delay initiator. Gas expansion from the man-seat separation booster initiator fires the cartidge in the MAN-SEAT SEPARATION ACTUATOR. or both. fires the MAN-SEAT SEPARATION BOOSTER INITIATOR and operates the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE PIN-PULL CYLINDER. which attaches the drogue parachute pack to the bottom of the seat. As the seat and ejectable rails continue to move upward on the intermediate rails. the hinged drag panel rotates downward. and 5 must be removed prior to accomplishing ejection sequence. ARMING SEQUENCE Raise armrests to the up position. the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE ZERO DELAY INITIATOR (1) is fired by a STRIKER attached to the fixed rails. MANUAL EMERGENCY OPERATION If the catapult initiator fails to fire when trigger is squeezed. 1 RH and LH Armrest (two) No. thus jettisoning the hatch. Safety pin No. locks the shoulder straps (harness).

1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System (Cont) MAN SEAT SEPARATOR EW AND GUNNER 11 1 5 10 9 2 1 3 2 8 4 5 6 7 ARMING LEVER SEQUENCE HATCH JETTISON SEQUENCE 1 FIRING SEQUENCE MANUAL EMERGENCY OPERATION A88001 SAFETY PIN LOCATIONS MECHANISM (FORWARD VIEW) Figure 1-24 (Sheet 5 of 6) 1-62 Change 12 .O.T.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Upward Ejection System (Cont) 12 3 A12633 TO MAN SEAT SEPARATOR EW AND GUNNER DETAIL 2 1 17 11 10 13 2 5 16 15 2 1 8 14 4 6 SEE DETAIL 2 A88002 MECHANISM (AFT VIEW) Figure 1-24 (Sheet 6 of 6) Change 12 1-63 .

. It may raise the seat occupant to such a height that the leg re- 1-64 straints will not restrain his legs. lock the inertia reel. the arms and container swing aft of the seat and deploy the drogue parachute. Restraint straps connected to the arms to limit travel are interconnected with the integrated harness mechanism to mechanically release the parachute and safety belt fittings as the arms are deployed. 1B-52H-1 DOWNWARD EJECTION SEATS The navigator and radar navigator are provided with forward facing downward ejection seats (figure 1-25). oxygen. A reel-type ballistic actuator and jackshaft is installed on the back of the seat. the ejection seat at that station will be armed and can be fired. this section. Man-Seat Separator The seats are equipped with a man-seat separator that ensures positive separation of crewmembers occupying downward seats during ejection. thus separating the seat from the occupant. One continuous pull on the ejection trigger ring will sequence a series of ballistic devices and mechanical linkages incorporated in the seat to rotate the leg guards. Do not use any form of shock absorbing device other than the survival kit and/or seat cushion designated as standard equipment for the ejection seat. A modified parachute and a specially designed safety belt are installed in the harness release fittings. Electrical. and ballistic lines are provided with disconnects to permit separation of the lines when the seat is ejected. The seat is equipped with a headrest and an inertia reel which assist the occupant in maintaining position during ejection. The actuator is connected by ballistic hose to the integrated harness ballistic actuation system. the other two sides of which form the seat back and bottom. The seats can be positioned electrically up and down. thus exposing them to possible injury from flailing in the windblast following ejection. As the seat leaves the rails. Utilizing the wrong seat cushions and/or survival kit or too much cushioning material creates a definite injury hazard and may position the seat occupant where it is difficult to reach the controls. Simultaneously with integrated harness release. To do so would create a definite possibility of serious injury during ejection and/or crash landing/ditching. Manual operation of the integrated harness release will disengage the safety belt and parachute harness and. The parachute is located in a container mounted below the seat on spring-loaded swinging arms. possibly incurring severe back injury. The man-seat separator separates the man from the seat 0. for additional information. An integrated harness release mechanism provides a means for separating the safety belt and parachute harness from the seat automatically after ejection of the seat. Two nylon straps are installed in the seat under the survival kit and parachute.T. and fire the catapult to eject the seat from the aircraft. they provide positive controlled separation of the seat occupant from the seat. Chance of vertebral injury upon impact of crash landing or ditching is increased considerably by sitting on too thick a compressible mass. allowing the seat occupant to slump forward. More time than this is needed to decelerate the man to an acceptable parachute deployment velocity and is provided by the parachute timer. fore and aft. As the straps are pulled tight. Each seat is positioned over an escape hatch and has fixed ejection rails. The ejection trigger ring initiates the ejection cycle. jettison the hatch. These actions are fully automatic and require no action on the part of the crewmember.3 seconds after ejection. in addition. stow the writing table. The downward ejection seat accommodates a survival kit and a back-type parachute. • • Should a downward ejection hatch be inadvertently dropped.O. will disengage the parachute arming lanyard. The seat is equipped with a drogue parachute and deployment mechanism to positively separate the seat from the seat occupant after the seat leaves the rails. and tilted by seat positioning switches during normal use. the straps are pulled tight. The nylon straps are attached to the jackshaft driven by the reel-type ballistic actuator. See INTEGRATED HARNESS SYSTEM. The added cushioning may also permit the seat occupant to sink far enough down to loosen the shoulder straps. forming one side of a triangle.

1 PARACHUTE SHOULDER STRAPS 5 14 6 10 18 15 8 17 16 7 A31647 Figure 1-25 (Sheet 1 of 5) Change 12 1-65 .O. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection Seat 1 2 3 4 11 5 6 10 7 1 12 19 9 8 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 HEADREST MODIFIED PARACHUTE GLOBAL SURVIVAL KIT SURVIVAL KIT RELEASE HANDLE EJECTION CONTROL TRIGGER RING EJECTION CONTROL TRIGGER RING RELEASE MECHANISM PIN ANKLE RESTRAINTS DROGUE PARACHUTE CONTAINER SEAT POSITIONING SWITCHES LEG GUARDS INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE RESET BUTTON (BEHIND) PARACHUTE CONTAINER ARM RELEASE INITIATOR (ACCOMMODATES MAINTENANCE SAFETY PIN NO.T. 5) RIPCORD T-HANDLE PARACHUTE ARMING LANYARD MANUAL CATAPULT INITIATOR SAFETY PIN-PULL HANDLE INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE HANDLE INERTIA REEL CONTROL HANDLE REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT SAFETY PIN NO.

the spring-loaded trigger ring will rotate 180° upward.O. A pull of approximately 35 pounds is required to remove the trigger ring from its retaining detent. It is possible to install the survival kit in the ejection seat with the arming plunger extended. rotates the leg guards. After release from the detent. the adjusters move the release handle to the locked position. 4 Survival Kit Release Handle FUNCTION A handle located on the right side of the survival kit. the trigger ring is safetied by the ejection control trigger ring release mechanism pin (6) which in turn is safetied by the No. Ensure that the plunger is fully depressed into the seat before occupying an ejection seat. Stowed on the front center of the seat.T. stows the writing table. When the release mechanism pin is lifted. Continued pull on the ejection trigger ring (exerting approximately the same 40 pounds for approximately 4 more inches of cable travel) fires the catapult initiator which fires the catapult to eject the seat. To do so may cause the kit to open. remove the No. an arming plunger (12. which locks the inertia reel. a pull of approximately 40 pounds and a cable travel of approximately 1 inch fires the arming initiator. It is operated by pulling up against the handle latch until the handle pulls free from the container. Prior to flight. or those described elsewhere are not included in the following sheets. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection Seat (Cont) NOTE Items not requiring description. The kit release handle may then be reset by replacing the handle in the socket. CONTROLINDICATOR NO. 1 REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT safety pin from the stowage clip on the ejection control trigger ring release mechanism pin. 1 REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT safety pin. Do not use the survival kit release handle to lift or carry the kit. thus severing the survival kit from the parachute harness. Figure 1-25 (Sheet 2 of 5) 1-66 Change 12 . Ensure the survival kit is locked by pulling on the parachute strap adjusters. reinstalling the parachute strap adjusters and while pushing firmly down. NOTE • • • 5 Ejection Control Trigger Ring Do not allow the arming plunger to drop down before the release handle and parachute strap adjuster have been reset. The lid will not open and the dropline will remain attached to the kit. and jettisons the escape hatch. the parachute strap adjuster will be disconnected. thus providing the seat occupant ready access to grasp the ring. figure 1-28) located on the bottom of the kit is depressed. If the kit release handle is pulled with the plunger depressed. In order to unstow the ejection control trigger ring. When the survival kit is in the seat. then pull upward on the spring-loaded release mechanism pin.

T. reverse the sequence. the fore and aft switch is mounted horizontally. In the event they are accidentally triggered. a 5-minute rest must follow before another actuation of any degree. If another full actuation of that positioning motor is required after the 30-second delay. The release mechanism pin cannot be operated until the No. Figure 1-25 (Sheet 3 of 5) Change 12 1-66A . they may be reset by pushing downward and outward on either restraint until pivot arms and restraints are locked. 9 Excessive operation of the positioning motors will shorten their normal duty cycle. The up and down switch is mounted vertically. 1. The ankle restraints will then hold the legs in position during ejection. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection Seat (Cont) NO.O. They may be kicked free any time after they are closed. If accidentally triggered. they may be reset by pushing downward and outward on either ankle restraint until the pivot arms and restraints are restowed and locked. the legs should be pressed against the triggers prior to grasping the ejection trigger ring. 7 Ankle Restraints Spring-loaded restraints that keep the legs in position during ejection. 1 safety pin is removed. and the tilt switch is mounted on a 45° slant. Normally. A full actuation in one direction should be followed by at least a 30-second rest. Ankle Restraint Triggers A trigger is located on each side of the seat front. The release mechanism pin provides a means of stowing and unstowing the ejection control trigger ring with the parachute and safety belt fastened. To obtain seat movement. Pressing the triggers causes the ankle restraints to rotate upward and inward to clasp the ankles securely. pull upward on the spring-loaded release mechanism pin to release the ejection control trigger ring from the stowed position. The ankle restraint triggers are cocked until triggered. To restow the trigger ring. the switch is pushed in the direction movement is desired to electrically position the seat. After removal of pin No. Seat Positioning Switches Three independently operated seat positioning switches are located on the right front corner of the seat. 1 REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT safety pin. the release mechanism pin provides a stowage clip for the No. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 6 Ejection Control Trigger Ring Release Mechanism Pin Installed on the front center of the seat. The electrical positioning actuators are 118 volt ac powered and contain limit switches to stop motor operation at the extremes of travel. In addition.

10 FUNCTION Leg Guards The leg guards are positioned automatically during the ejection cycle. Upward pressure on the leg guards may break the shear pin on the leg guard thruster and render it unserviceable. 15 Manual Catapult Initiator Safety Pin-Pull Handle A handle located on the left side of the seat. pulling upward on the manual pin-pull handle will allow a spring to force the pin-pull cylinder outward. manually disengages the catapult pin-pull cylinder and thus pulls the safety pin from the catapult initiator. Pulling the release handle upward disengages the two safety belt fittings. Do not apply pressure to the leg guards during ground or air operations. When pulled. This handle enables the seat occupant to manually detach the parachute harness and the safety belt from the seat in lieu of automatic release. 16 Integrated Harness Release Handle Located on the left side of each seat and painted yellow with black stripes. If the seat will not fire after pulling the trigger ring.O. No movement of the straight handle up past the stowed leg guard should be possible. On the upward ejection seats. or side loads can cause the handle to bind resulting in excessive force required to pull the handle. causing rapid movement of the leg guards during ejection sequence. The integrated harness release handle should be pulled directly upward since any fore. the release mechanism is reset by pushing the handle down. withdrawing the safety pin from the initiator. the parachute harness shoulder straps. The pin-pull handle should be straight and properly seated parallel to and in close proximity below the left leg guard. A loss of dampening fluid could result. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection Seat (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. and the parachute arming lanyard. aft. the parachute will have to be removed to reinstall the shoulder straps in the inertia reel fitting without assistance.T. Figure 1-25 (Sheet 4 of 5) 1-66B Change 12 . Lock the inertia reel before actuating the integrated harness release handle to assure complete release of the integrated harness before leaving the seat. Either circumstance can cause serious injury to the seat occupant during ejection. thus completely freeing the occupant from the seat. If the release handle is pulled and the parachute and survival kit are worn during such movement. NOTE • • The integrated release handle should not be used to free the occupant from the seat for normal inflight or postflight movement. Pulling the ejection control trigger ring triggers the arming initiator which in turn fires the leg guard thruster which turns the leg guard torque tube and rotates the leg guards into position to protect the legs during ejection.

When the handle is in RELEASED position. In addition. 18 Seat Safety Pin No. 1 pin marked REMOVE BEFORE FLIGHT is to be installed and removed by the flight crewmember. LOCKED position may be used as an additional safety feature over the automatic operation of the inertia reel system. however. each downward ejection seat is provided with three safety pins (numbered 3. catapult pin-pull initiator. the reel harness strap is manually locked so the crewmember is prevented from bending forward.O. 4. located on the left side of each seat. The arming lever used for seat ejection also locks the inertia reel. it will remain locked until the handle is moved to LOCKED and then returned to RELEASED position. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 17 Inertia Reel Control Handle A handle. The No. This pin safeties the ejection control firing trigger located at the front of the seat. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection Seat (Cont) NO. these pins are stowed in the box provided on the back of the seat. When the seat is in flight status. and 5 and marked USE DURING MAINTENANCE ONLY) to be used during maintenance operations only. with LOCKED – RELEASED positions. respectively. and drogue parachute support arm release initiator. 1 Each downward seat is provided with four safety pins. These maintenance pins are provided for the arming initiator. the reel harness strap will extend to allow the crewmember to lean forward. the reel harness strap will automatically lock when an impact force of 2 to 3 g’s is encountered. When the handle is in LOCKED position. LOCKED position is used for ditching and crash landing. When the reel is locked in this manner. A detent is provided for retaining the handle at either position of the quadrant. The pins for the arming initiator and the drogue parachute support arm release initiator are attached to each end of a single red streamer while the pin for the catapult pin-pull initiator is attached to a separate streamer. The two streamers are attached together with a snap fastener.T. Figure 1-25 (Sheet 5 of 5) Change 12 1-67 .

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection System 6 7 10 8 9 5 34 12 11 33 12 13 14 13 15 32 16 31 28 27 30 29 26 17 1 4 18 19 25 3 20 24 SCHEMATIC 23 22 21 HATCH JETTISON SEQUENCE ARMING AND FIRING SEQUENCE MANUAL EMERGENCY OPERATION SAFETY PIN LOCATION (PIN NO.) A31649 Figure 1-26 (Sheet 1 of 5) 1-68 .

4 . the DROGUE PARACHUTE SUPPORT ARM RELEASE INITIATOR (11) is fired by a INITIATOR TRIP (10) mounted on the fixed rails. 4 Body Structure Just Aft Hatch (Catapult Pin-Pull Initiator) No. and 5 must be removed. As the ESCAPE HATCH (20) is jettisoned. HATCH JETTISON THRUSTER (24) and TABLE STOWAGE INITIATOR (31). 5 On Left Ejectable Rail (Drogue Parachute Support Arm Release Initiator) REMOVED BY GROUNDCREW REMOVED BY FLIGHTCREW Figure 1-26 (Sheet 2 of 5) Change 20 1-69 . CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL INITIATOR (17) is fired by means of catapult safety pin-pull link attached to the escape hatch. If the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE INITIATOR (6) fails to fire. 3. Gas expansion from the arming initiator fires the LEG GUARD THRUSTER (25). Continued pull on the TRIGGER RING (26) fires the CATAPULT INITIATOR (29). 3 Front Center of Seat Bucket (Arming Initiator) No. and PARACHUTE ARMING LANYARD RELEASE FITTING (15). As the LEG GUARDS (19) rotate. PREFLIGHT STATUS AND LOCATION OF SAFETY PINS PIN NO. releasing the SAFETY BELT (12) and PARACHUTE HARNESS (34) thus allowing occupant to separate from seat. 1 Front Center of Seat Bucket (Ejection Control Trigger Ring Release Mechanism Pin) No. allowing the occupant to separate from the seat.T. Gas expansion from the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE INITIATOR (6) also fires the INTEGRATED ROTARY ACTUATOR (7) which operates to pull the nylon MAN-SEAT SEPARATION STRAPS (8) tight and forcibly separate the seat occupant from the seat immediately after release of SAFETY BELT RELEASE FITTINGS (13) and SHOULDER STRAP RELEASE FITTING (35). ARMING AND FIRING SEQUENCE Pull EJECTION CONTROL TRIGGER RING (26) upward. Gas expansion from the catapult safety pin-pull initiator operates the CATAPULT SAFETY PIN-PULL CYLINDER (30) causing it to retract pin which acts as a safety on the CATAPULT INITIATOR (29). allowing the drogue parachute support to rotate from the seat pulling a lanyard. pull the MANUAL CATAPULT PIN-PULL RELEASE HANDLE (18) to withdraw the pin-pull cylinder and pin from the catapult initiator. If the integrated harness release handle has been pulled for some reason other than bailout and it is desired to reset the mechanism. Action of the linkage unlocks the SAFETY BELT RELEASE FITTINGS (13).O. Firing of the catapult If the CATAPULT INITIATOR (29) fails to fire when trigger ring is pulled. pull the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE HANDLE (32). allowing drogue parachute deployment. the INERTIA REEL (9) is locked. Action of the linkage unlocks the SAFETY BELT RELEASE FITTINGS (13) and SHOULDER STRAP RELEASE FITTING (35). SHOULDER STRAP RELEASE FITTING (35). Gas expansion from the DROGUE PARACHUTE SUPPORT ARM RELEASE INITIATOR (11) causes the DROGUE PARACHUTE SUPPORT ARM PIN-PULLER (22) to operate. push down on the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE RESET BUTTON (33). LOCATION No. Gas expansion from the integrated harness release initiator operates the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE PIN-PULL CYLINDER (16). and the EJECTION CONTROL TRIGGER RING RELEASE MECHANISM PIN (36) must be actuated to release the ejection control trigger ring from the stowed position prior to accomplishing sequence. 1B-52H-1 NOTE causes the seat and ejectable rails to move downward on the fixed rails. Gas expansion from the CATAPULT INITIATOR (29) fires the INTEGRATED HARNESS RELEASE DELAY INITIATOR (0. As the seat moves through the hatch opening. A cable attached through a shock absorber to the ARMING INITIATOR (23) fires the initiator. and 4. thus moving TABLE (28) to stowed position. This is the key for sheets 1. MANUAL EMERGENCY OPERATION Gas expansion from the table stowage initiator fires the TABLE STOWAGE THRUSTER (27). EJECTION SEQUENCE PRE-EJECTION SEQUENCE One FLIGHT SAFETY PIN 1 and three MAINTENANCE SAFETY PINS 3 .3 SECOND DELAY) (6) and fires the CATAPULT (14).

O. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection System (Cont) Figure 1-26 (Sheet 3 of 5) 1-70 .T.

1B-52H-1 Figure 1-26 (Sheet 4 of 5) 1-71 .O.T.

O. 1B-52H-1 Downward Ejection System (Cont) Figure 1-26 (Sheet 5 of 5) 1-72 .T.

O. 1B-52H-1 Drogue Parachute Arm Locking Lever and Spring Figure 1-27 1-73 .T.

The actuation cable passes through the housing attaching to both the survival kit automatic actuation mechanism and one of the parachute risers. . one fitted to each parachute riser. The UWARS unit is designed to operate within 2. The ripcord T-handle bypasses the automatic release device. • An FXC model 11. Releasing either of the quick-releases will spill the canopy. When the personnel parachute deploys. modified to utilize the integrated harness release mechanism in the seat is provided in the ejection seats. Modifications include shoulder straps (5. The canopy quick-releases (6. A bailout oxygen bottle and gage is contained in the parachute and may be inspected by opening the flap located under the right side of the parachute lining.T. designated as a C-9P type. the safety belt. nor does it depend on the manual release for proper operation. Firing the ejection seat catapult triggers the integrated harness release initiator. a drogue parachute attached to the seat positively separates the seat from the seat occupant. The UWARS is functionally independent from the manual release system.5 psi for each degree of F. 1B-52H-1 INTEGRATED HARNESS SYSTEM The integrated harness system provided in the aircraft consists of the integrated harness release mechanism located on the seat. figure 1-28) on the right front of the harness.000 ballistic automatic parachute opening release which incorporates a 0. The housing attaches to the inside of the parachute pack and the CNU-129/P survival kit.5 seconds after being immersed in sea water. parachute (and arming lanyard). figure 1-28) manually releases the parachute when pulled. parachute. and an inertia control handle. The parachute actuator is attached to the survival kit when the parachute is installed in the seat.000 release is activated when the arming knob (10. and safety belt from the seat. and salt spray. an integrated harness release initiator with necessary ballistic tubing. The parachute contains the following features: Universal Water Activated Release System (UWARS) AUTOMATIC PARACHUTE • A pull-down vent line (PDVL) parachute canopy. The PDVL improves the low speed inflation characteristics of the parachute and improves the consistency of the parachute opening timing.75 second delay cartridge that automatically opens the parachute pack 0.3-second delay to open the integrated harness release fittings on the seat and allow seat occupant. Also. It does not affect the operation of the manual release. The unit will remain inactive when exposed to humidity. Normal bailout bottle pressure is 1.75 seconds after seat/man separation occurs. either manually or automatically by separation from the seat. The system consists of two independent self-contained activation devices which attach to the parachute risers and the left and right canopy releases. A ripcord T-handle (8. The automatic parachute is equipped with a faster opening type C-9 canopy for improved low level escape capability. and safety belt (along with survival kit) to separate from the seat as an integral unit. A type BA-27A automatic parachute. Releasing both quick-releases will completely separate the canopy from the harness. Four seconds after parachute deployment the cartridge fires and automatically deploys the survival kit.O. figure 1-28) which are sewn into the parachute harness for attachment to the inertia reel fitting. (Separation from the seat arms the automatic parachute since the parachute arming lanyard is anchored to the seat. The bailout bottle is operated by pulling the green bailout bottle release knob (3. and safety belt (along with survival kit). parachute. rain. developed specifically for use in B-52 aircraft upward and downward ejection seats.800 psi based on 70°F. 1-74 Change 12 The UWARS consists of two parachute harness sensing-release units (Figure 1-28 sheet 2). figure 1-28) is pulled. The model 11. figure 1-28) are located on the upper left and right of the harness. the force on the risers pulls the survival kit actuator cable thus firing a delay cartridge in the CNU-129/P survival kit actuation mechanism. and the automatic parachute (figure 1-28). an integrated release handle. Each activation device is equipped with a test circuit that permits a check of the battery which activates the release. An automatic survival kit actuator has also been provided in the parachute pack. This actuator consists of a flexible housing and cable assembly. A reduction in temperature causes reduction in cylinder pressure of 3. is utilized. The integrated harness release mechanism includes a trigger.) Pulling the integrated harness release handle on the seat provides for separation of man. The initiator fires after a 0. NOTE A zero delay lanyard is not provided on the type BA-27A parachute. An additional integrated harness initiator is installed and functions in the same manner to provide additional reliability.

NOTE Do not open safety belt to permit unrestrained hip movement. The survival kit attachment straps (19. this could spill the parachute in the seat. The shoulder strap attaching hardware is inserted into the inertia reel fitting of the seat. Since the parachute arming lanyard is anchored to the seat.O. The parachute arming lanyard anchor is inserted into the integrated harness release fitting at the left rear corner of the seat.T. and survival kit should first be installed in the seat. It is then only necessary to buckle chest strap. Each beacon is designed to begin transmitting automatically when a plastic plug is pulled from the radio by a lanyard during chute deployment. it is recommended that the parachute and survival kit be left in the seat when the crewmember desires to make routine movements about in the aircraft. NOTE The automatic parachute. or AN/URT-33 installed. then buckled to the crewmember. Change 12 1-75 . figure 1-28) in between the webbing of the safety belt and attach to the parachute accessory rings with the quick-disconnect at the opposite end. AN/URT-27. The beacon equipped parachutes may have an AN/URT-21. Except for size and range. and safety belt and to connect oxygen mask to prepare for ejection in an emergency. leg straps. Thread these straps through the safety belt loops (25. Since the parachute must be removed by the wearer in order to attach the shoulder straps to the inertia reel fittings unassisted. 3. 1B-52H-1 Parachute Installation The parachute is installed in the seat as follows: 1. The beacons are accessible to the crewmember after a parachute landing and have complete metalcal instructions for manual operation attached to the unit. figure 1-28) are connected to the survival kit strap adjustments. safety belt. Personal Locator Beacons Most parachutes are equipped with personal locator beacons. all three beacons are almost identical. Safety belt attachment fittings are inserted into integrated harness release fittings on the seat. 2. 4.

O. 1B-52H-1 Bailout Equipment Figure 1-28 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-76 Change 12 .T.

T. 1B-52H-1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 PERSONAL LOCATOR BEACON LANYARD SNAPPED (AUTOMATIC ACTUATION) PERSONAL LOCATOR BEACON LANYARD UNSNAPPED (NONAUTOMATIC ACTUATION) BAILOUT BOTTLE RELEASE KNOB OXYGEN HOSE CONNECTOR MOUNTING PLATE SHOULDER STRAP QUICK-RELEASE CHEST STRAP RIPCORD T-HANDLE ARMING LANYARD ANCHOR ARMING KNOB LEG STRAP ARMING PLUNGER KIT RELEASE HANDLE 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 MODE SELECTOR LEVER FIRING PIN INDICATOR MAIN COMPARTMENT COMPRESSIBLE SPACER SEAT CUSHION SURVIVAL KIT QUICK-DISCONNECT FITTING AND STRAPS BAILOUT BOTTLE INSPECTION FLAP PARACHUTE BACKPAD BAILOUT OXYGEN HOSE BAILOUT BOTTLE PRESSURE GAGE UWARS FITTING SAFETY BELT ATTACHMENT FITTINGS EJECTION SEAT ATTACHMENT LOOPS Figure 1-28 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 12 1-77 .O.

The automatically deployed survival kit is deployed by a sensor incorporated into the type BA-27A parachute. permitting the liferaft and kit to hang below the crewmember during the parachute descent. The dropline remains attached to the parachute harness and is attached to the liferaft and survival kit. The connection be- 1-78 Change 4 tween the sensor and actuator is automatically accomplished when the kit and parachute fittings are connected. or when accomplishing an alternate bailout. The type CNU-129/P survival kit is located in the bottom of the seat and includes a seat cushion. The safety belt and parachute are then installed in the integrated harness fittings on the seat. The straps are then passed through the safety belt loops and connected to the parachute accessory rings with the quick-disconnects. This interconnects parachute. For nonautomatic (manual) operation. he may do so by pulling the survival kit release handle while firmly seated on the survival kit. and survival kit. the lanyard must be configured for nonautomatic (manual) operation. and the liferaft to inflate. A selector lever. For automatic actuation of the beacon. The kit is attached to the parachute by means of a linkage assembly strap connected by quick-disconnect fittings to the parachute harness accessory ring. safety belt. GLOBAL SURVIVAL KITS A global survival kit (figure 1-28) is provided for each ejection seat.) For peacetime operations. . figure 1-28. NOTE The sole purpose of the beacon lanyard is to assure automatic operation (if desired) after bailout in case the crewmember is injured or incapacitated during the egress cycle. The liferaft is fastened to a loop which is located on the dropline about 10 feet from the survival kit. With the lever in the MANUAL (down) position.O. the automatic deployment feature is deactivated and deployment of the kit is accomplished by pulling the kit release handle. 1B-52H-1 Personal Locator Beacon Lanyard Parachutes equipped with a personal locator beacon have a nylon cord lanyard with a tab and a female snap fastener. the kit is automatically actuated 4 seconds after parachute deployment. A waterproof container. Normally the survival kit is not detached from the parachute except for emergency reasons such as a crash landing. NOTE Incorporation of the automatic actuator in the CNU-129/P survival kit does not affect or prevent manual deployment by use of the kit release handle. When mission requirements dictate the necessity to avoid detection and automatic actuation of the beacon is not desired. the other end is attached to a detachable fitting which is part of the left parachute attachment fitting. the beacon lanyard must be configured to the desired operation (automatic or nonautomatic) during the interior preflight and rechecked just prior to bailout. The kit is installed in the aircraft merely by placing it in the seat bucket. the tab is left unsnapped. When attached to the modified parachute. The inner compartment is secured with straps in the bottom of the main compartment and is passed through a slot in the lid. located on the right side of the kit below the kit release handle. Should a crewmember have occasion to leave the seat without the survival kit but wearing the parachute. the personal locator beacon lanyard must be configured for automatic operation. Automatic or manual deployment of the survival kit releases the parachute attachment fittings. The dropline automatically triggers liferaft inflation when fully extended.T. The lanyard can accommodate all three personal locator beacons. equipped with straps for carrying as a backpack. the straps with quick-disconnects are passed through loops in the safety belt. allowing the kit to drop. the tab fastener is snapped to a male snap fastener located below the right canopy release. For this reason. (See 1 and 2. The liferaft will hang about 15 feet below the descending airman and the kit about 25 feet below. The kit is made up of a compartment containing the liferaft and survival equipment. but will remain connected in position by the hinge assembly mounted on the front of the kit. the lid to open. Pulling the release handle while seated on the kit releases the strap adjusters and seat occupant from the survival kit and lid will unlock. With the lever in the AUTO (up) position. Provision for assorted items of survival equipment are contained in the kit. provides the option of manual or automatic release of the kit. serves as an inner compartment containing various items of survival equipment.

The kit release handle may then be reset by replacing the handle in the socket. Do not use the survival kit release handle to lift or carry the kit. A knife-like liferaft deflation tool (7. FIRING PIN INDICATOR A cylindrical indicator (15. Pilots will be alert to this possibility and be prepared to immediately puncture the liferaft should inadvertent inflation occur. figure 1-28) is located on the lower right-hand side of the front of the survival kit. reinstalling the parachute strap adjusters and while pushing firmly down. figure 1-28) located on the bottom of the kit is depressed.T. The lid will not open and the dropline will remain attached to the kit. Pulling the handle with the kit suspended will cause the lid to open. In an emergency. LIFERAFT DEFLATION TOOL Instances of inadvertent liferaft inflation have occurred in flight resulting in full forward control column displacement. this could cause a fatal delay in escaping from the aircraft. In the event the liferaft becomes inadvertently inflated at either pilot’s position. the parachute strap adjuster will be disconnected. the kit will be deployed only upon actuation of the survival kit release handle. to indicate that the release initiator has fired. the lid will open. the survival kit will be automatically deployed 4 seconds after parachute opening if connected to a type BA-21A or BA-27A parachute. the parachute strap adjuster will be disconnected. If the kit release handle is pulled with the plunger depressed. Ensure the survival kit is locked by pulling on the parachute strap adjusters. an arming plunger (12. arming the mechanism. AUTO. Do not pull the kit release handle while in the aircraft with the kit not installed in the seat. and the raft will inflate as the dropline is extended. with the red visible. the adjusters move the release handle to the locked position. The deployment sensor in the parachute initiates the deployment actuator in the survival kit. SURVIVAL KIT RELEASE HANDLE The survival kit release handle (13. When the survival kit is in the seat. 1B-52H-1 Global Survival Kit Controls MODE SELECTOR LEVER A mode selector lever (14. the compartment lid opening arming plunger will be extended. In MANUAL (down) position. thus severing the survival kit from the parachute harness. leaving the crewmember attached to the survival kit. In AUTO (up) position. 1-79 . the pilot or copilot will puncture the inflated raft with the deflation tool and use a ripping action to make a large opening for rapid deflation.O. If the kit release handle is pulled with the arming plunger extended. figure 1-28) located on the right side of the survival kit is operated by pulling up against the handle latch until the handle pulls free from the container. figure 1-17) located on the pilot’s and copilot’s glare shield above their respective side panels is provided for liferaft deflation. NOTE • • • Do not allow the arming plunger to drop down before the release handle and parachute strap adjuster have been reset. To do so may cause the kit to open. It is possible to install the survival kit in the ejection seat with the arming plunger extended. When the survival kit is removed from the seat. The lever has two positions. figure 1-28) having a red ring around its body will protrude from the release mechanism. the dropline will remain attached to the parachute harness. Ensure that the plunger is fully depressed into the kit before occupying an ejection seat.-MANUAL.

For routine movement about in the aircraft. Severe injury may be incurred if ejection is performed with any integrated harness attachment fitting disconnected. then disconnect the parachute chest and leg straps. ABNS LLC AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC Figure 1-29 1-80 RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL . seat occupant. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. Thus. 1B-52H-1 SAFETY BELT A safety belt with standard manual release and lock lever fittings is provided with each ejection seat.T.O. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. Escape Systems Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Ejection Seat Position Actuators EW Officer Gunner Copilot Navigator Pilot Radar Navigator 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE MISCELLANEOUS – SEAT POSITION – DECM FCS SEAT POS SEAT POSITION – COPILOT SEAT POSN – R OPER PILOTS SEAT POS SEAT POSN – L OPER RLC/F17 RLC/E17 RLC/F16 ABNS/A14 LLC/C34 ABNS/A13 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. Do not open the safety belt prior to ejection. parachute. figure 1-28) in the integrated harness fittings on each side of the seat. leaving the parachute with survival kit attached to the seat. and survival kit are released from the seat as an integral unit whenever the integrated harness release fittings are opening. it is recommended that the crewmember unlock and open the safety belt. The survival kit is then secured to the parachute by threading the parachute attachment fittings through the straps on the safety belt and fastening them to the kit. The belt is installed by inserting the attachment fittings (24. safety belt.

T. and 7. For usual flight operation. The accessory drive gearbox is also utilized for mounting the accessories necessary for engine control such as the engine fuel pump. The engines are trimmed per ‘‘flat rated’’ engine trim procedures. forms the engine air inlet. 5. An enginedriven variable delivery hydraulic pump is installed on the lower right side of engines 1. engines 5 and 6 in No. diametrically shaped fin exhaust air ducts are located outboard around each engine and inboard between engines below the strut structure from which the engines are suspended. 6. The nacelles are also numbered in this manner with engines 1 and 2 in No. The afterbody cowling covers the engine accessories and the remainder of the engine from the fan bypass duct exit to the aft end of the tailpipe. and oil pressure transmitter. During ground operation. and aircraft angleof-attack determine the differential pressure felt by each door. 1 nacelle. tachometer generator. At ambient temperatures below 100°F. The engines are mounted in pairs in four nacelles suspended below the wings and are numbered in the conventional manner from left to right 1 thru 8. a left and right upper and lower wrap cowl. An electrically controlled air-drive starter is installed on the lower side of each engine. For engine thrust rating information. 1B-52H-1 ENGINES DESCRIPTION ENGINE AIR BLEED ENGINE FUEL CONTROL SYSTEM ENGINE OIL SUPPLY SYSTEM ENGINE STALL PREVENTION SYSTEM ENGINE IGNITION AND STARTING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION ENGINE IGNITION AND STARTING SYSTEM OPERATION MONITORING EGT DURING TAKEOFF ENGINE LIFE DESCRIPTION Eight Pratt & Whitney Model TF33-P-3 turbofan engines (figure 1-30) are installed on the aircraft. engines 3 and 4 in No. are opened by differential pressure. Cowling for each nacelle pod consists of a nose cowl for each engine. pins. 4 nacelle. see figure 1-30. hydromechanical fuel control unit. The nose cowl. The doors. The nacelle pod cowling is attached to engine and strut structure and to mating cowling by a series of hooks. Airflow from the engine fan exit ducts is discharged axially over the afterbody cowling. 3. and quick-release latches to provide easy access to the engines. 3 nacelle. The first and second stage rotor blades are longer than those of the remaining stages of the compressor and comprise the fan portion of the turbofan engine. which are spring-loaded to the closed position. A 120 KVA generator is installed in a lower center position of engines 1. Engine circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-34. takeoff rated thrust will be obtained at throttle settings below the full forward position. Change 16 1-81 . Openings are provided in the cowling for servicing and to facilitate maintenance. 3. In each nacelle pod. The low pressure compressor on these engines consists of a compressor and fan assembly. The accessories are driven from an engine accessories gearbox by means of a shaft which is mechanically geared directly to the main shaft connecting the first stage turbine to the high pressure compressor. The wrap cowling covers the fan case and a portion of the turbofan exit ducts. All engines have cartridge start capability. the doors close during the initial portion of climb and remain closed until landing pattern maneuvers. The engines are identical with exception of the installation of engine-mounted accessories. 5. Takeoff rated thrust is obtained by adjusting the throttles to a predetermined value of engine pressure ration (EPR) as determined from a takeoff rated thrust EPR curve for the prevailing conditions of field barometric pressure and runway temperature. A constant speed drive air-oil cooler is located aft of the generator in the area of the turbofan exit duct where engine fan air used for cooling is exhausted overboard. 2 nacelle. to- 1-81 1-83 1-83 1-86 1-87 1-87 1-95 1-95 1-95 1-95 gether with the nose dome.O. Fan air is diverted into special ducts for cooling of 120 KVA generators and is exhausted overboard from under the afterbody cowl. 4. Generator rpm is maintained by use of a constant speed hydraulic drive installed on the same engines. engine thrust setting. Mach number. and engines 7 and 8 in No. and a left and right upper and lower afterbody cowl. and 7. Eight auxiliary air inlet doors are provided in the cowl to allow a sufficient volume of air to enter the engine during ground operation and takeoff. the doors open because of the pressure across them and assist in producing a more uniform pressure at the engine inlet.

500 14. AND 4TH STAGE TURBINES EXHAUST CONE EGT PROBE EPR PROBE(EXHAUST PRESSURE) FIRE SEAL FUEL OIL COOLER FUEL FLOWMETER ENGINE IGNITER PRESSURIZING AND DUMP VALVE 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 STARTER HYDRAULIC PUMP TACHOMETER GENERATOR SURGE BLEED VALVE ACTUATOR AND GOVERNOR ACCESSORY DRIVE CASE SURGE BLEED VALVE PORT FUEL PUMP CONSTANT SPEED DRIVE FUEL CONTROL UNIT GENERATOR COOLING AIR OUTLET CSD OIL COOLER AIR OUTLET AC GENERATOR CSD OIL COOLER GENERATOR COOL AIR INLET IGNITION UNIT ENGINE DRIVEN ACCESSORIES ENGINE NUMBER 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 X X X X HYDRAULIC PUMP X X AC GENERATOR & CONSTANT SPEED DRIVE X X X 8 X THRUST IN POUNDS AT SEA LEVEL ICAO STANDARD DAY ENGINES TF33-P3 TAKEOFF RATED THRUST MILITARY RATED THRUST NORMAL RATED THRUST MATERIAL 17. 1B-52H-1 The Engine 1 2 NOSE DOME EPR PROBE (INLET PRESSURE AUXILIARY AIR INLET DOORS INLET GUIDE VANES LOW PRESSURE COMPRESSOR. BLADE STAGES FAN AIR DUCT EXIT FUEL STRAINER OIL TANK. CONSTANT SPEED DRIVE BLEED AIR DUCT 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 FIRE DETECTORS (ON ENGINE FIREWALL) FUEL MANIFOLD (DUAL) COMBUSTION CHAMBER COMBUSTION CHAMBER CENTER TUBE FIRST STAGE TURBINE 2ND. FAN STAGES FAN AIR EXIT VANES LOW PRESSURE COMPRESSOR.T. 3RD.500 TITANIUM Figure 1-30 1-82 .000 16. ENGINE HIGH PRESSURE COMPRESSOR OIL TANK.O.

In addition to the above uses of high pressure compressor bleed air which is taken directly from the main manifold of the pneumatic system. Right body manifold bleed air is used for antiicing of the missile ram airscoop located in the leading edge of the right wing. The ATV is mechanically connected to the throttle valve. The FEV may also be used for starts when the temperature is 32° to 40°F. Advancing the inboard nacelle engine throttles 3 and 5 or 4 and 6 to approximately 75% rpm (approximately 45° throttle) completes the flaps up warning circuit which sounds the warning horn if the aircraft is on the ground and the flaps are not fully extended. Retarding a throttle near the IDLE position when the landing gear is not down and locked completes a circuit providing TR power to the landing gear warning horn. Advancing the throttles out of CLOSED position provides power to open the firewall fuel shutoff valves provided the fire shutoff switches have not been pulled (figure 1-32). resulting from continuous operation.000 feet when using JP-5. the system energizes the FEV. These are located aft of the large throttles and are spaced close together for convenience of use by the pilots. Throttles Eight throttles (12. Output from the pump is delivered to the fuel control unit. This system is not required with JP-4 fuel. This system makes it unnecessary to make throttle adjustments to compensate for variations in inlet temperature. this section. the fuel control sequencing valves are positioned to provide fuel pressure for closing the fuel dump valves. Except for the two center throttles. Operation of the engine bleed valve actuators allows bleeding of the 9th stage low compressor pressure (for prevention of hung starts and engine stall). JP-8. 115 volt ac power will be supplied.-OPEN. control cabin air conditioning. a fuel enrichment valve (FEV) and an auxiliary throttle valve (ATV). In addition to the utilization of engine bleed air. essential dc power is supplied to the engine ignition circuit. For further information on the above uses of engine bleed air. The system is made up of two major components. 16th stage engine bleed air is also used for pressurization of the constant speed generator drives and the oil tank for each drive. At the same time. The FEV then supplies fuel under pressure to the ATV. Change 22 1-83 .O. provided the engine starter switch is in START position. This allows fuel under boost pump pressure to reach a two-stage engine-driven fuel pump. A bypass valve is provided to allow fuel to bypass the first pump stage in the event of failure. see PNEUMATICS. This facilitates ground handling of the aircraft and thrust settings at the pilot’s discretion. or airspeed. With the throttles advanced approximately 18° from CLOSED position. When the fuel enrichment valve switch on the copilot’s side panel (19. The throttle provides basic engine thrust control and operates through the fuel control unit to position a throttle valve. Fuel from the tanks is routed through the fuel supply system to fuel control units which meter fuel to each engine. In CLOSED position. Bleed air obtained from the body manifold is regulated for pressurization of the missile environmental system air ducts. and inlet pitot tubes for the engine pressure ratio (EPR) transducers. figure 1-33) on the aisle stand control the firewall fuel shutoff valves and the throttle valves. (When in flight with the starter switch in CONT position. essential dc power is supplied to close the firewall fuel shutoff valves. the mechanical connection closes the ATV. each throttle has a different height from the adjacent throttle and is separated from the others by being slightly bent outboard for selectivity and ease of operation of individual engines. inlet guide vanes. figure 1-33) is set to OPEN. turbofan discharge air is used for generator cooling and constant speed drive oil cooling. nose domes. The additional fuel from the ATV is completely shut off when the engine fuel flow reaches 1500 pph. anti-icing of the left wing air conditioning ram airscoop.T.) See START- ER SWITCH. As the engine RPM increases. Engine fuel from the fuel supply system is also controlled by an electrically operated firewall fuel shutoff valve. To prevent possible damage to the fuel enrichment valve solenoid. metered fuel under pressure is then supplied to the primary manifold of each engine. A mechanical stop is provided on the throttles which prevents their being retarded to CLOSED unless each throttle knob is raised approximately 1/4 inch. altitude. 1B-52H-1 ENGINE AIR BLEED Pneumatic power is provided for engine starting. An individual smaller throttle lever and knob is integrally connected to each large throttle to serve as a one-hand multiple grip for operation of the eight engines simultaneously. The throttle quadrant is marked CLOSED-IDLE. Power to open this valve is supplied by the fire shutoff switch when the throttles are moved from CLOSED. this section. and pressurization of the hydraulic systems reservoirs. and for anti-icing of engine nacelle cowls. ENGINE FUEL CONTROL SYSTEM An engine fuel control system (figure 1-31) on each engine automatically provides optimum engine performance for any throttle setting. or JET A/A1 fuels. [EV] Engine Fuel Enrichment System The fuel enrichment system is used for ground starting of cold soaked engines at low temperatures (when the outside air temperature is at or below zero degrees Celsius) and air starting engines above 15. When the throttle opens during engine start the mechanical connection opens the ATV for additional fuel flow. the fuel enrichment valve switch should be set to the CLOSE position after engine starting is completed.

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Engine Fuel Control System
[EV]
FROM FUEL SUPPLY STSTEM

THROTTLES
ENGINE FIRE
SHUTOFF
SWITCH

OPEN

OP

NORMAL (IN)

CL
FIREWALL FUEL
SHUTOFF VALVE

FUEL
ENRICHMENT
VALVE SWITCH

CLOSED

FIRE
SHUTOFF
(OUT)

FILTER

PUMP
BYPASS
VALVE

TWO STAGE ENGINE
DRIVEN FUEL PUMP
DRAIN
PRESSURIZING
VALVE
FUEL CONTROL UNIT
PRESSURE
REGULATOR
AND
BYPASS
VALVE

FEV/
ATV

COARSE
FILTER
FINE
FILTER

FROM
FUEL
CONTROL
CASE
SERVO AND CONTROL PRESSURE

COMPRESSOR
INLET
PRESSURE
SERVO
THROTTLE
VALVE

FUEL
ENRICHMENT
VALVE

BURNER
PRESS
SERVO

MINIMUM PRESSURE
AND SHUTOFF VALVE
(Closed when throttle
is closed)

SPEED
SERVO

SPEED
GOVERNOR
SERVO

GOVERNOR

PILOT VALVE
(Operated by
throttle
movement
between
CLOSED
and IDLE)
FUEL CONTROL
CASE PRESSURE
RETURN TO ENGINE
PUMP INLET
DISCHARGE
MANIFOLDS

FLOWMETER
TRANSMITTER
PRIMARY

MAIN

ENGINE
INLET

TOTAL
FUEL FLOW
INDICATORS

FUEL
FLOW
METER

FUEL SUPPLY
METERED FUEL
BYPASS FUEL
TEMPERATURE OR PRESSURE
SENSING LINES
ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT
MECHANICAL ACTUATION

PRESSURIZING
VALVE

FUEL PRESSURIZING
VALVE (Closed
when throttle is open)

B62844

Figure 1-31 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-84

Change 20

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Less [EV]
FROM FUEL SUPPLY STSTEM

THROTTLES
ENGINE FIRE
SHUTOFF
SWITCH

OPEN

OP
FIREWALL FUEL
SHUTOFF VALVE

NORMAL (IN)

CL

CLOSED

FIRE
SHUTOFF
(OUT)

FILTER

PUMP
BYPASS
VALVE

TWO STAGE ENGINE
DRIVEN FUEL PUMP
DRAIN
PRESSURIZING
VALVE
FUEL CONTROL UNIT
PRESSURE
REGULATOR
AND
BYPASS
VALVE

COARSE
FILTER

THROTTLE
VALVE

FINE
FILTER

FROM
FUEL
CONTROL
CASE
SERVO AND CONTROL PRESSURE

COMPRESSOR
INLET
PRESSURE
SERVO

BURNER
PRESS
SERVO

SPEED
SERVO

SPEED
GOVERNOR
SERVO

GOVERNOR

MINIMUM PRESSURE
AND SHUTOFF VALVE
(Closed when throttle
is closed)

PILOT VALVE
(Operated by
throttle
movement
between
CLOSED
and IDLE)
FUEL CONTROL
CASE PRESSURE
RETURN TO ENGINE
PUMP INLET
DISCHARGE
MANIFOLDS

FLOWMETER
TRANSMITTER
PRIMARY

MAIN

ENGINE
INLET

TOTAL
FUEL FLOW
INDICATORS

FUEL
FLOW
METER

FUEL SUPPLY
METERED FUEL
BYPASS FUEL
TEMPERATURE OR PRESSURE
SENSING LINES
ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT
MECHANICAL ACTUATION

PRESSURIZING
VALVE

FUEL PRESSURIZING
VALVE (Closed
when throttle is open)

A31656

Figure 1-31 (Sheet 2 of 2)

Change 20

1-84A/(1-84B blank)

BLA

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Throttle Positions Chart
THROTTLES
POSITION
CLOSED

PERCENT
RPM

FIREWALL FUEL
SHUTOFF VALVE
POSITION

IGNITION

FUEL PRESSURIZING
AND DUMP VALVE

0%

CLOSED

Not Available

Open

Open unless engine
fire shutoff switch is
pulled

Available when
throttle is advanced from
CLOSED with
engine starter
switch in
START.

Advanced

18° approx

(Starting)

Closed.
Metered fuel under pressure is supplied to primary manifold.

IDLE

45° approx.

WARNING
HORN

Energized if
throttle is retarded when landing gear is not
down and locked.
75% approx.

Cruise

84 to 94%

OPEN

106.7% max.

Energized if aircraft is on the
ground and the
flaps are not fully
extended.

Figure 1-32

Fuel Control Unit

The fuel control unit (JFC 25-14) used on TF33-P-3
engines is of the hydromechanical type and provides a means of obtaining optimum engine performance at any thrust setting. The unit consists of a
metering and a computing system. The metering
system selects the rate of fuel flow to be applied to
the engine burners in accordance with the amount
of thrust demanded by the pilot but subject to engine operating limitations as scheduled by the computing system.

High pressure fuel from the engine-driven fuel
pump is supplied to the filtration system which is
incorporated within the fuel control inlet. The
filtration system consists of a coarse filter and a
fine filter. The fuel control unit contains speed,
burner pressure, and compressor inlet pressure (altitude sense) sensing servos, and a speed sensing
governor which acts in conjunction with the throttle
to position the throttle valve. Fuel pressure at the
throttle valve is maintained by a pressure regulating valve which bypasses the fuel in excess of that
directed to the throttle valve to the interstage area

1-85

T.O. 1B-52H-1
of the fuel pump. The throttle metering valve is
positioned by the computing section of the fuel control unit to permit selection of the proper fuel flow.
The amount of fuel metered to the engine by the
throttle valve is determined by a combination of
compressor inlet pressure, burner pressure, engine
rpm, and throttle position. A minimum pressure
and shutoff valve, which is the final fuel control
component to act upon metered flow prior to the
entry of fuel into the engine manifolds, is located
downstream from the throttle valve and is opened
by metered fuel pressure from the throttle valve.
This valve shuts off the flow of metered fuel to the
engine when the pilot moves the throttle to
CLOSED position. It also provides minimum operating pressure within the fuel control unit, ensuring that adequate pressure is available for operation of the servos and valves at minimum flow conditions.
The computing system of the fuel control unit positions the throttle valve to control steady state engine speed, acceleration, and deceleration. Positioning of the throttle valve is mechanically accomplished by using the ratio of metered fuel flow to
engine burner pressure to provide the required fuel
flow. Acceleration control is accomplished by placing a maximum stop on the ratio of metered fuel
flow to engine burner pressure, thereby limiting accelerations to avoid the overtemperature and surge
limits. When the throttle is closed, a sequencing
valve is opened which allows high pressure fuel to
close the minimum pressure and shutoff valve. Because of excessive pressure that would exist during
engine windmilling, the throttle controlled sequencing valve is designed to permit a windmill bypass
feature when the minimum pressure and shutoff
valve is closed, thereby allowing normal operation
of the pressure regulating valve and preventing
damage to the engine-driven fuel pump.
A flowmeter transmitter, flowmeter, and total fuel
flow indicator are also provided. Metered fuel under
pressure flows from the fuel control unit through
the flowmeter transmitter and fuel-oil cooler to the
primary manifold discharge nozzles and, when fuel
pressure is sufficient, a pressurizing valve is
opened which allows fuel to flow to the discharge
nozzles of the secondary fuel manifold.
The fuel pressurizing and dump valve is held closed
by fuel pressure, and is opened as fuel is shut off
when the throttle is moved to CLOSED position.
The opening of this valve as fuel pressure drops allows fuel to drain from both the primary and the
secondary engine fuel manifolds.

1-86

Change 13

ENGINE OIL SUPPLY SYSTEM

Each engine is provided with an integral oil system
which includes an oil tank with a minimum usable
capacity of 7.10 gallons and a total capacity of 10.23
gallons. Oil is supplied to a gear-type engine-driven
oil pressure pump from each engine oil tank. Above
engine idle rpm setting, the pump supplies a constant regulated 80 pounds of oil per minute at 45 to
50 psi pressure to the engine bearings and accessory drives in the various engine compartments.
Scavenge pumps remove oil from the engine compartments and returns it to the tank for reuse.
The fuel-oil cooler, which transfers heat from the oil
to the fuel, consists of a cylindrical oil chamber enclosed within an external jacket through which the
fuel passes without restriction of flow. Oil temperature is governed by a thermostatic control valve
which is an integral part of the fuel-oil cooler and
operates at temperatures between 40° and 120° C
(104° and 248° F). The valve permits bypassing of
the oil through the cooler at temperatures above
120° C.
The oil system incorporates a breather pressurizing
valve which is sensitive to altitude and which permits system pressurization up to 5 psi above atmospheric pressure. Pressurization improves the supply and scavenging system operation by compensating for the loss of gravitational forces on the oil at
altitude. When the oil supply is exhausted, approximately 1 to 1 1/2 gallons of oil remain trapped in
the lines and the oil cooler.
A selective type oil temperature indicating system
is provided for protection against engine damage or
failure and consists of a temperature gage and a selector switch located on the copilot’s side panel. To
obtain the indicated oil temperature of a particular
engine, the selector must be positioned to the desired engine by number. Each engine is equipped
with an oil temperature probe which will sense
temperatures in a range from –54° to 176°C and automatically provide an electrical signal to the temperature gage. With the exception of the oil temperature selector which is used in checking the engines
separately for high or excessive oil temperatures,
no manual controls are provided for the engine oil
system. For oil servicing information, see figure
1-186.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
ENGINE STALL PREVENTION SYSTEM

An engine stall prevention system is provided to
control the engine compressor surge bleed valves
for prevention of stalls which are caused by crosswinds during ground operation. During static engine operation, air entering the inlet around the
cowl lip separates and produces areas of low pressure across the face of the forward compressor. This
pressure distortion is aggravated further by wind
blowing across the inlet lip. Auxiliary air inlet takeoff doors are incorporated in the cowl to increase
the inlet area and minimize pressure distortion;
however, because of remaining inlet distortion combined with TF33-P-3 engine compressor characteristics, stalls will occur in crosswinds of 10 knots or
more. The stall prevention system permits stall-free
ground operation and enables takeoff since inlet
pressure distortion rapidly disappears with increase of airspeed during the takeoff roll and crosswinds are a negligible influence above an average
velocity of 50 knots. See ENGINE OPERATION,
this section, for additional information on engine
compressor stalls. Stall-free operation is accomplished by opening the compressor surge bleed
valves sufficiently to reduce the pressure rise across
the low speed forward compressor. A solenoid-operated valve in the bleed valve actuator air supply
line causes the bleed valve to open when energized.
The solenoid valves are controlled by a single engine stall prevention switch on each of the pilot’s
control wheels. The control circuit is deenergized by
the landing gear squat switches when the aircraft
is airborne.
ENGINE IGNITION AND STARTING SYSTEM

A turbine-driven starter is provided on each engine.
The starter turbine may utilize either low pressure
bleed air obtained from a ground source or from an
operating engine through the air bleed system or
may utilize high pressure gas generated by burning
a solid propellant cartridge. Starter operation is basically the same for pneumatic or cartridge operation with the major difference being the temperature and pressure of the two gases. The bleed air
enters the starter turbine at a temperature of
500°F or less, while the cartridge-produced gas
enters at a temperature in excess of 2100°F. Each
starter unit consists of a turbine, gear train, and an
overrunning clutch. In addition, the cartridge
starter has a breech chamber with breech cap and

locking handle, a pressure modulating valve, and
the necessary electrical components for cartridge
ignition and starter control. The cartridge cannot
be ignited unless the breech is properly installed
and the lock handle is in the proper position. The
pressure modulating valve maintains proper
operating pressure and, in case of malfunction,
relieves pressure to safe limits. As engine rpm
exceeds starter rpm, the overrunning clutch
releases to prevent the starter turbine from being
driven to an overspeed condition. When starting
with compressed air, a centrifugal switch monitors
rpm at the starter mounting pad and, as a specified
rpm is reached, breaks the circuit to the starter
control valve solenoid, allowing the valve to close
and shut off the starter air supply. Each starter is
geared to the high pressure compressor of the
engine on which it is installed. Since the primary
purpose of the cartridge-pneumatic starter is to
provide for operation without need for auxiliary air
and electrical power supply, provision (24, sheet 2 of
figure 1-1) has been made to carry eight spare
cartridges in the aircraft. Since all eight engines
have cartridge-pneumatic starters, provisions are
made in the electrical supply system for cartridge
starting all engines simultaneously to accomplish a
‘‘quick start.’’ These provisions also include the
capability to start all engines from a single battery
in the event of failure of one. The switching of the
start functions to the good battery is automatic and
cannot be controlled by the pilot.
A dual ignition system is installed, having an intermittent duty dc system for starting and a continuous duty ac system for prevention of flameout. Engine ignition is accomplished by spark ignitors located in the combustion chambers of each engine.
Ignition is under control of eight starter switches, a
start selector switch, and the throttles. These controls may be used to obtain starts on the ground in
any combination of engines from single to all, either
pneumatic or cartridge. In flight, these controls are
used for all combinations of air starts. Power for
starting ignition is essential dc power. Outboard engine ignition systems are supplied power from the
left essential dc start bus. Inboard engine ignition
systems are supplied power from the right essential
dc start bus. Under battery only operation, these
start buses will be automatically connected to the
good battery if one were to fail. AC power is used
for continuous ignition.

Change 4

1-87

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Engine Controls and Indicators

1
2
3
4
5
6

LOW OIL PRESSURE WARNING LIGHT (8)
OIL PRESSURE GAGE (8)
ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH (8)
EPR GAGE (8)
TACHOMETER (8)
EXHAUST GAS TEMPERATURE GAGE (8)

7
8
9
10
11

FUEL FLOW METER (8)
TOTAL FUEL FLOW METER
[EV] FEV OPEN CAUTION LIGHT
Less [EV] SPARE
STARTER NOT OFF CAUTION LIGHT
ENGINE OIL OVERHEAT CAUTION LIGHT

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 1 of 7)

1-88

Change 20

T.O. 1B-52H-1

12
13
14
15
16
17

ENGINE STALL PREVENTION (ESP) SWITCH
THROTTLES (8)
THROTTLE BRAKE LEVER
THRUST GATE
OIL TEMPERATURE GAGE
OIL TEMPERATURE SELECTOR SWITCH

18
19
20
21

MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH
[EV] FUEL ENRICHMENT VALVE SWITCH
Less [EV] BLANK
ENGINE START SELECTOR SWITCH
ENGINE START SWITCH

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 2 of 7)

Change 20

1-89

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Engine Controls and Indicators (Cont)
NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

FUNCTION
NOTE

To more readily identify a malfunctioning engine, a yellow vertical stripe is painted between the left-hand and
right-hand bank of engine instruments (between engines 4 and 5).
1

Low Oil Pressure Warning Lights (8)

Low engine oil pressure is indicated by eight amber low oil pressure warning lights located over each oil pressure gage on the eyebrow instrument
panel. A pressure switch is installed on each engine that will cause the
light to come on when a decreasing oil pressure reaches 37 (±2) psi and
turn the light off when an increasing oil pressure reaches 37 (±2) psi.
These lights will complement the oil pressure indicating system to provide
a cross-check to establish if a malfunction is occurring in the oil pressure
indicating system or in the engine. All lights have a press-to-test feature
and have provisions for manually dimming or shading. The low oil pressure warning lights operate on TR power.

2

Oil Pressure Gages (8)

Indicates engine oil pressure in increments of 5 psi.
NOTE


If the oil pressure circuit breaker has popped out, oil pressure
indicators are inoperative.
Oil pressure will have a tendency to follow the throttle due
to the type of oil pressure relief valve installed. This condition
is normal provided the oil pressure stabilizes between the
minimum and maximum limits.

3

Engine Fire Shutoff Switches (8)

A fire shutoff switch is provided for shutoff of fuel to each engine. Each
switch closes a corresponding engine firewall fuel shutoff valve when
pulled out to the FIRE SHUTOFF position, regardless of throttle position.
A red fire warning light is an integral part of each switch. For other switch
functions, see ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCHES, described under
EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT, this section.

4

Engine Pressure Ratio (EPR) Gages (8)

An engine pressure ratio (EPR) gage for each engine is located on the
pilots’ instrument panel. These gages indicate the ratio of engine inlet to
exhaust pressures which is used as a measure of engine thrust. The engine inlet and exhaust indications are compared by a computer-transmitter which electrically transmits an indication to the engine pressure ratio
gage.

5

Tachometers (8)

Speed of the high pressure compressor rotor in percent rpm is indicated
by eight tachometers on the pilots’ instrument panel. Engine driven
tachometer generators supply power to operate the indicators which are
independent of the aircraft electrical system. Each instrument has two
pointers. The larger pointer indication is read on a dial calibrated from 0%
to 100% rpm. The small pointer indication is read on a dial calibrated from
0% to 10% rpm.

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 3 of 7)

1-90

T.O. 1B-52H-1

NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

6

Exhaust Gas Temperature Gages (8)

Exhaust gas temperature of each engine is indicated by eight gages on
the pilots’ instrument panel. These gages are calibrated in degrees centigrade and indicate the temperature of the exhaust gases of each engine.
Engine thermocouples supply power to operate the gages which are independent of the aircraft electrical power system.

7

Fuel Flowmeters (8)

Fuel flow to the engine is shown by eight fuel flowmeters on the pilot’s instrument panel. These indicators read in pounds per hour and operate on
TR power.

8

Total Fuel Flow Indicator

A total fuel flow indicator is located on the pilots’ instrument panel. This
instrument uses 115 volt ac power to electrically add the flow rates indicated on the eight individual fuel flowmeters. The totalizer indication is accurate within ±3% when all engines are operating.

9

[EV] FEV OPEN Caution Light

The amber fuel enrichment valve (FEV) open caution light comes on any
time the FEV switch is in the OPEN position. It is a reminder to place the
FEV switch to CLOSE after engine start. This will prevent possible damage to the valve solenoid resulting from continuous operation. It should
be noted that the auxiliary throttle valve will close automatically when the
total fuel flow reaches 1500 pph, however, the fuel enrichment valve will
remain energized and open and the light will remain on until the FEV
switch is placed to the CLOSE position.

10

STARTER NOT OFF Caution Light

An amber starter-not-off caution light on the central caution panel is
marked STARTER NOT OFF. The light is illuminated by right essential
bus power when a starter switch is left in START position and, even
though the starter may be disengaged due to engine acceleration, the
light will indicate that power for ignition is available until shut off by the
starter switch.

11

ENGINE OIL OVERHEAT Caution Light

An amber engine oil overheat light on the central caution panel illuminates to read ENGINE OIL OVERHEAT when an oil temperature of 135°
to 142°C or higher occurs on any engine. The engine oil overheat light
may illuminate at temperatures of –10°C and below if the oil temperature
selector switch (No. 16) is positioned in M or any of the eight engine positions; however, the light will immediately be extinguished when the engines are started. Due to extremely cold temperatures, an actuating cam
within the gage, as well as the pointer, may rotate counterclockwise until
the overheat light switch within the gage is contacted, causing the light
to illuminate. Placing the temperature selector switch in T position will
cause the actuating cam to move clockwise and extinguish the light as
the pointer moves beyond the comparative point of contact of the actuating cam. If the light is out for all temperatures in the –10° to +135°C range,
operation is satisfactory.

12

Engine Stall Prevention (ESP) Switch

An engine stall prevention (ESP) switch is located on each of the pilot’s
control wheels and is used to prevent engine stall due to crosswind during
engine ground operation. These pushbuttons are also used as the
autopilot and air refueling boom release switches. When either engine
stall prevention switch is depressed, TR power is supplied to energize solenoid-operated valves which cause the compressor surge bleed valves
to open on all operating engines while on the ground. When the switch
is released, the surge bleed valves return to normal scheduled operation.
For additional functions of this switch, see AUTOPILOT and AIR REFUELING, this section.

FUNCTION

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 4 of 7)

Change 20

1-91

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Engine Controls and Indicators (Cont)
CONTROLINDICATOR

NO.
13

Throttles (8)

FUNCTION
Eight throttles on the aisle stand control engine ignition. Advancing a
throttle out of CLOSED position will supply essential dc power for starting
ignition to that engine if the starter switch is in START or will supply ac
power for continuous ignition if the starter switch is in CONT. Returning
the throttle to closed cuts off ignition power.
NOTE
Because of forward throttle creep when the throttles are positioned above IDLE setting, a potential flight safety hazard exists
at any time a constant throttle setting is desired with the throttle
brake lever OFF. The condition exists because of induced
torque from the fuel control unit and results in making precise
thrust adjustments difficult as well as creating high throttle retarding forces.

14

Throttle Brake Lever

A throttle brake lever on the aisle stand to the right of the throttles is used
to adjust the amount of force necessary to move the throttles. When in
OFF (aft) position, the throttle brake is released. Moving the throttle brake
lever in the INCREASE (forward) direction increases throttle friction.

15

Thrust Gate

An adjustable thrust gate spans the throttle quadrant forward of the
throttles to provide a means of restricting forward travel of throttles during
operation requiring a limited amount of thrust. The gate, which is a rollermounted carriage, travels between guide rails located above the quadrant surface at each side of the aisle stand. The gate carriage acts as an
impediment when the throttles are advanced and it may be adjusted as
necessary to provide the desired thrust limit. A scissor-type lever located
on the copilot’s side of the thrust gate carriage provides for adjustment
of the thrust gate within a 70° arc at the forward end of the quadrant. The
aft edge of the carriage, which is painted white, is used as a positioning
indicator for both pilot and copilot. Lighting is provided on the copilot’s
side to facilitate adjustment and, on some aircraft, an index pointer is also
provided on the copilot’s side. The outboard side of each guide rail is
marked by a metalcal in 5° increments and numbered at 10° increments
from 40° thru 110°. Adjustment of the thrust gate is usually accomplished
by the copilot; however, the adjustment lever is accessible to the pilot.
Detents are spaced 5° apart along the left guide rail for positioning of the
thrust gate which may be moved by squeezing the scissor-type lever to
release a roller-tipped spring-loaded plunger. The spring-loaded plunger
supplies the force to restrain the carriage in the selected detent position.
It is possible to overpower this force by applying approximately twice the
force required to normally operate all eight throttles simultaneously. For
operation not requiring use of the thrust gate, the carriage may be stowed
forward of full open throttle position.

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 5 of 7)

1-92

Change 20

T.O. 1B-52H-1

NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

FUNCTION

16

Oil Temperature Gage

A single engine oil temperature gage is located on the copilot’s side panel
and provides oil temperature readings for individual engine systems or
maximum temperature of all engine oil supply systems as selected by the
temperature selector switch. The temperature is indicated by a pointer
which rotates around a temperature scale on the indicating dial calibrated
from 0° to 180° C.

17

Oil Temperature Selector Switch

An oil temperature selector switch has 10 positions; one each for the eight
engine oil temperature probes (as designated by engine number), a T
(test) position, and an M (monitor) position. When the M position is selected, the indicating gage displays the temperature of the hottest of the
eight oil temperature probes but does not show which particular engine
has the high oil temperature. Due to a temperature tolerance of +5°/–0°C,
a higher temperature may be indicated in M position of the selector switch
than at any other separate selection (1 thru 8 positions) of engine oil systems. Due to quick response to changes in temperature of the indicating
system, identification of an engine with excessively high oil temperature
is readily accomplished by selecting the engines separately. When the
selector switch is placed in T position, the pointer moves to the extreme
maximum temperature scale stop. This position of the selector provides
a method of testing for proper operation of the temperature gage and
overheat light. An edge lighted panel installed below the selector and the
temperature gage displays the following caution: LEAVE IN M POSITION
TO MONITOR ALL ENGINES. The oil temperature selector switch, which
has integral lighting, operates on 24 volt dc power on the same circuit with
the engine oil overheat caution light on the central caution panel.

18

MANIFOLD VALVE Switch

The OPEN- -CLOSE manifold valve switch, guarded to the CLOSE position, is located on the copilot’s side panel. OPEN position, used primarily
for engine starting, provides for airflow from any engine to any other
engine by supplying 118-volt single-phase ac to open the motor-driven
body crossover manifold and No. 3 strut bleed valves, and TR power to
open the normally closed solenoid-operated No. 1 and 4 strut bleed
valves. In OPEN position, air conditioning system control of the body
crossover manifold and No. 3 strut bleed valves is discontinued. This results in hot bleed air being interconnected between all engines through
the body crossover manifold. The guarded CLOSE position restores
118-volt single-phase ac to the air conditioning system controls for management of bleed air source selection, and removes TR power from the
solenoid-operated No. 1 and 4 strut bleed valves which resume their normally closed positions.

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 6 of 7)

Change 20

1-93

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Engine Controls and Indicators (Cont)
CONTROLINDICATOR

NO.
19

[EV] FUEL ENRICHMENT VALVE
Switch

FUNCTION
The OPEN- -CLOSE fuel enrichment valve switch, guarded to the
CLOSE position, is located on the copilot’s side panel. When set to
OPEN, the switch opens the fuel enrichment valves to allow increased
fuel flow for engine starting in cold weather or high altitude with any alternate grade fuel. When set to CLOSE, the fuel enrichment valves are
closed.
NOTE
The auxiliary throttle valve is mechanically closed when the fuel
flow exceeds 1500 pph, however, the fuel enrichment valve will
remain open and energized until the fuel enrichment valve
switch is set to the CLOSE position.

20

START SELECTOR Switch

A start selector switch having CARTRIDGE- -FLIGHT- -PNEUMATIC
positions is located on the copilot’s side panel. The switch is locked in
center FLIGHT position and must be pulled out before moving to either
CARTRIDGE or PNEUMATIC positions. The position of this switch determines whether ignition only or both starter and ignition are provided when
the starter switch is operated. In momentary CARTRIDGE position, the
circuits are completed for firing of starter cartridges on engines selected
by the individual engine starter switches. If a starter switch is in START
position, positioning of this selector switch to CARTRIDGE position will
fire the cartridge for that selected engine. In FLIGHT position, only power
for engine starting ignition will be provided to the engine(s) for which the
starter switch is in START. The starters will be inoperable. In PNEUMATIC position, power is supplied to open the starter air valve on the engine
having the starter switch in START. Starting ignition power is also directed
to that engine.

21

Engine Start Switches (8)

Eight START- -OFF- -CONT starter switches are provided on the copilot’s side panel. These switches select the engine(s) for which a starting
or ignition function is desired. The desired functions are determined by
use of the start selector switch in accordance with the starting mode desired: pneumatic, cartridge, or inflight. When the starter switch is in
START, for pneumatic starting, the starter air valve is opened and ignition
power is directed to that engine. For cartridge starting, power is available
to fire the cartridge for that engine. For inflight starting, only ignition power
is directed to that engine. When the starter switch is in CONT, which represents “continuous ignition,” 115 volt ac ignition will be provided when
throttles are out of CLOSED position.

Figure 1-33 (Sheet 7 of 7)

1-94

Change 20

T.O. 1B-52H-1

ENGINE NORMAL OPERATION
ENGINE IGNITION AND STARTING SYSTEM OPERATION

When the engine accelerates above starter cutout
speed, the starter relay becomes deenergized. This
prevents the starter from reengaging if the engine
speed drops below starter cutout speeds, even
though the starter switch remains in START position. If the starter switch is returned to OFF position, however, and the engine speed drops below
starter cutout speed, the starter relay will become
energized. Then if the starter switch is placed in
START position while the engine is still rotating,
starter coupling shaft failure may result. The starter will not engage when the starter switch is in
CONT position. CONT position of the starter switch
provides continuous duty ignition for prevention of
flameout during flight.
MONITORING EGT DURING TAKEOFF

The EGT of a normally operating engine will usually peak considerably sooner than the 2-minute engine acceleration time limit. It therefore is important that the pilot not physically making the takeoff monitor EGT during the takeoff roll and as soon
after unstick as possible. Throttles should be retarded to maintain the appropriate EGT limits.
Normally, a very small reduction in throttle setting
will return an EGT to within limits.
ENGINE LIFE
Time-Temperature-RPM

The ‘‘Time-temperature-rpm’’ relationship within
the engine is the main factor in engine life. The
most important of these is temperature. The
strengths of the materials used in the engine decrease as high internal temperatures approach the
melting points of the metals, even though the danger point may not be closely approached. There is a
tendency for any material to take a permanent set,
stretch, or bend; this tendency increases with both
the load and the temperature. The amount of permanent set increases with the length of time that
the load and/or temperature is applied. After a certain amount of permanent set is attained, the fibers
or grains of the material begin to pull apart. Under
inspection with a high powered microscope, the beginnings of fine cracks may be seen. With additional time, the material begins to elongate at faster

rates as the cracks become bigger and deeper. Finally, the material breaks. This process is so slow
that elongation is perceptible only with careful
measurement. The term ‘‘creep’’ has been applied to
the process because of the length of time required
for elongation to become significant. In a turbine
engine, high load and high temperature are usually
experienced at the same time. The loading on the
turbine and compressor blades is principally the
combined result of the centrifugal force, associated
with rpm, and some gas or air load, associated with
engine internal pressures. When the turbine discharge pressure, which is indicative of other internal pressures, is high, the EGT is also high. This
means that when the turbine blades are subjected
to their heaviest load, the material of which they
are constructed will be at its weakest. The compound effect of high rpm and high temperature results in an astounding increase in the rate of creep
at very high thrust settings when the centrifugal
load is the greatest. The ends of the compressor
blades and the rims of the turbine wheels tend to
travel outward. The rate of creep, which is measured in millionths of an inch per hour, increases
tremendously as the rpm and EGT approach maximum.
Engine Thrust vs Time

The length of time that an engine may be operated
at each of the various thrust ratings, such as takeoff or military, has been established in the interest
of conserving the life of the engine and making the
time between overhauls predictable. The periods of
5 minutes for takeoff and 30 minutes for military
(full thrust) has, by universal acceptance of the definitions for the various engine ratings, been deemed
adequate to take care of most situations. The real
purpose of limiting the time for engine operation at
takeoff or military rated thrust is not so much to
permit a cooling period between intervals of operation at high thrust (although such a cooling period
is very desirable) as it is to provide distribution of
the rate of creep and deterioration of hot section
parts throughout an engine’s normal life. There is
no hard and fast rule for reducing the throttle setting to normal rated, when operating at military for
any specific length of time before the higher thrust
rating may be used again. Whenever the situation
permits, it is good practice to operate an engine at
reduced thrust between periods of operation at military thrust for the same amount of time that the
engine has just operated at the higher thrust setting.

1-95

T.O. 1B-52H-1
Engine Cycle

NOTE

Engine compressor and turbine disks are subject to
low cycle fatigue and are replaced when cycle limits
are exceeded. An accurate record of cycles must be
maintained as specified in T.O. 00-20-5 by making the
appropriate entry on AFTO Form 781H of the number
of cycles which have occurred during each flight. A
cycle, created by certain thrust changes, results in
stresses that affect the low cycle fatigue life of rotating parts. For recording engine cycles in AFTO Form
781H an engine cycle is defined as follows:

Disk life limited to maximum accumulated
cycles: Definition of a cycle count will have
two categories, training and conventional.
1. A conventional takeoff and landing will be
counted as one cycle.
2. For training missions, a touch-and-go will
count as half cycle (0.5).

Engines Circuit Protection and Location
EQUIPMENT
Continuous Ignition

CIRCUIT
BREAKER
TITLE
ENGINE – CONTINUOUS AC
1&8
2&7
3&6
4&5

CB PANEL/
LOCATOR
CODE 11

POWER
SOURCE

RLC/A20
RLC/A21
RLC/A22
RLC/A23

AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5

Engine Fire Detectors and Fire Warning Lights – See EMERGENCY
EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION, This Section
Engine Fire Shutoff Switches and Firewall Shutoff Valves – See EMERGENCY
EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION, This Section
Engine Stall Prevention and
Switch

AERIAL REFUELING –
DISC & ENGINE STALL CONT

RLC/F4

Rt. TR

EPR Gages

ENGINE – PRESSURE RATIO IND –
POD 1
POD 2
POD 3
POD 4

RLC/B13
RLC/B14
RLC/B15
RLC/B16

AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5
AC Bus 5

FUEL MISCELLANEOUS –
FLOW IND AC
FLOW IND DC

RLC/E1
RLC/E2

AC Bus 5
Rt. TR

[EV] Fuel Enrichment Valves

INBD FEV PWR
OUTBD FEV PWR

RLC/B24
LLC/D27

Rt. ESS Start Bus
Left ESS Start Bus

Ignition and Starting System

ENGINE – IGNITION
1
2
DC3
DC4
DC5
DC6
7
8

LLC/F22
LLC/F23
RLC/A14
RLC/A15
RLC/A16
RLC/A17
LLC/F24
LLC/F25

Left ESS Start Bus
Left ESS Start Bus
Rt. ESS Start Bus
Rt. ESS Start Bus
Rt. ESS Start Bus
Rt. ESS Start Bus
Left ESS Start Bus
Left ESS Start Bus

Fuel Flow Gages

Figure 1-34 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-96

Change 20

T.O. 1B-52H-1

EQUIPMENT

CIRCUIT
BREAKER
TITLE

CB PANEL/
LOCATOR
CODE 11

POWER
SOURCE

Oil Pressure Gages

ENGINE – OIL PRESS IND

RLC/C14

AC Bus 5

Oil Pressure Warning

ENGINE – OIL PRESS WARNING

RLC/C18

Rt. TR

Oil Temperature Indicator

ENGINE – OIL TEMP INDICATION

RLC/C16

AC Bus 5

Oil Temperature Warning

ENGINE – OIL TEMP WARNING

RLC/C15

Rt. TR

Standby Starting Power

POWER FEEDERS – DC
STBY START PWR INBD ENG
STBY START PWR OUTBD ENG

LLC/D9
RLC/D33

Aft Batt.
Fwd. Batt.

ENGINE – ENGINE START –
BUS SWITCHING
BUS SWITCHING
CONTROL AFT BUS
CONTROL FWD BUS
1&2
3&4
5&6
7&8

LLC/D24
RLC/B18
LLC/D23
RLC/B17
LLC/D25
RLC/B19
RLC/B20
LLC/D26

Left ESS
Rt. ESS
Left ESS
Rt. ESS
Left ESS
Rt. ESS
Rt. ESS
Left ESS

FUEL MISCELLANEOUS –
FLOW IND AC

RLC/E1

AC Bus 5

Starting System Control

Total Fuel Flow Indicator

11

LLC

The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code
is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER
PANELS figure, under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.
LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL

RLC

RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL

Figure 1-34 (Sheet 2 of 2)

1-97/(1-98 blank)

BLA

T.O. 1B-52H-1

FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION
FUEL TANK VENTING
FUEL CHECKOUT SYSTEM
FUEL SCAVENGE SYSTEM
FUEL SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
OPERATION
FUEL SYSTEM CHECKOUT
FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT

DESCRIPTION
The fuel supply system (figure 1-35) is designed so
that the engines receive fuel from the nearest of
four main tanks or by pressure override from a
main manifold. The main manifold can be pressurized by any auxiliary tank or tanks. The main
tanks are integral wing tanks (‘‘wet wing’’); each
tank has four boost pumps and normally supplies
two engines. No. 1 main tank furnishes fuel for engines 1 and 2, No. 2 main for engines 3 and 4, No. 3
main for engines 5 and 6, and No. 4 main for engines 7 and 8. The auxiliary tanks include two outboard wing tanks which are integral wing tanks, an
integral center wing tank, three body tanks, and
two non-jettisonable external tanks. Normally, the
main manifold is used for directing auxiliary tank
fuel to the engines. The main manifold is separated
from the refuel manifold by the main refuel valve.
During a refueling operation, the main manifold is
used to direct fuel to the desired tanks. See REFUELING SYSTEM, this section. The main manifold may also be used to transfer fuel from auxiliary tanks to main tanks. A crossfeed manifold is provided which makes it possible to interconnect the
fuel feed systems of each nacelle. Auxiliary fuel
should be fed directly to the engines. While auxiliary fuel is being used, main tank boost pump
switches are ON. The boost pumps in the auxiliary
tanks are of higher capacity than the boost pumps
in the main tanks thus allowing a pressure override
condition to exist. When an auxiliary tank runs dry,
the main tank boost pumps take over fuel supply to
the engines with no interruption in fuel flow. The
fuel system panel (figure 1-38) is used to control
fuel flow for engine feed and air refueling operations. This panel indicates the flow of fuel obtained
by selecting different positions on the controls. The
majority of the fuel system controls are numbered
to simplify their identification (figure 1-38). The
control numbers that appear on the fuel system
panel correspond to the control identification num-

1-99
1-99
1-105
1-105
1-105
1-114
1-114
1-116

bers that appear in this manual. The main manifold is scavenged by utilizing a float switch, a solenoid-operated valve, and a scavenge pump which
directs scavenged fuel from the main manifold to
No. 3 main tank. For correct fuel specification
grade, see figure 1-186.
A schematic of the fuel system showing the detailed
mechanical configuration and function of the various fuel lines is given in figure 1-36. The fuel tank
quantities are listed in figure 1-37.
Fuel system circuit protection and the location of
the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-51.
FUEL TANK VENTING

Body fuel tanks are vented through three manifolds
to a surge tank aft of the aft body tank. The surge
tank opens to the atmosphere through a port located aft of the rear wheel well on the underside of
the fuselage and also routes fuel discharged
through the vents to the aft body tank. Body tank
cavities are vented through a manifold which opens
to the atmosphere through a port located aft of the
rear wheel well on the underside of the fuselage. Internal tanks in each wing are vented with a single
vent line for each tank. The three lines in each
wing drain to a wing surge tank located in each
wing tip. The surge tanks route fuel discharged
through the vents to No. 1 and No. 4 main tanks.
Each external tank is vented through a single line
which opens to the atmosphere through a port located on the aft outboard side of the tank strut. The
vent system is designed for JP-4 fuel only. See
RATE OF CLIMB LIMITATIONS WITH EMERGENCY FUEL (AVIATION GASOLINE), Section V,
for operating restrictions when using aviation gasoline.

Change 16

1-99

VENT

17

TO LEFT
WING SURGE
TANK

VENT

VENT
LEFT OUTBOARD
WING TANK

RIGHT OUTBOARD
WING TANK

RIGHT EXTERNAL
TO RIGHT
TANK
WING SURGE
TANK

T.O. 1B-52H-1

1-100

LEFT EXTERNAL
TANK

ENGINE
FEED

VENT

ENGINE
FEED

18

PYLONS
OFF

PYLONS
ON

FLUTTER
ADVISORY
SELECTOR
SWITCH

FUEL FLOW
INDICATOR SWITCH
(TYPICAL)

FUEL QUANTITY GAGE
(TYPICAL)

TO
NO. 1 AND NO. 2
MAIN TANK FUEL
QUANTITY GAGES
FROM

24
AFT SURGE TANK

Figure 1-35 (Sheet 1 of 2)

ENGINE FEED

VENT
WING
TANKS
RESET
WING TANK
WARNING LIGHTS
(TYPICAL)

WING
TANKS
CAUTION
LIGHT
AFT BODY TANK

VENT
RETURN
DRAIN

VENT
TO REFUEL
SYSTEM

OVERBOARD
VENT

MAIN
REFUEL
VALVE

MID BODY TANK

FUEL FLOW
INDICATOR LIGHT
(TYPICAL)
CENTER WING TANK

FWD BODY TANK
FUEL PROBE
(TYPICAL)

MAIN MANIFOLD
INTERCONNECT VALVES
MAIN

MANIFOLD

29
28

A31658

ENGINE FEED

AUXILIARY TANK FUEL
FLOW CONTROL SWITCH
(TYPICAL FOR SWITCHES
NO. 17, 18, 23, 24, 25,
26 & 27)

29A

TO ALL OTHER
FUEL QUANTITY GAGES

29

OPEN
DEFUEL
VALVE

MAIN MANIFOLD
INTERCONNECT VALVES SWITCH

CLOSE

DEFUEL
VALVE
SWITCH
QUANTITY GAGES
PRESS TO TEST BUTTON

Fuel Supply System (Typical)

NO FUEL
FLOW FLASHER

MAIN
TANK LOW

TO MASTER
CAUTION LIGHTS

MAIN TANK LOW
CAUTION LIGHT

PUMP
PRESSURE
CHECK OUT
LIGHT

MAIN
MAINS

FROM LEFT
OUTBOARD
WING TANK

24 PSI

10 PSI
SCAVENGE
PUMP

PRESSURE
SWITCHES

Figure 1-35 (Sheet 2 of 2)

NO. 1 MAIN TANK

AUXILIARY TANK
ENGINE FEED
CONTROL VALVE
SWITCH (TYPICAL)

OPEN

SOLENOID FLOAT
VALVE
SWITCH
NO. 3 MAIN TANK

NO. 2 MAIN TANK

ON

OFF

16

VENT
SURGE
TANK
DRAIN

MAIN TANK
BOOST PUMP
SWITCH NO. 4
(TYPICAL FOR
SWITCHES NO.
1, 2 & 3)

FUEL IN
MAIN MANIFOLD
FUEL IN
MAIN MANIFOLD
LIGHT

SOLENOID
VALVE

VENT

CABIN

AUX

PUMP PRESSURE
CHECKOUT
PRESS TO
RELIEVE
BUTTON

SCAVENGE
SYSTEM
SWITCH

OFF

OFF

FROM NO. 3 AND
NO. 4 MAIN TANK
FUEL QUANTITY
GAGES

LEFT WING
SURGE TANK
(TYPICAL FOR
RIGHT WING)

PUMP
PRESSURE
CHECK OUT
SWITCH

NO. 4 MAIN TANK

BOOST PUMP AND
CHECK VALVE (TYPICAL)

14

13

9

ENGINE CROSSFEED
MANIFOLD VALVE (TYPICAL)

CLOSED
EINGINE
FIREWALL
FUEL
SHUTOFF
VALVE
(TYPICAL)

9

15

CROSSFEED

AUXIILIARY TANK ENGINE FEED
CONTROL VALVE (TYPICAL)

MANIFOLD

10

11

PUMP PRESSURE
CHECKOUT LINES

ENGINE CROSSFEED
MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH
12
(TYPICAL)

12

CLOSED

THROTTLES

OPEN

MAIN TANK FUEL
LINES

16

OPEN

CROSSFEED FUEL
LINES
CLOSED

SCAVENGE LINES

ELECTRICAL

CLOSED
NACELLE NO. 2

TO ENGINE FUEL
CONTROL SYSTEM

FIRE SHUTOFF
(PULLED)

NORMAL
(IN)
ENGINE FIRE SHUTOFF
SWITCH (TYPICAL)

1-101

T.O. 1B-52H-1

A31659

NACELLE NO. 1

AUXILIARY TANK
FUEL LINES

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Fuel System Composite
PRESSURE SWITCH
MANUAL DRAIN VALVE
RELIEF VALVE
FUEL FLOW INDICATOR
CHECK VALVE PRESSURE LOADED
FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE
CENTRIFUGAL PUMP
INLINE FLOAT SWITCH
FUEL PRESSURE DISCONNECT SWITCH
SOLENOID VALVE
SCAVENGE PUMP
OR
VALVE, SWING CHECK
A
AUXILIARY TANK ENGINE FEED CONTROL VALVE
C

I
D

11M ∗ 20

ENGINE CROSSFEED MANIFOLD VALVE
ENGINE FIREWALL FUEL SHUTOFF VALVE
MAIN MANIFOLD INTERCONNECT VALVE
DEFUEL VALVE
FLIGHT ESSENTIAL FUEL PUMPS

10M
9M
3

4
8M ∗
14
A

10A
7M ∗

C

10

FILTER (TYPICAL)
6M
C

1 2

5M

9

NO. 2
MAIN TANK

13
A

19

NO. 1 MAIN TANK

3A

17

LEFT EXTERNAL TANK

4M ∗

1A
18A

MAIN TANK FUEL FLOW LINES
AUXILIARY TANK FUEL FLOW LINES
REFUEL MANIFOLD AND REFUEL LINES

2A

SCAVENGE LINES
VACUUM RELIEF LINES

18

CROSSFEED MANIFOLD
MAIN MANIFOLD
LEFT OUTBOARD
WING TANK

THERMAL RELIEF LINES
MANUAL DRAIN LINES
PRESSURE RELIEF LINES
A66327

Figure 1-36 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-102

Change 4

T.O. 1B-52H-1

AIR REFUELING RECEPTACLE

GATE VALVE, MOTOR OPERATED,
LINE MOUNTED
SINGLE POINT
REFUELING RECEPTACLE
25 23A
24A

FORWARD BODY TANK
CENTER WING TANK

26
25A
26A

NO. 3 MAIN TANK

21
12M ∗

I 29

I

D

29A

30
13M

5

14M

6

15M ∗

27A

15
A

11 C

27

28A

22A
16M ∗

MID BODY TANK

7

17M
12 C

8

18M

29A
16

NO. 4 MAIN TANK

A

RIGHT
EXTERNAL
TANK

19M ∗
22

30A
20A

24
22A
23A

28

21A

28A
31A

AFT BODY TANK

32A
23

RIGHT OUTBOARD WING TANK

A66328

Figure 1-36 (Sheet 2 of 2)

Change 4

1-103

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Fuel Quantity Data
TANK CAPACITIES
USABLE FUEL (EACH)
TANKS

FULLY SERVICED (EACH)

NO.

POUNDS

GALLONS

POUNDS

NO. 1 AND 4 MAIN

2

31,843

4899

31,883

4905

NO. 2 AND 3 MAIN

2

44,259

6809

44,421

6834

MID BODY

1

46,410

7140

46,501

7154

FORWARD BODY

1

13,319

2049

13,345

2053

AFT BODY

1

55,192

8491

55,237

8498

OUTBOARD WING

2

7495

1153

7540

1160

CENTER WING

1

20,982

3228

21,060

3240

EXTERNAL

2

4550

700

4583

705

USABLE FUEL TOTALS
TANKS

POUNDS

NOTES
GALLONS

NO. 1, 2, 3, AND 4 MAIN

152,204

23,416

MAINS AND MID BODY

198,614

30,556

MAINS, MID BODY, FORWARD
BODY, AND AFT BODY

267,125

41,096

MAINS, ALL BODY, OUTBOARD
WING, AND CENTER WING

303,097

46,630

ALL TANKS

312,197

48,030

Figure 1-37

1-104

GALLONS



Fully serviced quantities include both
trapped and drainable fuel.
The tanks will have the quantities
shown under conditions of ICAO
standard day with fuel density of 6.5
pounds per gallon.
See data supplied in Section V,
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
to determine fuel loading.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
FUEL CHECKOUT SYSTEM

Fuel pressure gages and warning lights are not provided for each tank. To save weight, a fuel checkout
system is provided in the fuel system. This system
allows ground pressure checking of each boost
pump and each valve in the fuel system. To use the
fuel checkout system, fuel under pressure is routed
to a pressure switch by positioning various valves.
This switch is located in a fuel line between the
crossfeed manifold and the No. 2 main tank. The
pressure switches will close and supply power to illuminate a pressure checkout light, indicating proper system operation.
FUEL SCAVENGE SYSTEM

A separate scavenge system is provided for the
main fuel manifold and the refuel (cabin) manifold.
Each system has an ac powered pump, float switch,
and solenoid-operated valve, all under control of a
single scavenge switch. The main manifold fuel is
directed to the No. 3 main tank and the refuel (cabin) manifold fuel is directed to the No. 2 main tank.
The scavenge system controls and indicators are lo-

cated on the fuel scavenge system panel (figure
1-38) on the copilots’ instrument panel above the
fuel panels.

Continuous operation of a fuel scavenge
pump may cause damage. If the fuel-inmanifold light fails to go out after 20 minutes of operation, turn the scavenge system
switch OFF and annotate in the 781A.
FUEL SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS

Fuel system controls and indicators located on the
copilot’s side of the main instrument panel are the
main fuel control panel, the flutter advisory selector, the scavenge system panel, and the system
checkout panel. The total fuel quantity gage, and
two caution lights on the central caution panel, are
located on the forward instrument panel below the
No. 1, 2, and 3 engine instruments. Figure 1-38 discusses the fuel system controls and indicators.

1-105

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Fuel System Controls and Indicators

1
2
3
4
5

MAIN TANK LOW CAUTION LIGHT
WING TANKS RESET CAUTION LIGHT
TOTAL FUEL QUANTITY GAGE
ENGINE CROSSFEED MANIFOLD VALVE
SWITCHES (SWITCHES 9 THRU 12)
MAIN TANK BOOST PUMP SWITCHES
(SWITCHES 1 THRU 4)

6
7
8
9
10

PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT LIGHT
FUEL QUANTITY GAGES (12 PLACES)
AUXILIARY TANK FUEL FLOW CONTROL
SWITCHES (SWITCHES 17, 18, 23 THRU 28)
MAIN TANK FUEL LEVEL CONTROL SWITCHES
(SWITCHES 19 THRU 22)
FUEL FLOW INDICATOR LIGHTS (12 PLACES)

Figure 1-38 (Sheet 1 of 8)

1-106

T.O. 1B-52H-1

11
12
13
14
15

AUXILIARY TANK ENGINE FEED CONTROL
VALVE SWITCHES (SWITCHES 13 THRU 16)
FUEL FLOW CONTROL SWITCH LOCKS
WING TANK WARNING LIGHTS (2 PLACES)
QUANTITY GAGES PRESS-TO-TEST BUTTON
PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT PRESS-TO-RELIEVE BUTTON

16
17
18
19
20
21

PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT SWITCH
REFUEL LEVEL CHECKOUT SWITCH
FLUTTER ADVISORY SELECTOR SWITCH
DEFUEL VALVE SWITCH
SCAVENGE SYSTEM SWITCH
MAIN MANIFOLD INTERCONNECT VALVE
SWITCH (SWITCH 29)

Figure 1-38 (Sheet 2 of 8)

1-107

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Fuel System Controls and Indicators (Cont)
NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

1

Main Tank Low Warning Light (amber)

An amber main tank low warning light is located on the central caution
panel . A 4000 pound or less indication of any main tank fuel quantity gage
completes a contact allowing right TR power to cause the main tank low
warning light to glow, indicating that the fuel quantity in one or more main
fuel tanks is below the 4000 pound level. A signal through the same circuit
is also sent to the pilots’ master caution lights and they will come on simultaneously with the main tank low warning light. The main tank low warning
light and the master caution lights will come on in the manner described
above except that a 10-second delay timer has been incorporated to prevent flashing of these lights due to fuel slosh and subsequent oscillation
of the main tank fuel quantity gages.

2

Wing Tanks Caution Light (amber)

A wing tanks caution light marked WING TANKS RESET located on the
central caution panel lights to warn the crew of improper fuel usage or fuel
configurations for which airspeed limitations may be required to avoid flutter. The pilots’ master caution lights will not come on when the WING
TANKS RESET light comes on. The wing tanks caution light comes on
simultaneously with the wing tank warning lights on the fuel system panel
and serves to warn the crew to check either or both wing tank fuel systems
for improper usage. The wing tanks caution light will go out when the reset
button beside the central caution panel is pushed. This allows the WINGS
TANKS RESET light to monitor the remaining circuits in its particular
system for any improper usage that may occur.

3

Total Fuel Quantity Gage

The total fuel quantity gage receives its indication by electronic addition
of indications of the individual fuel gages. A best flare speed indicator dial
is installed outside of total fuel quantity gage to allow determination of
gross weight and best flare speed directly from the quantity indication.
See Wing Flap System under FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM, this section,
for additional information on the best flare speed indicator.

FUNCTION

NOTE


4

Engine Crossfeed Manifold
Switches (Switches 9 thru 12)

Valve

If an individual fuel quantity gage malfunctions, the total fuel
quantity gage will be in error by the amount that the individual
quantity gage is in error. If the circuit breaker for the malfunctioning gage is pulled, the totalizer contribution from that gage
will be zero.
There is an allowable tolerance of 3400 pounds between the
total fuel quantity gage and the sum of all individual gage fuel
quantity gage readings.

Four engine crossfeed manifold valve switches on the fuel system panel
have unmarked OPEN- -CLOSED positions. These rotary switches are
numbered 9, 10, 11, and 12 and control operation of the engine crossfeed
manifold valves of corresponding numbers allowing interconnection of
the fuel systems of each nacelle. When the white stripe on a switch is
aligned with the flow line on the panel, the switch is OPEN and left essential dc power for valves 9 and 12 or right essential dc power for valves 10
and 11 is supplied to open the corresponding valves. CLOSED position
supplies power to close the valve. Engine crossfeed manifold valve
switches are numbered for ease of identification.

Figure 1-38 (Sheet 3 of 8)

1-108

Change 16

T.O. 1B-52H-1

NO.
5

CONTROLINDICATOR

FUNCTION

Main Tank Boost Pump Switches
(Switches 1 thru 4)

Four main tank boost pump switches on the fuel system panel have
ON- -OFF positions and are guarded in the ON position. The switches are
numbered from 1 to 4 and each switch electrically controls the four boost
pumps in the corresponding main tank. Placing a switch in ON position
directs 205 volt three-phase ac power to the four boost pumps in the respective main tank. OFF position of a main tank boost pump switch deenergizes all the boost pumps in the respective main tank. Main tank boost
pumps are numbered for ease of identification.

Closure of the main tank switch guard may not actuate the boost
pump switch to the ON position. Apply firm pressure to the
toggle switch when placing it to the ON position and absolutely
ensure it is fully and completely ON before closing the guard.
6

Pump Pressure Checkout Light

When fuel pressure for the tanks selected by the pump pressure checkout switch (No. 16) reaches 10 psi for MAIN or 24 psi for AUX, the green
pump pressure checkout light illuminates.

7

Fuel Quantity Gages (12 Places)

The quantity of available (usable) fuel in each tank is indicated in pounds
by 12 fuel quantity gages on the fuel system panel. Fuel probes in each
tank sense the quantity of usable fuel. The fuel probe signals are relayed
to amplifiers in the gages. The fuel quantity gaging system may be in error
by as much as ±1.5% of gage indication due to variation in fuel dielectric
constants. A full (by weight) indication of the fuel quantity gage breaks circuits causing the corresponding fuel level control valve to close if the
master refuel switch is ON. The main tanks, external tank, and outboard
wing tank fuel quantity gages for each wing have internal safe-level
switches which complete circuits to supply TR power to the MAIN TANK
LOW warning light (No. 1) or WING TANKS caution light (No. 2). See figure 5-1 for gage markings.
NOTE
For fuel densities greater than 6.5 lb/gal, the 6.5 LB/GAL fuel loading charts in T.O. 1B-52H-5 are applicable and should be used.

8

Auxiliary Tank Fuel Flow Control
Switches (Switches 17, 18, 23 thru 28)

Eight auxiliary tank fuel flow control switches on the fuel system panel
have unmarked REFUEL- -OFF- -ENGINE FEED positions. These
rotary switches are numbered 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28 and control of the flow of fuel to and from the auxiliary tanks. A white arrowhead
is painted on top of each switch and the direction the arrow is pointing determines the position of the switch. For ENGINE FEED position, the arrow
is pointed away from the tank, for REFUEL position, the arrow is pointed
toward the tank, and for OFF position, the arrow is perpendicular to the
flow line between tank and main manifold. ENGINE FEED position directs 205-volt three-phase ac power to the boost pumps in the respective
tank. REFUEL position causes TR power to energize the fuel level control
valves in the respective tank provided the master refuel switch is ON. See
REFUEL SYSTEM, this section. OFF position deenergizes the boost
pumps and the fuel level control valves in the respective tank. The
switches for the external and outboard tanks (switches 17, 18, 23, and 24
respectively) are equipped with fuel flow control switch locks (No.12).
Each lock is a pivoting bar with a detent that mates with an extension on
the corresponding switch. Auxiliary tank fuel flow control valves are numbered for ease of identification.

Figure 1-38 (Sheet 4 of 8)

Change 16

1-109

-OFF positions. OFF position of a main tank fuel level control valve switch deenergizes the fuel level control valves in the respective tank causing them to close. 20. With an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch in ENGINE FEED position. Figure 1-38 (Sheet 5 of 8) 1-110 . 10 Fuel Flow Indicator Lights (12 Places) Twelve amber fuel flow indicator lights are located on the fuel system panel adjacent to the fuel quantity gages. that of indicating no fuel flow into the tank during refuel operations. indicating no fuel flow from the tank.T. When the white stripe on a switch is aligned with the flow line on the panel. NOTE • • A fuel flow indicator light may flash intermittently when fuel in an auxiliary tank is at a low level and the aircraft is being maneuvered. 21. Those indicator lights adjacent to auxiliary tank gages perform a dual function: 1) indicating no fuel flow from the corresponding tank during fuel feed operations. 1B-52H-1 Fuel System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. the switch is in REFUEL position and left and right TR power is supplied to energize the fuel level control valves in the respective tank provided the master refuel switch is ON. A fuel flow indicator light may not illuminate when an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch is in the ENGINE FEED position and the auxiliary tank is empty. See FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT. and 2) indicating no fuel flow into the tank during refuel operations. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 9 Main Tank Fuel Level Control Valves (Switches 19 thru 22) Four main tank fuel level control valve switches on the fuel system panel have unmarked REFUEL. See REFUEL SYSTEM. These rotary switches are numbered 19. the boost pumps in the corresponding auxiliary tank supply fuel to the main manifold. this section. Fuel level control valves are numbered for ease of identification. a flow switch in the line completes contacts allowing right TR power to cause the respective fuel flow indicator light to flash.O. this section. and 22 and control the flow of fuel to the main tanks. As soon as the auxiliary tank runs dry. Those indicator lights adjacent to the main tank gages perform only a single function. for description of refuel function of the lights.

the switch is OPEN and left essential dc power for valves 14 and 15 and right essential dc power for valves 13 and 16 is supplied to open the corresponding valves. When the switch is released. These rotary switches are numbered 13. 1B-52H-1 NO. right outboard. and outboard wing tank fuel quantity gages for each wing have internal safe level switches. the light will come on and remain on until the fuel quantity indications of both main tanks have reached the green band marking area on the dial. The main.-CLOSED positions. The light will also come on if the fuel quantity indication of either main tank in a wing is above the green band marking on the dial and the respective outboard or external tank fuel flow control switch is in the ENGINE FEED position. external. 18. and 24 respectively) are equipped with fuel flow control switch locks. Figure 1-38 (Sheet 6 of 8) 1-111 . the wing tank warning light will come on any time an external tank is below safe level or the fuel flow control switch for external tank is in the ENGINE FEED position. If the flutter advisory selector switch is in the PYLONS ON position. all fuel quantity gage pointers and totalizer gage pointer will return to their original position if the circuits are functioning correctly. 23. left outboard. and 16 and control operation of valves of corresponding numbers to direct auxiliary tank fuel to the engines. 13 Wing Tank Warning Lights (2 Places) Two amber wing tank warning lights on the fuel system panel are provided to warn the crew of improper fuel usage or fuel tank configurations for which airspeed limitations may be imposed to avoid flutter. 12 Fuel Flow Control Switch Locks The switches for the left external.O. When the white stripe on a switch is aligned with the flow line on the panel. Pushing this button causes left TR power to energize and open a solenoid-operated valve to allow fuel pressure to bleed off into No. and right external tanks (switches 17. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 11 Auxiliary Tank Engine Feed Control Valve Switches (Switches 13 thru 16) Four auxiliary tank engine feed control valve switches on the fuel system panel have unmarked OPEN. If the fuel quantity indication of either main tank in a wing is above the green band marking on the dial and the fuel quantity indication of either the external or outboard wing tank for the same wing is below safe level. 14 Quantity Gages Press-to-Test Button The quantity gages press-to-test button on the fuel system panel is used to test the circuit continuity. 2 main tank. Pressing the button will cause clockwise rotation of all fuel quantity gage pointers and totalizer gage pointer up to 98% (±2%) scale. Each lock is a pivoting bar with a detent that mates with an extension on the corresponding switch. 15. 14.T. 15 Pump Pressure Checkout Press-to-Relieve Button The pump pressure checkout press-to-relieve button on the fuel system panel is utilized to relieve the fuel pressure built up by use of the pump pressure checkout switch. CLOSED position closes the respective valve. The lock must be pivoted away from the switch before the switch can be moved from OFF position.

Figure 1-38 (Sheet 7 of 8) 1-112 . CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 16 Pump Pressure Checkout Switch The pump pressure checkout switch on the fuel system panel is used for ground checking of fuel pressure. marked PYLONS ON. the fuel flow indicator light adjacent to the appropriate fuel quantity gage glows steady. When fuel pressure reaches 10 psi. OFF position completely deenergizes the pump pressure checkout circuits. When the fuel level control valves (or valve) in a tank close. result in a fuel level control valve failing closed. the same pump pressure checkout light illuminates.-PYLONS OFF is located on the pilots’ instrument panel and controls the wing tank warning light circuits. This causes the fuel level control valves to close. Moving the switch to OFF position allows each primary float chamber to drain which allows the fuel level control valves to open and the light to go out. MAINS position supplies left TR power to the low pressure side of a pressure switch. left TR power is supplied to the high pressure switch. 17 Refuel Level Checkout Switch The refuel level checkout switch on the fuel system checkout panel on the copilot’s side panel has PRIMARY. It is recommended. the green pump pressure checkout light (No. The PYLONS ON position will be used any time external pylons are installed and PYLONS OFF will be used for a clean configuration. SECONDARY position performs the same function in the secondary float chamber. 6) on the fuel system panel glows. This switch is used to check the operation of the primary and secondary float valves in the fuel level control valves. an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch or a main tank fuel level control switch must be placed in REFUEL position. PRIMARY position of the refuel level checkout switch deenergizes the primary side of the fuel level control valves (or valve) in the tank. a two position toggle switch.T. as a remote possibility. Use of these switches at such a time might cause a pressure disconnect or might. This action permits fuel from the main manifold to flood the primary float chamber in each fuel level control valve in the tank. However. 18 Flutter Advisory Selector Switch The flutter advisory selector switch. and the master refuel switch on. In order to check the valves in a tank. NOTE The refuel level checkout switch can be used during air refueling to check operation of the fuel level control valves if absolutely necessary.O. that fuel level control valve operation be checked before flight while fueling through the single point ground refueling receptacle. 1B-52H-1 Fuel System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO.-SECONDARY positions. the manifold to the tank pressurized. When fuel pressure reaches 24 psi. their use in flight is not recommended. actuating the float valve to simulate a full-by-volume condition. The switch has MAINS--OFF--AUX positions. therefore. The primary and secondary float chambers are the same level in any one valve. In AUX position.-OFF.

open a solenoid shutoff valve. 1B-52H-1 NO.-MAIN positions.CLOSE positions and is guarded in CLOSE. OPEN position supplies right TR power to the valve causing it to open. MAIN position directs right TR power to a float switch in the scavenge line between the main manifold and No. 20 Scavenge System Switch The scavenge system switch on the fuel system panel has CABIN. CLOSE position causes the valve to close. CABIN position actuates the scavenge operation in the refuel manifold. As soon as the manifold is scavenged.-CLOSED positions. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 19 Defuel Valve Switch The defuel valve switch on the fuel scavenge system panel on the right side of the pilots’ instrument panel in front of the copilot has OPEN. the solenoid shutoff valve to close.T. the float switch makes a contact which causes the TR power to illuminate the fuel-in-main-manifold light. 3 main tank. This rotary switch is numbered 29 and controls the operation of main manifold interconnect valves 29 and 29A. Figure 1-38 (Sheet 8 of 8) 1-113 . the float switch breaks contact causing the scavenge pump to stop. the switch is OPEN and left TR power is supplied to open valve 29 and right TR power is supplied to open valve 29A. If there is fuel in the manifold. This switch is normally used on the ground for defueling but may be used in flight.-OFF. and the fuel-in-main-manifold light to go out. this section. See AIR REFUELING SYSTEM. and energize a relay which directs 118-volt single-phase ac power to the main manifold scavenge pump. This switch controls the defuel valve which separates the engine crossfeed manifold from the main manifold. Opening these valves interconnects the right and left sides of the main manifold. The fuel in the manifold is pumped into No. Care must be exercised during inflight use because of high fuel flow rates. When the white stripe on the switch is aligned with the flow line on the panel. OFF position completely deenergizes the scavenge circuits in the main and refuel manifolds. 21 Main Manifold Interconnect Valves Switch (Switch 29) A main manifold interconnect valves switch on the fuel system panel has unmarked OPEN. CLOSED position closes the two valves. 3 main tank.O.

Switch No. CLOSED. All external. Switches No. the pressure is trapped in the line and the light will not go out immediately unless the pump pressure checkout press-to-relieve button is pressed. 12. forward. Switch No. Switch No. Switches No. 9 & 18 – CLOSED and OFF 21. 8. 25 – ENGINE FEED. then OPEN (in order). FUEL SYSTEM CHECKOUT A complete checkout of the fuel feed system for all tanks may be accomplished as follows (figure 1-39): NOTE • • When pump pressure has caused the pump pressure checkout light to glow. 11 & 25 – CLOSED and OFF 31. Switches No. valve 29 to OPEN. Switch No. and ENGINE FEED. light out 14. 14 & 10 – ENGINE FEED. and OFF. Switches No. light out 23. 15. 18 – ENGINE FEED. Switch No. 17 – OFF. Switch No. CLOSED. 10 – CLOSED. 2 – OFF 12. 1. 28. Switch No. 28 – OFF. 1B-52H-1 FUEL SYSTEM OPERATION A schematic of the fuel system showing the detailed mechanical configuration and function of the various fuel lines is given in figure 1-36. 2 & 10 – ON and OPEN. light out 30. then on (each time) 25. then on 33. light on 24. Switch No. the press-to-relieve button is pressed until the light goes out. light on 13. Switch No. Fuel Quantity Gage Press-to-Test Button – Pressed Depress button to assure proper operation of fuel gages. light out 36. 4 – OFF 6. 26 – OFF. Fuel System Panel Switches 4 & 12 – ON and OPEN. do not operate the body or external tanks boost pumps when these tanks are empty. 1200 pounds in the aft body. Switch No. light out 34. During ground operations. light out 3. 15 – CLOSED. 12. Switch No. 26. 14. 29 & 27 – CLOSED. 9 – CLOSED. light on 29. Air trapped in the main manifold may cause additional time to be required to relieve pressure in the main manifold when 1-114 Change 4 checking auxiliary tank boost pumps. Switches No. 1000 pounds in the mid body. Switches No. light on 7. 3 & 11 – ON and OPEN. the tanks are considered empty when the applicable tank gage reading is at or less than 300 pounds in the forward body. OPEN. and 19 must be operational prior to flight. No more than one of the remaining two pumps in a single main tank may be inoperative. OPEN. or 100 pounds in an external. 11 – CLOSED. 16 – CLOSED. Switch No. Switch No. 12 – CLOSED. 29 & 14 – CLOSED. Switch No. 13 & 9 – ENGINE FEED. 1 & 9 – ON and OPEN. 23 – OFF. Switches No. then OPEN. outboard. and OPEN. light on 32.O. 12. Switches No. 16 & 23 – OPEN. Switches No. light out 18. 11. Fuel boost pump numbers 4. Switch No. 3 – OFF 9. and turning the tank switch of any tank that is less than full to REFUEL prior to pressing the press-to-relieve button. light out 28. light out 11. light on 4. light out. 16. CLOSED. When it is stated in the following steps that the light goes out after a valve is closed or the pumps in a tank are turned off. 29 & 27 – OPEN and ENGINE FEED. light on 27. This will preclude engine flameout due to fuel starvation during turns when any main fuel tank is in a low fuel state. Pump Pressure Checkout Switch – MAINS. light out 26. 13 – CLOSED. Switches No. 7. light out 20. light on 35. Switch No. 24 – ENGINE FEED. This additional time required can be substantially reduced by turning the master refuel switch to ON. and center wing boost pumps must be operational. light on 10. Pump Pressure Checkout Switch – OFF . Switches No. 15 & 11 – ENGINE FEED. NOTE • • The aircraft will not be flown with less than two operational pumps in the mid and aft body tanks.T. With the aircraft in a level attitude. light on 19. 16 & 24 – CLOSED. OPEN. light on 22. 17. and OFF. 1 – OFF 15. Switches No. OPEN. Switch No. 10. Pump Pressure Checkout Switch – AUX 16. light out 8. light on 17. it is to be understood that after the described action has been accomplished. and OPEN. 2. light out. and OPEN. light out 5. Switch No. Switches No.

1B-52H-1 Fuel System Checkout CHECKOUT OF LEFT EXTERNAL TANK SHOWN (TYPICAL) QUANTITY GAGES PRESS TO TEST GREEN LIGHT ON PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT MSN REFUEL LEVEL CHECKOUT PRIMARY OFF 3 ENG 4 5 ENG 6 1 ENG 2 FWD BODY 10 9 25 AUX 12 11 CTR WING AFT BODY OFF MAINS NO. 14. 16. 2 NO. 29. and 10 27.2 16 FUEL SYSTEM CHECKOUT PANEL ON 15 26 OFF MAINS NO. 14. 1 4 and 12 3 and 11 2 and 10 1 and 9 AUX TANKS: LEFT EXTERNAL LEFT OUTBOARD AFT BODY MID BODY CENTER WING FORWARD BODY RIGHT OUTBOARD RIGHT EXTERNAL 17. and 11 23. TANK TO BE CHECKED MAIN TANKS FUEL MANAGEMENT SWITCHES − ON. 15. OPEN OR ENGINE FEED (All other fuel management switches CLOSED or OFF) NO.4 R OUTBD R EXTERNAL L OUTBD WING TANK WARNING MID BODY 27 28 19 REFUEL RECPT L EXTERNAL SECONDARY PRESS TO RELIEVE PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT 14 ON 13 7 ENG 8 20 21 22 23 24 29 AMBER LIGHT ON FUEL FLOW STATIC PUMP PRESSURE CHECK OF FUEL TANKS PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT SWITCH POSITION MAINS OFF AUX.1NO. and 11 25. and 9 18. 13. 13. and 12 24. 15.O.3NO. and 12 A31664 Figure 1-39 1-115 .T. 4 NO. MAINS OFF AUX. 16. and 9 28. and 10 26. 3 NO.

To overcome the potentially adverse affects of JP-8 during alert start at these temperatures. main tank boost pump switches are ON. The boost pumps in the auxiliary tanks are of higher capacity than the boost pumps in the main tanks thus allowing a pressure override condition to exist. therefore. If operations are planned above 488. refer to the applicable appendix or the abbreviated checklist for fuel sequences and air refueling distribution. A decrease in main tank fuel quantity shows that the auxiliary tank is not maintaining pressure (flow). when transferring fuel. torching.O. and 1-47. Therefore. Auxiliary fuel flow control switches will be turned off whenever fuel transfer is to be stopped. A crossfeed manifold is provided which makes it possible to interconnect the fuel feed systems to each nacelle.T. prior to required fuel gage readings. the fuel gages should be tested using the quantity gages press-to-test button. monitor the applicable main tank quantity gage for an indication of fuel use. • NOTE • The aircraft shall be loaded with fuel in accordance with procedures as outlined in T. the next sequence step should be set. The main manifold is pressurized by the auxiliary tanks. engine fuel pump. Therefore. When an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch is in the ENGINE FEED position and the fuel flow indicator light fails to flash when it is anticipated that the tank should be empty. Handbook of Weight and Balance Data. skins. analysis has shown that if auxiliary fuel is used or the main tank crossfeed valves are opened the risk of engine fuel starvation during critical phases of flight is further reduced. 1B-52H-5. An Area of primary concern is the FTTP collecting at the main tank boost pump screens and restricting fuel flow to the engines. and pressurization and dump valve. FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT During all auxiliary fuel transfer operations below 25. 1-42. Details of fuel loading are given in T. JP-4 fuel will be loaded in the mid body and external fuel tanks. etc. At any time an unusual combination of engines is used. 1B-52H-1 given in this section were designed to be used in conjunction with proper fuel loading procedures and.g. the auxiliary tanks fuel control switches will be turned off when the gage reads empty or the no flow indicator light indicates a no flow condition. cg location. When an auxiliary tank runs dry. by following these sequences. 1B-52H-5. maximum aircraft service life can be realized.) within the integral fuel tanks.O. The fuel distribution for SIOP increased gross weight operations is unique in both initial fuel loading and subsequent fuel usage for flight operations. 1-43. The paint chips and flakes generated by FTTP have the potential to contaminate and obstruct fuel strainers and other fuel systems screens at the fuel boost pump. When auxiliary fuel is being used. stringers. slow ignition. fuel control unit.000 pounds gross weight. the expected increases and decreases in fuel tank gage reading should be confirmed. possibly restricting fuel flow to the engine. webs. See Section V for further information on fuel loading.000 feet MSL.O. Also. 1-1B-40. an explosive condition exists due to the auto-ignition temperature of fuel vapors and the potential ignition source from a malfunctioning auxiliary tank boost pump. Fuel Tank Topcoat Peeling (FTTP) is the blistering. The mid body and external tanks will be serviced with JP-4 jet fuel to the required fuel load IAW T. peeling and flaking of the paint on the internal surfaces of structural components (e. and aircraft gross weight limitations. . This requirement applies when temperatures are expected to remain below 30 degrees F. Also see FUEL MANAGEMENT FOR LATERAL TRIM under CLIMB in Section II. Along with maintenance procedures. and slow engine acceleration during engine start when the ambient temperature is below 30 degrees F. the main tank boost pumps take over fuel supply to the engines with no interruption in fuel flow. • NOTE Lateral fuel imbalance and engine flame out due to fuel starvation may result if the fuel balance is maintained without regard to the reliability of the gages.O. The fuel usage sequences 1-116 Change 17 • Physical characteristics of JP-8 fuel cause excessive smoke. Proper management of the fuel supply system for any step in the fuel usage sequence is given in figures 1-40. care should be taken to manage fuel so as to maintain proper center of gravity and fuel distribution. • The fuel supply system is designed so that the engines receive fuel from the nearest of the four main tanks or from the main manifold.

0% to 27. 7. These configurations can be entered from any sequence step. 13. 14. MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES TO EMPTY Turn fuel system panel switch 27 to ENGINE FEED and 25 and 28 to OFF and 29 to OPEN. fuel head. 3. the main manifold will be scavenged as follows: 1. Mains to all engines 2. all other switches to OFF or CLOSED. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. See figure 1-40 for abbreviated fuel sequences for each of the following steps: 1. 3. This is a result of pump cavitation caused by fuel air dissolution and is affected by variables such as rate of climb. 13 and 16 to OPEN. Main manifold interconnect valve switch No. • • Immediately after initial climbout at high power settings. Depending on the takeoff sequence used. AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5. if an altitude change is undesirable. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 CENTER WING TO 7 AND 8 Turn fuel panel switches 1. 2. This panel configuration is set as soon as the forward body tank is empty and is maintained until the mid body tank runs dry. 26 and 28 to ENGINE FEED. and low approaches are given following the normal fuel usage sequence steps. transition. 4. At initial level-off. • For takeoff with either center wing or aft body less than 2000 pounds. deenergizing for approximately 2 minutes. All engines are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. AFT BODY TO 1 AND 2 NO. the remainder of the fuel usage sequence. 2. 2. 7. energizing fuel pumps for the center wing and body tanks may result in a delay in fuel flow from these tanks. Engines 3. 3. 7. 26 and 28 to ENGINE FEED.T. 11. and 4 to ON. 4. altitude. and 8 are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. and 12 to OPEN. depending on the aircraft fuel loading as described below: • For takeoff with mains 1 and 4 above green band and center wing and aft body contain 2000 pounds or more each. All engines are being fed directly from the main tanks.O. 2. This panel configuration is set as soon as the center wing tank runs dry and is maintained until the forward body tank is empty. and 6 are being fed directly from the main tanks.0% MAC Closure of the main tank switch guard may not actuate the boost pump switch to the ON position. 6. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. Scavenge system switch to MAIN 3. 3. Engines 1. and 4 to ON. 5. AND 8 TO EMPTY Fuel panel switches 1. 29 to OPEN Turn scavenge system switch OFF and switch 29 to CLOSED as soon as the fuel-in-manifold light goes out. Apply firm pressure to the toggle switch when placing it to the ON position and absolutely ensure it is fully and completely ON before closing the guard. and so on until flow is established. some reduction in the cavitation period may be obtained by energizing the pumps for approximately 3 minutes. AND 8 TO EMPTY Turn fuel system panel switch 25 to ENGINE FEED and 26 to OFF. After takeoff. 2. all other switches to OFF or CLOSED. AFT BODY TO 1. and fuel temperature. 6. NOTE • Fuel Usage Sequence (No Pylons) – Operating Weight (Basic Weight Plus Crew and Oil) CG from 18. 2. 15. and 16 to OPEN. beginning with step 2. 9. Fuel panel configurations for landing. MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) Turn fuel panel switches 1. One of two fuel configurations is used for takeoff. 2. All engines are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. AFTER TAKEOFF. and 4 to ON. Proper differential must be maintained. AFT BODY TO 1. TAKEOFF. will be employed except for step omissions where tanks are empty or below specified quantities. All engines are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. However. Immediate flow may be obtained by reducing altitude. some of the above panel settings have been previously set. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Scavenging When all auxiliary fuel has been used (to empty or down to required ballast). 10. 3. 3. main tanks may be replenished with fuel from body and center wing tanks. energizing for approximately 3 minutes. all other switches to OFF or CLOSED. Change 19 1-117 .

2. step 8 should be reestablished. LEFT OUTBOARD TO 1 AND 2 TO EMPTY NO. 15.) 4. This configuration is maintained until mains 1 and 4 fuel quantity gage pointers indicate in the green band area. Engines 3. (Boost pumps should not be shut off in more than one main tank at any time except when specified in a fuel sequence. 16. 1B-52H-1 5. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. 5. All engines are being fed directly from the main tanks. 14. Open crossfeed valve switches as required to feed the low tank engines from the high tank. NOTE The following procedures may be used to maintain desired main tank lateral balance during cruise conditions: 1. 9. and 29 to CLOSED and 27 to OFF. 4. If the flutter advisory selector is in the PYLONS ON position. 2. 15. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT EXTERNAL TO 7 AND 8 TO EMPTY Turn fuel system panel switches 18 and 23 to OFF and 17 and 24 to ENGINE FEED. When the desired main tank balance is attained. 7. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 7 AND 8 TO EMPTY Turn fuel system panel switches 13 and 16 to OPEN. This panel configuration is set as soon as the left and right outboard tanks run dry and is maintained until the left and right externals are empty. 6. 2. 1-118 . This configuration is maintained until the aft body tank runs dry. Engines. Engines 1. 3. Check auxiliary tank engine feed control valve switches (13. 16. MAINS TO ALL ENGINES TO GREEN BANDS FOR MAINS 1 AND 4 Turn fuel panel switches 13. MAINS TO ALL ENGINES TO 20. and 29 to CLOSED and 28 to OFF. All engines are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. 5. and 6 are being fed directly from the main tanks. and 6 are being fed directly from the main tanks. This panel configuration is maintained until mains 1 and 4 fuel quantity gage pointers reach 20. 8. 14. Utilize outboard fuel as necessary to obtain desired fuel distribution in mains. This panel configuration is set as soon as main tanks 1 and 4 are in the green band area and is maintained until the outboard tanks run dry. All engines are being fed directly from the main tanks. 15. and 8 are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. Do not exceed upper limit of green band for mains during transfer. and 29 to OPEN and 28 to ENGINE FEED. 4. 15. 1. and 16) closed. 18 and 23 to ENGINE FEED. 7. turn on all main tank boost pump switches prior to closing the crossfeed valves. Shut off boost pump switches in the low tank.000 POUNDS EACH IN MAINS 1 AND 4 Turn fuel panel switches 13.T. LEFT EXTERNAL TO 1 AND 2 TO EMPTY NO. When the light goes out. the wing tank warning light will come on any time the fuel flow control switch for external is in the ENGINE FEED position. AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES TO EMPTY Turn fuel panel switches 13. 14. 16.000 pounds. Engines 3. 14. Glowing of a wing tank warning light after this panel configuration is set is an indication that one or both of the main tank fuel quantity gages for the respective main tanks have not reached the internal safe-level switch that corresponds to the green band upper limit.O. and 8 are being fed from the main manifold by the pressure override condition. In this case. step 7 should be reset on the fuel panel and maintained until the warning light goes out. 7.

Change 17 1-119 .11 and 12 regardless of the green band. For landings. Turn fuel panel switches 13 and 16 to CLOSED. 1B-52H-1 4 in green band area or when any main tank is down to 5000 pounds can provide a potential for engine flameout during a critical phase of flight. open crossfeed valves. transition and low approaches. AND LOW APPROACHES These panel configurations are used at any time when accomplishing landing. 10. Open all crossfeed valves (9. open all crossfeed valves (9. and 4 to ON. 10.O. and 12). See WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. 2. and 12 and 17 and 24 to OFF). 10. 11. it will be transferred directly into main tanks through the main manifold. and low approaches. MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN).10. All engines are being fed directly from the main tanks. auxiliary fuel may be used as required to keep fuel in main tanks 1 and 4 just below tops of green bands and balanced with main tanks 2 and 3. TRANSITION. ALL LANDING.T. transition.9. • Failure to accomplish prescribed fuel panel settings with fuel level in main tanks 1 or During practice low approaches and landings. MAINS TO ALL ENGINES NOTE • • Fuel system panel switches 1. When any main is down to 5000 pounds. 3. for speed restrictions associated with use of auxiliary fuel in various aircraft configurations. 11. Section V. If auxiliary fuel usage is desired. open all crossfeed valves. Auxiliary fuel will be used in order of omitted steps.

FUEL USAGE STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) REMARKS AFT BODY TO 1 AND 2 MAIN 2 TO 3 AND 4 MAIN 3 TO 5 AND 6 CENTER WING TO 7 AND 8 FOR TAKEOFF WITH MAINS 1 AND 4 ABOVE GREEN BAND AND CENTER WING AND AFT BODY CONTAIN 2000 POUNDS OR MORE EACH OR MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) FOR TAKEOFF WITH EITHER CENTER WING OR AFT BODY CONTAINING LESS THAN 2000 POUNDS. 1B-52H-1 Fuel System Operation with No Pylons NOTE OPERATING WEIGHT (BASIC WEIGHT PLUS CREW AND OIL) CG FROM 18. 6.0% TO 27. 2. 7 AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD. 8 LEFT OUTBOARD TO 1 AND 2 NO. 10. IF REQUIRED. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 7 AND 8 OUTBOARDS TO EMPTY Figure 1-40 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-120 Change 17 .O. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 3 AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5. 2. 7 AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 5 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 20. 11 AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. 2 AFT BODY TO 1. 3 AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5.000 POUNDS EACH 6 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO EMPTY 7 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO GREEN BANDS NOTE OBSERVE WING FLUTTER LIMITATIONS IN SECTION V.0% MAC. 6. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO.T.

10. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. Figure 1-40 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 17 1-121 . DURING PRACTICE LOW APPROACHES AND LANDINGS. AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED.T. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. TRANSITION.11 AND 12) NOTE • • • FOR LANDINGS.10. FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD.O. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT EXTERNAL TO 7 AND 8 EXTERNALS TO EMPTY MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5000 POUNDS. AUXILIARY FUEL MAY BE USED AS REQUIRED TO KEEP FUEL IN MAIN TANKS 1 AND 4 JUST BELOW TOPS OF GREEN BANDS AND BALANCE WITH MAIN TANKS 2 AND 3. 11. 11 AND 12) ALL LANDING. SECTION V. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9.10. 1B-52H-1 STEP 9 10 FUEL USAGE REMARKS LEFT EXTERNAL TO 1 AND 2 NO.11 AND 12 REGARDLESS OF THE GREEN BAND. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. 10.

The use of this chart is optional for normal training missions. If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed fuel figure can be moved from the mid body. 1B-52H-5. 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart. INSTRUCTIONS: DEDUCTIONS: Enter chart with computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC). then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body. move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart. . With No Pylons NOTE The aft body fuel adjustment chart may be used to set the CG to approximately 30% MAC for takeoff. Chaff Flares For conventional missions.T. no corrections are required. additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added.000 pound gross weight takeoff. with bombs in both the forward and aft bomb bays. The derived aft body fuel is additional fuel to be added to the aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T. Read left to right in a straight line until intersecting the diagonal line.O. In this case.O. ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds Figure 1-41 1-122 Change 4 – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds NOTE If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488. Read down in a straight line to the add aft body fuel line.

0% to 27.0% to 27. figure 1-49. NOTE • • If external weapons are retained.T. Fuel Sequence When Carrying External Conventional Weapons The fuel sequences in figure 1-42 or 1-47 will be used for all missions which are to accomplish a planned release. 1B-52H-1 Fuel System Operation With External AGM-86B Missiles (Two Pylons-Symmetrical Loading) Proper management of the fuel supply system when carrying external AGM-86B missiles for SIOP/Positive Control Launch is accomplished by using the sequence shown in figure 1-42 and for Training/ Tactical Ferry by using sequence in figure 1-47. The fuel sequences are to be used in conjunction with the aft body fuel adjustment chart for carrying external conventional weapons. This will maintain the aircraft cg within the safe operating limits shown in figure 5-15. continue with this sequence and determine the amount of external tank ballast fuel to be retained from figure 1-50.0% MAC and will maintain the aircraft cg within the safe operating limits shown in figure 5-15. Fuel System Operation With External AGM-129 Missiles (Two Pylons-Symmetrical Loading) Proper management of the fuel supply system when carrying external AGM-129 missiles for SIOP/Positive Control Launch is accomplished by using the sequence shown in figure 1-42 and for Training/ Tactical Ferry by using sequence in figure 1-47. 1B-52H-5 are based on fully loaded two pylon configurations. Do not use SIOP/Positive Control Launch fuel sequence for other than SIOP operations because aircraft structural life has not been considered in the fuel sequence.O. Do not use SIOP/Positive Control Launch fuel sequence for other than SIOP operations because aircraft structural life has not been considered in the fuel sequence.O. The fuel sequences and corresponding fuel loads in T. The operating weight cg for both SIOP/Positive Control Launch and Training/Tactical is from 18.0%. 1-123 . Command directives pertaining to nonstandard fuel loads should be followed for partial stores configurations. These sequences are usable for Operating Weight cg from 18.

NOTE • • • IF FUEL TRANSFER RESULTS IN A FUEL QUANTITY GREATER THAN THE FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 MAINS 2 AND 3 UNTIL EQUAL TO MAINS 1 AND 4 Figure 1-42 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-124 Change 17 . OR 11 MISSILE CONFIGURATION) FOR OPERATING WEIGHT CG FROM 18. AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 AFT BODY TO 1.11 AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION.10. 2.0% TO 27. IN ORDER TO PREVENT EXCEEDING CG LIMITS. IMMEDIATELY AFTER LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILE(S).000 POUNDS EACH CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN (9. FUEL SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45 SHOULD BE TRANSFERRED FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK. AND 8 NO. THE AIRCREW SHOULD RETURN THE FUEL TO THE AFT BODY TANK AND RESUME THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE. PUT THAT REMAINING FUEL IN THE CENTER WING TANK. 7. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD. 2. 3. 6. 9. IF TRANSFER OF FUEL FROM AFT BODY TANK TO FORWARD BODY TANK WAS ACCOMPLISHED AND PLANNED LAUNCH/JETTISON WAS NOT ACCOMPLISHED.0% MAC. REFER TO APPROPRIATE TRANSFER/GROSS WEIGHT CHART AND FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO.O. FUEL USAGE STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 18. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5.AGM-86B/C/D & AGM-129 SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICALLY LOADED OR ASYMMETRICALLY LOADED 7. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence When Carrying External Cruise Missiles . CHECK AIRCRAFT CG: IF CG IS AFT OF 30% MAC. • • DO NOT USE SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH FUEL SEQUENCE FOR OTHER THAN SIOP OPERATION BECAUSE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL LIFE HAS NOT BEEN CONSIDERED IN THE FUEL SEQUENCE.T. ACCOMPLISH THE FOLLOWING: PRIOR TO LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILES AND PYLONS. 2 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. 7.

10. 1B-52H-1 STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS 5 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 5000 POUNDS EACH 6 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 NOTE IF FUEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE FWD BODY AND CENTER WING TANKS FOR WEAPON/PYLON LAUNCH/JETTISON. 10. 7 7A FWD BODY AND CENTER WING TO 3. TRANSITION. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD. 11. 10. 11. IF NO FUEL WAS TRANSFERRED. ACCOMPLISH STEP 7A. AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. 7. AND 6 FWD BODY AND CENTER WING TO EMPTY OUTBOARDS TO 1. AND 8 OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 OUTBOARD TO ALL ENGINES OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) 8 EXTERNALS TO ALL ENGINES EXTERNALS TO BALLAST (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) SPEED RESTRICTED. Figure 1-42 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 17 1-125 . TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5000 POUNDS. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS SECTION V FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. ACCOMPLISH STEP 7. SEE SECTION V FOR WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITS 9 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 4. AND 12) NOTE • • FOR LANDINGS. AND 12) ALL LANDING. 10. 11. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED. 11 AND 12 REGARDLESS OF THE GREEN BAND. 5.T. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 2.O.

6. AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5.000 POUNDS EACH (MAINTAIN DIFFEREN1 TIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3) 8 OUTBOARDS TO ALL ENGINES OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 9 EXTERNALS TO ALL ENGINES EXTERNALS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 10 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN 1 MAIN 3 EQUALS MAIN 1 AND 4 FOR RH PYLON LATERAL DIFFERENTIAL: AVERAGE PYLON: APPROXIMATELY 4200 POUNDS AGM-86B/C/D: APPROXIMATELY 3600 POUNDS AGM-129: APPROXIMATELY 4200 POUNDS NOTE FUEL TRANSFER (AFT BODY TANK TO FWD BODY TANK) IS NOT REQUIRED FOR MISSILE AND PYLON LAUNCH OR JETTISON. AND 8 MAIN 2 TO 3 AND 4 MAIN 3 TO 5 AND 6 MAIN 2 EQUALS MAINS 1 AND 4 FOR LH PYLON 6 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO EMPTY 7 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 9. 2 AFT BODY TO 1. 11 AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. 10. 6. AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 5 AFT BODY TO 1. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD.O.T. 3. 7. Figure 1-43 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-126 Change 17 . 2. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. 2. 3. 2. 7. 7. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence When Carrying External Cruise Missiles Asymmetrically Loaded (One Pylon – One Missile) STEP FUEL USAGE 1 (TAKEOFF) REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES USE 4000 POUNDS FROM EACH MAIN CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN (9.

AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. 1 MAIN TO 1 AND 2 MID BODY TO 3. ACCOMPLISH STEP 9.T. 2. 3. 6. 11 AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 NO. FIGURE 1-46 (16.000 POUND MINIMUM IF PYLON AND WEAPONS ARE PRESENT) 7 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 9. NO FUEL TRANSFER REQUIRED ADDITIONAL FORWARD WEAPON: 2. ACCOMPLISH STEP 9A. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD.0% TO 27. OPERATING WEIGHT CG OF 22.0% MAC. 4.000 POUNDS Figure 1-43 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 17 1-127 . 7. AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5.0% MAC. AND 6 NO.000 POUNDS AFT WEAPONS: 600 POUNDS EACH PYLON: 2. AND 6 LH OUTBOARD TO 1 AND 2 RH OUTBOARD TO 7 AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 9A OUTBOARDS TO ALL ENGINES OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 10 EXTERNALS TO ALL ENGINES EXTERNALS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 11 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 NOTE FUEL TRANSFER FOR LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL WEAPONS AND PYLON (AFT BODY TANK TO FWD BODY TANK): OPERATING WEIGHT CG OF 18. IF NO FUEL WAS TRANSFERRED TO FWD BODY TANK. 5.O. 2.000 POUNDS EACH (MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3 OPPOSITE EXTERNAL AGM-86B OR AGM-129) 8 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO BALLAST PER FIGURE 1-46 MAINS 1 AND 4 EQUALS MAIN 3 FOR RH PYLON NOTE IF FUEL HAS BEEN TRANSFERRED TO THE FWD BODY TANK FOR WEAPON/PYLON LAUNCH/JETTISON. 7. 5. 6. 2 AFT BODY TO 1. 1B-52H-1 (One Pylon – Two Thru Six Missiles) STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) FUEL USAGE REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES USE 4000 POUNDS FROM EACH MAIN CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN (9.0% TO 22. 4. 4 MAIN TO 7 AND 8 MAINS 1 AND 4 EQUALS MAIN 2 FOR LH PYLON 5 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 6 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO LANDING BALLAST. 3. NO FUEL TRANSFER REQUIRED. TWO FORWARD WEAPONS. 9 FWD BODY TO 3. 10.

add to mid body) Figure 1-44 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-128 Change 20 . 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart for Carrying External Cruise Missiles AGM-86B/C/D MISSILES SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH NOTE (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICAL LOADED) OPERATING WEIGHT CG. %MAC 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 EXTERNAL AGM−86 MISSILES 27 6 PYLO FWD 2 N MIS SILE POSI 4 TION 18 19 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 ADD AFT BODY FUEL − 1000 LBS 2 0 2 4 6 8 0 DEDUCT AFT BODY FUEL A31666 Additional Aft Body Fuel (Pounds) (If full.T.O.

In that case. In some cases. additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added. Aft Pylon Position Missiles +1000 Pounds/Missile Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds NOTE If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488.O. Figure 1-44 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-129 . If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed fuel figure can be moved from the mid body. If fuel must be deducted from the aft body. 1B-52H-5.000 pound gross weight takeoff. move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart.T. move the computed amount from the aft body to the mid body. 1B-52H-1 INSTRUCTIONS: ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the number of forward pylon position missiles. This fuel will be additional fuel to be added to aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T.O. fuel must be deducted from the aft body. Read right to left in a straight line until intersecting the computed aircraft operating weight CG (%MAC) line. then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body. Read down in a straight line to the aft body fuel line.

1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart for Carrying External Cruise Missiles (Cont) AGM-129 MISSILES SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH NOTE (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICAL LOADING OR 7. If total adjustment is positive. move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart. – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds – 50 Pounds/ 1000 Pounds Figure 1-44 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-130 . If aft body fuel tank is full.T. If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed fuel figure can be moved from the mid body. add remainder to mid-body fuel. This fuel will be additional fuel to be added to the aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T. then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body.000 pound gross weight takeoff. If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488. add to the aft body fuel found on the primary fuel loading chart. reduce aft body fuel by that amount and add that fuel to mid-body fuel. Read down in a straight line to the aft body fuel line. Read right to left in a straight line until intersecting the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line.O. 11 MISSILE LOADING) INSTRUCTIONS: NOTE Enter the chart with the number of forward pylon position missiles. 1B-52H-5.O. 9. If total adjustment is negative. In that case. additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added. • • • ADDITIONS: Aft Pylon Position Missiles +1200 Pounds/Missile Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares CSRL Weapons • Forward pylon positions are to be loaded first.

000 8. FOR LAUNCH/JETTISON OF AFT MISSILES ONLY.T.400 4.500 0 0 0 24 2.600 7.900 0 0 26 4. IF FUEL TRANSFER IS GREATER THAN FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY.100 4.200 2. USE THE AFT MISSILE ONLY FUEL TRANSFER CHART. TRANSFER ADDITIONAL FUEL TO CENTER WING TANK.000 2.800 800 30 9. • AIRCRAFT CG 29 TO 35% MAC.000 4.400 9.800 1.000 31 10. Figure 1-45 (Sheet 1 of 4) 1-131 .600 33 12.400 1.400 2. AN AFT BODY TANK FUEL BURN OF 3. NO TRANSFER REQUIRED.100 2.800 4.O.400 0 0 0 23 1. FOR POST LAUNCH/JETTISON CGs OF 30% TO 35% MAC.600 800 0 0 25 3. NOTE • • • • TRANSFER AN ADDITIONAL 500 POUNDS OF FUEL FOR EACH AFT LOADED MISSILE EXPENDED ALONG WITH A FORWARD MISSILE.200 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 0 21 1 0 4 FWD MISSILES 1 1 2 FWD MISSILES 0 1 1 0 1 FWD MISSILE 1 1 0 0 PYLON ONLY JETTISON • AIRCRAFT CG FWD OF 29% MAC. TRANSFER 2000 POUNDS/PYLON 1 TRANSFER OF FUEL FOR AFT LOADED MISSILES NOT REQUIRED.800 34 13.100 4.200 600 0 28 7.000 0 27 5.200 5.000 Pounds (SIOP/Positive Control Launch) FUEL TRANSFER (AFT BODY TO FWD BODY) POUNDS AIRCRAFT CG % MAC 6 FWD MISSILES 35 13.000 POUNDS FOR EACH 1% AFT OF 30% IS REQUIRED BEFORE RESUMING THE SIOP FUEL SEQUENCE.800 8.400 6.600 2.600 0 29 8. TOTAL FUEL TRANSFERS OF LESS THAN 1000 POUNDS FOR A LAUNCH/JETTISON COMBINATION MAY BE OMITTED. 1B-52H-1 Forward Body Ballast Fuel Required for Launch/ Jettison of External Cruise Missiles Gross Weight 200.000 to 340.300 32 11.000 3.

100 4.500 400 30 8.800 34 13.200 2.600 27 4.000 8. TRANSFER ADDITIONAL FUEL TO CENTER WING TANK. Figure 1-45 (Sheet 2 of 4) 1-132 0 0 TRANSFER OF FUEL FOR AFT LOADED MISSILES NOT REQUIRED.000 31 9.300 8.200 0 28 5. • 1 0 1 PYLON ONLY JETTISON • AIRCRAFT CG FWD OF 29% MAC.600 4.T.000 to 430.000 0 29 7. TRANSFER 2000 POUNDS/PYLON 1 1 FWD MISSILE 1 0 .800 4.800 2.200 32 11.600 1.000 2.300 2. FOR POST LAUNCH/JETTISON CGs OF 31% TO 35% MAC.600 6.400 4. NO TRANSFER REQUIRED.200 4. USE THE AFT MISSILE ONLY FUEL TRANSFER CHART.600 9.400 2.000 Pounds (SIOP/Positive Control Launch) FUEL TRANSFER (AFT BODY TO FWD BODY) POUNDS AIRCRAFT CG % MAC 6 FWD MISSILES 35 13.600 25 1.100 26 2.600 7. AN AFT BODY TANK FUEL BURN OF 3.000 POUNDS FOR EACH 1% AFT OF 31% IS REQUIRED BEFORE RESUMING THE SIOP FUEL SEQUENCE. TOTAL FUEL TRANSFERS OF LESS THAN 1000 POUNDS FOR A LAUNCH/JETTISON COMBINATION MAY BE OMITTED.O.200 24 0 23 1 0 4 FWD MISSILES 1 1 2 FWD MISSILES 400 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 NOTE • • • TRANSFER AN ADDITIONAL 500 POUNDS OF FUEL FOR EACH AFT LOADED MISSILE EXPENDED ALONG WITH A FORWARD MISSILE.800 1. 1B-52H-1 Forward Body Ballast Fuel Required for Launch/ Jettison of External Cruise Missiles (Cont) Gross Weight 340. FOR LAUNCH/JETTISON OF AFT MISSILES ONLY. • AIRCRAFT CG 29 TO 35% MAC.100 3.400 33 12. IF FUEL TRANSFER IS GREATER THAN FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY.

200 400 0 29 5.100 4.000 9.400 32 11.500 2. Figure 1-45 (Sheet 3 of 4) 1-133 .200 400 30 7. NO TRANSFER REQUIRED. FOR POST LAUNCH/JETTISON CGs OF 32% TO 35% MAC.T.200 5.000 31 9.000 2. IF FUEL TRANSFER IS GREATER THAN FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY. USE THE AFT MISSILE ONLY FUEL TRANSFER CHART.000 8.300 0 28 3.400 5.100 2.800 4.000 7.800 33 12. TRANSFER 2000 POUNDS/PYLON 1 TRANSFER OF FUEL FOR AFT LOADED MISSILES NOT REQUIRED.000 6. TOTAL FUEL TRANSFERS OF LESS THAN 1000 POUNDS FOR A LAUNCH/JETTISON COMBINATION MAY BE OMITTED.000 8.200 34 13.200 2.000 Pounds (SIOP/Positive Control Launch) FUEL TRANSFER (AFT BODY TO FWD BODY) POUNDS AIRCRAFT CG % MAC 6 FWD MISSILES 35 14.000 4.000 to 488.000 2.700 26 0 0 25 1 4 FWD MISSILES 2 FWD MISSILES 1 FWD MISSILE 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 PYLON ONLY JETTISON • AIRCRAFT CG FWD OF 29% MAC. NOTE • • • • TRANSFER AN ADDITIONAL 500 POUNDS OF FUEL FOR EACH AFT LOADED MISSILE EXPENDED ALONG WITH A FORWARD MISSILE.600 3. • AIRCRAFT CG 29 TO 35% MAC.O.400 400 27 1. TRANSFER ADDITIONAL FUEL TO CENTER WING TANK. AN AFT BODY TANK FUEL BURN OF 3.000 POUNDS FOR EACH 1% AFT OF 32% IS REQUIRED BEFORE RESUMING THE SIOP FUEL SEQUENCE. 1B-52H-1 Gross Weight 430. FOR LAUNCH/JETTISON OF AFT MISSILES ONLY.

400 1.000 2.000 1.200 1.000 Pounds (SIOP/Positive Control Launch) FUEL TRANSFER (AFT BODY TO FWD BODY) POUNDS AIRCRAFT CG % MAC 6 AFT MISSILES 4 AFT MISSILES 2 AFT MISSILES 35 5.200 4.000 32 4.400 3. REGARDLESS OF WHETHER THERE ARE FORWARD MISSILES REMAINING.000 to 488.800 1. 1B-52H-1 Forward Body Ballast Fuel Required for Launch/ Jettison of External Cruise Missiles (Cont) Aft Missiles Only Gross Weight 200.600 34 4.600 2.200 33 4.O.500 0 0 0 29 0 0 0 0 NOTE USE THE AFT MISSILES ONLY FUEL TRANSFER CHART WHEN AN AFT MISSILE IS EXPENDED. Figure 1-45 (Sheet 4 of 4) 1-134 1 AFT MISSILE Change 4 .600 3.500 0 0 30 1.000 1.400 1.600 0 31 3.800 3.T. WHEN NO FORWARD MISSILES ARE EXPENDED.

The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with cruise missiles. then move up the diagonal line to the number of fwd pylon position missiles. Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 pounds EXAMPLE: Chaff Flares CSRL Weapons AGM-86 Pylons +3000 Pounds/Pylon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Four forward AGM-86 missiles on a 20% MAC operating weight requires full external tanks and 13. double the pylon/ weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities. • • • • – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds – 50 Pounds/ 1000 Pounds NOTE For landing ballast with asymmetrical loaded missiles double the number of missiles to account for main 2 or 3 fuel retained for lateral balance.0% to 27.0% MAC. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position missiles to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. Chart and adjustments valid for operating weight CG 18. if practical. 1B-52H-1 Ballast Fuel for Landing With External Cruise Missiles AGM-86B/C/D INSTRUCTIONS: BALLAST ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the number of aft pylon position missiles. Figure 1-46 (Sheet 1 of 2) Change 20 1-135 .700 pounds (7700 + 3000/PYLON) in the outboard wing tanks. Additional aft body fuel may be retained. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations.T.O.

and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight when installed. bomb racks.O. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position missiles to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. • • • 500 Pounds 700 Pounds 50 Pounds/ 1000 Pounds NOTE Rotary launchers. Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds AGM-129 Pylons +3000 Pounds/Pylon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares CSRL Weapons EXAMPLE: Four forward AGM-129 missiles on a 20% MAC operating weight requires full external tanks and 14. Additional aft body fuel may be retained. then move up the diagonal line to the number of fwd pylon position missiles. Figure 1-46 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-136 – – – . double the pylon/ weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities.T. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with cruise missiles.400 pounds (8400 + 3000/PYLON) in the outboard wing tanks. For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations. if practical. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. 1B-52H-1 Ballast Fuel for Landing With External Cruise Missiles (Cont) AGM-129 INSTRUCTIONS: BALLAST ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the number of aft pylon position missiles.

it should be treated as a multiple launch/jettison. because the aircraft is not to be operated in this manner (above 488. the attainable SIOP increased gross weight will be above 488. the cumulative cg shift can easily exceed the aft limit. the effect on cg will not normally be enough to exceed the aft limit.O. Refer to AGM-86 LAUNCH/JETTISON CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS. No fatigue analysis was accomplished for the increased gross weight operations. Reference is made to the basic non-SIOP material when the revised SIOP increased gross weight material is similar. Fuel Usage Sequence (No External Missiles) The fuel usage sequence in figure 1-46A provides information to operate with an aft cg for fuel economy. 2.000 pounds) on a routine basis. It is intended for SIOP use on aircraft initially loaded with a fuel configuration from ALERT FUEL LOADING FOR CLEAN CONFIGURATIONS chart in T. Section V.O. An additional procedure for fuel transfer prior to launch/jettison of external missiles has been added. The procedures to be followed by the aircrew to determine if aircraft cg location must be adjusted prior to launch/jettison of external missiles are as follows: 1.0% and 27. due to operation at SIOP increased gross weight with cg aft for fuel economy. This section contains text and charts for use in SIOP operations only. if rapid succession single launch/ jettison occurs. When operating the aircraft with no external missiles. The procedure should be initiated at least 15 minutes prior to launch/jettison of external missiles to allow time for fuel transfer from the aft body to the forward body tank. Fuel transfer from the aft body to the forward body tank is the most suitable method for attaining a forward cg shift. 1-46C. For single missile launch/jettison. which results in a center of gravity between 18. Aircraft cg location may be determined by use of the load adjuster. 1-46C. Transfer Fuel (if required). a single external missile launch/ jettison could exceed the aft cg limit during certain phases of flight. pilots shall take into consideration the aft cg shift that will occur when the missile(s) separate from the aircraft. In addition to information concerning SIOP increased gross weight. The information is specifically limited to air refueling and high altitude cruise flight operations with aircraft gross weight above 488. and 1-46D will provide the desired aircraft fuel management for SIOP increased gross weight operations.000 pounds and figures 1-46B. However. The aircraft must have an operating weight (basic weight plus crew and oil) which results in a center of gravity between 18. When operating the aircraft with external AGM86B missiles. 3. Ballast fuel specified in figure 1-45 should be transferred from the aft body tank to the forward tank to prevent exceeding cg limits due to launch/jettison of external AGM-86B missiles.O. the aircrew will check cg location at least 15 minutes prior to any external missile launch/jettison to ascertain if the cg should be adjusted forward. The flight test of the aircraft was limited to these flight regimes.000 pounds and figure 1-46A will provide the desired aircraft fuel management for SIOP increased gross weight operations. with only a short time between each release. Determine CG Location. These Fuel Usage Sequences supplement parts of the B-52H Performance Data Appendix (T.O.T. It is intended for SIOP use on aircraft initially loaded with a fuel configuration from ALERT FUEL LOADING FOR SYMMETRICALLY LOADED EXTERNAL AGM-86B MIS- SILES CONFIGURATIONS (HEAVY GROSS WEIGHT EXTENSION) chart in T. FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT Revised procedures for management of fuel usage and air refueling transfer are presented in this part. the attainable SIOP increased gross weight will exceed 488. Check Launch/Jettison CG Limit Range. and 1-46D provide information to operate with an aft cg for fuel economy with external AGM-86B missiles installed. For launch/jettison of all external missiles.000 pounds. Change 20 1-136A . 1B-52H-1 SIOP INCREASED GROSS WEIGHT IN FLIGHT NOTE For AGM-86C/D missile carriage. Therefore. use AGM-86B missile data. 1B-52H-5. 1B-52H-5. revised fuel loading charts and fuel usage sequences are provided to improve fuel economy on SIOP missions. The aircraft must have an operating weight (basic weight plus crew and oil). for aircraft launch/ jettison aft cg limits. the cg shift is significant. Fuel Usage Sequence (External AGM-86B Missiles) The fuel usage sequences in figures 1-46B. 1B-52H-1-1) for SIOP increased gross weight operation. Fuel usage sequences for various weapons configurations are also included.0% and 27.0% MAC in order to use these charts. If a series of single external missile releases in anticipated. Therefore.0% MAC in order to use these charts. Forward Body Ballast Fuel for Launch/Jettison of External Missiles Prior to launch or jettison of an external missile.

transfer additional fuel to the center 1-136B Change 12 wing tank.T. AGM-86B Missiles. 1B-52H-1 Summary of Launch/Jettison CG Factors Although many combinations of weapons load and fuel distribution are attainable on an SIOP sortie. If this transfer is not possible due to fuel distribution. If cg is aft of 30% MAC.O. The aircrew should be aware of the following: 1. 2. For conditions other than those listed in “1”. . transfer as much fuel as possible from the aft body tank to the forward body tank not to exceed the amount specified in figure 1-45. the load adjuster should be used to determine the aircraft cg. Figure 1-45 should be utilized in conjunction with AGM-86 LAUNCH/JETTISON CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS. While on the fuel sequence provided in figures 1-46B. check aircraft cg. determine the amount of ballast fuel to be transferred. 1-46C. it is possible to make a useful summary of the data pertaining to cg requirements for launch/jettison of external missiles. If fuel in the aft body is insufficient due to prior aft body burn and/or transfer. refer to the appropriate transfer/gross weight chart (figure 1-45) and follow instructions. utilizing figure 1-45 from the aft body tank to the forward body tank. HEAVY GROSS WEIGHT EXTENSION (Section V) and the actual aircraft cg to determine if it is safe to launch/jettison external missiles. Immediately after launch/jettison of external missile(s). transfer as much fuel as possible (aft to forward) while not exceeding the amount specified in figure 1-45. burn aft body to empty. and 1-46D. If this transfer is not possible due to aft body burn. If fuel transfer is greater than forward body tank capacity. This will ensure a safe cg with this fuel configuration. for any combination of launch/jettison of external AGM-86B missiles.

3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 7 AND 8 OUTBOARDS TO EMPTY. 3 AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5. 3 AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. 10. 11. 2. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 12) Figure 1-46A (Sheet 1 of 2) Change 17 1-136C . APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD.USE 8000 POUNDS 7 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 5000 POUNDS EACH 8 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO EMPTY. 10.Increased Gross Weight No External Missiles SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH NOTE DO NOT USE THIS FUEL SEQUENCE UNLESS THE AIRCRAFT OPERATING WEIGHT (BASIC WEIGHT PLUS CREW AND OIL) RESULTS IN A CG BETWEEN 18. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO.T. STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) FUEL USAGE REMARKS AFT BODY TO 1 AND 2 MAIN 2 TO 3 AND 4 MAIN 3 TO 5 AND 6 CENTER WING TO 7 AND 8 FOR TAKEOFF WITH MAINS 1 AND 4 ABOVE GREEN BAND AND CENTER WING AND AFT BODY CONTAIN 2000 POUNDS OR MORE EACH OR MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) FOR TAKEOFF WITH AND EITHER CENTER WING OR AFT BODY CONTAIN LESS THAN 2000 POUNDS OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 6. 2 AFT BODY TO 1. 11.0% MAC.0% AND 27. 7 AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 5 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 20. 10. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . 6. 11. AND 12) 9 LEFT OUTBOARD TO 1 AND 2 NO.O.000 POUNDS EACH 6 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY . OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. 7 AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. 2.

SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9.T. REFUEL OUTBOARDS. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. NOTE • • THE AIRCRAFT IS SPEED LIMITED UNTIL EXTERNALS ARE FULL. AND 12) ALL LANDING.10. Figure 1-46A (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-136D Change 17 .O. 11. 10. 11. TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED. TRANSITION. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5000 POUNDS. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 RIGHT EXTERNAL TO 7 AND 8 EXTERNALS TO EMPTY.11 AND 12. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. SECTION V. FUEL TRANSFER DURING AIR REFUELING IF OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE NOT FULL. FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE USED IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. AND 12) 11 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 10. AND 12) NOTE • • FOR LANDING. 10.Increased Gross Weight No External Missiles (Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS 10 LEFT EXTERNAL TO 1 AND 2 NO. EXTERNALS AND MAINS UNTIL OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE FULL. THEN REFUEL ALL TANKS SIMULTANEOUSLY UNTIL DESIRED GROSS WEIGHT IS ACHIEVED. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 11. 11. WING TANKS MUST BE FULL AT GROSS WEIGHTS ABOVE 500.000 POUNDS. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD. 10. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS CHART IN SECTION V OF THIS MANUAL.

TRANSFER ADDITIONAL FUEL TO THE CENTER WING TANK. TRANSFER AS MUCH FUEL AS POSSIBLE FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45. CHECK AIRCRAFT CG: IF CG IS AFT OF 30% MAC. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . FUEL SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45 SHOULD BE TRANSFERRED FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK. IN ORDER TO PREVENT EXCEEDING CG LIMITS. RETAIN THE FORWARD BODY BALLAST FUEL SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45 DURING STEP 2 OF THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE. IF TRANSFER OF BALLAST FUEL FROM AFT BODY TANK TO FORWARD BODY TANK WAS ACCOMPLISHED AND PLANNED LAUNCH/JETTISON WAS NOT ACCOMPLISHED.0% MAC.0% TO 27.O. REFER TO APPROPRIATE TRANSFER/GROSS WEIGHT CHART (FIGURE 1-45) AND FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS.000 POUNDS . IMMEDIATELY AFTER LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILE(S). IF MISSILES ARE TO BE LAUNCHED WITHIN AN HOUR AFTER REFUELING. ACCOMPLISH THE FOLLOWING: PRIOR TO LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILES AND PYLONS. AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. FUEL USAGE REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9.) • • DO NOT USE INCREASED GROSS WEIGHT SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH FUEL SEQUENCE FOR OTHER THAN SIOP OPERATION BECAUSE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL LIFE HAS NOT BEEN CONSIDERED IN THE FUEL SEQUENCE.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Two and Four AGM-86B Missiles SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH (GROSS WEIGHT OVER 488.TWO PYLONS .SYMMETRICALLY LOADED WITH TWO OR FOUR AGM-86 MISSILES) FOR OPERATING WEIGHT CG FROM 18. 11. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD.T. 10. • • • • STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) NOTE IF FUEL TRANSFER IS GREATER THAN THE FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY. Figure 1-46B (Sheet 1 of 3) Change 17 1-136E . IF THIS TRANSFER IS NOT POSSIBLE DUE TO FUEL DISTRIBUTION. THE AIRCREW SHOULD RETURN THE BALLAST FUEL TO THE AFT BODY TANK AND RESUME THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE.

AND 8 10 FWD BODY (BALLAST) TO ALL ENGINES FWD BODY TO EMPTY (FUEL WHICH WAS TRANSFERRED TO FWD BODY FOR MISSILE LAUNCH) 11 EXTERNALS TO ALL ENGINES EXTERNALS TO BALLAST OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 5 AFT BODY TO 1. 2. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5.000 POUNDS EACH 9 LEFT OUTBOARD 1. 7. 2. 6.T. 11. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. AND 4 OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 7. 11. AND 12) Figure 1-46B (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-136F Change 12 . 3. AND 12) (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 5.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Two and Four AGM-86B Missiles (Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS 2 FWD BODY TO ALL ENGINES FWD BODY TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1.000 POUNDS EACH 7 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO EMPTY 8 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 5. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 UNTIL MAINS 2 AND 3 EQUAL TO MAINS 1 AND 4 6 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 15. 2. 3. 10. 10. AND 8 NO. 6. 10.O. 11. AND 12) (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) 12 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 7.

000 POUNDS.O. • THE AFT BODY SHOULD BE FULL AFTER REFUELING. REFUEL MAINS. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . THE AIRCRAFT IS SPEED LIMITED UNTIL EXTERNALS ARE FULL. AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE USED IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. OUTBOARDS. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD. AT NO TIME SHOULD MAINS BE ALLOWED TO BE LESS THAN 5000 POUNDS. THEN REFUEL ALL TANKS EXCEPT FORWARD BODY UNTIL MAINS ARE FULL AND AFT BODY CONTAINS AT LEAST 36.10. FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5000 POUNDS. FUEL TRANSFER DURING AIR REFUELING IF OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE NOT FULL. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. SECTION V.11 AND 12. • WING TANKS MUST BE FULL AT GROSS WEIGHTS ABOVE 500. 11. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS CHART IN SECTION V OF THIS MANUAL. TRANSITION. 10. THEN REFUEL ALL TANKS SIMULTANEOUSLY UNTIL DESIRED GROSS WEIGHT IS ACHIEVED. AND 12) NOTE • • FOR LANDING. • FOR AIRCRAFT WITH OPERATING WEIGHT CG FORWARD OF 22% MAC.000 POUNDS. 10. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9.T. NOTE • • MAINTAIN MAINS AS CLOSE TO 9000 POUNDS EACH AS POSSIBLE. LIMIT FORWARD BODY FUEL TO 8000 POUNDS Figure 1-46B (Sheet 3 of 3) Change 17 1-136G . EXTERNALS AND AFT BODY UNTIL OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE FULL.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Two and Four AGM-86B Missiles (Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS ALL LANDING. TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9. 11. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS.

AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. THE AIRCREW SHOULD RETURN THE BALLAST FUEL TO THE AFT BODY TANK AND RESUME THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Six thru Twelve AGM-86B Missiles SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH (GROSS WEIGHT OVER 488. FUEL USAGE STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . 10. TRANSFER ADDITIONAL FUEL TO THE CENTER WING TANK. • • • • NOTE IF FUEL TRANSFER IS GREATER THAN THE FORWARD BODY TANK CAPACITY. TRANSFER AS MUCH FUEL AS POSSIBLE FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45.O. • • DO NOT USE INCREASED GROSS WEIGHT SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH FUEL SEQUENCE FOR OTHER THAN SIOP OPERATION BECAUSE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL LIFE HAS NOT BEEN CONSIDERED IN THE FUEL SEQUENCE. Figure 1-46C (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-136H Change 17 .T. CHECK AIRCRAFT CG: IF CG IS AFT OF 30% MAC. FUEL SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45 SHOULD BE TRANSFERRED FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK. RETAIN THE FORWARD BODY BALLAST FUEL SPECIFIED IN FIGURE 1-45 DURING STEP 2 OF THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE.000 POUNDS .0% MAC.0% TO 27. IF MISSILES ARE TO BE LAUNCHED WITHIN AN HOUR AFTER REFUELING. ACCOMPLISH THE FOLLOWING: PRIOR TO LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILES AND PYLONS.SYMMETRICALLY LOADED IN WITH SIX TO TWELVE MISSILE CONFIGURATION) FOR OPERATING WEIGHT CG FROM 18.TWO PYLONS . IF THIS TRANSFER IS NOT POSSIBLE DUE TO FUEL DISTRIBUTION. IMMEDIATELY AFTER LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL MISSILE(S). 11. REFER TO APPROPRIATE TRANSFER/GROSS WEIGHT CHART (FIGURE 1-45) AND FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS. IF TRANSFER OF BALLAST FUEL FROM AFT BODY TANK TO FORWARD BODY TANK WAS ACCOMPLISHED AND PLANNED LAUNCH/JETTISON WAS NOT ACCOMPLISHED. IN ORDER TO PREVENT EXCEEDING CG LIMITS.

11. 7. 3. AND 4 MID BODY TO 5. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. AND 4 RIGHT EXTERNAL TO 5. AND 8 OUTBOARD TO BALLAST (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 10. 2. 11. 10. 7.T. 11. AND 4 RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 5. 10. 11.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Six thru Twelve AGM-86B Missiles (Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS 2 FWD BODY TO ALL ENGINES FWD BODY TO EMPTY 3 CENTER WING TO ALL ENGINES CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO 7000 POUNDS 5 AFT BODY TO 1. 7. 7. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . 6. 6. AND 8 MID BODY TO EMPTY 6 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 21. AND 12) 10 LEFT OUTBOARD 1. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 MAINS 2 AND 3 UNTIL EQUAL TO MAINS 1 AND 4 8 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 5000 POUNDS EACH 9 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO EMPTY OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 8 (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) EXTERNAL TO BALLAST (RETAIN BALLAST FUEL SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 2. 6. AND 8 NO. 10. 3. 10.000 POUNDS EACH 7 AFT BODY TO 1. AND 12) 11 FWD BODY (BALLAST) TO ALL ENGINES FWD BODY TO EMPTY OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 2. AND 12) Figure 1-46C (Sheet 2 of 3) Change 20 1-136J . AND 12) 13 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 12) (FUEL WHICH WAS TRANSFERRED TO FWD BODY FOR MISSILE LAUNCH) 12 LEFT EXTERNAL TO 1.O. 3. 11. 2.

EXTERNALS AND AFT BODY UNTIL OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE FULL.Increased Gross Weight Symmetrical External Load of Six thru Twelve AGM-86B Missiles (Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS ALL LANDING.11 AND 12. THEN REFUEL ALL TANKS EXCEPT FORWARD BODY UNTIL MAINS ARE FULL AND AFT BODY CONTAINS AT LEAST 36. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS CHART IN SECTION V OF THIS MANUAL. 10. TRANSITION. SECTION V. NOTE • • MAINTAIN MAINS AS CLOSE TO 9000 POUNDS EACH AS POSSIBLE. AND 12) NOTE • • FOR LANDING. AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE USED IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. THEN REFUEL ALL TANKS SIMULTANEOUSLY UNTIL DESIRED GROSS WEIGHT IS ACHIEVED. TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES.O. • WING TANKS MUST BE FULL AT GROSS WEIGHTS ABOVE 500. FUEL TRANSFER DURING AIR REFUELING IF OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE NOT FULL. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9. 11.000 POUNDS. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence .T. OUTBOARDS. 10. • FOR AIRCRAFT WITH OPERATING WEIGHT CG FORWARD OF 22% MAC. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5. 11.000 POUNDS Figure 1-46C (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-136K Change 17 .000 POUNDS. • THE AFT BODY SHOULD BE FULL AFTER REFUELING. REFUEL MAINS. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. THE AIRCRAFT IS SPEED LIMITED UNTIL EXTERNALS ARE FULL. LIMIT FORWARD BODY FUEL TO 8.000 POUNDS. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS.10. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED. AT NO TIME SHOULD MAINS BE ALLOWED TO BE LESS THAN 5000 POUNDS.

2 AFT BODY TO 1. STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) FUEL USAGE REMARKS AFT BODY TO 1. 4.T. 6. 11 AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. AND 8 OR CENTER WING TO EMPTY MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) FOR TAKEOFF. AND 6 NO. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence . 2.O.000 POUNDS EACH (MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3 OPPOSITE EXTERNAL MISSILES) 7 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO BALLAST AS SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 (OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES) 8 LEFT OUTBOARD TO 1. Figure 1-46D Change 17 1-136L . 2.0% MAC. 3. 7 AND 8 FWD BODY TO EMPTY 3 NO.Increased Gross Weight Asymmetrical External Load of One thru Six AGM-86B Missiles on One Pylon SIOP / POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH (GROSS WEIGHT OVER 488. AND 4 RIGHT OUTBOARD TO 5. AND 8 EXTERNALS TO BALLAST AS SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 (OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES) 10 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES NOTE MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3 OPPOSITE EXTERNAL MISSILES. 3.WITH ONE TO SIX MISSILES) FOR OPERATING WEIGHT CG FROM 18. AND 8 OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST AS SHOWN IN FIGURE 1-46 (OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES) 9 LEFT EXTERNAL TO 1. 4 MAIN TO 7 AND 8 UNTIL: (LH PYLON): MAINS 1 AND 4 EQUAL TO MAIN 2 (RH PYLON): MAINS 1 AND 4 EQUAL TO MAIN 3 4 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 5 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO 10. 2.000 POUNDS . 7.0% TO 27. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD. 10. 3 AND 4 FWD BODY TO 5.ONE PYLON ASYMMETRICALLY LOADED . 5. 7. AND 4 RIGHT EXTERNAL TO 5. 3. 6. 6. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. IF MISSILES ARE RETAINED FOR LANDING.000 POUNDS 6 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 5. 7. 2. 1 MAIN TO 1 AND 2 MID BODY TO 3. 6.

externals. Forward body should not exceed 8000 pounds. resume the appropriate fuel usage sequence based on weapons configuration. 1B-52H-1. then refuel all tanks simultaneously until desired onload is achieved.Internal Weapons (Increased Gross Weight) If outboards and externals are not full. Complete air refueling operations as smoothly and expeditiously as possible. NOTE Complete air refueling operations as smoothly and expeditiously as possible. refuel mains.SIOP INCREASED GROSS WEIGHT IN FLIGHT OPERATIONS FUEL DISTRIBUTION PRIOR TO AIR REFUELING Fuel distribution for increased gross weight operations is unique in both initial fuel loading and subsequent fuel usage sequences for flight operations. Refer to WING FLUTTER AND SPEED LIMITATIONS chart in Section V of T. and mains until outboards and externals are full.000 pounds.External AGM-86 & Internal Weapons (Increased Gross Weight) If outboards and externals are not full. externals.000 pounds.O. Minimum time in air refueling reduces the exposure to overstressing the aircraft at increased gross weight and improves fuel economy. The aft body should be full after refueling. The aircraft is speed limited until externals are full. The fuel loading charts are contained in T.O. The fuel sequences provided in FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT in this part reflect continual maintenance of an aft cg for increased range. • • • • • NOTE The aircraft is speed limited until externals are full. outboards. Minimum time in air refueling reduces the exposure to overstressing the aircraft at increased gross weight and improves fuel economy. Air Refueling Procedure . For specific fuel usage sequences see the appropriate procedure under FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT in this part. Utilization of the revised fuel management procedures prior to air refueling results in an aft cg. refuel outboards. All wing tanks must be full at gross weights above 500. • • • Air Refueling Procedure . 1B-52H-1 AIR REFUELING FUEL MANAGEMENT . All wing tanks must be full at gross weights above 488. 1-136M Change 12 . At the completion of increased gross weight air refueling. then refuel all tanks simultaneously until desired onload is achieved.T. See WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS chart in Section V of the basic flight manual. and aft body until outboards and externals are full. resume the appropriate revised fuel usage sequence. 1B-52H-5.O. At the completion of increased gross weight air refueling.

OUTBOARDS TO ALL ENGINES. FIGURE 1-46 FOR EXTERNAL CRUISE MISSILES 10 OUTBOARDS TO ALL ENGINES OUTBOARDS TO BALLAST. 7. 3 MAIN TO 5 AND 6 MAINS 2 AND 3 EQUAL TO MAINS 1 AND 4 (FOR ASYMMETRICAL LOADINGS. 3. THE AIRCREW SHOULD RETURN THE BALLAST FUEL TO THE AFT BODY TANK AND RESUME THIS FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE.000 POUNDS FOR AGM-86B/C/D AFT BODY TO 20. PRIOR TO EXTERNAL BOMB RELEASE. MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3) 5 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 15. AND 8 CENTER WING TO EMPTY 4 AFT BODY TO 1.T. AND 8 NO. FUEL TRANSFERED TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK FOR LAUNCH/JETTISON OF EXTERNAL WEAPONS SHALL BE ROUTED TO ALL ENGINES AFTER THE AFT BODY FUEL TANK IS EMPTY OR PRIOR TO STEP 10. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence With External Cruise Missile or Conventional Pylons. 2. APPLY FIRM PRESSURE TO THE TOGGLE SWITCH WHEN PLACING IT TO THE ON POSITION AND ABSOLUTELY ENSURE IT IS FULLY AND COMPLETELY ON BEFORE CLOSING THE GUARD. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. 6.0% TO 27.000 POUNDS EACH 6 7 FWD BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES FWD BODY TO EMPTY AFT BODY TO 12. FIGURE 1-46 OR FIGURE 1-50 AS APPLICABLE Figure 1-47 (Sheet 1 of 2) Change 22 1-137 .000 POUNDS FOR AGM-129 AFT BODY TO EMPTY FOR CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS 8 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES MAINS TO 5000 POUNDS EACH (FOR ASYMMETRICAL LOADINGS. IF THE TRANSFER OF BALLAST FUEL FROM THE AFT BODY TANK TO THE FORWARD BODY TANK WAS ACCOMPLISHED AND THE PLANNED LAUNCH/ JETTISON WAS NOT ACCOMPLISHED.0% MAC. 9. FUEL USAGE REMARKS MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) USE 4000 POUNDS FROM EACH MAIN FOR TAKEOFF. AND 4 CENTER WING TO 5. OR 11 CRUISE MISSILE CONFIGURATION) FOR OPERATING WEIGHT CG FROM 18. 2 MID BODY TO ALL ENGINES MID BODY TO EMPTY 3 AFT BODY TO 1. 10. TRANSFER 300 POUNDS OF AFT BODY FUEL TO THE FORWARD BODY FOR EACH 1000 POUNDS OF BOMBS/ MISSILES TO BE RELEASED.O. IF BOMB/MISSILE RELEASE OCCURS AFTER STEP 8 OF THE FUEL USAGE SEQUENCE. 7. THE AIRPLANE CG WILL BE FAR ENOUGH FORWARD TO SAFELY EXPEND EXTERNAL STORES. AND 12) CLOSURE OF THE MAIN TANK SWITCH GUARD MAY NOT ACTUATE THE BOOST PUMP SWITCH TO THE ON POSITION. 2. MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3) 9 AFT BODY TO ALL ENGINES AFT BODY TO BALLAST. 2 MAIN TO 3 AND 4 NO. With or Without Weapons CONVENTIONAL OPERATIONS/TRAINING/TACTICAL FERRY FUEL SEQUENCE • • • STEP 1 (TAKEOFF) (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICALLY CONVENTIONAL LOADED OR SYMMETRICALLY/ASYMMETRICALLY LOADED 7. 11.

Figure 1-47 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-138 Change 22 . AUXILIARY FUEL WILL BE IN ORDER OF OMITTED STEPS. 11 AND 12 REGARDLESS OF THE GREEN BAND. AND 12) WITH ANY MAIN DOWN TO 5000 POUNDS. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Sequence With External Cruise Missile or Conventional Pylons. 11. MAINTAINING AIRCRAFT CG WITHIN SAFE LIMITS. With or Without Weapons(Cont) STEP FUEL USAGE REMARKS 11 EXTERNALS TO ALL ENGINES EXTERNALS TO BALLAST. FIGURE 1-46 OR FIGURE 1-50 AS APPLICABLE 12 MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) (FOR ASYMMETRICAL LOADINGS.T.O. AND 12) NOTE • • • FOR LANDING. SECTION V. AND AT THE SAME TIME. 10. USE OF THIS SEQUENCE DURING CONVENTIONAL WEAPONS DELIVERY ALLOWS THE CREW TO JETTISON WEAPONS IMMEDIATELY AFTER TAKEOFF WITHOUT ADJUSTING FUEL. TRANSITION. IF AUXILIARY FUEL USAGE IS DESIRED. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. 11. IT WILL BE TRANSFERRED DIRECTLY INTO MAIN TANKS THROUGH THE MAIN MANIFOLD. OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. TRANSITION AND LOW APPROACHES. AND LOW APPROACHES MAINS TO ALL ENGINES (CROSSFEED VALVES OPEN) OPEN ALL CROSSFEED VALVES (9. MAINTAIN DIFFERENTIAL FUEL IN MAIN 2 OR 3) ALL LANDING. FOR SPEED RESTRICTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH USE OF AUXILIARY FUEL IN VARIOUS AIRCRAFT/MISSILE CONFIGURATIONS. 10. OPEN CROSSFEED VALVES 9. 10.

T. add to mid body) Figure 1-48 (Sheet 1 of 4) Change 17 1-139 . % MAC 18 22 20 24 EXTERNAL AGM−86B/C/D MISSILES 26 FWD 2 PYLO N MIS SILE 4 POSI TION 6 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 ADD AFT BODY FUEL − 1000 LBS 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 0 DEDUCT AFT BODY FUEL A31671 Additional Aft Body Fuel (Pounds) (If full.O. 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart for Carrying External Cruise Missiles AGM-86B/C/D MISSILES OPERATIONAL MISSIONS/TRAINING MISSIONS/TACTICAL FERRY NOTE (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICALLY LOADED) OPERATING WEIGHT CG.

1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart for Carrying External Cruise Missiles (Cont) INSTRUCTIONS: ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the number of fwd pylon position missiles.O.O. 1B-52H-5. Aft Pylon Position Missiles +1000 Pounds/Missile Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds NOTE If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488.T. then read left in a straight line to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. This fuel will be additional fuel to be added to the aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T. Read down in a straight line to the additional aft body fuel line.000 pound gross weight takeoff. move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart. In that case. If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed fuel figure can be moved from the mid body. then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body. Figure 1-48 (Sheet 2 of 4) 1-140 . additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added.

9. OR 11 MISSILE LOADING) Figure 1-48 (Sheet 3 of 4) Change 17 1-141 .T. 1B-52H-1 AGM-129 MISSILES OPERATIONAL MISSIONS/TRAINING MISSIONS/TACTICAL FERRY NOTE (TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICAL LOADING OR 7.O.

This fuel will be additional fuel to be added to the aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T. move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart. In that case. additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added.000 pound gross weight takeoff.O. 1B-52H-5. add to the aft body fuel found on the primary fuel loading chart.T. 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart for Carrying External Cruise Missiles (Cont) INSTRUCTIONS: BALLAST ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the number of fwd pylon position missiles. If aft body fuel tank is full. If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed figure can be moved from the mid body. Figure 1-48 (Sheet 4 of 4) 1-142 . Aft Pylon Position Missiles +1000 Pounds/Missile Internal Bombs (FWD Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares CSRL Weapons – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds – 50 Pounds/ 1000 Pounds NOTE • • • • Forward pylon positions are to be loaded first.O. If total adjustment is negative. Read down in a straight line to the additional aft body fuel line. reduce aft body fuel by that amount and add that fuel to mid-body fuel. If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488. add remainder to mid-body fuel. If total adjustment is positive. then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body. then read left in a straight line to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line.

PYLONS. 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart For Carrying External Conventional Weapons ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds) OPERATING WEIGHT (BASIC WEIGHT PLUS CREW.O.T. AND OIL) DEDUCTIONS: Chaff – 500 Pounds Flares – 700 Pounds Figure 1-49 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-143 .

Read down in a straight line to the aft body fuel line. In some cases.O. 1B-52H-5.O. fuel must be deducted from the aft body. Read right to left in a straight line until intersecting the computed aircraft operating weight CG (%MAC) line.000 pound gross weight takeoff. This fuel will be additional fuel to be added to aft body fuel depicted in the applicable fuel loading chart in T. Figure 1-49 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-144 . move fuel from the mid body tank to the aft body tank equal to the amount computed from the chart. additional aft body (or mid body) fuel cannot be added. If fuel must be deducted from the aft body. 1B-52H-1 Aft Body Fuel Adjustment Chart For Carrying External Conventional Weapons (Cont) INSTRUCTIONS: ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the external conventional load.T. In that case. If the aft body becomes full before the entire computed fuel figure can be moved from the mid body. then move only that amount from the mid body to fill the aft body. move the computed amount from the aft body to the mid body. Aft Pylon Position Missiles +1000 Pounds/Missile Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds DEDUCTIONS: Chaff Flares – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds NOTE If the aircraft is already loaded with maximum fuel for a 488.

Class Weapons OPERATING WEIGHT CG. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position weapons to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. doubling the quantities on the heavy side configuration (in this case. For example.T. when installed. and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight. the right side pylon) would result in a total of 2 fwd and 6 aft position weapons. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line.O. double the pylon/weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities. % MAC EXTERNAL QUANTITIES 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 6 4 2 OUTBOARD AUXILIARY 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 AFT BODY 8 6 4 2 0 BALLAST FUEL (1000 LBS) 0 8 6 4 2 EXTERNAL WING INSTRUCTIONS: Enter the chart with the total number of aft pylon position weapons. Enter the chart with these values and obtain required ballast fuel in a manner similar to the previous example above. NOTE • Rotary launchers. • Additional aft body fuel may be retained. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. Figure 1-50 (Sheet 1 of 5) Change 22 1-145 . bomb racks. 1B-52H-1 Ballast Fuel for Landing With External Conventional Weapons Configurations 500 Lb. if there are only 3 aft position weapons on the left pylon and 1 fwd and 3 aft position weapons on the right pylon. • For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations. The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with external weapons. if practical. then move up the diagonal line to the total number of fwd pylon position weapons. 0 2 6 4 FWD PYLON POSITIONS 18 AFT PYLON POSITIONS B61080 BALLAST ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds Center Station Weapons +300 Pounds/Weapon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff – 500 Pounds Flares – 700 Pounds CSRL Weapons – 50 Pounds/1000 Pounds EXAMPLE: Four forward weapons (two on each pylon) on a 20% MAC operating weight requires 8000 pounds in the external wing tanks.

NOTE • Rotary launchers. double the pylon/weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities.O. • Additional aft body fuel may be retained. The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with external weapons. if there are only 3 aft position weapons on the left pylon and 1 fwd and 3 aft position weapons on the right pylon. • For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations. if practical. Class Weapons OPERATING WEIGHT CG. For example. % MAC EXTERNAL QUANTITIES 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 6 4 2 OUTBOARD AUXILIARY 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 AFT BODY 8 6 4 2 0 BALLAST FUEL (1000 LBS) 0 8 6 4 2 EXTERNAL WING INSTRUCTIONS: Enter the chart with the total number of aft pylon position weapons. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. doubling the quantities on the heavy side configuration (in this case. the right side pylon) would result in a total of 2 fwd and 6 aft position weapons. when installed. Figure 1-50 (Sheet 2 of 5) 1-146 Change 22 . bomb racks. 1B-52H-1 Ballast Fuel for Landing With External Conventional Weapons Configurations (Cont) 750 Lb.T. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position weapons to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight. then move up the diagonal line to the total number of fwd pylon position weapons. 0 2 4 6 FWD PYLON POSITIONS 18 AFT PYLON POSITIONS B61079 BALLAST ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds Center Station Weapons +450 Pounds/Weapon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff – 500 Pounds Flares – 700 Pounds CSRL Weapons – 50 Pounds/1000 Pounds EXAMPLE: Four forward weapons (two on each pylon) on a 20% MAC operating weight requires 8500 pounds in the external wing tanks. Enter the chart with these values and obtain required ballast fuel in a manner similar to the previous example above.

Enter the chart with these values and obtain required ballast fuel in a manner similar to the previous example above. double the pylon/weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities. For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations. Additional aft body fuel may be retained. For example. and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight. bomb racks. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position weapons to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. % MAC EXTERNAL QUANTITIES 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 6 4 2 OUTBOARD AUXILIARY 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 AFT BODY 8 6 4 2 0 BALLAST FUEL (1000 LBS) 0 8 6 4 2 EXTERNAL WING INSTRUCTIONS: Enter the chart with the total number of aft pylon position weapons. if there are only 3 aft position weapons on the left pylon and 1 fwd and 3 aft position weapons on the right pylon. when installed. EXAMPLE: Four forward weapons (two on each pylon) on a 20% MAC operating weight requires full external tanks and 200 pounds in the outboard wing tanks. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit.T.O. The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with external weapons. Class Weapons OPERATING WEIGHT CG. then move up the diagonal line to the total number of fwd pylon position weapons. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. doubling the quantities on the heavy side configuration (in this case. if practical. the right side pylon) would result in a total of 2 fwd and 6 aft position weapons. 1B-52H-1 1000 Lb. • • • 0 6 4 2 FWD PYLON POSITIONS 18 AFT PYLON POSITIONS B61083 BALLAST ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds Center Station Weapons +600 Pounds/Weapon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff – 500 Pounds Flares – 700 Pounds CSRL Weapons – 50 Pounds/1000 Pounds NOTE Rotary launchers. Figure 1-50 (Sheet 3 of 5) Change 21 1-146A .

if there are only 3 aft position weapons on the left pylon and 1 fwd and 3 aft position weapons on the right pylon. EXAMPLE: Four forward weapons (two on each pylon) on a 20% MAC operating weight requires full external tanks and 3000 pounds in the outboard wing tanks. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. For example. double the pylon/weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities. the right side pylon) would result in a total of 2 fwd and 6 aft position weapons. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position weapons to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. bomb racks. Additional aft body fuel may be retained.T. and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight. • • • FWD PYLON POSITIONS 6 0 AFT PYLON POSITIONS B61082 BALLAST ADDITIONS: Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds Center Station Weapons +1200 Pounds/Weapon BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Chaff – 500 Pounds Flares – 700 Pounds CSRL Weapons – 50 Pounds/1000 Pounds NOTE Rotary launchers. if practical. then move up the diagonal line to the total number of fwd pylon position weapons. Enter the chart with these values and obtain required ballast fuel in a manner similar to the previous example above.O. Figure 1-50 (Sheet 4 of 5) 1-146B Change 21 . doubling the quantities on the heavy side configuration (in this case. % MAC EXTERNAL QUANTITIES 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 4 2 OUTBOARD AUXILIARY 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 AFT BODY 8 6 6 4 2 0 BALLAST FUEL (1000 LBS) 4 0 2 8 6 4 2 EXTERNAL WING INSTRUCTIONS: Enter the chart with the total number of aft pylon position weapons. when installed. For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations. The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with external weapons. Class Weapons OPERATING WEIGHT CG. 1B-52H-1 Ballast Fuel for Landing With External Conventional Weapons Configurations (Cont) 2000 Lb.

• • • • Chaff Flares CSRL Weapons – 500 Pounds – 700 Pounds – 50 Pounds/1000 Pounds NOTE ALCM/CALCM pylons (SUU-67) and ACM pylons (SUU-72) are considered expendable stores and are not included in the operating weight.O. Internal Bombs (Fwd Bomb Bay) +210 Pounds/1000 Pounds EXAMPLE: BALLAST DEDUCTIONS: Pylons +3000 Pounds/Pylon Four forward weapons (two on each pylon) on a 20% MAC operating weight requires full external tanks and 13. Read left in a straight line from the number of fwd pylon position weapons to the computed aircraft operating weight CG (% MAC) line. then move up the diagonal line to the total number of fwd pylon position weapons. double the pylon/weapon quantities of the heavy side configuration and enter the chart with these quantities. when installed. in order to move the aircraft landing CG (% MAC) further aft of the forward landing CG limit. if there are only 3 aft position weapons on the left pylon and 1 fwd and 3 aft position weapons on the right pylon. Additional aft body fuel may be retained. Read down in a straight line to the ballast fuel line. Rotary launchers. For example. the right side pylon) would result in a total of 2 fwd and 6 aft position weapons. if practical. 1B-52H-1 3300 Lb. For landing ballast fuel with asymmetrical pylon/weapon configurations.700 pounds (7700 + 3000/PYLON) in the outboard wing tanks.T. Enter the chart with these values and obtain required ballast fuel in a manner similar to the previous example above. bomb racks. Class Weapons INSTRUCTIONS: BALLAST ADDITIONS: Enter the chart with the total number of aft pylon position weapons. Figure 1-50 (Sheet 5 of 5) Change 21 1-146C/(1-146D blank) . The computed ballast fuel will be retained if landing with external weapons. doubling the quantities on the heavy side configuration (in this case. and all other non-expendable useful load items are to be included in the operating weight.

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TR Left TR RLC/B1 LLC/B12 RLC/B2 Rt. TR FUEL PUMP CONTROL – BODY TANKS – AFT 30 AFT 31 AFT 32 CTR 25 CTR WING 26 FWD 23 FWD 24 MID 27 MID 28 MID 29 LEFT WING TANKS – EXT 1 OUTBD 2 OUTBD 3 RIGHT WING TANKS – EXT 22 OUTBD 20 OUTBD 21 Firewall Fuel Shutoff Valves – See EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION. ESS Rt. ESS Left ESS FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – FUEL MANAGE IND RLC/E3 Rt. TR Left TR Left TR Rt. TR Left TR Rt. ESS LLC/C20 RLC/C5 LLC/C21 LLC/C18 RLC/C2 RLC/C1 LLC/C17 RLC/C3 RLC/C4 LLC/C19 Left TR Rt.T. TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – CABIN MAIN RLC/E8 RLC/E9 Rt.O. TR FUEL FEED CONTROL – CROSS FEED VALVE – 9 10 11 12 LLC/C13 RLC/C7 RLC/C8 LLC/C14 Left ESS Rt. TR Rt. TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – FQIS DC RLC/E10 Rt. TR Left TR Rt. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Supply System Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Auxiliary Tank Engine Feed Control Valve Switches Aux Tank Fuel Flow Control & Boost Pump Switches (In engine feed position) Engine Crossfeed Manifold Valve Switches Engine Fuel Shutoff Valves CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE FUEL FEED CONTROL – DIRECT FEED VALVE – 13 14 15 16 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE RLC/C9 LLC/C15 LLC/C16 RLC/C10 Rt. ESS Left ESS POWER FEEDERS – DC FUEL SHUTOFF VALVE INBD ENG FUEL SHUTOFF VALVE OUTBD ENG RLC/D34 LLC/D10 Rt. ESS Left ESS Left ESS Rt. TR Rt. Fuel Flow Indicator Lights Fuel-In-Manifold Lights Fuel Quantity Indicating System Control Power Figure 1-51 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-147 . TR RLC/B12 LLC/B21 RLC/B11 Rt. TR Rt. TR Left TR Rt. This Section.

TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – LEVEL WARN – MAIN TANK LOW RLC/E5 Rt. TR Left TR Left TR LLC/B17 LLC/B18 RLC/B7 RLC/B8 Left TR Left TR Rt. TR Rt. TR Rt. TR Left TR Left TR RLC/B5 RLC/B6 LLC/B15 LLC/B16 Rt.T.O. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Supply System Circuit Protection and Location (Cont) EQUIPMENT Fuel Quantity Gages Main Manifold Interconnect Valves Switch Main Tank Boost Pump Switches (Boost pump control power) Main Tank Low Warning Light Pump Pressure Checkout Pressto-Relieve Button CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE FUEL QUANTITY INDICATORS – AFT BODY CTR WING FWD BODY MID BODY 1 2 3 4 FUEL QTY IND – LEFT EXT LEFT OUTBD RIGHT EXT RIGHT OUTBD POWER SOURCE CPCBP/A7 CPCBP/A5 CPCBP/A4 CPCBP/A6 CPCBP/A1 CPCBP/A2 CPCBP/A8 CPCBP/A9 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 CPCBP/B1 CPCBP/B2 CPCBP/B5 CPCBP/B4 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 LLC/C12 RLC/C6 Left TR Rt. 3 12 13 14 15 RIGHT WING TANKS – NO. TR LLC/B19 LLC/B20 RLC/B9 RLC/B10 Left TR Left TR Rt. TR Rt. TR RLC/B3 RLC/B4 LLC/B13 LLC/B14 Rt. 2 8 9 10 11 RIGHT WING TANKS – NO. TR FUEL SYSTEM – GRD CHK OUT – REFUEL VALVE LLC/A13 Left TR FUEL FEED CONTROL – CROSS FEED VALVE – 29 29A FUEL PUMP CONTROL – LEFT WING TANKS – NO. TR Rt. 1 4 5 6 7 LEFT WING TANKS – NO. 4 16 17 18 19 Figure 1-51 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-148 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 .

O. TR Total Fuel Quantity Gage FUEL QTY IND – TOTAL CPCBP/B3 AC Bus 5 Wing Tank Warning Light FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – LEVEL WARN – OUTBD & EXT TANK RLC/E4 Rt. TR The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. 1B-52H-1 EQUIPMENT 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Pump Pressure Checkout Switch and Light FUEL SYSTEM – GRD CHK OUT – PUMP PRESS LLC/A12 Left TR Scavenge System Switch (In MAIN position.T. for CABIN position – see REFUELING SYSTEM CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION. this section) FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – MAIN RLC/E9 Rt. CPCBP LLC COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-51 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-149/(1-150 blank) . under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.

BLA .

operating weight and weapon load. WBA – Weapons Bay Aft WB-C. and when a fuel tank approaches a selected quantity. POWER SOURCE Single-phase 118 volt ac power to the CG/FLAS is controlled by the CG/FLAS PWR switch. and chaff are manually input and fuel quantity is automatically input by the FQIS or can be manually input. The CG/ FLAS controls and indicators (figure 1-53) consists of a control panel located on the copilot’s side panel and a display unit located on the pilot’s instrument panel. flares. fuel quantity. WBF – Weapons Bay Forward WPN – Weapon WT – Weight WTLA – Weight Left Aft WTLF – Weight Left Forward WTRA – Weight Right Aft WTRF – Weight Right Forward Figure 1-52 1-151 . 1B-52H-1 CENTER OF GRAVITY/FUEL LEVEL ADVISORY SYSTEM play unit will display cg. WBC – Weapons Bay Center WB-F.T. mode keys. Weapons.O. an asymmetrical fuel loading condition. and data entry keys. CONTROLS AND INDICATORS Control Panel The CG/FLAS control panel consists of the power switch. DESCRIPTION The center of gravity fuel level advisory system (CG/FLAS) automatically provides a continuous cg indication during flight. It also indicates when the cg approaches either forward or aft limit for normal gross weights and heavy weight extension (BIGWIP) configuration. Power for the mode lights is provided through the pilot’s warning dimming switch and 28 volt ac power for the key lights and rocker switch is provided through the side panel rotary switch on the copilot’s light control panel. CG/FLAS abbreviations are listed in figure 1-52. CG/FLAS ABBREVIATIONS BS – Body Station BS-A – Body Station Aft BS-F – Body Station Forward BSLA – Body Station Left Aft BSLF – Body Station Left Forward BSRA – Body Station Right Aft BSRF – Body Station Right Forward CHAF – Chaff CHKN – Check No CHKY – Check Yes CONV – Conventional ERAS – Erase EXT – External FLAR – Flares GF – Gage Fail HARP – Harpoon INIT – Initialization INTR – Interrupt LT – Left NUC – Nuclear OPER – Operational OW – Operating Weight OWCG – Operating Weight Center of Gravity PWR – Power PYLN – Pylon RT – Right STRT – Start WB-A. Display Unit See figure 1-53 for indicator and display arrangement. See figure 1-54 for CG/FLAS circuit protection and the location of applicable circuit breakers. The dis- See figure 1-53 for control and functional information on the CG/FLAS control panel.

T. 1B-52H-1 CG/FLAS Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 CG/FLAS DISPLAY UNIT POWER SWITCH INITIALIZATION KEY WEIGHT KEY WEAPON KEY SCROLL KEY SHIFT KEY 8 9 10 11 12 13 TEST KEY ENTER KEY DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS KNOB CHANGE KEY FUEL KEY MODE LIGHTS (3 PLACES) Figure 1-53 (Sheet 1 of 6) 1-152 .O.

O. 5 WPN (Weapon Status Mode) Key Pressing the WPN key activates the weapon status mode and allows operator to monitor weapon status and to decrement weapons when a release or launch occur. cg. The WT mode light comes on when the WT mode is active. Rotating the knob clockwise increases brightness and rotating the knob counterclockwise decreases brightness. When the CHG key is pressed. 4. 7 SHIFT Key When pressed. fuel gage failure.T. ON applies power and starts self-test. Figure 1-53 (Sheet 2 of 6) 1-153 . 4 WT (Weight Status Mode) Key Pressing the WT key activates the weight status mode and displays fuel quantity. The WPN mode light is on when the WPN status mode is active. any weapon selection list or fuel and weight modes) pressing SHIFT key allows reverse scroll capability. and 12) are inactive when initialization mode is active. FUNCTION CG/FLAS DISPLAY UNIT 1 CG/FLAS Display Unit See Sheets 3 thru 6 for CG/FLAS Displays. 5. Flashes the displayed data to be changed. sequences to the next digit on the display unit that data can be manually input for the selected change function. Allows entry of operating weight. 9 ENTER Key Enters displayed data into the CG/FLAS. and external missiles that can be released are displayed. 8 TEST Key Initiates self-test of the system.. the SCROLL key will sequence thru the data available for the change function. When displaying a sequence of displays (i. and weapons load in sequence. and burn-down-to-levels. operating weight CG. The three mode keys (No. 1B-52H-1 CONTROLINDICATOR NO. 12 FUEL (Fuel Status Mode) Key The fuel level advisory mode is active and the FUEL mode light comes on when the FUEL key is pressed. 11 CHG Key Allows operator to change the selected data. 6 SCROLL Key The SCROLL key will allow the operator to sequence through the displays and select the actual aircraft loading configuration.OFF. CG/FLAS CONTROL PANEL 2 PWR (Power) Switch A lighted rocker switch which alternately selects ON . 3 INT (Initialization) Key Enters initialization when pressed. tank designations. 10 DISPLAY BRT Knob Controls brightness of the display unit.e. Burn-down-to-levels for selected tanks. 13 MODE Lights (3) Come on when respective status modes are active. asymmetrical fuel loadings..

DISPLAY UNIT Figure 1-53 (Sheet 3 of 6) 1-154 Displays loaded: . Weight Status Mode – Displays the FQIS or operator input. CHKY – Check Yes CHKN – Check No Airplane configuration – Weapons location EXT – External weapons WB – Weapons Bay F – Forward C – Center A – Aft Body stations and weights for new weapons. CHKN entered. The fourth window displays flares and/or chaff loading. The 4th window displays pounds from selected burn down in thousands of pounds. displays the aircraft cg in % MAC. Weapons Check – WPN will be displayed. Displays GF on gage failure. • • Fuel Level Advisory Mode – Displays tank designation and burn-down-to level. and cg in % MAC. • MK56 MK60 MK62 MK64 MK65 MK82 82AR 82SE M117 117R 117A MK84 NEW operation being B-52 Aircraft OW Operating weight OWCG Operating Weight Center of Gravity • • Internal Weapons Count – First window displays the forward bay.T. Fuel Level Advisory Mode – First two display windows show the number of external missiles that can be launched without exceeding the aft cg. • • Displays operating weight (pounds). after WPN. 1B-52H-1 CG/FLAS Controls and Indicators (Cont) In all modes. The next two windows show the right pylon forward and aft positions. With gage failure. Weapons Load NUC CONV ALCM ACM HARP CB52 CB58 CB71 CB87 CB89 GB10 GB12 MK20 MK36 M40C M40F MK52 MK55 B53 B61 B83 NEW • • • • NOTE Display will flash when within 1% MAC of either forward or aft CG limit. The 3rd window shows asymmetric fuel load and tank designation where the difference occurred. Weight Status Mode – Displays selected tank(s) and fuel weight in hundreds of pounds. tank designation and last accurate tank reading displayed. • • Weapons Check – Weapons correction or check needed.O. the second window the center bay and the third window the aft bay. External Weapons Count – First two windows show left pylon forward and aft positions. and pounds from selected burn down in thousands of pounds. CSRL capabilities.

2 Main is Low Between Main Tanks 2 and 3. 2 Main Tank 3 – No. a P is displayed if all external missiles are released and both pylons can be jettisoned without exceeding the aft cg limit. Left and Right EX – External Tanks. 3. 2. 1 Main Tank 4 – No. NOTE The numbers are displayed on right half of LED and letters are displayed on full LED. No. 1B-52H-1 TANK SELECTION SCROLL 14 – Main Tanks 1 and 4 MB – Mid Body Tank 23 – Main Tanks 2 and 3 MN – Main Tanks 1. 3. 3 Main is Low Tank Tank Tank Tank (> (> (> (> 2000 2000 2000 2000 pounds) pounds) pounds) pounds) FUEL LEVEL ADVISORY MODE Figure 1-53 (Sheet 4 of 6) 1-155 . Quantity (4.O. No. and 4 FB – Forward Body Tank AB – Aft Body Tank OW – Outboard Wing Tanks. No. *) From Burn-Down-To Level (LB x 1000) – Flashing * indicates tank level less than selected burn-down-to level. No. 4 Main is Low Between Main Tanks 2 and 3. ASYMMETRICAL FUEL LOADING CONDITION E 0 1 4 2 3 = = = = = = Between External Tanks ( > 1000 pounds) Between Outboard Wing Tanks ( > 1000 pounds) Between Main Tanks 1 and 4. 2. 1 Main is Low Between Main Tanks 1 and 4. Left and Right CW – Center Wing Tank 1 – No. 4 Main Tank 2 – No. 3 Main Tank LO – Left Outboard Tank RO – Right Outboard Tank LE – Left External Tank RE – Right External Tank Current Aircraft CG % MAC SHIFT Next scroll returns to tank selection 14 Number of External Weapons That Can Be Released Without Exceeding Aft CG Limit – With an ALCM/ACM pylon selected during initialization. 1.T.

WEAPON STATUS MODE Figure 1-53 (Sheet 5 of 6) 1-156 .O. Right Pylon – Number of weapons FWD and AFT.T. and AFT bomb bay locations. CTR. CSRL weapons indicated in CTR and AFT locations only. Example two weapons forward and one aft. Internal Load Number of weapons in FWD. Example one weapon forward and three aft. FLARES – CHAFF F – Flares Remaining C – Chaff Remaining B – Both Remaining Blank – Neither Remaining P – Displayed in AFT locations to indicate an empty pylon when all ALCMs/ACMs on the applicable pylon are expended. 1B-52H-1 CG/FLAS Controls and Indicators (Cont) External Load Left Pylon – Number of weapons FWD and AFT.

O. Fuel Level Input Status For Selected Tank. M. Depending on Tank Designation) – Manually changeable only in manual (M). 3 Main Tank F – Forward Body M – Mid Body A – Aft Body C – Center Wing LO – Left Outboard RO – Right Outboard LE – Left External RE – Right External SHIFT Next scroll returns to tank selection 1 NOTE Scroll sequence is altered if a gage failure (GF) occurs or if the fuel input status is manually changed from F. 3.T. 1. and F for SCROLL key and F. TANK SELECTION SCROLL 1 – No. 2 Main Tank 3 – No. F – FQIS. O. Quantity (4. 1B-52H-1 FQIS Gage Failure Detected on Selected Tank – Fuel level input status must be manually changed to manual (M) or opposite (O) before system will return to normal operation. and GF for SHIFT key. M. 4 Main Tank 2 – No. *) From BurnDown-To Level (LB x 1000) – Flashing * indicates tank level less than selected burn-down-to level. and M – Manual. 2. 1 Main Tank 4 – No. O. O – Opposite Paired Tank. Order of preference is GF (if not corrected). Selected Tank Fuel Level (LB x 100) (May Have Two Digits. WEIGHT STATUS MODE Figure 1-53 (Sheet 6 of 6) 1-157 .

1B-52H-1 NORMAL OPERATION The CG/FLAS has a self-test function. The system is programmed to initially indicate 1770 operating weight on the display unit. The second digit to be input will flash. Use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input all numerical data. The self-test function automatically checks the internal circuitry of the CG/ FLAS. fuel level advisory. . Input the OWCG in percent MAC using the same procedure as for OW. When the appropriate number is displayed. starting on the top row. PWR INTR will be displayed if self-test was entered automatically at power application and TEST PASS will be displayed if self-test was entered with the TEST key. Use the SHIFT key to obtain the previous display. and the number of external weapons that can be released and remain forward of the aft cg. The previous display cannot be obtained if the ENTER key is pressed. When self-test is complete. If initialization data is not stored in memory. Use the SCROLL key to increment the numbers from 0 to 9.O.T. and weapon. Use the same procedure to input the second number. the TEST and ENTER keys are the only active keys. Press ENTER to display STRT. initialization process. If initialization data is stored in memory. DATA FAIL is displayed if the initialization data is corrupted. and ERAS DONE displays are not applicable. INITIALIZATION When PWR INTR is displayed. A “C” may be displayed under the digits on some displays. PWR INTR or TEST PASS will be displayed if self-test passes.0 (OWCG). TEST FAIL will be displayed if the system fails self-test. This indicates that the value can be modified with the CHG process. The internal circuitry is checked. and in the weight status mode. The numbers represent a fault and are as follows: NUMBER FAILURE 1 2 3 4 5 Micro-processor Program Read Only Memory (PROM) Random Access Memory (RAM) Keyboard Analog to Digital Circuitry 1-158 • • Use the SCROLL key to obtain the next display. and chaff data. fuel quantity can be displayed or manually changed for each tank and failed gage information is displayed. All the elements of the display segments on the display unit will come on one row at a time. the three mode lights come on. shows an asymmetrical fuel loading. then the middle and the bottom row. Obtain the OW from the aircraft DD Form 365-4 (Form F) and input the OW in hundreds of pounds. The keys are used as previously discussed. The system will initially display 16. the OPER MODE and DATA ERAS displays are selected by using the SCROLL/SHIFT key. press ENTER to display the aircraft OW. weapon status. and weight status modes. If the system fails self-test. As self-test begins. The fuel level mode allows fuel management monitoring. otherwise the mode keys. Press ENTER to display the operating weight cg (OWCG). All lights on the keyboard and the decimal point on the top row of the display come on at initial power application. The initialization process allows the operator to enter the operating weight. TEST. press the SHIFT key. flare. Repeat the procedure until the OW input is complete. The first digit of the display to be input will flash. a number will be displayed to the right of the decimal point indicating the latest software revision and the mode lights will go off. and ENTER are the only active keys. If self-test was entered automatically at power application. NOTE • NOTE Pressing a key during self-test may cause a keyboard error detection. INIT. DATA ERAS. The weapon status mode allows the operator manually to update weapon status as weapons are released. After self-test is completed. SELF-TEST Self-test can be accomplished any time except during initialization and the change process by pressing the TEST key and is automatically entered when power is initially applied to the CG/FLAS. Input the OW by pressing the CHG key. operating weight cg. and when complete. the display unit goes blank. the numbers 1 thru 5 may be displayed in the upper left corner of the display unit. pressing the SCROLL/SHIFT keys do not change the display from STRT INIT as the OPER MODE.

scroll to ACM PYLN. Input body station forward (moment arm location) data using the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys (this data is available in T. EXT ACM. scroll to the ACM PYLN. EXT ACM and EXT ALCM displays are used for symmetrical weapon loads. then. EXT ALCM. If chaff is aboard. If no chaff is aboard. LT Y is displayed. With ACM pylons installed. The external weapon loading is now complete. press ENTER to display EXT WTLF and input the individual weight of the new weapons located on the left forward pylon positions by using the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys. press ENTER to display CHAF NONE. then scroll to EXT. press ENTER to select internal weapon load configurations. pressing ENTER selects the EXT SAME. If weapons on the pylons are different and/or at least one of the pylons is not an ACM pylon. With the B-52 NUC display selected. Press the SCROLL/SHIFT key to select B-52 NUC or B-52 CONV. press ENTER to display EXT. If the initialization data stored in memory is different from the current mission and a data erase is desired. ERAS DONE is displayed. With EXT NEW displayed. pressing ENTER allows the operator to choose from four external weapon configurations. press ENTER to display FLAR NONE. System questioning determines whether a left or right ACM pylon is installed. and WPN CHKY. press ENTER to select the internal loading configurations. then. press ENTER to display CHAF NONE. then press ENTER. Scroll to EXT WT and use the CHG/ SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input the weapon weight. then. The first configuration is EXT NONE.T. scroll to EXT WTLA and use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input the individual weight of the new weapon weight located on the left aft pylon positions. NO. With EXT BSLF displayed. When the data is erased. scroll to DATA ERAS. weapon load) is identical to the current mission. Further initialization is not required. 1B-52H-1 If the initialization data stored in memory (flares. scroll to CHAF YES. LT N display and press ENTER. scroll to OPER MODE. YES display. NO display and press ENTER. The first display is B-52 NONE. If the left pylon is not an ACM PYLON with ACM PYLN. With an ACM pylon installed on the right wing. press ENTER to obtain the EXT WT display. press ENTER to show the weapon load display. Pressing ENTER with the STRT INIT display selected allows the operator to choose from three B-52 weapon configurations. After a data erase.O. With B-52 NONE display selected. If flares are aboard. Press ENTER to display ACM PYLON. If no flares are aboard. a complete initialization is necessary. The system displays weapon load immediately and is ready for the weapon check question. If the pylons are ACM pylons. Zeros will be displayed only when using the CHG process to change the weapon count. ACM PYLN.O. then. If the pylons are not ACM pylons. the external loading is complete. 1-159 . then. NOTE The weapon count display will also go blank when the weapons are decremented to zero. use the CHG/SCROLL/ SHIFT keys to input body station left forward data. ENTER reverts back to the B-52 NONE display. ENTER completes initialization. The weapon body station locations for the ACM pylons are already programmed. The weapon load display will be blank if it was initialized with no weapons on board. RT Y. press ENTER to select ACM PYLON YES. or EXT ALCM) completes the external weapon load and selects the internal weapon load configurations. WTRF and follow the same weight input procedures for the right forward and right aft pylon positions as used for the left pylon. Input the weapon weight using the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys. Press ENTER to select the STRT INIT display. The EXT NEW display allows loading of new weapons not currently listed in the CG/FLAS program and also makes provisions for asymmetric pylon loading and ALCM/ ACM pylon loading. The weapon body station locations for the ACM pylons are already programmed. LT Y displayed. Pressing ENTER with any of the first three external weapon display choices (EXT NONE. First. BS-F. WPN CHKN. press ENTER to show the weapon load display. With an ACM pylon installed on the left wing. press ENTER. Press the SCROLL/SHIFT key to select EXT ACM. chaff. or EXT NEW. scroll to FLAR YES. 1B-52H-5). scroll to EXT WTLF and use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input the weapon weight on the left forward position of the pylon. scroll to the EXT BSLA display and use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input body station left aft data. Press ENTER to command the weapon check options. Next. press ENTER to display EXT. BS-A and use the CHG/SCROLL/ SHIFT keys to input body station aft moment arm location. If all weapons on the pylons are the same. scroll to the EXT SAME.

New weapon data is loaded as previously described. the SCROLL/SHIFT keys to display the different types of weapons listed. a P is displayed if all external missiles are released and both pylons can be jettisoned without exceeding the aft cg limit. RT N and use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input body station and weight data using the same procedures as used for the left pylon.T. both the center and aft bay CSRL weapons display an L prior to the weapon designation. If the right pylon is an ACM pylon. aft. Press ENTER to display ACM PYLN. Press ENTER to input appropriate weapon data. With an ALCM/ACM pylon selected during initialization. The fuel level advisory mode will be displayed when the FUEL key is pressed and the FUEL level advisory mode light will come on and remain on while the fuel level mode is active. The external loading is complete. When internal loading is complete. RT Y. New weapon data is input using the same procedures as the procedures for the forward bay. press ENTER to display FLAR NONE. therefore. 1000 pounds.O. use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to correct CG/FLAS weapon load to actual weapon load. then ENTER. scroll to ACM PYLN. use the CHG/SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input weight data for the forward and aft positions of the pylon. disregard CG/FLAS and follow FUEL SYSTEM MANAGEMENT procedures this section. If the actual weapon load is different from the system weapon load. The first two digits on the third line indicate the number of external missiles that may be launched without exceeding the aft cg limit. and number of external missiles that can be released and asymmetrical fuel load condition on the third line. press ENTER to display EXT NONE. Use 1-160 FUEL LEVEL ADVISORY MODE NOTE Due to differences in tolerances between CG/FLAS and the aircraft fuel quantity indicating system. Select the proper weapon and ENTER. and inputting weapon location and weight data into the applicable displays. 1B-52H-5) is input and entered and then the weapon weight is input and entered. Select the proper display. 2000 pounds. New weapon data can be input by selecting EXT NEW. 1B-52H-1 Scroll to the EXT WTLA display and use the CHG/ SCROLL/SHIFT keys to input the weapon weight for the left aft position of the pylon. Other forward bay weapon options can be selected by using the SCROLL/SHIFT keys. Use the SCROLL/ SHIFT keys to select the remaining center bay weapons. when the weapon count display appears after loading flares and chaff. With B-52 CONV selected. and then. Center bay weapon data is loaded next. selected tank and burn-down-to level on the second line. The last digit on the third line displays the burn-down-to level difference. aircraft cg is displayed on the top line. It continues down 3000 pounds. complete initialization for nuclear weapon operations. After the internal weapon data is loaded. If the weapon loaded in the forward bay is not shown. When the actual fuel level equals the selected fuel level or less. pressing ENTER. then. select WB-F NEW and ENTER. Use previously discussed procedures for loading flare and chaff data. The cue that the actual fuel level is approaching the selected burn-down-to level appears when the level is within 4000 pounds. input the flare and chaff data. Use the SCROLL/SHIFT keys as necessary for the aft weapons and press ENTER when appropriate.O. If a fuel gage reads empty or a fuel flow indicator light comes on. Except for ALCM. press ENTER to select the internal loading configurations. . Then. detailed conventional initialization procedures are not provided. The first internal load display is WB-F NONE. The display at this location is blank until the 4 appears. Conventional weapon initialization procedures parallel the procedures for no weapons and nuclear weapons. center. Internal conventional weapon data is loaded in the same sequence as nuclear weapon data: forward. an asterisk * will appear and begin flashing. complete initialization. With the center bay loaded. CG/FLAS may not indicate empty at the same time as the fuel quantity indicating system. When the fuel level advisory mode is active. If the right pylon is not an ACM pylon. press ENTER to display WB-A NONE. Select the proper weapon and press ENTER. Weapon location data (body station moment arm location available in T. WB-C NONE is displayed.

such as MAIN 1 and MAIN 4. When M is selected. the operator uses CHG. and internal weapon load on the bottom. the number of external weapons will decrease. then the CHG. use the SCROLL or SHIFT key to access the desired tank(s). As the cg moves aft. The weight status mode uses FQIS inputs normally. SHIFT. SHIFT process as described earlier. WEAPON STATUS MODE The weapon status mode is used to change weapon status after a gravity release or missile launch. the first digit on the center row will flash and will move from left to right and then across the bottom row as the SHIFT key is pressed. and burn-down-to-level difference in the last digit. and total fuel weight (in 100s of pounds) on the third row. Then press CHG and the third digit in the second row will flash. The correct aircraft cg is displayed on the top row. If a differential of 1000 pounds develops in the external tanks. In the fuel level advisory mode. if required. Press the SCROLL or SHIFT key until the desired tank to be monitored is displayed in the first two windows of the second row. WEIGHT STATUS MODE The weight status mode is used to monitor fuel quantity and update status. The current aircraft cg is displayed on the top row. Also. When the CHG key is pressed. SCROLL until the desired weight is displayed. If the same differential of 1000 pounds appears in the outboard tanks. SCROLL. a P will be displayed and is accounted for in the same manner as a weapon. The weapon status is changed from left to right starting on the center row and sequencing thru the bottom row. The selections are F (FQIS). an E will appear. Weapon status change process is initiated by pressing the CHG key.T. the low tank number will be displayed. Remaining External Weapons The number of external weapons that can be released is a function of aft cg. then ENTER. M (manual). Now. Then use SCROLL. SCROLL process and then ENTER. Pressing the SCROLL or SHIFT key will cause the second row to display tank input status in the first digit. When ALCMs/ACMs are present and a pylon is empty. Asymmetrical Fuel Load If an asymmetrical fuel load condition develops. then ENTER. the opposite tank weight can be used if an opposite tank exists. The O input can be used when a gage failure occurs. and O displays opposite paired tank weight. and the third row to display selected tank and weight. external weapon load on the center row. the desired burn-down-to level is displayed in thousands of pounds. but a fuel weight can be manually input. and an approximate reading can be monitored from the opposite paired tank. until the desired weapon status is displayed. Use the SCROLL key until the desired number is displayed. To change from one input selection to another. 1B-52H-1 Fuel Input The fuel level advisory mode is used to monitor fuel management. The weight status mode light comes on and remains on while the weight status mode is active. gross weight (in 100s of pounds) on the second row. 1-161 . The burn-down to level can be cancelled by selecting 99. The aircraft cg calculations will be based on the manual fuel weight inputs. and which is the low one. the CG/FLAS will alert the crew by indicating which pair of tanks are involved. the fuel sequence should be altered to move the cg forward. Press ENTER to load system. only the burn-down-to quantity can be manually input. an O will be displayed. Use the SCROLL key to display the desired value.O. Weapon status is displayed and the weapon status mode is active when the WPN key is pressed. If more missile launches are scheduled than number of missiles displayed. Press the SHIFT key and the next digit will flash and the preceding digit goes steady. The weapon status mode light comes on and remains on while the weapon status mode is active. If a main tank differential becomes greater than 2000 pounds relative to its opposite tank. The weight status mode data will be displayed when the WT key is pressed.

1B-52H-1 CG/FLAS Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT CG/FLAS Control Power Main Power 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE FUEL SYSTEM – CG/FLAS DC PWR CG/FLAS AC PWR RLC/D9 RLC/D10 Rt. LLC LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC Figure 1-54 1-162 RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL .O. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. TR AC Bus 5 Key Light and Rocker Switch Power INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT INST RLC/A29 AC Bus 5 Mode Lights Power LIGHTING – INTERIOR – DIM CONTROL PILOT & COPILOT LLC/E12 Left TR The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.T.

Single point ground refueling system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-60. Single point servicing of the fuel system reduces the time and amount of equipment required during fuel servicing of the aircraft. The nozzle adapter of the receptacle contains a spring-loaded poppet which is opened by the fuel 1-163 1-164 1-164 1-165 1-165 1-165 1-176 1-176 1-177 nozzle and seals the filler opening when the nozzle is withdrawn.T. 1B-52H-1 REFUELING SYSTEMS SINGLE POINT GROUND REFUELING SYSTEM AIR REFUELING SYSTEM AIR REFUELING HYDRAULIC PRESSURE AIR REFUELING FUEL FLOW AIR REFUELING SCAVENGE SYSTEM AIR REFUELING SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS AIR REFUELING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION AIR REFUELING SYSTEM CHECK AIR REFUELING FUEL MANAGEMENT SINGLE POINT GROUND REFUELING SYSTEM A single point ground refueling receptacle (figure 1-186) is provided to allow filling of all aircraft fuel tanks from a single point. The fuel system panel (figure 1-38) or the refuel panel (figure 1-56) includes the controls necessary for operation of the refuel system valves. The receptacle is located forward of the left forward wheel well and is accessible through a filler cap. 1-163 .O. The single point refueling receptacle is connected directly to the refuel manifold and fuel flows in the same manner as in air refueling (figure 1-55).

allows hydraulic pressure to operate the slipway doors actuator and to position the toggle actuator to unlock the toggles. AIR REFUELING HYDRAULIC PRESSURE Hydraulic pressure used to operate the slipway door system is normally supplied by the left body hydraulic system. The signal amplifier serves to control the refueling sequence and to indicate the sequence conditions of the amplifier to the pilot and copilot. . The right body hydraulic system serves as an alternate source of pressure for this purpose. which can be covered by hydraulically operated slipway doors when not in use. is located on top of the fuselage slightly aft of the pilots’ stations. The main manifold distributes fuel to each tank through the fuel level control valves which are controlled from the fuel system panel (figure 1-38) located in front of the copilot on the pilots’ instrument panel.O. Air refueling system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-60. An air refueling slipway and receptacle. See FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM. this section. Pressure is also supplied to two electrically operated toggle latching valves. A separate refuel panel (figure 1-56) is installed on the overhead panel adjacent to the air refueling panel and contains the master refuel switch. and refuel valve position indicator.T. One valve is controlled automatically by the signal amplifier and the other valve is controlled by a manual toggle latching switch. Opening a toggle actuator valve allows hydraulic pressure to lock the latching toggles which hold the air refueling boom in the receptacle. A main refuel valve downstream from the air refuel receptacle and the single point ground refuel receptacle connects the refuel manifold to the main manifold. An air refueling panel (figure 1-56) located on the pilots’ overhead panel contains the controls necessary to operate the air refueling hydraulic system and to con- 1-164 trol a signal amplifier system. A refuel system (figure 1-55) makes it possible to fill all the aircraft fuel tanks from the air refueling receptacle or a single point ground refueling receptacle. A dual shuttle valve. The refuel system is an extension of the fuel supply system using the same panel to control flow of fuel through the same manifold. 1B-52H-1 AIR REFUELING SYSTEM An air refueling system makes it possible to refuel the aircraft in flight from a boom-type tanker aircraft. the refuel valve switch. This pressure is controlled by normal and alternate slipway door control valves which are electrically controlled by slipway door switches. positioned by the pressure source.

A voluntary disconnect may be initiated by either pilot pressing the disconnect switch on his control wheel or by a disconnect signal by the boom operator. pressure builds up in the main manifold and refuel manifold and a disconnect is effected when the pressure exceeds a disconnect pressure switch setting of 69 (±3) psi.) When fuel level control valves for all tanks are closed. In the receiver. float valves will close the primary and secondary valves in the fuel level control valve. will close the primary and secondary valves in the fuel level control valves in the tank. REFUELING SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS A description of the refueling system controls and indicators is contained in figure 1-56. When a fuel tank is full by weight. AIR REFUELING SCAVENGE SYSTEM A fuel scavenge system is provided for the refuel manifold and consists of an ac powered pump.T. which is an integral part of the fuel quantity indicator. Rate of flow is controlled by the tanker crew and number of receiver tanks open. and shutoff valve. A disconnect is also caused by the boom exceeding its envelope limits. Change 4 1-165 . fuel is pumped from the tanker to the receiver refuel manifold. (The primary and secondary valves in each fuel level control valve are at the same level. the full-by-weight switch. When a fuel tank is full by volume. float switch. fuel flows from the refuel manifold into the main manifold and into fuel tanks as directed by fuel level control valves which are operated by switches on the fuel system panel (figure 1-38).O. 1B-52H-1 AIR REFUELING FUEL FLOW When the air refueling boom nozzle is seated in the air refueling receptacle and held by hydraulically operated latching toggles. all under control of the scavenge system switch on the fuel scavenge system panel.

READY LIGHT (Doors Open) T. 1B-52H-1 1-166 SLIPWAY SLIPWAY DOOR CLOSED AND LOCKED LIGHT AIR REFUEL RECEPTACLE SLIPWAY DOOR ACTUATOR (TYPICAL) CONTACT LIGHT TOGGLE ACTUATOR TO MAIN MANIFOLD SCAVENGE SYSTEM INDUCTION COIL PLUNGER LIMIT SWITCH MANUAL TOGGLE CONTROL VALVE THROUGH CABIN POSITION OF SCAVENGE SYSTEM SWITCH SINGLE POINT REFUEL RECEPTACLE PRESSURE DISCONNECT SWITCH FLOAT SWITCH SOLENOID VALVE FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD SCAVENGE PUMP TO NO.O. 2 MAIN TANK DUAL SHUTTLE VALVE FROM LEFT BODY SYSTEM A31680 NORMAL OPEN NORMAL SLIPWAY DOOR CONTROL VALVE PILOT’S ALTERNATE CLOSED FROM RIGHT BODY SYSTEM ALTERNATE OPEN ALTERNATE SLIPWAY DOOR CONTROL VALVE COPILOT’S DISCONNECT SWITCHES FROM SIGNAL AMPLIFIER POWER SWITCH SIGNAL AMPLIFIER REFUEL MANIFOLD NORMAL CLOSED MANUAL TOGGLE LATCHING SWITCH SIGNAL AMPLIFIER RESET BUTTON DISCONNECT LIGHT Refueling System Figure 1-55 (Sheet 1 of 2) NORMAL TOGGLE CONTROL VALVE MAIN OFF CABIN SCAVENGE SYSTEM SWITCH .

1B-52H-1 ALTERNATE OPEN LINES AND MANUAL TOGGLE LATCHING LINES NORMAL CLOSE LINES ALTERNATE CLOSE LINES .O.NORMAL SLIPWAY DOOR CONTROL SWITCH MAIN REFUEL VALVE (Normally Motor Driven) OPEN OPEN ALTERNATE SLIPWAY DOOR CONTROL SWITCH CLOSE OPEN MAIN REFUEL VALVE SWITCH ON OFF TO SIGNAL AMPLIFIER RESET BUTTON THROUGH OPEN POSITION OF EITHER SLIPWAY DOOR CONTROL SWITCH Figure 1-55 (Sheet 2 of 2) AUXILIARY TANK FUEL FLOW CONTROL SWITCH (TYPICAL) MANUAL POWER LIGHT FUEL FLOW INDICATOR LIGHT (TYPICAL) FUEL QUANTITY GAGE (TYPICAL) FUEL FLOW MANIFOLD SCAVENGE LINES HYDRULIC SYSTEM PRESSURE NORMAL DOOR AND TOGGLE OPEN PRESSURE CLOSE MASTER REFUEL SWITCH REFUEL REFUEL MAIN MANIFOLD SIGNAL AMPLIFIER POWER SWITCH CENTER MAIN REFUEL REFUEL VALVE VALVE EMERGENCY POSITION CONTROL LEVER INDICATOR MAIN TANK FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE SWITCH (TYPICAL) REFUEL LEVEL CHECKOUT SWITCH PRIMARY OFF SECONDARY THROUGH REFUEL POSITION OF FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE SWITCH THROUGH REFUEL POSITION OF FUEL FLOW CONTROL SWITCH NORMAL TOGGLE LATCHING LINES FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE (TYPICAL) FUEL FLOW INDICATOR LIGHT (TYPICAL) FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE (TYPICAL) RETURN LINES A31681 1-167 ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL AUXILIARY TANK (TYPICAL) TO OTHER TANKS MAIN TANK (TYPICAL) T.

1B-52H-1 Air Refueling System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 NORMAL SLIPWAY DOOR SWITCH SLIPWAY DOOR CLOSED AND LOCKED LIGHT ALTERNATE SLIPWAY DOOR SWITCH MANUAL TOGGLE LATCH SWITCH SIGNAL AMPLIFIER RESET BUTTON MANUAL POWER LIGHT SIGNAL AMPLIFIER POWER SWITCH REFUEL VALVE POSITION INDICATOR REFUEL VALVE SWITCH 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 MASTER REFUEL SWITCH READY FOR CONTACT LIGHT (BLUE) CONTACT-MADE LIGHT (GREEN) DISCONNECT LIGHT (AMBER) FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD LIGHT FUEL IN MAIN MANIFOLD LIGHT AUTOPILOT AND AIR REFUELING (IFR) BOOM RELEASE BUTTONS Figure 1-56 (Sheet 1 of 8) 1-168 Change 20 .O.T.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 17 18 19 20 21 DEFUEL VALVE SWITCH FUEL SCAVENGE SYSTEM SWITCH REFUEL LEVEL CHECKOUT SWITCH AUXILIARY TANK FUEL FLOW CONTROL SWITCHES (8 PLACES) FUEL FLOW INDICATOR LIGHTS 22 23 24 MAIN TANK FUEL LEVEL CONTROL VALVE SWITCHES (4 PLACES) MAIN MANIFOLD INTERCONNECT VALVES SWITCH MAIN REFUEL VALVE EMERGENCY CONTROL LEVER Figure 1-56 (Sheet 2 of 8) 1-169 .

by high fuel pressure. the toggles are released and allow the air refueling boom nozzle to be withdrawn from the receptacle. In RELEASE position.-HOLD positions.T. FUNCTION NOTE The alternate slipway door switch must be in CLOSED position for the normal slipway door switch to operate the doors properly. and to the disconnect light. This light is supplied right TR power when the slipway doors are closed and locked. provided the master refuel switch is ON and the light is off when either door is not closed and locked. CONTROLINDICATOR 1 NORMAL SLIPWAY DOORS Switch Normal slipway door switch with OPEN and CLOSED positions are provided on the air refueling panel. In the HOLD position. induction coil. When the normal slipway door switch is placed in CLOSED position. Figure 1-56 (Sheet 3 of 8) 1-170 . Power is supplied to this switch when the master refuel switch is in ON position.O. This switch is supplied with right TR power only when the signal amplifier power switch is in the MANUAL position. 3 ALTERNATE SLIPWAY DOORS Switch The alternate slipway door switch functions similarly except that the right body hydraulic system and the alternate slipway door control valve are utilized. HOLD position also supplies power to slipway door limit switches. power is supplied to the manual toggle latching valve allowing the latching toggles to hold the boom in the air refueling receptacle. or by brute force pullouts. right TR power is supplied to the normal slipway door control valve which allows hydraulic pressure from the left body hydraulic system to open the doors. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. power is supplied to the normal slipway door control valve to close the doors. 4 MANUAL TOGGLE LATCH Switch A manual toggle latch switch located on the air refueling panel has RELEASE. When the normal slipway door switch is in OPEN position. 2 SLIPWAY DOOR CLOSED & LOCKED Light (amber) An amber slipway door closed-and-locked light is located on the air refueling panel. The latching toggles may also be released by pressing the air refueling release button on the pilot’s control wheel or copilot’s control wheel. OPEN position also directs right TR power to the signal amplifier power switch. and controls the latching toggles (normally controlled by the signal amplifier).

When the refuel valve switch is placed in OPEN position. power is supplied to open the main refuel valve and energize the refuel valve position indicator. In OPEN position. The indicator remains deenergized until the valve closes and a limit switch stops the motor and energizes the indicator to show the CLOSED marking. right TR power is supplied to close the main refuel valve and energize the refuel valve position indicator. This switch controls the main refuel valve located downstream from the air refuel receptacle and the single point refuel receptacle. MANUAL position directs right TR power to the manual toggle latch switch.-CLOSE positions. the slipway door limit switches. and the signal amplifier. When pressed after a disconnect has been accomplished. 7 SIGNAL AMP POWER Switch A signal amplifier power switch located on the air refueling panel has MANUAL. When the refuel valve switch is moved to CLOSE position.. this button resets the automatic control circuit of the signal amplifier. and the plunger limit switch. then back to ON will accomplish the same thing as pressing the reset button and the signal power amplifier will be in the ‘‘ready for contact’’ position. The manual power light is out when the signal amplifier power switch is in NORMAL. 8 REFUEL VALVE Position Indicator A tab-window type refuel valve position indicator on the refuel panel has three markings to register position of the main refuel valve and switch. 5 CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION Signal Amplifier Reset Button A push-to-reset signal amplifier reset button is located on the air refueling panel. After resetting. Placing the master refuel switch to OFF. 9 REFUEL VALVE Switch A refuel valve switch on the refuel panel has OPEN. Figure 1-56 (Sheet 4 of 8) 1-171 .NORMAL positions. NORMAL position directs right TR power to the plunger limit switch. the manual power light. When the valve is open. 1B-52H-1 NO.T. showing the slanting stripes marking. the air refueling system is ready for another contact. 6 MANUAL/POWER ON Light (amber) A right TR powered manual power light is on the air refueling panel. a limit switch stops the motor and energizes the refuel valve position indicator to show the OPEN marking. In CLOSE position. the signal amplifier reset button will either fall out of or be pushed inside the air refueling panel when attempting to reset after a disconnect has occurred. right TR power is supplied to open the valve. NOTE Upon occasion. the position indicator is deenergized. The valve separates the refuel manifold from the main manifold.O. This light is illuminated when the signal amplifier power switch is in MANUAL position provided the air refueling system master switch is ON.

000 feet MSL. no power is supplied to these units. the auxiliary tank boost pumps will continue to run with a no flow condition. an explosive condition exists due to the auto-ignition temperature of fuel vapors and the potential ignition source from a malfunctioning auxiliary boost pump.O. In OFF position. The light receives right TR power from the signal amplifier or from the HOLD position of the manual toggle latch switch. 10 CONTROLINDICATOR MASTER REFUEL Switch FUNCTION A master refuel switch on the refuel panel has ON. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. the master refuel switch will not be used by itself to control auxiliary tank fuel transfer operations. Whenever engine feed is selected with the auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch and the master refuel switch is off. The light will go out as soon as the manifold is scavenged. The light receives right TR power through the fully open positions of the slipway door limit switches. The light receives right TR power through the plunger limit switch in the air refuel receptacle. 12 Contact-Made Light (green) A green contact-made light is the center light of the three air refueling lights on the eyebrow instrument panel. The word READY can be read on the light. The master refuel switch also supplies power to the fuel level control valve circuits. 14 FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD Light The fuel-in-manifold light marked FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD is located on the central caution panel and indicates when fuel is in the refuel manifolds. ON position supplies right TR power to the normal and alternate slipway door control switches. The word DISCONNECT can be read on the light. OFF position of the master refuel switch removes power from the fuel level control valve circuits. 18) is placed in CABIN position. During low level or traffic pattern fuel panel operations. the valves will close and refueling through the valves is impossible.T. The word CONTACT can be read on the light. Therefore. 13 Disconnect Light (amber) An amber disconnect light is the lower light of the three air refueling lights on the eyebrow instrument panel. 11 Ready-for-Contact Light (blue) A blue ready-for-contact light is the upper light of the three air refueling lights on the eyebrow instrument panel. The FUEL IN CABIN MANIFOLD light will glow if fuel is in the refuel manifold and the master-refuel switch is placed to OFF or when the scavenge system switch (No. This is necessary since below 25. Figure 1-56 (Sheet 5 of 8) 1-172 . both the master refuel switch and all auxiliary fuel control switches will be turned off whenever fuel transfer is to be stopped.-OFF positions.

16 Autopilot and Air Refueling (IFR) Boom Release Button (2 places) An autopilot and air refueling (IFR) boom release button is located on the pilots’ control wheels. The light will go out as soon as the manifold is scavenged or the scavenge system switch is turned OFF.T.O.CLOSE positions and is guarded in CLOSE.-MAIN positions. OPEN position supplies right TR power to the valve causing it to open. See FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM. Figure 1-56 (Sheet 6 of 8) 1-173 . If fuel is in the refuel manifold (as determined by a float switch). the FUEL IN MAIN MANIFOLD light will glow if fuel is in the main manifold. 2 main tank. Care must be exercised during inflight use because of high fuel flow rates. 17 DEFUEL VALVE Switch A defuel valve switch on the fuel scavenge system panel on the right side of the pilots’ instrument panel in front of the copilot has OPEN. This switch is normally used on the ground for defueling but may be used in flight. OFF position deenergizes the scavenge circuits in the main and refuel manifolds. 18) is placed in MAIN position. this section. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 15 FUEL IN MAIN MANIFOLD Light (amber) The fuel-in-manifold light marked FUEL IN MAIN MANIFOLD is located on the central caution panel and indicates when fuel is in the main manifold. this section. Pressing this button during air refueling operations utilizes right TR power to deenergize the toggle latching valve releasing the latching toggles. Additional functions of this switch are covered under AUTOPILOT. CABIN position causes right TR power to open a solenoid shutoff valve and energizes a relay which directs 118-volt singlephase ac power to the refuel manifold scavenge pump. 18 FUEL SCAVENGE SYSTEM Switch A scavenge system switch on the fuel system panel has CABIN. As soon as the manifold is scavenged. the float switch breaks contact causing the scavenge pump to stop and the solenoid shutoff valve to close. MAIN position actuates the scavenge operation in the main manifold. When the scavenge system switch (No.-OFF. This switch controls the defuel valve which separates the engine crossfeed manifold from the main manifold.. The fuel in the manifold is pumped into No. CLOSE position causes the valve to close. 1B-52H-1 NO.

that fuel level control valve operation be checked before flight while fueling through the single point ground refueling receptacle. the arrow is pointed perpendicular to the flow line between the tank and the main manifold. The primary and secondary float chambers are the same level in any one valve. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. ENGINE FEED position of an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch directs 205-volt three-phase ac power to the boost pumps in the respective tank.-SECONDARY positions.T. 18. Use of these switches at such a time might cause a pressure disconnect or might. and for OFF position. and the master refuel switch on. In order to check the valves in a tank. the arrow is pointed away from the tank. as a remote possibility. These rotary switches are numbered 17. SECONDARY position performs the same function in the secondary float chamber. 24.O. It is recommended. Fuel level control valves are numbered for ease of identification Figure 1-56 (Sheet 7 of 8) 1-174 . 20 Auxiliary Tank Fuel Switches (8 places) Flow Control Eight auxiliary tank fuel flow control switches on the fuel system panel have unmarked REFUEL. Moving the switch to OFF position allows each primary float chamber to drain which allows the fuel level control valves to open and the light to go out. and 28 and control the flow of fuel to and from the auxiliary tanks.-OFF.-OFF. For ENGINE FEED position. 25. PRIMARY position of the refuel level checkout switch deenergizes the primary side of the fuel level control valves (or valve) in the tank. an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch or a main tank fuel level control switch must be placed in REFUEL position. See FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM. result in a fuel level control valve failing closed. the fuel flow indicator light adjacent to the appropriate fuel quantity gage glows steady. REFUEL position causes left and right TR power to energize the fuel level control valves in the respective tank provided the master refuel switch is ON. OFF position deenergizes the fuel level control valves in the respective tank causing them to close. This switch is used to check the operation of the primary and secondary float valves in the fuel level control valves. A white arrowhead is painted on top of each switch and the direction the arrow is pointing determines the position of the switch. their use in flight is not recommended. 27. When the fuel level control valves (or valve) in a tank close. the manifold to the tank pressurized.-ENGINE FEED positions. CONTROLINDICATOR 19 REFUEL LEVEL CHECKOUT Switch FUNCTION A refuel level checkout switch on the fuel system checkout panel on the copilot’s side panel has PRIMARY. This action permits fuel from the main manifold to flood the primary float chamber in each fuel level control valve in the tank. for REFUEL position. this section. the arrow is pointed toward the tank. This causes the fuel level control valves to close. therefore. 23. NOTE The refuel level checkout switch can be used during air refueling to check operation of the fuel level control valves if absolutely necessary. 26. However. actuating the float valve to simulate a full-by-volume condition.

In CENTER position.-OFF positions. indicating the valves are closed.-CLOSED positions. contacts are completed allowing right TR power to cause the respective fuel flow indicator light to glow steady. 23 Main Manifold Interconnect Valves Switch A main manifold interconnect valves switch on the fuel system panel has unmarked OPEN. 1B-52H-1 NO. CLOSED position closes the two valves. the switch is in REFUEL position and left and right TR power is supplied to energize the fuel level control valves in the respective tank provided the master refuel switch is ON. The main refuel valve emergency control lever should be in the CENTER position before the main refuel valve is actuated electrically since OPEN and CLOSE positions of the lever apply cable tension to the valve.-CLOSE (DOWN) positions. 22 Main Tank Fuel Level Control Valve Switches (4 places) Four main tank fuel level control valve switches on the fuel system panel have unmarked REFUEL. When the white stripe on the switch is aligned with the flow line on the panel. OFF position of a main tank fuel level control valve switch deenergizes the fuel level control valves in the respective tank causing them to close. and 22 and control the flow of fuel to the main tanks. Figure 1-56 (Sheet 8 of 8) Change 10 1-175 . for additional information on these lights. no cable tension is applied to the valve.T. this section. Moving the lever to CLOSE (DOWN) position operates cables to close the valve. the fuel level control valves in the corresponding tank are opened provided the master refuel switch is ON. 21. A detent at the CENTER position makes it necessary to pull out on the handle before moving it to either extreme position. When a main tank fuel level control valve switch or an auxiliary tank fuel flow control switch is placed in REFUEL position. 29 and 29A. 20. 24 Main Refuel Valve Emergency Control Lever A main refuel valve emergency control lever located between the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations has OPEN (UP) . These rotary switches are numbered 19. either by weight or by volume. Opening these valves interconnects the right and left sides of the main manifold. When the valves close due to a full tank. This rotary switch is numbered 29 and controls the operation of main manifold interconnect valves No. This lever provides manual control of the main refuel valve which is normally controlled by the refuel valve switch. the switch is OPEN and left TR power is supplied to open valve 29 and right TR power is supplied to open valve 29A. Moving the lever to OPEN (UP) position operates cables to open the valve. When the white stripe on a switch is aligned with the flow line on the panel.O. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 21 Fuel Flow Indicator Lights (amber) (12 places) Twelve amber fuel flow indicator lights are located on the fuel system panel adjacent to the fuel quantity gages. Fuel level control valves are numbered for ease of identification (figure 1-36 or 1-38).-CENTER. See FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM.

The blue ready light will blink on. 5. 9. NOTE Cycling of the toggle latches will occur when the boom release buttons on the pilot’s or copilot’s control wheels are depressed while the Electronic Warfare Officer holds the plunger limit switch in the contact-made position. NOTE The toggles will engage as soon as the copilot releases the signal amplifier reset button because the Electronic Warfare Officer is still holding the plunger limit switch depressed. toggles disengaged (EW) Electronic Warfare Officer releases signal switch plunger and toggle actuator will return to the release position. . 8. blue ready light will go out and the green contact-made light will illuminate indicating contact made and toggles engaged. Amber disconnect light will illuminate and the green contact-made light will go out. and at the discretion of the flightcrew. time and conditions permitting. 1B-52H-1 AIR REFUELING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION AIR REFUELING SYSTEM CHECK (PILOT READS) Interior Check This check may be performed after maintenance on a reported malfunction has occurred. Plunger Limit Switch Actuator – Pressed. the closed-and-locked light will be out and the blue ready light will illuminate when the slipway doors are fully open. refuel valve position indicator – OPEN (CP) 3. toggles engaged (EW) The Electronic Warfare Officer presses the plunger limit switch actuator on pilot’s request and observes toggle actuator operation. indicating the toggles are in the release position. Copilot’s Boom Release Button – Pressed (CP). The amber disconnect light will illuminate and the green contact-made light will go out. Plunger Limit Switch Actuator – Released. indicating contact made and toggles engaged. Pilot presses boom release button on control wheel. toggles engaged (EW) Electronic Warfare Officer holds the plunger limit switch in the pressed position and observes toggles actuator operation.O. Pilot’s Boom Release Button – Pressed (P). the Electronic Warfare Officer should check the actuator and spring for operation by pulling down on the actuator arm. NOTE When operating the plunger limit switch actuator. Electronic Warfare Officer checks toggle release action. 6. 10. then will go out and the green contact-made light will illuminate. 1.T. Electronic Warfare Officer observes toggle actuator operation. The following preflight will be accomplished after external power is connected to the aircraft and the left body hydraulic system standby pump is turned on. Normal Slipway Door Switch – OPEN. Master Refuel Switch – ON (CP) 2. 11. NOTE The pilot must wait 30 seconds after the blue ready light is illuminated to allow sufficient warmup time for the signal amplifier before proceeding with the next steps. toggles disengaged (EW) Copilot presses boom release button on control wheel. 1-176 Change 4 7. Signal Amplifier Reset Button – Pressed (CP). readyfor-contact light on (CP) When slipway doors are open. Blue ready light will go out and the green contact-made light will illuminate indicating contact made and toggles engaged. toggles engaged (EW) Copilot presses and then releases the signal amplifier reset button. toggles disengaged (EW) NOTE Cycling of the toggle latches will occur when the boom release buttons on the pilot’s or copilot’s control wheels are depressed while the Electronic Warfare Officer holds the plunger limit switch in the contact-made position. the Electronic Warfare Officer need only push the limit switch. Refuel Valve Switch – OPEN. No external air is required. Plunger Limit Switch – Pressed. Electronic Warfare Officer checks toggle release action and continues to hold the plunger limit switch depressed. For the remaining checks. Signal Amplifier Reset Button – Pressed (CP) Push and release signal amplifier reset button and check ready light illuminated. Signal Amplifier Power Switch – NORMAL (CP) 4. The amber disconnect light will illuminate and the green contact-made light will go out. indicating the toggles are in the released position.

22. Master Refuel Switch – OFF (CP) If the master refuel switch is turned OFF before the slipway doors closed-and-locked light illuminates.T. 3. Signal Amplifier Power Switch – MANUAL (CP) The amber manual power light will illuminate and the blue ready light will illuminate when the toggle latching switch is in the release position. toggles disengaged (EW) Pilot presses boom release button on control wheel. Pilot’s Boom Release Button – Pressed (P). 1. closed-and-locked light on (CP) Amber slipway door closed-and-locked light will illuminate when doors are fully closed. Master Refuel Switch – OFF (CP) AIR REFUELING FUEL MANAGEMENT Fuel Distribution Prior to Air Refueling With the exception of ground operation and takeoff. toggles engaged (EW) The blue ready light will go out. This results in a desirable distribution of fuel for air refueling since the three body tanks and the center wing tank are capable of taking fuel simultaneously as fast as the tanker can supply it and their combined capacity will normally satisfy any outbound or inbound refueling requirements. NOTE If the pilot’s and copilot’s boom release buttons function properly when the signal amplifier switch is in NORMAL. Electronic Warfare Officer checks toggle release action. Manual Toggle Latch Switch – HOLD (CP). Change 4 1-177 . the cg moves aft remaining well within the flight limit. fuel will generally be used first from the center wing and body tanks. slipway door closed-and-locked light on (CP) The amber slipway door closed-and-locked light will illuminate when the doors are fully closed. mains. 14. Air Refueling Accumulator Preload – 1000 (±200) psi (EW) Electronic Warfare Officer checks air refueling accumulator located to the right and aft of the air refueling receptacle. Plunger Limit Switch Actuator – Released (EW) 13. 19. Signal Amplifier Power Switch – NORMAL (CP) 18. As the four tanks fill simultaneously. Master Refuel Switch – ON (CP) 2. Report to pilot. Where a tank is refueled in successive steps.O. ready. 4. Be careful to maintain the proper differential between tanks. it is unnecessary to check the copilot’s boom release button with the signal amplifier switch in MANUAL. 16. 21. This check will normally be made only after maintenance or reported malfunction has occurred. The tanks in each step will be refueled simultaneously to the prescribed quantities prior to commencing the next step. the doors will remain in an unlocked or intermediate position. 1B-52H-5. Manual Toggle Latch Switch – RELEASE (CP) 17. amber disconnect light will illuminate.O. outboard and external wing tanks will be full for takeoff and additional fuel required will be distributed between the center wing and body tanks in accordance with loading data in T. 15. Electronic Warfare Officer checks toggle engage action.for-contact light on (CP) Amber door-locked light will go out and blue readyfor-contact light will illuminate when the doors are fully open. Refuel Valves Operating Technique A typical panel configuration for refueling is shown in figure 1-57. Refuel Valve Switch – CLOSE. Consequently. Alternate Slipway Door Switch – CLOSED. Normal Slipway Door Switch – CLOSED. Before Taxiing Check The following alternate slipway door switch check will be made after the engines are started. Alternate Slipway Door Switch – OPEN. position indicator – CLOSE (CP) 20. Hydraulic Leaks – Checked (EW) Electronic Warfare Officer checks for possible hydraulic leaks aft of slipway area. This check could not be made during the POWER-ON INTERIOR CHECK because hydraulic standby pump pressure is not available to the alternate slipway door control valve with the controllable hydraulic check valves CLOSED. it may be practical to leave the appropriate valve open at the end of the initial step. 1B-52H-1 12.

O.2 13 7 ENG 8 25 ON 15 26 OFF MAINS NO.1NO.T.4 R OUTBD WING TANK WARNING MID BODY 27 28 17 R EXTERNAL L OUTBD 18 19 REFUEL RECPT L EXTERNAL 20 WING TANK WARN 21 22 23 24 29 BLINKING AMBER LIGHT INDICATES "NO FLOW" CONDITIONS STEADY AMBER LIGHT INDICATES SHUTOFF VALVE CLOSED MAIN FUEL FLOW REFUEL FLOW STATIC A31683 Figure 1-57 1-178 .3NO. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling Fuel Management REFUEL VALVE OPEN MASTER REFUEL ON OPEN OFF CLOSE REFUEL PANEL 3 ENG 4 5 ENG 6 1 ENG 2 FWD BODY 10 9 12 11 16 PUMP PRESSURE CHECKOUT 14 ON CTR WING AFT BODY OFF MAINS NO.

and 3 & 4 should be maintained. Change 4 1-179 . refueling will be smoother because of improved performance and stability characteristics. Continue filling all tanks simultaneously until desired gross weight is achieved. The cg at maximum gross weight is not always a constant figure. Whenever a token off-load has been received and considerable fuel has been used out of the main tanks for pilot air refueling proficiency purposes. all wing tanks must be full at gross weights above 500.000 pounds is 35%. NOTE The aircraft is speed restricted until the external wing tanks are full.O. 1-1C-1 and T. The most skill required of the pilot for operation at maximum weight will be air refueling. See Section V for WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. the receiver may not have the normal amount of power for maneuvering if refueling at optimum cruise altitude. If refueling is done at lower altitudes where it is possible aerodynamically to reach limit load.000 feet).O. refuel outboards. If outboards and externals are not full. at the airspeeds flown. see AUTOPILOT. its respective refuel valve should be left open during the remainder of the refueling operation in order to replenish fuel used from the main tank for engine feed. above 27. the aircraft is easier to handle at high gross weight during a refueling if the cg is maintained forward of 30%.O. the aircraft cannot aerodynamically exceed the 1. it is recommended that the receiver disconnect. Air Refueling Procedure – No Pylons 1. In general. chaff load. In this case. 2. drop back and stabilize. At maximum weight. For additional information. Fuel density. By following prescribed air refueling procedures in this section. externals and mains until outboards and externals are full. NOTE If refueling for ‘‘SIOP-increased gross weight’’. NOTE For further air refueling operation and checklists. it is possible for the pilot to exceed the g limit of the aircraft. Refueling at Heavy Gross Weights NOTE Pilot fatigue and aircraft loads are substantially reduced by using the aerial refuel mode of the automatic flight control system. Refueling with an aft cg causes considerable pitching of the receiver which induces pitching of the tanker and the two soon become incompatible. The proper distribution between mains 1 & 2. if the refueling is done at normal altitudes (that is.T. Refueling should be done smoothly because.8 g limit load. then move in for a new hookup. bomb load. If pitching commences during a refueling hookup. 1B-52H-1 Whenever a main tank is full. the main tanks should be replenished with fuel from the body tanks in normal fuel usage sequence down to ballast requirements. etc. Main tank(s) differential fuel load is maintained by opening and closing appropriate refuel valves as required. causing difficulty in maintaining optimum refueling position with the tanker.000 pounds. are variables which can affect the cg location. refer to T. the cg will be maintained forward of 30% as maximum gross weight is approached. Although the aft cg flight limit at 488. Air Refueling Procedure With External Cruise Missiles or Conventional Weapons The air refueling sequence for SIOP positive control launch is shown in figure 1-58 and for Conventional Operations/Training/Tactical Ferry in figure 1-59. the tanker may have to start a slow descent during the last part of the refueling. 1-1C-1-15. this section.

AT NO TIME SHOULD MAINS BE ALLOWED TO BE LESS THAN 5000 POUNDS EACH. • AFT BODY TO FULL. SEE WING FLUTTER AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS CHART. • OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS TO FULL. EXTERNALS.000 POUNDS EACH. MAINS AND AFT BODY TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • MAINS TO 18. MAINS. AND AFT BODY TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • AFT BODY TO 30.000 POUNDS EACH. • AFT BODY TO 30. Figure 1-58 1-180 Change 20 .O. AS SOON AS OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE FULL.000 POUNDS EACH.000 POUNDS. • MAINS 2 AND 3 TO 30. USE THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURES: IF OUTBOARDS AND EXTERNALS ARE FULL: 1. • MID BODY TO DESIRED GROSS WEIGHT. MAINS AND AFT BODY TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • MAINS 1 AND 4 TO 20. SECTION V. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling Procedure With External Cruise Missiles or Conventional Weapons SIOP/POSITIVE CONTROL LAUNCH NOTE TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICAL LOADING.000 POUNDS. OUTBOARDS. 2. THE FOLLOWING TANK REFUELING SEQUENCE IS FOR AIRCRAFT CARRYING EXTERNAL CRUISE MISSILES IN A SYMMETRICAL LOADING. REFUEL THE TANKS SPECIFIED IN EACH STEP (FORWARD BODY AND CENTER WING TANKS ARE NOT REFUELED): IF OUTBOARD AND EXTERNALS ARE NOT FULL: 1. • MAINS TO 9000 POUNDS EACH. AIRCRAFT IS SPEED RESTRICTED UNTIL EXTERNALS ARE FULL.T. NOTE • • • MAINTAIN MAINS AS CLOSE TO 9000 POUNDS EACH AS POSSIBLE. MAINS AND MID BODY: • MAINS TO FULL. 3.

000 POUNDS EACH. • MAINS TO 16. • MID BODY TO DESIRED GROSS WEIGHT. 1B-52H-1 Air Refueling Procedure With External Cruise Missiles or Conventional Weapons CONVENTIONAL OPERATIONS/TRAINING/TACTICAL FERRY NOTE TWO PYLONS – SYMMETRICAL LOADING. • MAINS 1 AND 4 TO FULL. REFUEL THE TANKS SPECIFIED IN EACH STEP (FORWARD BODY AND CENTER WING TANKS ARE NOT REFUELED): 1.000 POUNDS EACH. • MAINS 2 AND 3 TO FULL. 2.500 POUNDS. THE FOLLOWING TANK REFUELING SEQUENCE IS FOR AIRCRAFT CARRYING EXTERNAL CRUISE MISSILES IN A SYMMETRICAL LOADING.000 POUNDS EACH.O. • MAINS 2 AND 3 TO 32. Figure 1-59 Change 4 1-181 . MID BODY. AND MAINS TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • AFT BODY TO INITIAL LOADING (MISSILES NOT LAUNCHED). 3. 4. MAINS. AND OUTBOARDS TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • AFT BODY TO 9000 POUNDS. • MAINS TO 29. AFT BODY AND MAINS TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • AFT BODY TO 24.T.500 POUNDS. • OUTBOARDS TO FULL. AFT BODY AND MAINS TO THE FOLLOWING QUANTITIES: • AFT BODY TO 28. AFT BODY. AFT BODY.

1 19 & 19A NO. TR FUEL LEVEL CONTROL – REFUEL VALVES – LEFT WING TANKS – NO. 2 20 RIGHT WING TANKS – 3 – 21 4 – 22 & 22A AERIAL REFUELING – MANUAL CONTROL Figure 1-60 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-182 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 . TR RLC/D8 LLC/A20 RLC/D6 LLC/A19 RLC/D7 Rt. 1B-52H-1 Refueling System Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE Autopilot and Air Refueling (IFR) Boom Release Buttons AERIAL REFUELING – DISC & ENGINE STALL CONT Auxiliary Tank Fuel Flow Control Switches (In refuel position) (Master Refuel switch must be ON to allow power to reach the refuel valves) FUEL LEVEL CONTROL – REFUEL VALVES – BODY TANKS – AFT 28 AFT 28A CTR WING 26 FWD 25 MID 27 LEFT WING TANKS – EXT 17 OUTBD 18 & 18A RIGHT WING TANKS – EXT 24 OUTBD 23 & 23A Defuel Valve Switch Disconnect Light Fuel Flow Indicator Lights Fuel-In-Manifold Lights Main Manifold Interconnect Valves Switch Main Tank Fuel Flow Control Switches (In refuel position) (Master Refuel switch must be ON to allow power to reach the refuel valves) Manual Power Light POWER SOURCE RLC/F4 Rt. TR FUEL FEED CONTROL – CROSS FEED VALVE – 29 29A LLC/C12 RLC/C6 Left TR Rt. TR AERIAL REFUELING – DISC & ENGINE STALL CONT SIGNAL AMPL RLC/F4 RLC/F5 Rt. TR Rt. TR RLC/F3 Rt. TR LLC/A15 LLC/A16 Left TR Left TR RLC/D5 RLC/D4 Rt.T.O. TR Left TR Rt. TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – FUEL MANAGE IND RLC/E3 Rt. TR Rt. TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – DEFUEL VALVE RLC/E7 Rt. TR Rt. TR LLC/A17 LLC/A18 Left TR Left TR RLC/D2 RLC/D3 Rt. TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – CABIN MAIN RLC/E8 RLC/E9 Rt. TR Rt. TR Left TR Rt.

and Ready For Contact Light AERIAL REFUELING – MANUAL CONTROL SIGNAL AMPL RLC/F3 RLC/F5 Rt. TR 11 LLC The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. TR LLC/A14 RLC/D1 Left TR Rt. this section) FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – CABIN Signal Amplifier. TR Rt. TR Refuel Valve Switch and Position Indicator Scavenge System Switch (In CABIN position. TR Rt. Reset Button. Contact Made Light. for MAIN position – see FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION. 1B-52H-1 Refueling System Circuit Protection and Location (Cont) EQUIPMENT Manual Toggle Latch Switch CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 AERIAL REFUELING – SIGNAL AMPL POWER SOURCE RLC/F5 Rt. TR Master Refuel Switch (ON position supplies control power to refuel valve circuits thru the LEFT MASTER and RIGHT MASTER circuit breakers on the LLC and RLC circuit breaker panels.O. TR Rt.T. in the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. Signal Amplifier Power Switch. TR Rt. LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-60 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-183/(1-184 blank) . respectively) AERIAL REFUELING – SIGNAL AMPL SLIPWAY DOOR – ALT SLIPWAY DOOR – NORMAL FUEL LEVEL CONTROL – LEFT MASTER RIGHT MASTER Refuel Level Checkout Switch FUEL SYSTEM – GRD CHK OUT – REFUEL VALVE LLC/A13 Left TR FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – REFUEL VALVE RLC/E6 Rt. TR RLC/F5 RLC/F2 RLC/F1 Rt. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. TR RLC/E8 Rt. TR Slipway Doors Switches AERIAL REFUELING – SLIPWAY DOOR – ALT SLIPWAY DOOR – NORMAL RLC/F2 RLC/F1 Rt.

BLA .

1B-52H-30-4. This 205/118-volt three-phase ac power is used for most heavy loads such as fuel boost pumps. Primary power is supplied by four engine-driven generators. Electrical power supply systems circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-71. actuators. Each generator is capable of carrying 120 kva at a reasonable power factor. Secondary power is 28-volt nominal unregulated dc supplied by transformer-rectifier (TR) units fed from the 205-volt three-phase ac power of the primary system. The dc 1-185 1-185 1-196 1-202 1-206 1-206 1-206 1-206 1-206 1-207 1-207 1-224 1-239 power requirements for missiles are provided from one TR unit to provide dc power for the rotary launcher hydraulic pump and three paralleled NDC power supplies to provide power to missile electronics and EED power. Missile ac power requirements are provided from the aircraft through circuit breakers in the engine No.T. 1. 5. 1B-52H-30-1.O. This TR power is used for control circuits. The gyro power switch on the pilot’s side panel controls the flight gyro emergency power inverter. bus tie and generator circuit breakers. and 7. The ac input power is redistributed within the missile system through circuit breakers located in a missile power distribution box installed in the forward wheel well. and wing flap motors. a central bus tie. and 7 generator power boxes. For additional information regarding the AGM-86B electrical system.O. small motors. 3. power load boxes. and circuit breaker panels. 5. or T. Single-phase 118-volt ac power is generally used for small motors. and is used for some electronic equipment. 1B-52H-1 ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION AC POWER SYSTEM DIRECT CURRENT SYSTEM EXTERNAL ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS NORMAL OPERATION CONTROL CIRCUITS INSTRUMENT INDICATIONS DC SYSTEM EXTERNAL POWER GENERATOR OPERATION ELECTRICAL LOADS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION DESCRIPTION Primary and secondary distribution buses supply power to the aircraft. refer to T. For AGM-129. Change 16 1-185 . 1B-52H-34-2-9 for the AGM-86C/D electrical system. and electronic equipment. Both ac and dc power are distributed throughout the aircraft by buses located in junction boxes and panels. with circuit breaker protection in the power distribution box. refer to T. Circuit breakers and fuses are installed to protect aircraft wiring.O. a flight gyro emergency power inverter.O. Generators The primary ac power supply is provided through four engine-driven 120 kva generators located underneath the engines on the accessory pads of engines 1. power distribution boxes. AC and dc power may be obtained for ground operation through external power receptacles. An ac control panel (figure 1-64) at the copilot’s station provides all the controls and indicators for operation of the system. Two nickel-cadmium batteries provide an auxiliary source of 24-volt dc power which is supplied to essential equipment in case the ac or TR system fails to function. Missile dc control power and other miscellaneous requirements are supplied from the aircraft non-interruptible dc (NDC) bus. Transformers reduce singlephase ac power to 28 volts for most lighting. The batteries also provide power directly to emergency equipment through the forward and aft battery buses. 3. instruments. AC POWER SYSTEM The ac power system (figures 1-61 and 1-62) consists of four engine-driven generators.

a drive is needed to drive the generator at a constant speed throughout the range of various engine speeds. When this happens. . Each protective feature may accomplish one or more of the following actions: An electro-mechanical decoupling device is contained in the drive and provides a means of manually decoupling the drive input shaft from the engine shaft. and central caution light will come on and the drive should be decoupled.1) Hz. the switch will energize the under-overspeed relay. See figure 1-63 for a generator drive decoupler control schematic. when its generator shuts down. 1-186 Change 16 1. By use of the basic governor through the wobble pump. Movement of the governor flyweights controls the action by directing oil pressure to vary the pitch of the wobble plate. The limit governor also causes the transmission to be hydraulically locked in full underdrive (slowest output speed) position.75 quarts and a total capacity of 9 quarts. see figure 1-186. through an oil cooler. If the generator field is not energized. See ELECTRICAL SYSTEM OPERATION. master caution lights. the basic governor controls the frequency.T. When the drive overspeeds. The drive used consists of a hydraulic transmission controlled by an electromechanical governor. Speed Protection An under-overspeed switch controlled by a limit governor provides protection from excessively low or high generator speeds. for additional information on generator frequencies. its respective bus tie circuit breaker will automatically trip open and will remain open until it is closed by actuation of the generator switch. Oil is routed through the generator drive. the drive overheat light. When the temperature of a drive reaches 250° (±10°) F. if not already closed. 3. this section. Disconnect the generator from its main bus by tripping the respective generator circuit breaker. Throw the drive in full underspeed operation so it will turn at the slowest rate possible for the speed at which the engine is operating. and returned to the tank. 1B-52H-1 GENERATOR DRIVES PROTECTIVE FEATURES Since certain electronic equipment requires constant frequency. tripping the generator control relay and generator circuit breaker. Oil temperature is controlled by a thermostatic valve which allows bypassing of the cooler. the drive adds to or subtracts from the variable input speed of the engine and provides a constant ac output from the generator of 400 (±1) Hz. The transmission receives its input drive power directly from the engine. No manual controls are provided for this system. If the drive fails to disconnect. Cooling air for the oil cooler is provided by engine fan air. Provisions have been made for manually decoupling of the generator drive from the engine. Isolate the generator by tripping the respective bus tie circuit breaker. 4. For generator drive oil servicing. Generator Overheat Protection When a generator reaches a temperature of 240°C or above. The minimum generator cut-in speed is approximately 5670 engine rpm. The frequency is controlled automatically by the frequency and load controller through the magnetic trim head of the basic speed governor if the generator field is energized. the lights will again come on when the drive temperature reaches 350° (±15°) F. If the speed of the generator drops to a point where the ac output frequency is below 295 Hz (possibly due to a faulty governor or engine shutdown). GENERATOR DRIVE OIL SYSTEM Each generator drive is provided a separate oil system which includes an oil tank having a usable capacity of 6. The drive shaft and engine shaft cannot be recoupled during flight. The frequency reference unit provides a constant ac output from the generator at 400 (+0. Generator protective features are incorporated in the generator and generator drive systems. the generator cannot be put back on the line for the duration of the flight. The generators are driven at a constant speed of 8000 rpm. 2. the under-overspeed switch is drained of oil by the limit governor and reacts in the same manner as an underspeed condition. NOTE A bus tie circuit breaker will close automatically.O. This will take the generator off the line and thus protect electronic equipment which might be damaged by operation at a low frequency.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 AC Power Routing Figure 1-61 1-187 .

1 B DIFF FAULT DETECT MASTER ISOLATE SWITCH GENERATOR OVERHEAT RESET CLOSE MASTER ISOLATE RELAY BUS TIE CKT BKR (TYPICAL) GEN DRIVE DECOUPLE O V E R H E A T TRIP CLOSE TRIP RT. 1 CONTROL PANEL BUS TIE TRIP AMPERES AMPERES 350oF 250oF ENG 1 GEN RIGHT ESS.T. 3 Bφ CLOSE EXT PWR TRIPOUT RELAY ON EXT PWR CONTROL RELAY BATTERY OVERRIDE SWITCH OFF MAIN EXT PWR SWITCH Bφ CLOSE TRIP TRIP EXT PWR CKT BKR TRIP CLOSE EXT PWR LOCKOUT RELAY EXT PWR CKT BKR POSI− TION INDICATOR GEN NO. TR BUS R. 1B-52H-1 AC Power System TO GEN NO. ESS DC CENTRAL TIE BUS DECPL MON NORM OVER HEAT ENG 3 GEN ENG NO. 3 GEN EXT PWR & BUS TIE ISOLATE F N PHASE SEQUENCE RELAY TO GEN NO. ESS DC L. ESS DC DECPL MON NORM OVER HEAT O V E R H E A T ENG 1 GEN ENG 5 GEN ENG 7 GEN VOLTS & CYCLES SELECT A31685 Figure 1-62 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-188 Change 4 . 1 GEN L. 1 BUS MAIN EXTERNAL POWER RECEPTACLE ON OFF GENERATOR SWITCHES TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHT C N OFF ON GEN CIRCUIT BKR (TYPICAL) A ENG 3 GEN CONSTANT SPEED DRIVE GENERATOR NO. DC 10 10 ENG NO. 3 BUS GEN NO.O.

5 BUS GENERATOR CIRCUIT BREAKER POSITION INDICATOR (TYPICAL) AC GENERATOR CONTROL PANEL GEN BKR CLOSE BUS TIE CLOSE TRIP CLOSE BUS TIE CKT BKR POSITION IND INBD BUS TIE CIRCUIT BREAKER POSITION INDICATOR (TYPICAL) TRIP FREQUENCY METER BUS TIE CKT BKR POSITION IND OUTBD CLOSE LEFT ESS. 5 205 volts ac (3φ) FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH 205 volts ac monitor 1 Closes in correct ON phase if all generator breakers are open. DC 205 volts ac control 28 volts dc control power IN PULLED OUT 10 GENERATOR NO. DC RT ESS. 7 BUS GEN NO. DC CYCLES VOLTMETER O V E R H E A T OVER HEAT DECPL MON NORM DECPL MON NORM OVER HEAT O V E R H E A T VOLTS AC A31686 Figure 1-62 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-189 . As long as generator breakers are open. 7 GEN LEFT ESS. External power plugged in but not selected. and 7 on.T. 1B-52H-1 CONDITION: AMPERES ENG 5 GEN CONSTANT SPEED DRIVE AMPERES Generators 1. the External Power Tripout relay applies right essential power to trip the external power circuit breaker. 5. and all bus tie breakers closed. TRIP GEN NO. OFF 2 Supplies left FREQUENCY AND LOAD CONTROLLER essential power to External Power Tripout relay through the open side of generator circuit breakers. When a generator is placed on.O. ON VOLTAGE REGULATOR OFF GENERATOR SWITCHES BUS TIE TRIP Bφ TRIP GEN BKR TRIP TO GEN 7 Bφ CLOSE CLOSE 3 Decouple solenoid. NORMAL (IN) ENG 7 GEN ENG NO. External Power Tripout relay remains open.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Generator Drive Decoupler System (Typical) Figure 1-63 1-190 Change 4 .

in addition. are used to provide protection for aircraft wiring. Some limiters have an indicator element that protrudes out of the limiter body when the limiter has blown. These circuit breakers are of the tripfree pushbutton type. ranging in size from 2. and 60 amperes are used. Six ratings of 10. the other generators act as an alternate source to provide power to the faulty generator power distribution box.O. The boxes and panels are supplied power through multiwire feeders of three or more wires for each phase. NOTE The circuit breakers located on the pilot and copilot side panels are the trip-free pushbutton type. The inverter is deenergized when the gyro power switch is in OFF position. Although applied specifically for wire protection. Panels. INDICATING FUSES Indicating fuses are used for protection of some lightly loaded three phase ac transformers. The inverter utilizes emergency battery power. furnish 118-volt single-phase power to auto-transformers for reduction to 28 volt ac. Fuses and additional circuit breakers on the circuit breaker panels within the crew compartment are used to protect wiring to individual pieces of equipment. and Circuit Breakers Primary 205 volt ac power is fed to separate buses within the four generator power boxes. AC Power Distribution Boxes. 40. The circuit breaker side panels should not be used as a storage area for checklists or other equipment.T. which in turn feed power to separate buses within the five power distribution boxes and panels. one for each phase. The three-phase breakers will open all three power circuits simultaneously in the event that a short occurs in any one circuit. others show discoloration inside the glass barrel when blown. CURRENT LIMITERS (FUSES) One basic type of fast blow fuse is used throughout the aircraft for fault protection. If any generator becomes inoperative. A neon light in the end of the fuseholder will glow when its respective fuse is blown. 30.5 to 50 amperes. Keep the pilot and copilot circuit breaker side panels free of equipment to allow proper functioning and crew monitoring of the circuit breakers. Distribution circuits for the circuit breaker panels in the crew compartment except the EVS circuit breaker panel are protected by circuit breakers located on the POWER FEEDER portion of the left and right load central circuit breaker panels. The inverter also supplies single-phase power for instrument lighting of the pilot’s attitude indicator. provided the gyro power switch on the pilot’s side panel is in ON position. Fuses. 20. These fuses protect transformer windings as well as the aircraft wiring. 1B-52H-1 Flight Gyro Emergency Power Inverter An emergency flight instrument inverter is provided to supply 115-volt three-phase ac power to primary flight instruments in the event of a complete failure of the ac system. Three-phase circuit breakers of this type are used for some OAS components requiring three-phase power. See figure 1-61 for ac power routing. These power distribution boxes and panels provide power throughout the aircraft (figure 1-70). The inverter supplies power to the pilot’s attitude indicator and pilot’s heading indicator (gyro). The buses in these boxes and panels supply all of the 205-volt three-phase and 118-volt single-phase loads and. Wiring to three-phase loads is protected by three individual circuit breakers. This is accomplished through automatic features of the generator system. Special circuit breakers are used in conjunction with the offensive avionics system to provide both wire and component protection. 50. they provide some protection for components. The inverter is automatically turned on when the complete ac power source fails. 1-191 . CIRCUIT BREAKERS Standard circuit breakers. These circuit breakers are toggle type and are used in fractional ampere ratings.

1B-52H-1 AC Power System Controls and Indicators Figure 1-64 (Sheet 1 of 4) 1-192 .T.O.

2 Generator Switches (4 places) Four three-position generator switches are marked ON and OFF at the extreme positions respectively and are spring-loaded to the unmarked neutral position.O. See figure 5-1 for ammeter markings. 1B-52H-1 1 2 3 AC AMMETERS (4 PLACES) GENERATOR SWITCHES (4 PLACES) GENERATOR CIRCUIT BREAKER POSITION INDICATORS (4 PLACES) BUS TIE CIRCUIT BREAKER POSITION INDICATORS (4 PLACES) GENERATOR DRIVE OVERHEAT LIGHTS (4 PLACES) GENERATOR DRIVE DECOUPLER SWITCHES EXTERNAL POWER CIRCUIT BREAKER POSITION INDICATOR 4 5 6 7 NO.T. The ammeters indicate in the range from 0 to 500 amperes. 24 volt nominal dc essential power closes the generator control relay and the generator circuit breaker and energizes the generator field. When the switch is held momentarily in ON position. Figure 1-64 (Sheet 2 of 4) Change 20 1-193 . 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 MASTER ISOLATE SWITCH MAIN EXTERNAL POWER SWITCH FREQUENCY METER VOLTMETER AND FREQUENCY SELECTOR SWITCH VOLTMETER GENERATOR DRIVE OVERHEAT CAUTION LIGHT AC CIRCUIT BREAKER CAUTION LIGHT CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 AC Ammeters (4 places) Four ac ammeters provide an indication of output in amperes supplied by each individual generator. the same power trips both the generator control relay and the generator circuit breaker and closes the bus tie circuit breaker. When the switch is held in OFF position.

The switches are marked NORM and DECPL at the extreme positions and MON at the center position. one for each generator circuit breaker provide a means of indicating the position of the respective circuit breakers. 7 External Power Circuit Breaker Position Indicator A single three-position tab indicators provides a means of indicating the position of the main external power circuit breaker relay. See External Power system Controls and Indicators this section. OFF position indicates the tab indicator is not receiving control power. The lights will also illuminate when the drive temperature reaches 350° (±15°) F regardless of decoupler switch position. 1B-52H-1 AC Power System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. 5 Generator Drive OVERHEAT Lights (4 places) Four amber generator drive overheat lights. one for each bus tie circuit breaker provide a means of indicating the position of the respective circuit breakers.O. one for each generator are on the ac control panel. 8 Master Isolate Switch A master isolate switch on the copilot’s control panel is marked PUSH TO ISOLATE CENTRAL TIE BUS. 3). Two positions of the tab indicator are bars and the other is OFF. isolating all generators from the central bus tie. OFF position is black and has OFF marked in white across the center of the indicator. 10 Frequency Meter A frequency meter adjacent to the ac control panel provides a means of reading individual frequencies of the generators and central bus tie. the circuit breaker is closed. Figure 1-64 (Sheet 3 of 4) 1-194 Change 4 . For typical frequency meter instrument markings. see figure 5-1. Holding the generator switches in ON position until the bus tie circuit breakers close will repower the central bus tie. The bars are white and run vertically and horizontally through the center of the black indicator. See External Power system Controls and Indicators this section. one for each generator are marked OVERHEAT. FUNCTION 3 Generator Circuit Breaker Position Indicators (4 places) Four three-position tab indicators. the circuit breaker is open.T. When the bar is aligned with the reference line on the ac control panel. Pressing the switch energizes the master isolate relay. Some frequency meters are calibrated from 350 to 450 Hz and some from 380 to 420 Hz. 4 Bus Tie Circuit Breaker Position Indicators (4 places) Four three-position tab indicators. it can only be recoupled while the aircraft is on the ground with the generator drive removed. which in turn trips the bus tie circuit breakers. When the bar is at a right angle to the reference line. The bus tie circuit breaker position indicators function in the same manner as the generator circuit breaker position indicators (No. The switch latches in NORM position and is spring-loaded to MON position after being placed in DECPL position. 6 Generator Drive Decoupler Switches (4 places) Four generator drive decoupler switches. NOTE If a generator drive is decoupled during flight. provided the decoupler switch is in NORM position. 9 Main External Power Switch A three-position switch controls application of main external power. The lights will illuminate when a generator drive temperature exceeds 250° (±10°) F.

NOTE 60-001 thru 60-062 Faults on the left essential bus or the associated circuit breaker being open may cause the generator drive overheat light and generator drive overheat caution light to come on dimly. 12 Voltmeter A voltmeter adjacent to the ac control panel provides a means of reading individual voltages of the generators and central bus tie. This is caused by a feedback voltage from the right essential bus.O. In ENG 1 GEN position. When the generators are in parallel. at which time.-ENG 3 GEN. 14 AC CIRCUIT BKR Caution Light (Amber) The light. The light may be reset by pressing the reset switch adjacent to the central caution panel. The voltmeter is calibrated from 0 to 250 volts. The ac circuit breaker light serves to caution that one of the generator or bus tie circuit breakers has tripped open. The remaining positions will perform the previous operation for their respective generators as marked.-ENG 5 GEN. With a system malfunction.T. 1 generator may be read on the frequency meter and voltmeter provided the generators are isolated. it should be reset by pressing the reset switch adjacent to the central caution panel so the remaining generator drives may be monitored. The light will come on at the same time any of the generator or bus tie circuit breakers open and will remain on as long as the circuit breaker is open unless it is reset. see figure 5-1. all generator switch positions will be read the same as the CENTRAL TIE BUS position. In event the generator drive overheat caution light comes on. FUNCTION 11 Voltmeter and Frequency Selector Switch A five-position frequency and voltage selector switch located adjacent to the ac control panel has ENG 1 GEN. shows amber letters AC CIRCUIT BKR OPEN. The switch provides a means of selecting and reading frequency and voltage of the central bus tie and of each generator. Figure 1-64 (Sheet 4 of 4) 1-195 . it will go out and be ready for additional indication of any circuit breaker which may open.-ENG 7 GEN positions. The generator drive overheat light signal is also received by the master caution lights causing them to light simultaneously. The copilot must monitor the generator drive overheat lights on the ac control panel in order to determine which generator drive has the overheat condition. when illuminated. the frequency and voltage of the No. For voltmeter markings. 1B-52H-1 CONTROLINDICATOR NO. RESET on a black background. the lights will illuminate with normal brilliance. The indication given on the ac circuit breaker light is also indicated on the master caution lights located on the pilots’ instrument panel. 13 Generator Drive Overheat Caution Light (Amber) A generator drive overheat caution light marked GENERATOR OVERHEAT – RESET on the central caution lights panel indicates that one or more of the generator drives are in an overheat condition and the drive should be decoupled by the copilot.-CENTRAL TIE BUS.

and temperature. one for the forward battery and one for the aft battery are located in the left forward wheel well. The forward battery supplies power directly through fuses and circuit breakers to battery buses located in the right forward dc power box. A mission ready status is defined as the BATTERY READY indicator ON and both fault latches in the no fault (totally black face) mode. dc power would not be supplied to the TR buses. left load central circuit breaker panel. and right forward BNS overhead circuit breaker panel. When TR power is available. The time from application of charger input power until the battery is charged is dependent on battery initial state of charge.T. topping. load. Both the forward and aft batteries and chargers are identical. and Aft TR Bus The equipment will receive power from one of the buses according to the importance of the equipment (figure 1-65). Essential battery buses are supplied battery power through the left and right essential dc battery relays when the battery switch is ON and TR power is not available. and a LAMP TEST pressto-test button. pilot’s circuit breaker panel. Battery Chargers During normal operating conditions. 5 generator bus. Left TR Bus. pilot’s circuit breaker panel. The batteries have heaters and are capable of satisfactory operation at –40°F (–40°C). DC power is distributed and protected through boxes and panels located throughout the aircraft (figure 1-70). The aft battery bus and forward battery bus can supply direct battery power to emergency equipment. and jettison power are connected directly to the battery buses. Loads such as emergency landing gear control. battery fault and battery charge status for the respective circuits. the batteries are maintained in a fully charged condition by a two separate 37 amp charging TR units (battery chargers). 1B-52H-1 DIRECT CURRENT SYSTEM Direct current (dc) power is normally provided through transformer-rectifier (TR) units which are supplied ac power by the generators. DC power is supplied to the various equipment from one of the following buses: • Aft Battery Bus and Forward Battery Bus • Emergency Battery Power Bus and Emergency Instrument Power Bus • Right Essential Bus and Left Essential Bus • Right TR Bus.O. The batteries are charged from individual static transformer-rectifiers. Batteries An auxiliary source of dc power is provided by two 24-volt 35 ampere-hour maintenance-free batteries (27 and 28. and cell imbalance. and constant potential charging cycle will not exceed four hours. A CHARGER FAULT indicates that the charger was inoperable at some period of time. The battery charger front panel contains a CHARGER FAULT indicator. BATTERY READY LED. depending on position of emergency dc power switch (figure 3-21). The left essential and right essential buses normally receive TR power but in the event of an ac system failure. Battery power duration is dependent on the load conditions. This indicates that the battery is charged and the system is operational. The total time for the base. These buses supply battery power to essential dc operated equipment which normally receive TR dc power. entry light. In the event of an ac power failure. right load central fuse installation. . 3 generator bus and that for the aft battery receives ac power from engine No. The two forward TR buses are interconnected and will supply dc power as long as ac power is available. the right and left dc TR relays are energized. The TR units will supply charging power for their batteries as long as ac power is on the respective generator buses. and aft BNS overhead panel. Two 24-volt 35 ampere-hour maintenance-free batteries are used as an auxiliary source of dc power. BATTERY FAULT conditions include the battery being excessively hot. Should the 1-196 Change 20 ac or TR power fail. left load central fuse installation. Loads such as bailout warning and airbrake control are connected so that they may receive power from either the forward or aft battery. and with only the minimum flight essential equipment powered can supply enough power to fly the aircraft for up to four hours in an emergency situation. right load central circuit breaker panel. The aft battery supplies power directly through fuses and circuit breakers to battery buses located in the aft battery power box. The battery chargers (figure 1-66) provide charger fault. BATTERY FAULT indicator. Fully charged batteries are capable of performing a simultaneous eight engine cartridge start with no ground support equipment. essential battery bus loads are assured a source of power from the batteries for short periods. The transformer-rectifier unit for the forward battery receives ac power from engine No. sheet 1 of figure 1-1) designated as the aft and forward batteries located in the forward wheel well. temperature sensor failure. these buses automatically transfer to battery power provided the battery switch is ON.

The OFF current can be up to 25 amps depending on battery bus loads. may be inoperative because they are controlled by TR power. the charger will transition to overcharge mode. The output of the aft units is distributed to the aft dc power box. Loads above 25 amps will be supplied by the battery. Five TR units are located in the aft portion of the forward wheel well area. If the charger is in the basecharge less than approximately 20 minutes at the 85% transition point it will go into the tricklecharge mode.e. For basecharges greater than 20 minutes. The output of the forward units is distributed to the left and right forward dc power boxes through the load centrals to the individual crewmember’s circuit breaker panels. The three remaining TR units are located in the aft equipment compartment. The ON pulse is typically 25 amps. Change 17 1-196A/(1-196B blank) .O. stabilizer trim. If the temperature is not excessive. etc. If not. TR bus voltage is between 23 and 30 volts depending upon load and condition of TR units. In the event of complete failure of a TR bus. The OFF current can be up to 25 amps depending on battery bus loads. No latches should set and the BATTERY READY indicator should come on within approximately 20 minutes. The constant voltage mode is in operation when the battery temperature is between –40°F (–40°C) and 32°F (0°C) at that point it transitions to basecharge. If the charger shuts down and the BATTERY READY indication is off. The ON pulse is typically 25 amps. The base charge mode is an approximately 37 amp constant current output until battery reaches a temperature derived voltage. Overcharge mode is a fixed two hour period with a variable ON/OFF duty cycle based on battery temperature. a new battery greater than 40 amp hours) may take more than one basecharge cycle to reach 85% (BATTERY READY). 1B-52H-1 The BATTERY READY is a green LED that indicates the charger is operational and the battery is charged to at least 85% of capacity. certain ac loads such as flaps. Occasionally a deep discharged battery (<18 volts) with high capacity (i. reset latches and cycle AC power to the charger. Buses. take corrective action. fuel. The LAMP TEST is a press-to-test button used to verify the operation of the BATTERY READY lamp. Loads above 25 amps will be supplied by the battery. BATTERY CHARGING There are four charge modes.T. Tricklecharge mode after basecharge or overcharge maintains the battery charge at a duty cycle of 3 seconds ON and 73 seconds OFF. check the battery for excessive temperature (>72°C or 162°F). sheet 1 of figure 1-1) which operate directly from the ac power boxes and are supplied three-phase 205-volt ac power from the generators. The forward TR units are bussed together as are the aft TR units so that partial TR unit failure will not result in a loss of power to any dc operated equipment. This is the 85% of capacity point when the BATTERY READY indication comes ON. There is a watchdog timer that shuts down the charger if it hasn’t reached 85% in approximately 70 minutes. Transformer Breakers Rectifier Units. and Circuit Direct current power for normal operation is supplied from 28-volt output transformer-rectifier (TR) units (25.

BLA .

5 FORWARD TR UNITS FORWARD TR UNITS 4 2 1 8 AC POWER FROM GEN NO.O. 3 NO. 7 AC POWER FROM FROM GEN GEN NO. 3 FROM GEN NO.T. 1B-52H-1 DC Power System AC POWER FROM FROM GEN GEN NO. BATTERY CHARGING TR UNIT FROM GEN NO. 1 AFT TR UNITS 5 3 6 7 FUSES RIGHT TR BUS LEFT TR BUS COPILOT’S LEFT ESSENTIAL BUS LEFT ESSENTIAL BUS NORMAL EMERGENCY DC POWER SWITCH AFT TR BUS COPILOT’S RIGHT ESSENTIAL BUS RIGHT ESSENTIAL BUS BATTERY SWITCH OFF ON EMERGENCY INSTRUMENT BUS AC POWER TR POWER TR OR BATTERY POWER BATTERY POWER EMERGENCY BATTERY BUS NOTE EMER. 1 NO. 5 A31689 Figure 1-65 1-197 . AFT BATTERY BUS BATTERY CHARGING TR UNIT AFT BATTERY FORWARD BATTERY BUS FORWARD BATTERY See figure 3 21 for battery and essential bus loads and figure 3 22 for TR bus loads.

T. When the indicator is black. 3 LAMP TEST Switch The LAMP TEST switch checks the BATTERY READY light. the respective circuit is good and when the indicator shows alternately black and white. a fault is indicated After a fault is indicated the indicators can be reset mechanically by rotating the indicator 60 degrees clockwise. 4 CHARGER FAULT Indicator The CHARGER FAULT indicator is a magnetic latching indicator and shows charger fault status. 2 BATTERY READY Light A green BATTERY READY light shows the charge condition of the battery. and is off at less than 85% capacity. FUNCTION 1 BATTERY FAULT Indicator The BATTERY FAULT indicator is a magnetic latching indicator and shows battery fault status. If the BATTERY READY light is on. the BATTERY READY light comes on. Figure 1-66 1-198 Change 6 . When the LAMP TEST switch is pressed. the lamp test is not required. 1B-52H-1 Battery Charger CONTROLINDICATOR NO. a fault is indicated. the respective circuit is good and when the indicator shows alternately black and white.O. If the light does not come on. After a fault is indicated the indicators can be reset mechanically by rotating the indicator 60 degrees clockwise. When the indicator is black. the BATTERY LIGHT is inoperable. This light is on if the battery capacity is 85% or more.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 DC Power System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 BATTERY SWITCH EMERGENCY DC POWER SWITCH AFT BATTERY DISCHARGING LIGHT BATTERY CHARGE TEST SWITCH FORWARD BATTERY DISCHARGING LIGHT 6 7 8 9 BATTERY CAUTION LIGHT FORWARD BATTERY END OF LIFE LIGHT AFT BATTERY END OF LIFE LIGHT INTERPHONE POWER SWITCH Figure 1-67 (Sheet 1 of 3) Change 20 1-199 .

A battery bus load of at least 1. the right and left essential dc buses are normally powered from their respective battery any time the battery switch is ON. provided battery bus loads between 0. With the BATT CHARGE TEST switch in TEST FWD AND AFT and the batteries greater than 85% of full charge. regardless of the position of the battery switch. If the battery switch is OFF and TR power is available. provide visual indication that the battery is discharging.25 to 1. A DISCHARGING light No. no battery power is available to the essential battery buses. Reference to the two DISCHARGING lights on the copilot side panel will indicate which charger is not operating. For detail loads in each switch position.T. With the switch in TEST FWD AND AFT. A warning light on the central caution panel marked BATTERY RESET indicates when battery charging power is not present.-OFF battery switch routes battery power to the essential battery buses.0 amp with no charging TR power present is indicated by steady lights. 3 Aft Battery Discharging Light (amber) Two amber lights. the battery DISCHARGING lights will flash on and off indicating the pulsing action of the charger. forward battery power is supplied to both buses. In the copilot’s circuit breaker panel only. charging action will be steady and the battery DISCHARGING lights will not come on. one for each battery. When the battery switch is placed in ON position. FUNCTION 1 Battery Switch An ON. This condition exists due to feedback through the battery detection circuit and main TR bus loads to ground if the press-to-test feature is operated.O. No light will be present if the battery is below 85% of full charge. When the battery switch is in OFF position. flashing of the light indicates the battery is greater than 85% charged. the forward battery DISCHARGING light may come on while the INTERPHONE POWER switch is OFF and no TR power is available. see figure 3-21. When the switch is in NORMAL position. However. the INTERPHONE POWER switch must be ON. Figure 1-67 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-200 Change 6 . and left essential power is supplied to the emergency instrument power bus. when TR power is available. 2 Emergency DC Power Switch An emergency dc power switch marked NORMAL. A battery discharging rate of 0. they will be powered from the TR buses.0 amp shall exist to assure operation of battery DISCHARGING light during battery testing with the BATT CHARGE TEST switch. battery power is directed to the essential buses through the essential dc battery relays and. Battery power is supplied directly from each battery to individual (direct) battery buses at all times. A press-to-test feature of the battery DISCHARGING lights allows the copilot to check the light bulbs and ground circuits. For proper operation of the press-to-test feature.0 and 5 amps exist. 4 Battery Charge Test Switch The BATT CHARGE TEST switch may be used to test the state of charge of both the forward and aft batteries. 1B-52H-1 DC Power System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. relays are energized to transfer essential buses to TR power.-EMER located on the copilot’s side panel controls which source of power is connected to the emergency battery power bus and the emergency instrument power bus. When the switch is placed in EMER position.25 to 1. At loads above 5 amps. aft battery power is supplied to the emergency battery power bus. 3) for each battery is located next to the test switch.

The forward battery discharging light will press to test with the interphone switch OFF if a feedback voltage exists through the battery detector system. this section). ON position energizes both battery detectors and allows the battery discharging lights to function. in addition to its normal functions (see INTERPHONE SYSTEM. the battery discharging lights will not be on unless sufficient loads are on the buses. The battery caution light signal is also received by the master caution lights causing them to light simultaneously. 9 INTERPHONE POWER SWITCH An ON. OFF position deenergizes the battery detectors and battery discharging light circuits.-OFF interphone power switch on the pilot’s side panel.3 or above. 6 Battery Caution Light (amber) An battery caution light marked BATTERY-RESET indicates that one or both of the battery charging TR units are not supplying charging power to their respective battery buses. The light may be reset by pressing the reset switch adjacent to the central caution panel.T. controls operation of both battery detectors. With a maximum emergency load of 15 amperes on the battery buses.1) volts. In the event the battery caution light comes on. the light should be reset so the remaining battery may be monitored 7 FWD BATTERY END OF LIFE Light (amber) The forward battery end of life light indicates the approach to and the end of useful battery output. The lights will remain off when voltage is 22. The light will continue to flash until voltage decreases to 18 (+0.2 (±0. the battery is discharged beyond a usable condition. Figure 1-67 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-201 . 1B-52H-1 NO. however. 7). The copilot must monitor the battery discharging lights on his side panel in order to determine which battery is not receiving charging power. 3). 8 AFT BATTERY END OF LIFE Light (amber) The aft battery end of life light functions in the same manner as the forward battery end of life light (No. there is a minimum time of 6 minutes and a maximum of 14 minutes from the time the end of life lights flash on and off until they have a steady illumination. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 5 Forward Battery Discharging Light (amber) The forward battery discharging light functions in the same manner as the aft battery discharging light (No. When battery voltage decreases to 22.O. the respective light will flash at a rate of 45 (+20/-15) cycles per minute (a cycle being one complete on and off operation).5) volts at which time the lights will remain on. At this time.

O. This circuit maintains noninterruptible electrical power to the aircraft installed equipment during transfer from the ground power unit to aircraft power. a bombing navigational system receptacle. and interphone are supplied external power. Three pins take 205 volt three-phase ac power. the domelight. In addition to the gunner equipment. The other receptacle has three pins. It may be necessary to adjust external power supply frequency to accomplish the power transfer. during transfer from aircraft power to ground power. If FCS external power is applied to the FCS receptacle. 1B-52H-1-12. sheet 1 of figure 1-1) located on the right side of the fuselage adjacent to the forward wheel well just aft of the main external power receptacle. The other receptacle is for dc power and has three pins. One receptacle is for ac power and has six pins. The control circuits are interlocked such that dc power cannot be supplied unless ac power is also available. AC power is connected to the BNS circuit breaker panels through the actuation of the OAS external power switch. If external power is applied to the OAS receptacle while power is applied to the main external receptacle. The main external power receptacle is used to furnish OAS equipment power for normal preflight operation which may include inertial navi- 1-202 gation system ground alignment. Therefore. and one is for 24-volt dc external power to energize the external power control relay through the phase sequence relay. one is for ground. Power is supplied to the FCS circuit breaker panel through the actuation of the external power switch. For additional information concerning OAS system power turn on and turnoff operations. will be completely shut down before aircraft power can be turned off. Three pins take 205-volt three-phase ac power. sheet 1 of figure 1-1) located on the right side of the fuselage adjacent to the forward wheel well. refer to T. the OAS external electrical power will automatically isolate the OAS from the aircraft power system. One receptacle is for ac power and has six pins. Offensive Avionics System External Power External power for the offensive avionics system (OAS) is routed to the BNS circuit breaker panels by means of two receptacles (26. all FCS equipment will automatically be isolated from aircraft power. one for ground. The OAS. Control circuits are interlocked such that both ac and dc must be applied simultaneously. one is for 24-volt dc external power to energize the connecting relay. two take 24-volt dc for power and control and one is for ground. particularly the INS. However. and all EVS subsystems should be OFF to prevent surge damage when switching from aircraft power to external power or if aircraft power is interrupted. OAS equipment. one pin for ground and two to take 24 volt dc external power for control and power to the BNS circuit breaker panels. 1B-52H-1 EXTERNAL ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS Three external power receptacles are provided for energizing aircraft equipment from an external source: a main receptacle. radar. pulling the plug. . Main External Power The main external power (ac) is routed to the central bus tie by means of an external power receptacle (26. and a gunnery system receptacle. or energizing any aircraft generator. and the remaining pin is not used. and the remaining pin is not used. This receptacle has six pins. there is momentary interruption of electrical power which will cause damage to OAS equipment. spotlights. The external power circuit breaker relay connects the ac power to the aircraft bus and is closed through actuation of the external power switch on the copilot’s ac control panel. the external power frequency will be within 3 Hz of the aircraft power frequency as read on the aircraft frequency meter. The external power circuit breaker is closed through the open side of the generator circuit breakers. an autoparalleling circuit is incorporated. In order to eliminate momentary power interruption during ground power-to-aircraft power transfer. Three pins take 205-volt three-phase ac power. two pins are for ground. one for 24 volt dc control power to energize the connecting relays through the phase sequence relay. NOTE In order to accommodate the ground-to-aircraft power transfer. The main external power circuit breaker relay may be tripped by placing the external power switch to OFF position.O. shutting off the external power cart. Fire Control System External Power External power for the fire control system (FCS) is routed to the aft ac power box by means of a double receptacle located aft and adjacent to the right rear wheel well.T.

• • This switch is not to be used for normal training missions. 1-203 . Make certain the EXT PWR & BUS TIE ISOLATE circuit breaker on the copilot’s circuit breaker panel is in when external power is connected to the aircraft bus. power is supplied to the switch from pin E of the power cart to close the external power circuit breaker through the interlock circuits. When placed to the ON position. This will assure protective circuitry in the event of a circuit fault. In OFF position.O. The switch is provided as an emergency means of connecting external power to the aircraft bus when aircraft battery power is unavailable.-OFF spring-loaded momentary switch is located in the forward wheel well on the bottom forward end of the left dc power box.T. the external power control circuitry is returned to the normal configuration. 1B-52H-1 Battery Override Switch An ON. EXTERNAL ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS The controls and indicators associated with external power are described in figure 1-68. The external power switch on the copilot’s ac control panel should be used to trip the external power circuit breaker to disconnect external power.

T. 1B-52H-1 External Power System Controls and Indicators 1 2 MAIN EXTERNAL POWER SWITCH MAIN EXTERNAL POWER SYSTEM INDICATOR 3 OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM EXTERNAL POWER SWITCH Figure 1-68 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-204 .O.

The OFF indicator is black and has OFF marked in white across the center of the indicator. the system is deenergized and OAS external power is removed from the bus. In order to turn off external power. When the bar is at a right angle to the reference line on the ac control panel. the external power circuit breaker relay is tripped open and external power is removed from the bus. The switch is provided for controlling the main external power system.-OFF switch marked BNS EXTERNAL POWER located on the BNS ground cooling control panel at the radar navigator’s station is provided for controlling the offensive avionics system external power system. The switch receives control power from the OAS external power receptacle. and the battery switch is ON. When the bar is lined up with the reference line on the ac control panel. generator circuit breakers are open. Two positions of the tab indicator are bars and the other is OFF. When placed in ON position momentarily. feeding external power to the aircraft distribution system provided phase sequence is correct. 2 Main External Power System Indicator A three-position tab indicator located on the ac control panel provides a means of indication that the main external power circuit breaker relay is closed and main external power is on the bus. the external power circuit breaker is closed and power is on the aircraft bus.O. 3 Offensive Avionics System External Power Switch A two-position ON. the external power circuit breaker relay is closed and latched. In OFF position. When placed in OFF position momentarily. OFF position indicates the tab indicator is not receiving control power. In ON position. The bars are white and run vertically and horizontally through the center of a black indicator. the EXT PWR & BUS TIE ISOLATE circuit breaker on the copilot’s circuit breaker panel will be in. the external power circuit breaker relay is open and external power is not on the aircraft bus. the BNS control relay and BNS external power relays are energized feeding power to the OAS equipment provided phase sequence is correct.T. Figure 1-68 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-205 . 1B-52H-1 NO. CONTROLINDICATOR 1 Main External Power System Switch FUNCTION A three-position main external power switch on the ac control panel is marked ON and OFF at extreme positions respectively and is springloaded to the unmarked neutral position.

placing the external power switch to OFF. This use of essential battery power assures that with the battery switch in the ON position. INSTRUMENT INDICATIONS EXTERNAL POWER Information which can be obtained from the electrical system instruments can be correctly interpreted only if the significance of the readings is understood. Voltage Voltage is the electrical potential supplied by the batteries. 1-206 Change 12 To connect external power.O. It is necessary that the bus tie circuit breakers be closed manually. Load Four ac ammeters (figure 1-64) located on the ac control panel are provided to measure B phase ac current and to enable the copilot to compare the four indicated load values. it is an indication that the battery charging system is not operating properly. actuate the generator switches to OFF position and circuit breakers will open. . the forward and aft battery discharging lights will blink on and off at a slow rate if the batteries are 70% or more charged. It is the force which pushes current through the lines.2 (+0. Placing any operating generator switch to ON. There are no means of measurement for TR voltage. If one or both of the discharging lights do not blink. and route power throughout the aircraft. The ac voltmeter measures the effective voltage rather than the instantaneous voltage at the peak of the cycle. TR units. essential dc power will close the external power circuit breaker sending power to the central bus tie. These lights should illuminate since TR power for battery charging is not available. Control power for the main external power relays is also furnished by essential power while control power for the BNS and FCS external power relays is furnished by the respective power cart. When external power is plugged into the external receptacle and the external power switch is placed in ON position. the voltage peaks of the three phases are separated by one-third of a cycle or 120°. The battery charge test switch can be used to determine if the forward and aft batteries are 85% to 100% charged. One complete cycle is considered 360 electrical degrees and each phase reaches a voltage and a current peak in both directions once during each cycle. A check of the four circuit breaker position indicators would be sufficient to determine the correct position of the generator circuit breakers since these indicators use essential battery power. or generators. excessive loads on the battery bus will prevent the battery charging TR unit from pulsing and the battery discharging lights will not blink on and off. The battery switch should be turned ON and a check made of the battery discharging lights. Since this is a balanced three-phase system. Frequency The ac frequency meter indicates the number of voltage (and current) cycles that occur in each second. If the indicators show the circuit breakers are closed.T. A brief explanation of the meaning of the instrument readings is given in the following paragraphs. The generator circuit breakers should be open since the control circuit for external power is routed through the open side of these circuit breakers. 1B-52H-1 ELECTRICAL SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION DC SYSTEM CONTROL CIRCUITS Battery Charge Test A complete understanding of the dc relays which control the primary electrical system is a valuable aid in the efficient operation of the electrical systems. The only indication of battery voltage is through the battery end of life lights which flash on and off when voltage decreases to 22. or removing the external cord plug will remove external power from the aircraft system. When the test switch is placed in FWD AND AFT position. retract airbrakes (if extended). Current in amperes is the rate of flow of electricity. All controls that affect the starting and routing of electrical power use 24-volt dc essential battery power. If the battery discharging lights do not blink. control. by placing generator switches to OFF in order to power all units on the aircraft. However. there will always be power available to start.1) volts or below. placing the power cart switch to OFF. if open. several preliminary steps will first be accomplished.

Normally. the under-over speed switch will trip the generator circuit breaker and de-excite the field. One frequency reference unit is provided in the electrical system and operates in conjunction with the four frequency and load controllers. Each generator can be energized and placed on its main bus after its engine is started. Paralleling through the generator circuit breaker requires momentary actuation only of the generator switch to ON. Change 5 1-207 . Load indication is only shown on the ammeters. The latter is by far the more common occurrence. see MASTER ISOLATE SWITCH. It is not necessary to trip the generator switch to OFF prior to engine starting as the generator control relay is tripped automatically on engine shutdown and bus tie circuit breakers are closed. the ac system protects itself if faults or abnormal operation are experienced. Joggling of the engine speed is required if the generators do not parallel. the load should never exceed the limitation on the ammeters. All generators have an overload capacity that allows them to operate at 240 kva for 5 seconds or at 180 kva for 5 minutes. Under normal operating conditions. The frequency and load controller has two basic circuits. After the generators are on their respective bus. Parallel Operation During parallel operation. Should any generator or drive fail. Re-coupling of the drive can only be accomplished when the aircraft is on the ground with engines shut down and the CSD removed. Holding of the generator switch to ON is required only during paralleling through the bus tie circuit breaker. the load would be automatically redistributed among the remaining three generators. it is best to actuate the generator switch after all engines are started. less copilot attention is required during engine starting. Two or more generators operating in parallel will have the same frequency (speed ) and voltage. The unit will not operate unless power is on the central tie. 1B-52H-1 GENERATOR OPERATION ELECTRICAL LOADS Starting The generators are designed to carry 120 kva at a reasonable power factor.O. The latter procedure allows external power to carry the entire electrical load until all engines are operating and the flightcrew is ready to operate on aircraft power and for ground crew to disconnect external power.T. Power for frequency and load controller sensing is supplied from the generator output. The unit is supplied 400 Hz power from the central tie and in turn supplies 115-volt ac at 400 (±0. Isolated Operation For information on generator isolation.1) Hz to each frequency and load controller. Shutdown The generator may be completely shut down by use of the constant speed drive (CSD) decoupler switch without shutting down the engine. However. this section. all electrical loads are divided among the four generators. In addition. Frequency Control One frequency and load controller for each generator automatically controls the frequency through the magnetic trim head of the basic speed governor. a frequency circuit for controlling the generator frequency and a load division circuit for maintaining real load balance between paralleled generators. loss of aircraft dc voltage does not affect the ac generation system except that the copilot has no generator switch control. During normal shutdown.

6 3 3 2.7 5 5 5 4.0 19.6 RLC/B24 3 3 3 3 2.4 26.8 3.0 19.2 0.0 CPCBP/E4 Q-Spring Airscoop Anti-Ice 1 2. TR RLC/C22 RLC/C23 3 7.4 22.5 CPCBP/D12 CPCBP/D10 CPCBP/D11 FLIR Window Heater Pitot & Q-Inlet System Anti-Ice ALTITUDE COMPUTER – PITOT HEAT – LH RH FLIGHT INDICATORS – LEFT PITOT & FAIR HTR MISCELLANEOUS – RH PITOT & FAIR HTR STV Window Heater 115 AC-PHASE A – STV WINDOW HTR 115 AC-PHASE B – STV WINDOW HTR 115 AC-PHASE C – STV WINDOW HTR Window Anti-Ice ANTI-ICE – LEFT – WINDOW CONT UNITS ANTI-ICE – RIGHT – WINDOW CONTR UNITS MISCELLANEOUS – WINDOW HEAT POWER – AUX WINDOWS LEFT 1 2 LEFT 3 & 4 LEFT WINDOW HEAT POWER – AUX WINDOWS RIGHT 2 RIGHT 3 & 4 RIGHT Figure 1-69 (Sheet 1 of 16) 1-208 . TR Rt. 2 ENGINE – ANTI-ICE CONTROL – POD 3 POD 4 3 3 0.2 Rt.6 LLC/D29 5 2.5 26.O.3 0.7 EVS/E2 EVS/F3 EVS/J3 3 2.2 PCBP/C12 PCBP/C13 3 2.T.5 PCBP/D6 5 6. 1 NO.7 2.7 2.5 PCBP/E5 PCBP/E1 PCBP/E2 PCBP/E3 5 5 5 2.4 Stabilizer Screw Heat (2) 1 1.3 Left TR Left TR LLC/D32 LLC/D33 5 5 0. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE ANTI-ICING SYSTEMS Engine and Nacelle Anti-Icing ANTI-ICE – POD CONTROL – NO.

O.7 0.7 0. TR LLC/F29 5.5 28.7 LLC/D14 LLC/D15 LLC/D16 Fwd Batt. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS Autopilot Power and Control AUTOPILOT – AC POWER 3 Stability Augmentation System 3 FLIGHT CONTROLS – PITCH SAS – AC 1 AC 2 AC 3 FLIGHT CONTROLS – YAW SAS – AC 1 AC 2 AC 3 5.5 28.6 Fwd.T. 2. 2.8 1.8 RLC/D24 RLC/D25 RLC/D26 9.8 3 3 3 0.0 5 5 5 1.0 ABNS/A26 ABNS/A25 Fwd Batt.4 PCBP/E21 Interphone System Main Power MISCELLANEOUS – MAIN INPH PWR Liaison Radio (AN/ARC-190(V)) Emer Batt.7 0.8 1. 1 21.0 ABNS/B26 ABNS/B25 0.7 LLC/D17 LLC/D18 LLC/D19 3 3 3 0.1 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 2 of 16) 1-209 .7 0.8 RLC/A29 BOMBING SYSTEM Aft Weapon BOMB SYSTEM – AFT ALT WEAPON – IFC T-249 TESTER PANEL LIGHTS 3 Forward Weapon BOMB SYSTEM – FWD ALT WEAPON – IFC T-249 TESTER PANEL LIGHTS 3 CG/FLAS Key Lights and Rocker Switch Power INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT INST 5 COMMUNICATION AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT AFSATCOM System MISCELLANEOUS – AFSATCOM R-T  A AFSATCOM R-T  B AFSATCOM R-T  C 10.

5 0.2 ECM/P2 1 1.5 0.0 LLC/C28 KY-100 DU Right TR 7.T. & 4) (4) 1 3. TR System 16 Heater 5 15.0 Rt.5 LLC/C27 LLC/C26 DAMA DU Left TR 5.0 Left TR Chaff Dispensers (No. 1.4 Chaff Dispensers (No. TR ECM Systems Miscellaneous CLOCK System 15 Pressure Pump Left TR 0.8 Aft TR 3 15.3.6. TR FLARE EJECTOR POWER 5 2.7. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE COMMUNICATION AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT (Cont) Miniature Receive Terminal (AN/ARR-85(V) MINITR REC TERM – CONT DC MINITR REC TERM – PTR AC MINITR REC TERM – RCVR  A RCVR  B RCVR  C 2.4 3 0.2.5 0. 5.3 Rt.5 RLC/E33 DEFENSIVE SYSTEMS Blanking System System 15 Heater 1 15.2 ECM Test Receptacles MISCELLANEOUS – NOSE ECM TEST RECP – AC LLC/C32 Expendable Countermeasures Systems Figure 1-69 (Sheet 3 of 16) 1-210 Change 17 ECM/O2 .5 AUXBNS/D10 AUXBNS/D11 AUXBNS/D12 V/UHF Radio (AN/ARC-210(V) MISCELLANEOUS – ARC-210 – HPA POWER Left TR Left TR 25 7.O.4 Left TR AUXBNS/D8 AUXBNS/D9 3 3 3 0. & 8) (4) 7 3.3 Rt.

3 ECM/G2 12.0 System 16 (AN/ALQ-172) 7 26.4 Aft TR System 11 & 12 (AN/ALT-32) (2) 7 42.0 System 20 (AN/ALT-32L) 3 20.4 Aft TR RLC/D20 RLC/E20 RLC/F20 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 4 of 16) Change 20 1-211 .8 Aft TR System 13 & 14 (AN/ALQ-155(V)) (2) 7 51.3 Left TR System 9 (AN/ALQ-122/AN/ALT-16A) 1 27.2 1.3 Rt. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE DEFENSIVE SYSTEMS (Cont) Receiver Systems AN/ALR-20A Search Receiver AN/ALR-20 AC  A AN/ALR-20 AC  B AN/ALR-20 AC  C 5 5 5 4.2 System 1 & 2 (AN/ALQ-155(V)) (2) 3 51.5 1.3 Aft TR System 15 (AN/ALQ-172) 5 26.3 Left TR System 3 & 5 (AN/ALQ-155(V)) (2) 3 51.6 MISCELLANEOUS – ECM PMS  A MISCELLANEOUS – ECM PMS  B MISCELLANEOUS – ECM PMS  C 5 5 5 1. TR System 21 (AN/ALQ-122/AN/ALT-16A) 7 27.9 Rt.0 ECM/S2 Receiver-Transmitter Systems CH ALQ-172(V) CDU DT Left TR CM Set (AN/ALQ-153(V)) 3 16.5 ECM/P1 ECM/Q1 ECM/R1 Sensor Integration Systems SI DISPLAY AC 5 1.0 ECM/I2 Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) WARNING RCVR AC 5 3.5 1.2 1.3 Left TR System 4 & 6 (AN/ALQ-155(V)) (2) 5 51.T. TR System 7 & 8 (AN/ALQ-155(V)) (2) 3 51.5 1.O.

2 0.9 0. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM Battery Chargers Aft Battery Charger 5 7.5 PCBP/D9 Power Feeders POWER FEEDERS – PHASE A – RH 28V TRANS 5 0.4 0.4 RLC/B13 RLC/B14 RLC/B15 RLC/B16 5 0. 5.2 LLC/B7 5 5 5 5 0.9 EVS/K3 EVS/N2 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 5 of 16) 1-212 .4 0.2 Forward Battery Charger 3 6.T.8 RLC/E1 5 0.4 0.9 EVS Monitor and Display Systems Monitor Power 115V AC-PHASE A – MONITOR COPILOT MONITOR PILOT 115V AC-PHASE C – MONITOR NAV MONITOR RADAR NAV 3 5 0.2 EVS/A4 EVS/E3 5 3 0.1 RLC/C16 ENGINES EPR Gages ENGINE – PRESSURE RATIO IND – POD 1 POD 2 POD 3 POD 4 Fuel Flow Indicators FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – FLOW IND AC Oil Temperature Indicator ENGINE – OIL TEMP INDICATION EVS EVS Complete System Load 35.7 RLC/A32 POWER FEEDERS – PHASE B – PILOT 28V AC PWR 3 1.9 Flight Gyro Emergency Inverter FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS – EMER INVTR Emer.O. Inst.

2 EVS/O1 EVS/N3 3 3 3 0.4 EVS/B3 EVS/D3 3 3 0.2 EVS/M3 EVS/N1 5 4.1 0.5 EVS/B2 5 1.1 EVS/A3 EVS/D3 5 3 0.2 0.3 EVS/A1 EVS/F1 EVS/J1 3 5 0.2 0.2 EVS/A2 5 7.4 EVS/J2 Symbol Generator 115V AC-PHASE A – SYMBOL GEN 115V AC-PHASE B – SYMBOL GEN 115V AC-PHASE C – SYMBOL GEN VDU Power 115V AC-PHASE A – VDU COPILOT/TA/SSG VDU PILOT/STV 115V AC-PHASE C – VDU NAV/PRI SYNC VDU R NAV/ALT SYNC/FLIR EVS Turret Window Wash System Pump Power 115V AC-PHASE A – WINDOW WASH PUMP 115V AC-PHASE B – WINDOW WASH PUMP 115V AC-PHASE C – WINDOW WASH PUMP Tank Heater Power 115V AC-PHASE A – WINDOW WASH TANK HTR 115V AC-PHASE B – WINDOW WASH TANK HTR 115V AC-PHASE C – WINDOW WASH TANK HTR Figure 1-69 (Sheet 6 of 16) 1-213 .4 EVS/F2 5 7.2 0.3 0.8 0.3 EVS/K2 5 19.3 EVS/G2 5 1. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE EVS (Cont) EVS Monitor and Display Systems (Cont) SCU Power 115V AC-PHASE A – SCU COPILOT/FLIR SCU PILOT/STV 115V AC-PHASE C – SCU-FLIR SCU-STV 3 3 0.O.T.

0 EVS/D2 EVS/I2 EVS/M2 5 5 5 4.2 5.T.2 EVS/B1 EVS/G1 EVS/K1 3 3 3 17.0 4.6 Environmental Heater Power 115V AC-PHASE A – FLIR ENV HTR 115V AC-PHASE B – FLIR ENV HTR 115V AC-PHASE C – FLIR ENV HTR Fan Power 115V AC-PHASE A – FLIR ENV FAN 115V AC-PHASE B – FLIR ENV FAN 115V AC-PHASE C – FLIR ENV FAN Window Heater Power Steerable TV System Control and Main Power 115V AC-PHASE C – STV DC POWER – POWER – STV 5 1.8 8.O.5 1.4 EVS/C2 EVS/H2 EVS/L2 5 5 5 1.7 2.4 3.8 EVS/L3 EVS/S2 5 5 5 5.2 8.2 EVS/C1 EVS/H1 EVS/L1 3 3 3 6.0 1.7 EVS/E2 EVS/F3 EVS/J3 Left TR Environmental Heater Power 115V AC-PHASE A – STV ENV HTR 115V AC-PHASE B – STV ENV HTR 115V AC-PHASE C – STV ENV HTR Fan Power 115V AC-PHASE A – STV ENV FAN 115V AC-PHASE B – STV ENV FAN 115V AC-PHASE C – STV ENV FAN Window Heater Power 115V AC-PHASE A – STV WINDOW HTR 115V AC-PHASE B – STV WINDOW HTR 115V AC-PHASE C – STV WINDOW HTR Figure 1-69 (Sheet 7 of 16) 1-214 .4 0.7 2.9 3.9 4. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE EVS (Cont) Forward Looking Infrared System Control and Main Power 115V AC-PHASE A – FLIR 115V AC-PHASE B – FLIR 115V AC-PHASE C – FLIR 3 3 3 9 5.0 EVS/D1 EVS/I1 EVS/M1 3 7.

PCBP/E12 PCBP/E13 1 7 53.0 53.5 PCBP/D9 3 3 3 0. Emer.T.9 FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM Pilot’s Emergency Attitude Data Source (MD-1) Power FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS EMER INV Emer.2 0. 5.7 PCBP/D8 0.2 AUXBNS/D1 AUXBNS/D2 AUXBNS/D3 3 0.2 2.2 Emer. Figure 1-69 (Sheet 8 of 16) 1-215 .0 Left TR Rt. Batt.2 PCBP/D3 Pilot’s Normal Source (AHRS) Attitude Data Source Power OAS NAV – AHRS – A B C Horizontal Situation Indicators (HSI) FLIGHT INDICATORS – RADIO NAV IND – AC Pilot’s Rate of Turn Gyro FLIGHT INDICATORS – RATE OF TURN Emer. TR PCBP/E6 PCBP/E7 3 1.2 0. Batt. Inst.O. Inst. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM Airbrakes Control MISCELLANEOUS – AIR BRAKE CONTR – INBD OUTBD 2. TR PCBP/E9 1.5 Flap Position Control MISCELLANEOUS – WING FLAPS – CONTROL – LEFT CONTROL – RIGHT Lateral Trim Actuator MISCELLANEOUS – LATERAL TRIM ACTUATOR Stabilizer Trim 1 Fwd.

2 8.2 8. TR Left TR LLC/C20 RLC/C5 LLC/C21 LLC/C18 RLC/C2 RLC/C1 LLC/C17 RLC/C3 RLC/C4 LLC/C19 RLC/B1 LLC/B12 RLC/B2 1 3 1 8. TR RLC/E8 RLC/E9 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0.2 8.1 0.O.2 8. TR Rt. TR Left TR Rt.2 8.1 0.1 0.2 8.6 Rt. TR RLC/B12 LLC/B21 RLC/B11 5 1 1. TR Left TR Rt.2 8.1 0.1 CPCBP/B1 CPCBP/B2 CPCBP/B5 CPCBP/B4 CPCBP/B3 Fuel-In-Manifold Lights FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD – FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – CABIN MAIN Fuel Quantity Gages FUEL QUANTITY INDICATORS – AFT BODY CTR WING FWD BODY MID BODY 1 2 3 4 FUEL QTY IND – LEFT EXT LEFT OUTBD RIGHT EXT RIGHT OUTBD TOTAL Figure 1-69 (Sheet 9 of 16) 1-216 .2 8.2 8. TR 7 7 5 8.1 0.T.2 Left TR Rt.2 Rt.2 Rt. TR Left TR Rt.1 0.1 CPCBP/A7 CPCBP/A5 CPCBP/A4 CPCBP/A6 CPCBP/A1 CPCBP/A2 CPCBP/A8 CPCBP/A9 5 5 5 5 5 0.2 8.6 1.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3 7 1 1 7 3 5 5 7 1 8. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM Aux Tank Fuel Flow Control & Boost Pumps (16) FUEL PUMP CONTROL – BODY TANKS – AFT 30 AFT 31 AFT 32 CTR 25 CTR WING 26 FWD 23 FWD 24 MID 27 MID 28 MID 29 FUEL PUMP CONTROL – LEFT WING TANKS – EXT 1 OUTBD 2 OUTBD 3 RIGHT WING TANKS – EXT 22 OUTBD 20 OUTBD 21 14.1 0. TR Left TR Left TR Rt. TR Rt. TR Rt.

0 Standby Hydraulic Pumps HYDRAULIC PACKAGE – STANDBY PUMP CONTROL – LH BODY LH OUTBD RH BODY RH OUTBD . 2 8 9 10 11 RIGHT WING TANKS – NO.9 4.T.2 3. TR Rt. TR LLC/B17 LLC/B18 RLC/B7 RLC/B8 3 5 1 7 4.2 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 10 of 16) 1-217 .2 12.TR PCBP/C8 PCBP/C9 Left TR Left TR Rt.2 12.2 3.3 Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic Pumps RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM – PUMP CONTROL – NO.9 3.0 FUEL PUMP CONTROL – LEFT WING TANKS – NO. 82.1 NO.2 Rt. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM (Cont) Main Tank Boost Pumps (16) 6.9 3. TR Left TR Left TR RLC/B3 RLC/B4 LLC/B13 LLC/B14 4. TR Rt. TR LLC/B19 LLC/B20 RLC/B9 RLC/B10 Left TR Rt. 4 16 17 18 19 Rt. 3 1 1 7 12.2 12. TR Rt.2 3.2 82. 1 4 5 6 7 LEFT WING TANKS – NO. TR Left TR Left TR RLC/B5 RLC/B6 LLC/B15 LLC/B16 3 5 1 7 4. 3 12 13 14 15 RIGHT WING TANKS – NO.9 1 7 3 5 HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM Hydraulic Ground Cooler 1 28. TR Rt.2 1 7 Standby Hydraulic Pumps (Starting Load) 21. 2 .9 Left TR Left TR Rt. TR PCBP/C5 PCBP/C4 PCBP/C6 PCBP/C7 1 7 3 5 3. TR Rt.9 Left TR Left TR Rt.O.

Inst.3 LLC/C31 Emer.O. Inst.5 PCBP/D9 0.5 Rt.T.2 AUXBNS/D1 AUXBNS/D2 AUXBNS/D3 3 0.1 3 2.2 0.4 AUXBNS/D5 0. TR RLC/F7 7 1.2 0.1 PCBP/D10 Emer.4 Crosswind Landing and Taxi Light Control LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – TAXI & CROSS WIND CONTROL Landing Lights Navigation Lights LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – NAV PWR Figure 1-69 (Sheet 11 of 16) 1-218 LLC/F12 . LANDING GEAR SYSTEM Antiskid Control 1. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE INSTRUMENTS Attitude Heading Reference System OAS NAV – AHRS – A B C 3 3 3 0. 5. Inst.5 LIGHTING EQUIPMENT Exterior Lighting Air Refueling Slipway Doors and Wing Illumination Lights AERIAL REFUELING – EXT LIGHT 5 1.4 PCBP/D5 Altitude Computer and Pilots’ Altimeters in Servo Mode MISCELLANEOUS – ALT CMPTR C-2A Heading Indicator (Emergency Power) FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS DIR IND C-2 FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS EMER INV Radar Altimeter OAS NAV – RDR ALTM 3 Standby Attitude Indicator FLIGHT INDICATORS – STANDBY ATTITUDE Emer.9 Left TR LLC/F16 1&7 10. 1.

3 LLC/E20 5 5 0.O.2 RLC/A27 3 0.4 ECM/A1 ECM/A3 3 0.6 RLC/A29 LLC/E17 Dome Lights (Nav Station) MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – DOME OAS Dome Lights (Pilots’ Station) INTERIOR LIGHTING – PILOT & COPILOT DOME Essential Flt Inst.3 ECM/B1 ECM/B3 3 0.3 0. Lights (With complete AC power failure) – Pilot’s ADI Lights LIGHTING – INTERIOR – EMER INSTR LTS CONT Flood Lights (EWO. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE LIGHTING EQUIPMENT (Cont) Exterior Lighting (Cont) Terrain Clearance Light Operation LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – TERRAIN CLEARANCE CONTROL Wing Taxi Light 3 2.T.5 0.2 ABNS/A8 5 3 0.4 0. DI. and Gunner) DECM LTS – FLOOD FCS LTS – FLOOD Flood Lights (Nav Station) MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – OAS FLOOD Flood Lights (Pilots’ Station) INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOTS FLOOD PILOT FLOOD Instrument Lights (Pilots’ Station) (Including Standby Compass Light) INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT INST LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PILOT INST Figure 1-69 (Sheet 12 of 16) 1-219 .3 RLC/A25 LLC/E19 5 3 0.8 1.8 ABNS/A5 5 1.5 Interior Lighting (Total Load) LLC/F15 31. and Gunner) DECM LTS – DOME FCS LTS – DOME 5 5 0.0 Dome Lights (EWO.0 5 2. DI.

8 Camera Blower 1 2.O.0 ECM/C1 5 3 0.2 CPCBP/E2 5 5.2 5. TR ABNS/B2 .9 RLC/D16 RLC/F15 ABNS/B6 Panel Lights (EWO) DECM LTS – PNL Panel Lights (Pilots’ Station) INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT PANEL LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PILOT PANEL MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT Electronic Clocks CLOCK Left TR Food Warming Oven MISCELLANEOUS – FOOD WARMING OVEN Hot Cups MISCELLANEOUS – HOT CUP ECM & FCS HOT CUP PILOT & COPILOT HOT CUP Vertical (Strike) Camera 3.4 MISSILE SYSTEM AGM-86B (Load per Missile) 23.2 Left or Right Pylon (Without Missile) 1.3 RLC/A28 LLC/E18 0.7 RLC/E19 5 5 3 5.0 CAMERA – DOOR CONTR 1 1.4 ECM/C3 5 2.7 5. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE LIGHTING EQUIPMENT (Cont) Interior Lighting (Cont) Panel Lights (DI and Gunner) FCS LTS – PNL 5 0.9 1.2 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 13 of 16) 1-220 Change 18 Rt.8 Missile Interface Unit Bay (Without Missile) 1.T.5 Camera Heaters (8) 1 1.

3/[AMI].T.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.3 2.3 AUXBNS/E12 AUXBNS/F12 AUXBNS/G12 AUXBNS/E11 AUXBNS/F11 AUXBNS/G11 3 1.5 2.2 AUXBNS/E2 3 1.3/[AMI].3/[AMI].5 2.2 Left TR LLC/B32 OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM (OAS) Computational Subsystem Less [AMI] Processor Power (Combined total load for all 3 processors) [AMI] Processor Power (Combined total load for both processors) OAS COMPUTATIONAL – PROCESSOR NO.2 AUXBNS/E3 Controls and Displays Subsystem Display Electronics Unit CONTROLS AND DISPLAYS – DEU AC NO.5 AUXBNS/E8 AUXBNS/F8 AUXBNS/G8 AUXBNS/E7 AUXBNS/F7 AUXBNS/G7 PROCESSOR NO.3/[AMI].3/[AMI].3/[AMI].9 3 3.3/[AMI].2 AUXBNS/G4 3 1.5 2. 1 ALT PWR  A ALT PWR  B ALT PWR  C NORM PWR  A NORM PWR  B NORM PWR  C 7.3 2.3/[AMI].5 AUXBNS/E10 AUXBNS/F10 AUXBNS/G10 AUXBNS/E9 AUXBNS/F9 AUXBNS/G9 Less [AMI] PROCESSOR NO.0 1.3/[AMI].3/[AMI].5 5 5 5 3 3 3 2.3 2.7 AUXBNS/E1 3 1.3 LFBNS/A17 3&5 64. 3 ALT PWR  A ALT PWR  B ALT PWR  C NORM PWR  A NORM PWR  B NORM PWR  C 5 5 5 3 3 3 2. 1 OAS Master Power Switch (AC) Radar Scan Converter OAS NAV – RDR SCAN CONV Interface Subsystem Armament Interface Unit (AIU) OAS INTERFACE – ARMT IU – ALT AC EVS Interface Unit (EIU) OAS INTERFACE – EVS IU – AC Radar Interface Unit (RIU) OAS INTERFACE – RDR IU – AC Figure 1-69 (Sheet 14 of 16) Change 21 1-221 . 2 ALT PWR  A ALT PWR  B ALT PWR  C NORM PWR  A NORM PWR  B NORM PWR  C 3 3 3 5 5 5 2.5 2.5 2.O.3/[AMI].3/[AMI]. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT TACAN Receiver (AN/ARN-118(V)) MISCELLANEOUS – AN/ARN-118(V) – DC 3 2.3 2.3 2.5 2.

0 3.5 3 1.8 LFBNS/B1 LFBNS/B2 LFBNS/B3 LFBNS/B7 LFBNS/B8 LFBNS/B9 LFBNS/B4 LFBNS/B5 LFBNS/B6 LFBNS/B10 RTSV/H2 RLC/F29 Right TR Right TR Aft Batt INS No.0 3.1 INS DC B/U POWER 3 Fwd Batt 0.5 LFBNS/A1 RLC/F29 Aft Batt 0.2 INS AC PWR NO.O.4 INS No.7 1.1 INS AC PWR NO. 2 NO.7 1. 1 NO.0 13.7 1.5 Global Positioning System 1.5 LFBNS/B4 LLC/F6 0.8 LFBNS/A1 LFBNS/A2 LFBNS/A3 LFBNS/A7 LFBNS/A8 LFBNS/A9 LFBNS/A4 LFBNS/A5 LFBNS/A6 LFBNS/A10 RTSV/A1 LLC/F6 1. 1 INS – AC PWR  A AC PWR  B AC PWR  C FAN  A FAN  B FAN  C HEATER  A HEATER  B HEATER  C COOL DC ALT PWR AFT BATTERY POWER – RSPA PWR 24V IEU 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.7 2. 2 NO.5 Less [AMI] INS Sets (2) (Total Load) 16. 1 NO.7 2. 2 INS – AC PWR  A AC PWR  B AC PWR  C FAN  A FAN  B FAN  C HEATER  A HEATER  B HEATER  C COOL DC ALT PWR FWD BATTERY POWER – RSPA PWR 24V IEU 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Right TR Right TR Fwd Batt [AMI] INS Sets (2) (Total Load) 1.1 4.1 4.T. 1B-52H-1 Equipment Power Source and Electrical Loads Chart (Cont) POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM (OAS) (Cont) Navigational Subsystem Doppler Radar OAS NAV – DOPPLER RDR 1.7 4.7 AUXBNS/D4 INS No.4 AUXBNS/D5 INS No.7 1.2 INS DC B/U POWER 5 Radar Altimeter OAS NAV – RDR ALTM 3 Figure 1-69 (Sheet 15 of 16) 1-222 Change 21 .0 13.1 4.1 16.1 16.1 4.7 4.

The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.5 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list.1 PCBP/E14 6.5 AUXBNS/C7 Radar Pressurization RDR PRESS – AC Radar Transponder (AN/APN-69) 5. TR Rt. The figures (amps) listed in the load column are to be used as a relative guide in determining high load items.6 5 1 Rt. Figure 1-69 (Sheet 16 of 16 ) Change 21 1-223 . since multiple generators share loads and ammeters reflect phase B load only. ABNS AUXBNS CPCBP ECM EVS LFBNS AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL EVS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LLC PCBP RFBNS RLC RTSV LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT S/V FILTER BOX NOTE The following points are emphasized to enable the crewmember to better use this chart.0 RLC/C27 PNEUMATICS Air Bleed System CABIN AIR CONDITIONING – BLEED VALVES – STRUT NO.T. 3 & BODY XOVER 5 REFUELING SYSTEM Fuel-In-Manifold Lights FUEL MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD FUEL SCAVENGE CONTROL – CABIN MAIN 1.6 1.8 AUXBNS/C1 AUXBNS/C2 AUXBNS/C3 3 6. 1B-52H-1 POWER SOURCE EQUIPMENT/ CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE AC BUS DC BUS UNIT LOAD (AMPS) CONTROL SOURCE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR 11 CODE OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM (OAS) (Cont) Strategic Radar Subsystem 11.6 Cooling Blowers RADOME GROUND COOL – BLOWER  A BLOWER  B BLOWER  C 3 3 3 4.O. • • • All items in capital letters are actual labels on circuit breaker panels in the pressurized crew compartment.6 OXYGEN SYSTEM Oxygen Quantity Indicator OXY QTY IND 3 0.8 4.8 4. TR RLC/E8 RLC/E9 WHEEL BRAKE SYSTEM Antiskid Control 11 1. Consider the immediate mission priorities when reducing loads in an emergency situation. The actual drop on generator ammeter gages will not necessarily be the amperage shown in this figure. Load analysis data is presented as a consolidated grouping when relation to an individual circuit breaker is not practical.

O. 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels Figure 1-70 (Sheet 1 of 15) 1-224 .T.

5 GENERATOR POWER BOX 14 ENG NO.T. 1B-52H-1 1 PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (PCBP) 2 COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (CPCBP) 3 RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL (RLC) CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL 4 LEFT LOAD CENTRAL (LLC) CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL 5 RIGHT FORWARD BNS (RFBNS) CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL 6 LEFT FORWARD BNS (LFBNS) CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL 7 EVS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (EVS) 8 AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (ABNS) 9 LEFT LOAD CENTRAL FUSE INSTALLATION 10 AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (AUXBNS) 11 ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (ECM) 12 ENG NO. 7 GENERATOR POWER BOX 15 STATION 694 POWER PANEL 16 AFT AC POWER BOX 17 SECTION 47 OR AFT DC POWER BOX 18 FCS POWER BOX 19 AFT ECM POWER BOX 20 ENG NO.O. 3 GENERATOR POWER BOX 13 ENG NO. 1 GENERATOR POWER BOX 21 AGM-69A BATTERY POWER BOX 22 MISSILE POWER DISTRIBUTION BOX 23 AFT BATTERY POWER BOX 24 LEFT FORWARD DC POWER BOX 25 RIGHT FORWARD DC POWER BOX 26 RIGHT SV FILTER BOX CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RTSV) DENOTES READILY ACCESSIBLE PANELS Figure 1-70 (Sheet 2 of 15) 1-225 .

1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only.T. aircraft does not have these markings.O. 1 PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (PCBP) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 3 of 15) 1-226 .

T. aircraft does not have these markings.O. 1B-52H-1 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 2 COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (CPCBP) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 4 of 15) Change 18 1-227 .

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 2 Power for flight loads data recorder (some airplanes). aircraft does not have these markings. 3 Less [AMI] RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RLC) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 5 of 15) 1-228 Change 21 .

1B-52H-1 Figure 1-70 (Sheet 6 of 15) Change 20 1-229 .T.O.

T. 3 [AMI] RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RLC) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 6A of 15) 1-230 Change 21 . aircraft does not have these markings. 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 2 Power for flight loads data recorder (some airplanes).O.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Figure 1-70 (Sheet 6B of 15) Change 21 1-230A .

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 4 Less [AMI] LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (LLC) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 7 of 15) 1-230B Change 21 . aircraft does not have these markings.

T. 1B-52H-1 Figure 1-70 (Sheet 8 of 15) Change 20 1-231 .O.

1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 4 [AMI] LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (LLC) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 8A of 15) 1-232 Change 21 .O. aircraft does not have these markings.T.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Figure 1-70 (Sheet 8B of 15) Change 21 1-232A .

aircraft does not have these markings.T. 6 Less [AMI] LEFT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (LFBNS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 9 of 15) 1-232B Change 21 . 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 5 RIGHT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RFBNS) (TYPICAL) 1 Locator code system is for reference only.O.

T. aircraft does not have these markings. 1B-52H-1 5 RIGHT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RFBNS) (TYPICAL) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 6 [AMI] LEFT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (LFBNS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 9A of 15) Change 21 1-232C/(1-232D blank) .O.

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7 EVS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (EVS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 10 of 15) Change 21 1-233 . aircraft does not have these markings.O. 1B-52H-1 1 Locator code system is for reference only.T.

T. 8 AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (ABNS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 11 of 15) 1-234 Change 10 . 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. aircraft does not have these markings.O.

1B-52H-1 1 Locator code system is for reference only.O. 10 Less [AMI] AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (AUXBNS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 12 of 15) Change 21 1-234A/(1-234B blank) .T. aircraft does not have these markings.

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O. 10 [AMI] AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (AUXBNS) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 12A of 15) Change 21 1-235 . 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only.T. aircraft does not have these markings.

1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 2 These circuit breakers have been deactivated.T.O. aircraft does not have these markings. 11 ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (ECM) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 13 of 15) 1-236 .

T. 1B-52H-1 11 ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (ECM) (TYPICAL) (Cont) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 14 of 15) Change 20 1-237 .O.

aircraft does not have these markings. aircraft does not have these markings.T. 1 Locator code system is for reference only. 1B-52H-1 Circuit Breaker Panels (Cont) Less [AMI] 1 [AMI] Locator code system is for reference only. 26 RIGHT S/V FILTER BOX CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL (RTSV) (TYPICAL) Figure 1-70 (Sheet 15 of 15) 1-238 Change 21 .O.

ESS CP Left ESS CP Rt. ESS Emergency Battery Power and Control and Emergency DC Power Switch POWER FEEDERS – FWD BATTERY POWER – EMER BUS CONT EMER INSTR BUS CONT R EMER INSTR PWR R EMER PWR RLC/F25 RLC/F34 RLC/F33 RLC/F32 Fwd Batt Fwd Batt Fwd Batt Fwd Batt POWER FEEDERS – LEFT ESSENTIAL DC POWER – LEFT EMER INSTR PWR LLC/E6 Left ESS Flight Gyro Emergency Power Inverter FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS – EMER INVTR PCBP/D9 Emer. ESS CP Left ESS Bus Tie Master Isolate Switch.T. ESS Generator Drive Decoupler Switches ENGINE – GEN DRIVE DECOUPLE RLC/C19 Rt. TR POWER FEEDERS – PHASE A – COPILOT DEFENSE LEFT 28V TRANS PILOT RH 28V TRANS RLC/A34 RLC/A33 LLC/A6 LLC/A3 RLC/A32 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 5 Bus Tie Breaker Position Indicators Power Feeders – AC Phase A Figure 1-71 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-239 . Bus Generator Controls and Switches. Inst. and Main External Power System Indicator AC GENERATOR CONTROL – EXT PWR & BUS TIE ISOLATE CPCBP/C6 CP Rt. and Generator Drive Overheat Lights AC GENERATOR CONTROL – ENG NO. ESS CP Rt. 1B-52H-1 Electrical Power System Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Battery Discharge Indicator Light CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE POWER FEEDERS – DC RIGHT ESSENTIAL DC POWER – BATT DISCHG IND LIGHT RLC/E27 Fwd Batt AC GENERATOR CONTROL – BUS TIE CKT BKR POSITION IND – INBD OUTBD CPCBP/C4 CPCBP/C5 CP Rt. 1 GEN ENG NO. 5 GEN ENG NO.O. 3 GEN ENG NO. Generator Breaker Position Indicators. Main External Power Switch and Control Circuits. 7 GEN GEN TRIP IND BOX CPCBP/C1 CPCBP/C2 CPCBP/C7 CPCBP/C8 CPCBP/C11 CP Left ESS CP Rt.

O. 1B-52H-1 Electrical Power System Circuit Protection and Location (Cont) EQUIPMENT Power Feeders – AC Phase B Power Feeders – AC Phase C Power Feeders – DC Aft Battery Power Feeders – DC Forward Battery Power Feeders – DC Left Essential DC Power Power Feeders – DC Left TR Power CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE POWER SOURCE POWER FEEDERS – PHASE B – AHRS SYNC BNS 28V AC PWR COPILOT DEFENSE PILOT 28V AC PWR PILOT LLC/B2 LLC/B6 RLC/B34 RLC/B33 LLC/B7 LLC/B3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 POWER FEEDERS – PHASE C – DEFENSE PILOT RLC/C33 LLC/C3 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 POWER FEEDERS – AFT BATTERY POWER – BNS EMER L ESS DC BATT CONT L ESS DC BATT PWR PILOT LLC/F1 LLC/F3 LLC/F4 LLC/F5 LLC/F2 Aft Batt Aft Batt Aft Batt Aft Batt Aft Batt POWER FEEDERS – FWD BATTERY POWER – BNS PILOT R ESS CONTR R ESS PWR RLC/F28 RLC/F31 RLC/F26 RLC/F27 Fwd Batt Fwd Batt Fwd Batt Fwd Batt POWER FEEDERS – LEFT ESSENTIAL DC POWER – BNS PILOT TR LLC/E3 LLC/E2 LLC/E1 Left ESS Left ESS Left ESS POWER FEEDERS – DC LEFT TR POWER – BNS BNS STA PILOT LLC/D3 LLC/D4 LLC/D5 Left TR Left TR Left TR Figure 1-71 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-240 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 .T.

1B-52H-1 EQUIPMENT Power Feeders – DC Right Essential DC Power Power Feeders – DC Right TR Power 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE POWER FEEDERS – DC RIGHT ESSENTIAL DC POWER – R ESS BNS R ESS PILOT RLC/E28 RLC/E29 Rt. ESS Rt. TR Rt.T. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. CPCBP LLC COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RLC PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-71 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-241/(1-242 blank) . TR The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. ESS POWER FEEDERS – DC RIGHT TR POWER – BNS COPILOT DECM PILOT R ESS BUS RLC/D30 RLC/D28 RLC/D31 RLC/D29 RLC/D32 Rt. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.O. TR Rt. TR Rt. TR Rt.

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Anticollision Lights Three rotating anticollision lights. Change 4 1-243 . A crosswind taxi light (18 figure 1-71A) is installed on the right forward landing gear. The landing lights will not illuminate after the landing gear has been retracted. and three white lights.O. In addition. The lights illuminate the receptacle. crosswind landing light. nacelles. 13 figure 1-71A). Taxi Lights Three taxi lights and the crosswind landing light provide lighting for taxi operation. two on top of the fuselage (11. 14 figure 1-71A) and one on the bottom just forward of the empennage (15 figure 1-71A). In addition. Exterior lighting controls are described in figure 1-72. and spoilers. The lights utilize 28 volt ac power reduced from 118 volts ac by autotransformers. Navigational Lights The navigational lights consist of a red light on the left wingtip (16 figure 1-71A). Terrain Clearance Light A retractable terrain clearance light (19 figure 1-71A) installed on the forward bottom fuselage will provide illumination during a night crash landing. the lights aid the tanker boom operator in checking the receiver aircraft. air refueling lights. a green light on the right wingtip (7 figure 1-71A). taxi lights. are used to safeguard against midair collision. navigation lights. and wing areas during night air refueling operations. It will not illuminate unless the landing gear lever is in DOWN position. one on top of the fuselage (9 figure 1-71A) and one on each side above the bomb bay doors (8. The lights in the slipway doors may be used for scanning the wing leading edges. Crosswind Landing Light A crosswind landing light (4. 20 figure 1-71A) for use during approach and landing. slipway. anticollision lights. struts. Landing Lights A fixed landing light is installed in each forward landing gear door (5. 17 figure 1-71A). and a signal light. one installed in the receptacle (3 figure 1-71A) and two in each slipway door (1.T. two white lights on each tip of the horizontal stabilizer (12. the light may also be used for night takeoff and landings. terrain clearance light. 1B-52H-1 LIGHTING EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION EXTERIOR LIGHTING INTERIOR LIGHTING 1-243 1-243 1-244B DESCRIPTION Lighting equipment circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-75. Air Refueling Lights Air refueling lights consist of five white lights. EXTERIOR LIGHTING Exterior lighting (figure 1-71A) consists of landing lights. 2 figure 1-71A). 10 figure 1-71A). figure 1-71A) is installed on the right forward landing gear to provide lighting on the landing area during crosswind landings. One light is installed on the leading edge of each wing just outboard of the outboard pods (6.

1B-52H-1 Exterior Lighting Locations 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 LEFT AND RIGHT SLIPWAY DOOR LIGHTS LEFT AND RIGHT WING ILLUMINATION LIGHTS IFR RECEPTACLE LIGHT CROSWIND LANDING LIGHT RIGHT LANDING LIGHT RIGHT TAXI LIGHT RIGHT WING TIP LIGHT RIGHT BODY NAVIGATION LIGHT TOP BODY NAVIGATION LIGHT LEFT BODY NAVIGATION LIGHT RIGHT UPPER ANTICOLLISION LIGHT RIGHT LOWER AND UPPER TAILLIGHTS LEFT LOWER AND UPPER TAILLIGHTS LEFT UPPER ANTICOLLISION LIGHT LOWER ANTICOLLISION LIGHT LEFT WING TIP LIGHT LEFT TAXI LIGHT CROSSWIND TAXI LIGHT TERRAIN CLEARANCE LIGHT LEFT LANDING LIGHT Figure 1-71A (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-244 Change 4 .O.T.

O. 1B-52H-1 Figure 1-71A (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 4 1-244A .T.

All lights utilize 28 volt ac power reduced from 118 volts ac by autotransformers except the entry lights and. Entry and walkway lights are described in figure 1-74. EW officer’s. gunner’s. Red lights are used during night flights since red color does not adversely affect night vision. Signal Light 1-244B Change 4 . radar navigator’s. dull light conditions and during thunderstorms to lessen the blinding effect of lightning flashes. The lights are controlled by a rheostat switch on the individual light.T. A power receptacle is located adjacent to the light for plugging in the power cord leading from the light. INTERIOR LIGHTING Spotlights Interior lighting is provided by red and white lights. White lights are used for daytime flights during Spotlights are located at the pilots’.O. sheet 3 of figure 1-1) stowed aft of the copilot may be used as a means of communication between aircraft in flight or an aid in identification. and navigator’s stations. the essential instrument lights which use 24 volt dc battery power. Interior lighting is described in figure 1-73. 1B-52H-1 A 28 volt ac powered signal light (8. in an emergency.

T. 1B-52H-1 Exterior Light Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 NAVIGATION LIGHT STEADY-OFF-FLASH SWITCH NAVIGATION LIGHT BRIGHT-DIM SWITCH ANTI-COLLISION LIGHTS SWITCH AIR REFUELING AIRPLANE LIGHTS SWITCH 5 6 7 8 9 AIR REFUELING SLIPWAY LIGHTS SWITCH LANDING LIGHT SWITCH TERRAIN CLEARANCE LIGHT SWITCH TAXI LIGHTS SWITCH CROSSWIND LANDING LIGHTS SWITCH Figure 1-72 (Sheet 1 of 2) Change 4 1-244C/(1-244D blank) .O.

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T. Limit switches automatically stop the motor at either extreme of travel. 118 volts ac power is supplied to a motor which extends the light out of the fuselage. The air refueling lights will not illuminate unless the master refuel switch is ON and either the slipway door normal or alternate switch is in OPEN position. 4 Air Refueling Switch LIGHTS The left and right wing illuminating lights are controlled by a rotary switch.-OFF switch marked CROSSWIND LANDING on the aisle stand. OFF position stops the motor and allows the light to remain at any degree of travel during extension or retraction. the light may be controlled by a switch marked TAXI on the aisle stand.-DIM switch selects bright or dim illumination of all navigational lights.O. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Navigation Light STEADY-OFF-FLASH Switch The toggle switch on the pilots’ overhead panel controls the navigation lights. 2 Navigation Light BRIGHT-DIM Switch The intensity of the lights are controlled by a toggle switch on the pilots’ overhead panel. The BRIGHT.-OFF switch on the pilots’ overhead panel. In EXT position. 5 Air Refueling SLIPWAY LIGHTS Switch The receptacle light and slipway lights are controlled by a rotary switch.-OFF switch on the aisle stand. The crosswind landing light will not illuminate unless the landing gear lever is in DOWN position. Light illumination is independent of the switch and is controlled by position of the light. The air refueling lights will not illuminate unless the master refuel switch is ON and either the slipway door normal or alternate switch is in OPEN position. 1B-52H-1 NO. 8 TAXI Lights Switch The lights are controlled by an ON. The switch has EXT. AIRPLANE Figure 1-72 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-245 .-OFF. RET position supplies power to the motor to retract the light into the fuselage. FLASH position selects a flashing of the wing and tail lights with steady illumination of the fuselage lights. The light will be illuminated at any time the light is extended more than 10°. 7 TERRAIN CLEARANCE Lights Switch The light is controlled by an open guarded three-position switch on the aisle stand. The STEADY position selects steady illumination of all lights. 9 CROSSWIND LANDING Lights Switch The light is controlled by an ON.-RET positions. Also. while OFF position turns the lights out.-OFF switch on the aisle stand and will not illuminate when the landing gear is up and locked. 6 LANDING Lights Switch The landing lights are controlled by an ON. 3 ANTI-COLLISION Lights Switch The lights are controlled by an ON.

1B-52H-1 Interior Light Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 PANEL LIGHT SWITCH (7 PLACES) WARNING LIGHT DIMMING CONTROL EYEBROW PANEL LIGHT SWITCH FLIGHT INSTRUMENT LIGHT SWITCH (2 PLACES) FLOOD LIGHT SWITCH (2 PLACES) 6 7 8 9 9A DOME LIGHT RED/WHITE SWITCH DOME LIGHT INTENSITY CONTROL SWITCH THUNDERSTORM LIGHTS BUNK COMPARTMENT DOME LIGHTS NVIS LIGHT SWITCH DQ Figure 1-73 (Sheet 1 of 6) 1-246 Change 1 .O.T.

The rotary flight instruments switch on the pilot’s side panel provides for additional dimming control. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION PILOTS’ STATION LIGHTING 1 PANEL Lights (Pilot’s SIDE PANEL and FORWARD PANEL. When the switch is placed to BRIGHT position. 9 Bunk Compartment Domelights One white and one red domelight located at the crew comfort station are controlled by a RED. The switch has DIM. Momentarily moving the switch to DIM position will energize the dimming control relay to dim all lights with the exception of the fire warning. are red. NVIS Light Switch The three position switch controls the light intensity of the AN/ARC-210 (V) Switch panel. landing gear lights.. The lights are the primary source of instrument lighting and are controlled by OFF.O. 7 DOME Light Intensity Control Switch The intensity of the domelights is controlled by an OFF. The light color is selected by a RED. which illuminate indirectly from the underside.-BRIGHT at the extreme positions respectively and is spring-loaded to the NEUTRAL position. The lights are controlled by an ON . The rotary control switch is mechanically linked to the dimming circuit.-BRIGHT rotary switches on the pilot’s side panel and copilot’s side panel. all indicator lights are at their brightest illumination. Energizing the thunderstorm lights resets all indicator and warning lights to bright.T. 9A Figure 1-73 (Sheet 2 of 6) Change 1 1-247 .-WHITE switch adjacent to the oxygen regulator and interphone panel. The lights are controlled by OFF. 3 EYEBROW PANEL Lights The eyebrow panel lights and the standby compass light are controlled by an OFF. and pilots’ overhead panel. 5 PILOT’S and COPILOT’S FLOODS (Floodlights) Floodlights are a secondary source of instrument lighting and are mounted in a manner so as to provide illumination on a group of instruments located in the same area. CTR INSTRUMENTS CTR CONSOLE.-BRIGHT rotary switches on the pilot’s side panel and copilot’s side panel.-BRIGHT rotary switch. 8 THUNDERSTORM Lights Two white thunderstorm lights in the pilots’ compartment provide illumination during thunderstorms to lessen the blinding effect of lightning flashes. 1B-52H-1 NO. The pilots’ station floodlights are controlled by OFF.-WHITE toggle switch.OFF switch. OVERHEAD PANEL.-OFF.-BRIGHT rotary switch on the pilot’s side panel. and Copilot’s FWD PANEL and SIDE PANEL) Lights within edge-lighted panels.-BRIGHT rotary switches on the pilot’s side panel. 4 FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS Lights (Pilot and Copilot) Red lights in the instrument hoods provide illumination for individual instruments. and the warning lights are automatically reset to bright whenever flight instruments lights have been turned to OFF position. 6 DOME LIGHT WHITE/RED Switch One red and one white domelight are located by the pilot’s and copilot’s escape hatches. 2 WARNING LIGHT Dimming Control Switch A warning light dimming switch on the pilot’s side panel controls the brightness of all indicator and warning lights at the pilot’s and copilot’s station with the exception of the fire warning lights and the landing gear lights. copilot’s side panel. The thunderstorm light control switch cuts out the dimming control circuit when positioned ON.

1B-52H-1 Interior Light Controls and Indicators (Cont) 10 11 12 13 EW OFFICER’S MAIN CONSOLE PANEL LIGHT SWITCH ECM INDICATOR LIGHTS SWITCH DOME LIGHT RED/WHITE SWITCH (2 PLACES) FLOOD LIGHT SWITCH (2 PLACES) 14 15 16 DOME LIGHT INTENSITY CONTROL SWITCH (2 PLACES) EW OFFICER’S PANEL LIGHTS SWITCH DI.T.O. AND GUNNER’S PANEL LIGHTS SWITCH Figure 1-73 (Sheet 3 of 6) 1-248 . BUNK.

BRIGHT rotary switch on the gunner’s light control panel.BRIGHT rotary switches and light color is selected by a RED . bunk .T. 16 DI.DIM positions springloaded to a center neutral position. 14 EW Officer’s. DI.WHITE toggle switch. AND GUNNER’S LIGHTS 10 EW Officers MAIN CONSOLE Panel Lights Switch Lights within all of the edge-lighted panels on the front (main) console of the EW officer’s station are controlled by an OFF ..WHITE toggle switch..O. 13 EW Officer’s. The switch has BRIGHT .BRIGHT rotary switch on the main console light control panel..BRIGHT rotary switches on the EW officer’s light control panel and the gunner’s light control panel. 15 EW Officer’s Panel Lights Switch Lights within the edge-lighted panels on the side walls at the EW officer’s station are controlled by an OFF . and Gunner’s FLOOD Lights Switches Red floodlights in the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations are controlled by OFF . DI.BRIGHT rotary switch on the ECM light control panel. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION EW OFFICER’S. The light color is selected by a RED ... One toggle switch is located on the EW officer’s light control panel and another toggle switch is located on the gunner’s light control panel. The bright or dim light level of the indicator lights is obtained by actuating the switch to the desired position. and Gunner’s DOMELIGHTS Switch Two red and two white domelights are located at the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations and are controlled by OFF . DI. 11 ECM IND Lights Switch Dimming of indicator lights on the master expendables panel and the ALT-28 antenna selector panel is controlled by an ECM indicator light control switch adjacent to the light control panel on the left sidewall of the EW officer’s station. Bunk and Gunner’s Panel Lights Switch Lights within all edge-lighted panels at the defense instructor’s... 1B-52H-1 NO. and gunner’s stations except the AFSATCOM printer and keyboard are controlled by an OFF .. The lights on the two AFSATCOM panels are controlled by the illumination switch on the printer Figure 1-73 (Sheet 4 of 6) Change 4 1-249 . 12 DOME WHITE/RED Switch Two red and two white domelight are located by the EW officer’s and gunner’s stations. One rotary switch is located on the EW officer’s light control panel and another rotary switch is located on the gunner’s light control panel.

1B-52H-1 Interior Light Controls and Indicators (Cont) 17 18 19 20 NAV STATION PANEL LIGHTS SWITCH (3 PLACES) RED FLOOD LIGHTS SWITCH DOME LIGHT RED/WHITE SWITCH DOME LIGHT INTENSITY CONTROL SWITCH 21 22 23 24 BNS FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS SWITCH OAS TABLE LIGHT SWITCH EVS INDICATOR LIGHTS SWITCH SERVICE DOME LIGHT SWITCH Figure 1-73 (Sheet 5 of 6) 1-250 .T.O.

-BRIGHT rotary switch. BNS FRONT PANEL. 20 NAV Station DOME Lights Two domelights. The lights are controlled by an OFF. 1B-52H-1 NO.-BRIGHT rotary switch. 21 BNS FLIGHT INST Lights Red lights in the instrument hoods provide illumination for individual instruments. while the spotlights have an individual rotary switch on each light.T. The domelights are controlled by an ON. 22 OAS TABLE Lights Two white table lights over the navigator’s table are controlled by an OFF. one red and one white.-OFF switch on the overhead panel above instructor navigator’s seat. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION NAV STATION LIGHTING 17 NAV Station Panel Lights (LH SIDE. are located above each navigator’s seat.-WHITE toggle switch. The light color is selected by a RED. and RH SIDE PANEL) Lights within all of the edge-lighted panels are controlled by the respective OFF.-BRIGHT rotary switch. 19 DOME WHITE/RED Switch One red and one white domelight are located above each navigator’s seat.-DIM toggle switch on the navigator’s table light control panel. ELECTRONIC RACK LIGHTING 24 SERVICE DOME Lights Lighting for the electronic racks is supplied by service domelights and spotlights. 18 NAV Station RED FLOOD Lights Floodlights for the entire compartment are controlled by an OFF. 23 EVS IND Lights The EVS indicator lights are controlled by a BRIGHT. The light intensity is controlled by an OFF. Figure 1-73 (Sheet 6 of 6) 1-251 .O.-BRIGHT rotary switch on the OAS light control panel.-BRIGHT rotary switch on the right BNS observer’s pressure suit control panel.

1B-52H-1 Entry Light Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 ENTRY LIGHT SWITCH (MAIN ENTRY DOOR) COPILOT’S ENTRY LIGHT SWITCH (PILOTS’ COMPARTMENT) WALKWAY LIGHT SWITCH 4 5 6 AISLE LIGHTS SWITCH BNS LIGHTING CONTROL PANEL WALKWAY LIGHT SWITCH AISLE LIGHTS SWITCH Figure 1-74 (Sheet 1 of 2 ) 1-252 Change 12 .T.O.

one located right of entry ladder in the lower crew compartment and one in ceiling of upper crew compartment. The entry lights are white lights located on the copilot’s glare shield. 1) to control the entry lights. OAS power panel. and aft equipment compartment. The walkway lights are white lights located along the walkway and crawlway through the equipment deck. 5) to control the walkway lights. Figure 1-74 (Sheet 2 of 2 ) OAS PANEL INDICATOR LIGHTS The OAS panel indicator lights are controlled by two dimmer controls. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Main Entry Door Entry Light Switch This switch by the main entry door works with the switch at the copilot’s station (No. RNMP. 5 BNS Light Control Panel WALKWAY LIGHTS Switch This switch on the OAS light control panel works with the switch above the crawlway entrance (No.T. are controlled by this switch and a switch (No. 4 AISLE LIGHTS Switch Two white aisle lights. computer control panel. and in deck above entry door.O. 1-253 . 3) to control the walkway lights. 6) in the upper crew compartment. WCP. The dimmer control on the radar navigator’s sta- tion controls the intensity of the RN keyboard. The dimmer control on the NAV station controls the intensity of the indicators on the NAV keyboard. 6 AISLE LIGHT Switch This switch works with the switch above the crawlway entrance (No. 3 WALKWAY LIGHTS Switch This switch above the crawlway entrance works with the switch on the BNS light control panel (No. pilots’ overhead panel. and RN radar presentation panel. 2) to control the entry lights. wheel wells. bomb bay. and NAV radar presentation panel. 1B-52H-1 NO. one located on the RN station and the other located on the navigator’s station. in deck above entry ladder. 2 Copilot’s Entry Light Switch This switch works with the switch at the main entry door (No. 4) to control the aisle lights.

GEAR NORMAL CONTROL – R FWD LIGHTING – EXTERIOR TERRAIN CLEARANCE CONTROL Interior Lighting Aisle Lights and Spot Lights (EWO. and Gunner DECM LTS – DOME FCS LTS – DOME ECM/B1 ECM/B3 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 Nav Station MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – DOME OAS ABNS/A5 AC Bus 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING – PILOT & COPILOT DOME RLC/A27 AC Bus 5 ECM Indicator Lights ECM IND DIMMING ECM/X2 Left TR Electronic Rack Lights MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – DOME MISC LIGHTING – INTERIOR – AISLE AND SPOT ABNS/A6 AC Bus 3 LLC/E16 AC Bus 3 Crosswind Landing and Taxi Light Control Landing Light Control Left Right Navigation Lights Signal Light Terrain Clearance Light Extension and Retraction Motor Control Power LANDING GEAR NORMAL CONTROL – L FWD LDG. Gunner. DI. TR Anti-Collision Lights LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – ANTI-COLLISION – LOWER ANTI-COLLISION – UPPER LLC/F14 LLC/F13 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – TAXI & CROSS WIND CONTROL LLC/F16 Left TR LLC/C23 Left ESS RLC/F10 Rt.T. Nav and Pilots’ Station) Dome Lights Bunk Compartment Pilots’ Station Figure 1-75 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-254 . 1B-52H-1 Lighting Equipment Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Exterior Lighting Air Refueling Slipway Doors and Wing Illumination Lights AERIAL REFUELING – EXT LIGHT RLC/F7 Rt.O. DI. ESS LIGHTING – EXTERIOR – NAV PWR LLC/F12 AC Bus 3 MISCELLANEOUS – SIGNAL LIGHT RECP RLC/E14 AC Bus 5 LLC/F15 AC Bus 3 LIGHTING – INTERIOR – AISLE AND SPOT LLC/E16 AC Bus 3 MISCELLANEOUS – DOME LIGHT BUNK COMPARTMENT RLC/E15 AC Bus 5 EWO.

T. 1B-52H-1 EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Interior Lighting (Cont) Entry Lights RFBNS/B27 Aft Batt. LLC/E20 AC Bus 3 PCBP/E18 AC Bus 3 DC POWER – EVS INDICATOR DIMMING EVS/R3 Left TR DECM LTS – FLOOD FCS LTS – FLOOD ECM/A1 ECM/A3 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – OAS FLOOD ABNS/A8 AC Bus 3 LIGHTING – INTERIOR – COPILOTS FLOOD PILOT FLOOD REMOTE FLOOD RLC/A25 LLC/E19 LLC/E15 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – INST ABNS/A10 AC Bus 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT INST LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PILOT INST RLC/A29 LLC/E17 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 OAS Compartment Remote Panel Lights MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – REMOTE PANEL ABNS/A7 AC Bus 3 OAS Panel Indicator Lights MISCELLANEOUS – NAV IND LTS RDR NAV LTS ABNS/B13 ABNS/B14 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – TABLE ABNS/A9 AC Bus 3 Essential Flt Inst. Lights (With complete AC power failure) Pilot’s ADI Lights Pilot’s Instrument Lights EVS Indicator Lights Flood Lights EWO. and Gunner Nav Station Pilots’ Station Instrument Lights Nav Station Pilots’ Station OAS Table Lights ENTRY LIGHTS LIGHTING – INTERIOR – EMER INSTR LTS CONT MISCELLANEOUS – EMER FLIGHT INSTR LIGHTS Figure 1-75 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-255 .O. DI.

and Bomb Bay Lights Warning Light Dimming Control Switch 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.O. Crawlway. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. 1B-52H-1 Lighting Equipment Circuit Protection and Location (Cont) EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Interior Lighting (Cont) Panel Lights DI and Gunner FCS LTS – PNL ECM/C3 AC Bus 5 EWO DECM LTS – PNL ECM/C1 AC Bus 5 Nav Station MISCELLANEOUS – OAS COMPARTMENT LIGHTS – PANEL – FRONT LH OPER RH OPER ABNS/A2 ABNS/A3 ABNS/A4 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 INTERIOR LIGHTING – COPILOT PANEL LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PILOT PANEL RLC/A28 LLC/E18 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 3 LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PRESS-TO-TEST LLC/E13 Left TR Standby Compass Light LIGHTING – INTERIOR – PILOT INST LLC/E17 AC Bus 3 Thunderstorm Lights MISCELLANEOUS – THUNDER STORM LIGHT RLC/E16 AC Bus 5 MISCELLANEOUS – WALKWAY LIGHTS – AFT CONTR FWD PWR ABNS/A12 ABNS/A11 Left TR AC Bus 3 LIGHTING – INTERIOR – DIM CONTROL PILOT & COPILOT LLC/E12 Left TR Pilots’ Station Press-to-Test Lights Power Walkway.T. ABNS ECM EVS LLC AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL EVS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RFBNS RLC PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-75 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-256 .

and right aft landing gear. forward bomb door. The outboard left and right wing location electric motor-driven pumps supply standby pressure to the outboard spoilers and tip protection gear. are mounted on the right aft side of the fuselage in the 47 section of the aircraft. steering and crosswind crab. Therefore. normal body systems pressure will not provide any pressure within the rudder/elevator system and these flight control systems will be inoperative. and the stabilizer nut. The left body system supplies normal pressure to the air refueling system. 5. there are six independent engine-driven systems (figure 1-76) consisting of inboard and outboard. which supply normal pressure to the wing and body systems. In addition. 6. and 7. figure 1-78). Engine-driven pumps 1 and 7 supply normal pressure to the outboard spoilers and tip protection gear. available for use in all systems except the inboard wing systems. 1 and 2 rudder/elevator hydraulic systems (figure 1-78). 3. 4. Electric motor-driven pumps. Change 16 1-257 . Section III. 1B-52H-1 HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION ENGINE-DRIVEN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS HYDRAULIC PUMP CAPACITIES RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS HYDRAULIC SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS NORMAL OPERATION PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION DESCRIPTION NOTE Reference to engine-driven pumps/left or right body hydraulic systems providing standby pressure to the rudder/elevator hydraulic systems should not be misunderstood. brakes. The engine-driven pumps on engines 3 and 6 supply normal pressure to the inboard spoilers and provide emergency pressure for extension of the tip protection gear. however. The engine-driven pumps installed on engines 4 and 5 supply normal pressure to the body systems and standby pressure to the rudder/ elevator systems (RUD/ELEV AUX 1 and 2. brakes. It also supplies emergency pressure to the right forward landing gear. if a complete loss of hydraulic fluid occurs in the rudder/ elevator systems resulting in the illumination of all four indicator lights. and it supplies standby pressure to the rudder and elevator. Instead of the usual single main system. The right body system standby pump supplies standby pressure to the No. which supply normal pressure 1-257 1-259 1-264 1-264 1-265 1-267 1-273 1-274 1-274 1-275 to the No. left forward landing gear. are installed at the left and right wing trailing edge locations and left and right body locations. and right and left body hydraulic systems (figure 1-77). Electric motor-driven standby pumps. left aft landing gear. right and left wing hydraulic systems.O. the hydraulic fluid in the body systems is completely separated from that in the rudder/ elevator systems. Engine-driven pumps. respectively. Hydraulic pressure provided by the body systems provides a source of power for the auxiliary hydraulic pumps. are mounted on the right side of engines 1. The left and right body electric motor-driven pumps provide standby pressure for the essential body systems normally serviced by engines 4 and 5. The hydraulic systems of this aircraft differ from a conventional system in decentralization. 2 rudder/elevator hydraulic system. there are two electric motor-driven primary hydraulic systems consisting of main No.T. See RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC MALFUNCTIONS. 1 and 2 main rudder/elevator hydraulic systems.

1B-52H-1 Hydraulic System Locations (Typical) Figure 1-76 1-258 .T.O.

brakes. with cutout pressure of 3000 (±50) psi and provides both variable flow and pressure. and the stabilizer screw. With exception of the inboard spoilers and the aft bomb door actuator. and air refueling doors. restrictor valves are located downstream from the accumulators to prevent a momentary drop in pressure. steering and crosswind crab. brakes. Pressure can be furnished from either of two engine-driven pumps or a standby pump for operation of the stabilizer. steering and crosswind crab. Pressure can be furnished from either No. right aft landing gear. a standby pump may run continuously for several hours under emergency conditions. Due to a one-way check valve in each body system. Each electric motor-driven standby pump has a rated flow of 3 gallons per minute at 1300 psi output pressure. engine-driven and standby pump cutout pressures will indicate 3000 (±250) psi on the hydraulic system pressure gages. Where the restrictor valves are located downstream from the accumulator in the brake pressure lines. Oil-air type accumulators which have attached air gages are incorporated to provide air preload pressure for accelerating the operation of outboard wing system components and certain body system components.O. providing increased life to vital equipment during either combat or routine missions. brakes. The lights which indicate main pump pressure only are located on the pilot’s side panel. The variable delivery standby pumps. brakes. crosswind crab. In the brake pressure lines. steering. Direct application of pressure is provided to the stabilizer hydraulic motors and the bomb door. which discontinue delivery at a cutout pressure of 3000 (±50) psi. No standby pump pressure is available to the bomb doors. is able to supply standby pressure only to the right aft landing gear. the pumps continue to operate but discontinue delivery. landing gear. for additional information. each separate hydraulic power supply system (brakes. According to system demand. A pressure switch is incorporated in each system to control the respective pressure low warning light for that system. 1 and 2 main rudder/elevator system pumps. this section. left forward landing gear. the fluid is bypassed to return.T. and air refueling toggle actuators. Due to accumulative tolerance buildup in pressure transmitters and pressure gages. brakes. 1B-52H-1 The right body system supplies normal pressure to the right forward landing gear. Each pump has a rated flow of 12 gallons per minute at an output pressure of 2800 psi. and right forward landing gear. located downstream of the system one-way check valve. Change 4 1-259 . ENGINE-DRIVEN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS A variable delivery engine-driven pump supplies normal pressure to each wing and body hydraulic system (figure 1-77) and supplies standby pressure to the rudder/elevator hydraulic systems (figure 1-78). and it supplies standby pressure to the rudder and elevator. and left aft landing gear. stabilizer screw. left forward. a thermal relief valve with an opening pressure of 3750 (±100) psi is located at each accumulator to relieve excess pressure caused from continuous use of the brakes. and left aft landing gear. in a similar manner. It also supplies emergency pressure to the air refueling system. registers system pressure at the hydraulic pressure gage on the pilot’s side panel. See HYDRAULIC SYSTEM OPERATION. Reliability of the aircraft hydraulic systems is assured by alternate sources of pressure. forward and aft bomb doors. 4 or 5 engine-driven pumps for operation of the rudder and elevator in event of failure of the No. A pressure transmitter in each system. Hydraulic power systems circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-80. this section. air refueling toggle actuator. landing gear. the left body standby pump is able to supply standby pressure only to the air refueling system. landing gear. are controlled by individual switches on the pilot’s side panel. Launcher rotational drive is accomplished through the use of two similar but independent launcher hydraulic systems. See Rotary Launcher Hydraulic Systems. etc) has either or both emergency and standby alternate sources of pressure. At cutout pressure. The right body standby pump.

1B-52H-1 Hydraulic Power Supply Systems ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP FROM AIR BLEED SYSTEM FROM AIR BLEED SYSTEM FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH FILTER AND FLOW CONTROL ORIFICE QUICK DISCONNECTS CHECK VALVE TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHT TO CENTRAL CAUTION LIGHTS STANDBY PUMP SWITCH PRESSURE SWITCH FILTER AND FLOW CONTROL ORIFICE QUICK DISCONNECTS CHECK VALVE PRESSURE REGULATING RELIEF VALVE FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH VENT RELIEF OP CL HYDRAULIC PUMP OUT LIGHT HYDRAULIC PUMP OUT LIGHT STBY OFF MOTOR DRIVEN STANDBY PUMP PRESSURE REGULATING RELIEF VALVE VENT RELIEF AIR PRESSURE TO BODY SYSTEM TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHT PRESSURE SWITCH 3.5 GALLON RESERVOIR PRESSURE TRANSMITTER SPRING LOADED GROUND SERVICE (TEST) PUMP SWITCH ACCUMULATOR OFF HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GAGE PRESSURE TRANSMITTER TO OUTBOARD SPOILERS TO INBOARD SPOILERS TO OUTBOARD AIRBRAKE CONTROL ACTUATOR TO INBOARD AIRBRAKE CONTROL ACTUATOR EMERGENCY PRESSURE FOR TIP GEAR SYSTEM TO TIP GEAR SYSTEM OUTBOARD WING SYSTEM (TYPICAL) INBOARD WING SYSTEM (TYPICAL) A31701 Figure 1 77 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-260 .5 GALLON RESERVOIR TO CENTRAL CAUTION LIGHTS GROUND SERVICE (TEST) PUMP HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GAGE ON 3.O.T.

T.O. 1 HYD DRIVEN AUX PUMP TO STABILIZER TRIM SYSTEM CL LEFT BODY SYSTEM Figure 1-77 (Sheet 2 of 3) ROTARY LAUNCHER POWER PUMP LOW PRESS LIGHT CONNECTIONS FOR CSRL A31702 1-261 . 1B-52H-1 MAIN PRESSURE EMERGENCY PRESSURE STANDBY PRESSURE GROUND SERVICE (TEST) PRESSUE SUPPLY RETURN AIR PRESSURE ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH QUICK DISCONNECTS OP PRESSURE SWITCH STANDBY PUMP SWITCH CL STBY OFF FROM LT.7 GALLON RESERVOIR TO LEFT FWD GEAR STEERING 1. INBOARD SPOILER RESERVOIR AIR PRESS SYSTEM HYDRAULIC PUMP OUT LIGHT TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHT STANDBY PUMP TO CENTRAL CAUTION LIGHTS EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO FWD BOMB DOOR ACTUATOR MANUALLY OPERATED GROUND SERVICE VALVE 6.0 GALLON STANDBY PUMP RESERVOIR TO AIR REFUELING DOORS AND TOGGLE ACTUATOR TO LEFT FWD LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR QUICK DISCONNECTS TO ROTARY LAUNCHER TO LEFT FWD GEAR BRAKES LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC CONTROL SWITCH EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO RIGHT FWD LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR TO LEFT REAR GEAR STEERING OP TO LEFT REAR LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO RIGHT REAR LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR TO LEFT REAR GEAR BRAKES TO RUD/ELEV SYS NO.

0 GALLON STANDBY PUMP RESERVOIR TO AFT BOMB DOOR ACTUATOR HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GAGE PRESSURE TRANSMITTER TO RUD/ELEV SYS NO. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic Power Supply Systems ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP MAIN PRESSURE EMERGENCY PRESSURE STANDBY PRESSURE GROUND SERVICE (TEST) PRESSURE SUPPLY RETURN AIR PRESSURE ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS 6. INBOARD SPOILER RESERVOIR AIR PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM CL TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHT STANDBY PUMP SWITCH QUICK DISCONNECTS OP PRESSURE SWITCH HYDRAULIC PUMP OUT LIGHT TO CENTRAL CAUTION LIGHT TO FWD BOMB DOOR ACTUATOR STBY OFF TO RIGHT FWD GEAR STEERING EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO AIR REFUELING DOORS AND TOGGLE ACTUATOR TO RIGHT FWD GEAR BRAKES STANDBY PUMP TO RIGHT FWD LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO LEFT FWD GEAR ACTUATOR 1. 2 HYD DRIVEN AUX PUMP TO STABILIZER TRIM SYSTEM CONNECTONS FOR CSRL TO RIGHT REAR STEERING TO RIGHT REAR LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR TO LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC CONTROL SWITCH EMERGENCY PRESSURE TO LEFT REAR LANDING GEAR ACTUATOR RIGHT BODY SYSTEM Figure 1-77 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-262 MANUALLY OPERATED GROUND SERVICE VALVE TO RIGHT REAR GEAR BRAKES A31703 .T.O.7 GALLON RESERVOIR FIRE SHUTOFF SWITCH (IN) NORMAL (OUT) FIRE SHUTOFF FROM RT.

Two 120 cubic inch Type I fuses are installed upstream of the emergency extension control valves of the tip protection gear. cap. Pump cutout pressure is 3000 (±50) psi. In the event of a complete hydraulic failure on one wing. Each pump has a rated flow of 12 gallons per minute with an output pressure of 2800 psi with pump rpm at 3100. The pumps utilize hydraulic fluid from the supply for cooling and lubrication. Each standby pump is controlled by a manually operated switch and.O. Each reservoir also incorporates a filler neck. All main system reservoirs are pressurized from the air system at 25 to 30 psi operating pressure. Hydraulic Shutoff Valve A motor-operated hydraulic shutoff valve is installed in the supply line of each system for control of fluid from the reservoir to the engine-driven pump. Two 120 cubic inch Type I fuses are used in the air refueling pressure actuating lines. decreasing to zero flow at 3000 psi. The outboard wing hydraulic system has no standby reservoir. Each wing hydraulic system includes a 3.5 gallon of fluid. The pump and motor are packaged as a complete assembly which is self-cooled and electrically controlled. the supply should be enough to extend the tip protection gear. Change 13 1-263 . Cutout pressure of each standby pump is 3000 (±50) psi. The pumps are of variable delivery design and are driven by the engines at a ratio speed of 0.2 gallons per minute at 2800 psi. decreasing to 1. Main reservoirs for the body system have a capacity of 6. and a window-type sight gage calibrated to show full and refill levels. The standby pump consists of a 205-volt 400 Hz ac constant speed continuous duty electric motor coupled with a variable delivery hydraulic pump which has a rated flow of 3 gallons per minute at 1300 psi. Cavitation of the pump is prevented by keeping a head of fluid available to the pump by air pressurization of the supply portion of the system.7 gallons and are located in the trailing edge of the inboard wings. when energized. there are no manual-type controls for energizing the engine-driven hydraulic pumps. however. Standby Pump The standby pump in each of four hydraulic systems (body and outboard wing) supplies sufficient pressure to operate the system should the enginedriven hydraulic pump fail. Hydraulic Pump (Engine-Driven) Each engine-driven hydraulic pump is a complete packaged unit with engine mounting provisions.T. thus preventing the loss of an excessive quantity of hydraulic fluid. The shutoff valves are open and provide a continuous flow of hydraulic fluid when the engine fire shutoff switches on the pilot’s instrument panel are pushed in to the normal position. NOTE Fluctuations of the reservoir fluid level near the full mark are normal and may be expected due to pressure and temperature variations in the system air and oil which cause expansion and contraction. Type I fuses require the pressures on each side of the fuse be equalized and Type II fuses require reverse flow for resetting. The outboard wing reservoirs supply hydraulic fluid for the electric motor-driven standby pumps as well as the main engine-driven pumps. Shutoff of the supply will result in damage to the pump while the engine is windmilling. Due to being controlled by operation of the engines. and react to either continuous or intermittent demands of power. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic Fuses Reservoir Hydraulic fuses of two types.5 gallon capacity reservoir which is located in the wing trailing edge. supplying variable flow and pressure accordingly. strainer. will regulate from zero flow to full flow within 0. Standby pump reservoirs are equipped with inlet and outlet attach fittings only and are installed at respective left forward and right aft bulkhead locations of the bomb bay. the supply lines to the standby pumps hold 0. The circuit breakers for the standby pumps are in the standby pump switch circuits which are controlled by TR power. The fuse types consist of Type I and Type II which are similar in performance and differ only in the manner in which they are reset after closing.0-gallon reservoir is installed in the return line of each body system to provide a supply of fluid to the standby pump of the right and left body hydraulic systems. which are installed as a safety feature in certain systems. The wheel brake system incorporates two 60 cubic inch Type I fuses in the slave control lines and eight 120 cubic inch Type II fuses in the wheel brake pressure lines. will automatically close when a break in a downstream line allows more flow than the calibrated rate of a fuse.342 of engine rpm.05 second. are self-regulating. Each reservoir is equipped with an internal 100 cubic inch capacity negative g tank which will keep a supply available to the pump with fluid held to the top of the tank due to negative g flight attitude. The pumps operate continuously with engine operation. A 1.

The assembly is rated for continuous duty at 2 gallons per minute to an altitude of 55. Each main hydraulic power supply consists of an electric motor-driven pump. one in each inboard wing hydraulic system. Return fluid from each system is routed through an air/oil cooler in each system. axial piston. To prevent pump overheating. These valves will open to allow auxiliary pump operation when the associated main pump is switched off or upon failure of a main pump.1 gpm at high altitude idle. They are installed for emergency or ground check operation when for some reason the engine-driven pump is not functioning.3) gpm.05 second at 1300 psi and will reduce to 0 gpm flow at 3000 psi. 11. A flow regulator is installed in the pressure port of the auxiliary hydraulic pump to limit flow to 3 (+0/–0.O. 4 gpm hydraulic pump. Each pump is controlled by a toggle switch having ON.2 gpm at sea level takeoff Main Hydraulic Pump (AC Motor-Driven) 8.-OFF (spring-loaded OFF) positions. Each pump produces 0. . but maintain fluid isolation between the body hydraulic systems and the rudder/elevator hydraulic system. an airless self-pressurizing reservoir. supply components.T. and a manifold. An auxiliary hydraulic pump (hydraulic transformer) is installed in each of the hydraulic systems to provide standby power capable of supplying adequate hydraulic pressure for system operation in 1-264 Change 20 An auxiliary hydraulic pump is incorporated in each rudder/elevator hydraulic system to provide a standby source of hydraulic power for rudder and elevator actuation. The auxiliary hydraulic pumps are prevented from continuous operation by a shutoff valves that are controlled by hydraulic pressure from the primary system. 13. Standby Pump (Electric-Driven) Each standby pump produces 3 gpm flow within 0. provide a means of pressurizing the respective system during maintenance operations.6 gpm at high altitude cruise 10.7 gpm at sea level idle A hydraulic power supply is incorporated in each rudder/elevator system as the main (primary) source of hydraulic power. The auxiliary rudder/elevator hydraulic pumps utilize power from the aircraft left and right body hydraulic systems. 1B-52H-1 HYDRAULIC PUMP CAPACITIES Hydraulic Pump (Engine-Driven) Rated capacity is affected by change of altitude and rpm as indicated for the following conditions and is: the event of electric motor-driven supply failure. The auxiliary rudder/elevator pump is a transformer type unit consisting of a fixed displacement hydraulic motor with a flow regulator in the inlet port and a fixed displacement hydraulic pump (driven by the hydraulic motor) with a check valve in the outlet port. Each hydraulic system has its own fluid power generation. Rudder/Elevator Auxiliary Hydraulic Pumps Ground Service (Test) Pumps Two ground service (test) pumps. Each auxiliary pump delivers zero flow at pump differential pressures above 2800 psi and delivers flow at pressure differentials below 2600 (+50/–130) psi.45 gpm flow at 3000 psi. the ground service (test) pumps are limited to 5 minutes continuous operation. RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS The rudder and elevator flight controls are powered by two independent hydraulic systems (figure 1-78). Each auxiliary rudder/elevator hydraulic pump has a normal output of 2 gallons per minute at a discharge pressure of 2200 (±50) psi. They are capable of continuous operation. Rated pump speed is 5625 rpm. and actuation subsystem. The left and right body hydraulic systems each supply power to one transformer.000 feet. in that either is adequate for mission accomplishment in event of failure of the other. The motor pump assembly consists of a variable delivery. NOTE A shutoff valve is installed forward of each auxiliary pump to prevent continuous operation of the pumps from body hydraulic system pressure. Normal hydraulic power is generated by variable displacement hydraulic pumps driven by ac electric motors. They are located in the left lower longeron in the left forward wheel well. fluid transmission. and a three-phase 118/205-volt ac induction motor. The systems are redundant.

the reservoir outlet pressure will be 38 (±5) psi. switch back to ON PRIMARY. three-phase. The rotary launcher power pump is the primary source of hydraulic pressure to rotate the launcher and is mounted on the left lower longeron midway in the bomb bay.4 gallon capacity each are installed for use in the powered rudder/ elevator main No. 400 Hz electric motor. switch to the RH body hydraulic system and command rotation of the CSRL. The ac circuit breakers for the launcher power pump are not accessible in flight. 1 generator power box to drive the launcher power pump. Placing the switch in the ON PRIMARY position supplies 28 volt dc power from the left TR BUS to energize the hydraulic pump control relay. The blower is deactivated during flight through a landing gear safety switch and cooling air is then supplied to the hydraulic systems from a ram air scoop located in the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer. 1 and 2 hydraulic systems. When energized. Launcher Power Pump Maximum time that rudder/elevator hydraulic systems can be operated without ground blower in operation is 4 minutes. 5 hydraulic pump through a control valve connected to the right body system. Change 13 1-265 . The 205-volt ac blower is activated when either main hydraulic system switch 1 or 2 is in ON. Ground Cooling Blower A ground cooling blower is also incorporated to supply cooling air for the oil coolers and hydraulic supply electric motors during ground operation. return. With 3000 psi applied to the pressurizing piston. The launcher power pump consists of a variable delivery piston type pump powered by a 115/200-volt ac.-ON RH BODY) toggle switch on the pilot’s hydraulic control panel. Exhaust air from the oil coolers and electric motors is ducted overboard. and bypass line with quick-disconnect fittings located on the right and left lower longeron for mating with the launcher hydraulic lines (figure 1-77 sheet 2). ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS The rotary launcher hydraulic pressure supply system provides hydraulic power for operation of the rotary launcher when the launcher is installed in the bomb bay. These are ‘‘bootstrap’’ type reservoirs with a reservoir piston loaded to approximately 8 psi by means of a helical spring.O. An electric motor-driven hydraulic pump connected to the left body system provides primary hydraulic pressure for normal launcher rotation.-OFF. NOTE The CSRL will not rotate while the landing gear is in transit as the landing gear hydraulic system has priority over the rotary launcher. NOTE On CSRL configured aircraft. Secondary hydraulic pressure for emergency rotation is provided by the engine No. Each source of hydraulic pressure is electrically controlled by a three position (ON PRIMARY. Each launcher hydraulic system contains a pressure. To change back to the launcher hydraulic system. when the launcher pump fails to supply the required pressure. The pump is controlled by activating the rotary launcher switch located on the pilot’s hydraulic control panel. The launcher power pump receives its fluid supply from the left body hydraulic system return line.T. The system consists of two similar but independent hydraulic systems. this relay closes the three-phase ac circuit from the engine No. 1B-52H-1 Reservoir Two reservoirs of approximately 2.

T. 1 SHOWN SYSTEM NO.4 GALLON RESERVOIR ACCUMULATOR TO HYDRAULIC SYSTEM NO. 2 IDENTICAL CHECK VALVE ON OFF TO CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL RUD/ELEV MAIN 1 RUD/ELEV MAIN 1 PUMP MAIN PRESSURE SWITCH SAS PRESSURE SWITCH CHECK VALVE TO SAS AIR/OIL COOLER RETURN LINE FILTER PRESSURE LINE FILTER 2. 1B-52H-1 Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic Power Systems FROM LH BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM STAB TRIM BYPASS LINE PRESSURE HYDRAULIC TRANSFORMER RETURN SHUTOFF VALVE SUPPLY STANDBY PRESSURE FLOW REGULATOR HYDRAULIC MOTOR ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS RUD/ELEV AUX 1 AUX PRESSURE SWITCH RUD/ELEV AUX 1 PUMP MECHANICAL ACTUATION SYSTEM NO.O. 2 ELECTRO−HYDRAULIC CONTROL VALVES RUDDER ACTUATOR RUDDER Figure 1-78 A31705 . 2 ELEVATOR ACTUATOR SINGLE ELEVATOR (TYPICAL) 1-266 TO HYDRAULIC SYSTEM NO.

O. The PDUC circuit breaker is also on the switch panel.-OFF. The edge-lighted control panel has an outline of the hydraulic systems shown with designated power supply components of each system. provides power to the rotary launcher PDU. 4. each corresponding to a respective engine. for additional information on engine fire shutoff switches. 6. 1B-52H-1 Secondary Hydraulic Power Supply A secondary source of hydraulic power to rotate the launcher is provided by a solenoid operated. corresponding to the above engines. Each of the six switches. During secondary system operation. a two-position switch marked ON. are installed horizontally across the upper edge of the pilots’ instrument panel for inflight emergency use. and 7 on which the hydraulic pumps are installed. 5. See EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT. Selecting ON RH BODY on the launcher switch located on the pilot’s hydraulic control panel supplies 28 volt dc power from the left TR BUS to operate the hydraulic control valve. Four standby pump control switches are located on the control panel according to positions which correspond with the arrangement of the aircraft hydraulic systems. Each hydraulic shutoff valve unit consists of a dc motor and a gate-type valve which will open or close within 1 second regardless of temperature. threeway hydraulic control valve which routes pressure from the right body hydraulic system pressure line to the launcher manifold. will close the motor-operated engine firewall hydraulic shutoff valve which controls the flow of fluid from the system reservoir to the engine-driven pump. Secondary pressure will be interrupted during operation of either the stabilizer trim system or the bomb door system. located on the RH equipment rack in the lower compartment. Two switches and four lights are also located on the lower part of the panel to control and monitor the rudder/elevator hydraulic systems. The six individual hydraulic systems are represented on the control panel by six pressure gages and six pump-out indicating lights which are grouped by location according to the aircraft systems arrangement. the ENG 5 (right body) hydraulic pressure gage will indicate available supply pressure. HYDRAULIC SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS The hydraulic system controls are arranged on the hydraulic control panel (figure 1-79) which is located on the forward vertical part of the pilot’s side panel. In addition to providing shutoff control of other systems. six of the switches will shut off the hydraulic fluid supply to engines 1. Power Drive Unit Control (PDUC) Power Switch The PDUC power switch. 1-267 . this section.T. 3. Engine Fire Shutoff Switches Eight pull-type engine fire shutoff switches (figure 1-33).

T. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 HYDRAULIC PRESSURE GAGES (6 PLACES) STANDBY PUMP SWITCHES (4 PLACES) ENGINE-DRIVEN HYDRAULIC PUMP OUT LIGHTS (6 PLACES) RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SWITCHES (2 PLACES) 5 6 7 8 RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM INDICATOR LIGHTS (4 PLACES) ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC SELECTOR SWITCH ROTARY LAUNCHER POWER PUMP LOW PRESSURE LIGHT HYDRAULICS RESET CAUTION LIGHT Figure 1-79 (Sheet 1 of 4) 1-268 Change 20 .O.

NOTE During ground operation. the gage will then indicate only the pressure supplied to this isolated portion of the system. a signal is sent simultaneously to a pump-out light on the hydraulic control panel. to the hydraulics caution light (No. 2 Standby Pump Switches (4 places) Four two position (OFF . the pump-out lights may illuminate momentarily when a demand is placed on a hydraulic system and the engine driving the pump for that system is at or near idle.O. the separate switches energize respective standby pumps to provide hydraulic system pressure. When placed in STBY position. engine-driven and standby pump cutout pressures will indicate 3000 (±250) psi on the hydraulic system pressure gages. 8) on the central caution light panel. Due to accumulative tolerance buildup in pressure transmitters and pressure gages. Pump-Out Whenever a pressure switch senses low pressure. When the standby pump is energized. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION HYDRAULICS CONTROL PANEL 1 Hydraulic Pressure Gages (6 places) Six gages indicate pressure of the hydraulic systems. Each light is illuminated when system pressure drops to 350 (±150) psi and goes out when system pressure increases to 700 psi maximum as controlled by pressure switches in the systems. See figure 5-1 for gage markings. 1B-52H-1 NO. a light will remain on after failure of a main pump even though (for those systems which have a standby pump) system pressure is restored to normal by the standby pump.T. This pressure should dissipate either through normal internal leakage or by operation of a system component located downstream of this one-way check valve. The location of each gage on the control panel corresponds to the respective hydraulic system which it serves and which is shown by outline on the control panel. the pressure gage will then indicate only pressure trapped in that portion of the system downstream of the oneway check valve.STBY) hydraulic standby pump switches control the starting and stopping of individual system pumps. Since the lights indicate engine-driven pump pressure only. In the event an engine-driven pump fails on the left or right body system. illuminating the lights. and to the master caution lights on the pilots’ forward instrument panel. Figure 1-79 (Sheet 2 of 5) 1-269 . The gages are calibrated from 0 to 4000 psi. 3 Engine-Driven Hydraulic Lights (amber) (6 places) Each of the six individual hydraulic systems has an amber pump-out indicating light. Only a return of the affected main pump to proper operation will extinguish the light.

then go out indicating auxiliary system pressure is available. Moving the switches from one position to another requires pulling them out of one detent and placing them in the other detent. Should a main pump fail. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. the RUD/ELEV AUX lights receive signals from the auxiliary hydraulic system for proper RUD/ELEV AUX light indications. In the OFF position. 1 and 2 hydraulic systems. 5 Rudder/Elevator Main Hydraulic System Indicator Lights Four amber push-to-test indicator lights are available for monitoring the main and auxiliary rudder/elevator hydraulic systems. for main hydraulic systems 1 and 2. that specific pump has failed.-OFF positions and in the ON position they energize ac motor-driven pumps located in the 47 section that operate the rudder/elevator main No. the rud/elev main 1 and 2 lights and the rud/elev aux 1 and 2 lights will be out. ON position of either hydraulic system switch 1 or 2 also activates the ground cooling blower. OFF positions by detents. a signal is sent to the light on the hydraulic control panel and. simultaneously to the master caution light on the pilots’ forward instrument panel. Figure 1-79 (Sheet 3 of 5) 1-270 . their respective lights will illuminate. The lights are marked RUD/ELEV MAIN 1 (or 2) and RUD/ELEV AUX 1 (or 2) for main rudder/elevator hydraulic systems 1 and 2 and auxiliary rudder/elevator hydraulic systems 1 and 2 respectively.T. illuminating the lights. NOTE The RUD/ELEV AUX 1 and 2 lights receive signals from the same pressure switches as the RUD/ELEV MAIN 1 and 2 lights. the corresponding aux light may come on momentarily.O. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 4 Rudder/Elevator Main 1 and 2 System Switches Two rudder/elevator hydraulic system switches have ON. The switches are spring-loaded toggle-type switches and are held in both the ON. or pumps have failed. When main hydraulic system switches 1 and 2 are on and the hydraulic system pumps are operating normally. When main pump switches are OFF. Whenever a pressure switch senses low pressure. power is removed from the hydraulic pumps. When the main pump switches are placed ON and pumps are operating normally. all four lights will go out. If main rudder/elevator hydraulic system pumps 1 and/or 2 fail. If one or the other aux rudder/elevator lights illuminate. The aux rudder/ elevator lights 1 and/or 2 will remain out indicating that hydraulic pressure is being supplied to systems 1 and/or 2 from the right and/or left body hydraulic systems.

-ON RH BODY. 6 CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION Launcher Hydraulic Selector Switch A single toggle switch provides for selection of the launcher power pump or right-hand body hydraulic system pressure to power the rotary launcher.O. Do not place the launcher hydraulic control switch to ON PRIMARY unless a rotary launcher is installed and will be rotated. 7 Launcher Power Pump Low Pressure Light (Amber) An amber launcher low pressure light indicates that a low pressure condition exists in the launcher primary hydraulic system and that hydraulic pressure is not adequate for launcher rotation.T. The hydraulics caution light circuit may be reset for use as an indicator of other malfunctions by pressing the central caution reset button which extinguishes both the central and master caution lights. This light and the master caution light will come on when the launcher power pump output pressure drops below 1300 (±100) psi. the power pump is turned off and the launcher operates from the aircraft right-hand body hydraulic system. With the switch positioned to ON PRIMARY. 1B-52H-1 NO. as damage may result to the rotary launcher hydraulic pump. The light will go out when pressure increases to 1500 (±50) psi or when ON RH BODY or OFF position is selected. the rotary launcher power pump is powered. the secondary launcher control valve is automatically turned off whenever the electrical stabilizer trim buttons are used or an electrical signal is introduced to operate the bomb doors. To preclude interruption of the stabilizer trim system or bomb door operation while operating the launcher on the right-hand body system. CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL 8 Hydraulics Caution Light An amber caution light marked HYDRAULICS – RESET and the master caution lights illuminate whenever a pressure low signal is sent from any one of the six engine-driven hydraulic pumps and the two main rudder/ elevator system hydraulic pumps. The hydraulic control panel must be monitored to determine which particular hydraulic pump has a pump-out light illuminated. The light will come on for a low pressure condition in the primary system only when the launcher hydraulic control switch is in the ON PRIMARY position. and the launcher is operated by this pump. Figure 1-79 (Sheet 4 of 5) 1-271 . The switch has positions marked ON PRIMARY.-OFF. With the switch positioned to ON RH BODY.

CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION PDUC POWER PANEL 9 PDUC Power Switch The PDUC power switch. NOTE With a CSRL configured for gravity weapons. as applicable. the CSRL will not rotate. In the OFF position. NUC SLU and bomb monitor power must be reapplied after turning the PDUC power switch back on. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic System Controls and Indicators (Cont) 9 PDUC POWER SWITCH NO. the PDUC allows rotation of the CSRL on either the launcher hydraulic system or the RH BODY hydraulic system. The PDUC circuit breaker is also on the switch panel. In the ON position. a two-position switch marked ON. turning the PDUC power switch to OFF will also turn off the NUC SLU and bomb monitor power.T.O. Figure 1-79 (Sheet 5 of 5) 1-272 .-OFF provides power to the rotary launcher PDU.

Standby pressure is not available to the nut. The variable delivery standby pumps are controlled by individual switches.T.O. and both normal and emergency pressure for opening of the air refueling toggles and closing or opening of the air refueling doors. Each electric motor-driven standby pump has a rated flow of 3 gallons per minute at 1300 psi output pressure. Similarly. The actuator components of the front landing gear. Normal pressure for movement of the nut is furnished by the left body system. in case of normal pressure failure. Each hydraulic system has an amber pump-out warning light which indicates main pump pressure only. A pressure transmitter in each system registers system pressure at the respective hydraulic system pressure gage. a warning light illuminates. Horizontal stabilizer control is accomplished through a hydraulic pressure-driven jackscrew and nut assembly. The shutoff valves. which are provided with engine-driven pump pressure only. the aft landing gear components. A motor-operated hydraulic shutoff valve is installed in the supply line of each system for control of fluid from the reservoir to the enginedriven pump. normal pressure for brake application. However. The light may go out at any pressure above this value and will positively go out when pressure reaches 700 psi maximum. Each pump has a rated flow of 12 gallons per minute at an output pressure of 2800 psi and provides variable flow and pressure in accordance with the system demands. As a safety feature in the event of a ruptured line. Except for the inboard wing hydraulic systems. are open and provide continuous flow of hydraulic fluid when the fire shutoff switches on the pilots’ instrument panel are pushed in to the normal position. including brakes and steering on the right gear only and the hydraulic jackscrew for the horizontal stabilizer. Emergency or alternate pressure is provided for certain hydraulically operated components by interconnecting pressure sources from both enginedriven and standby pumps of another system. Hydraulic system pressure is independent of the engine pump speed. and the air refueling toggle actuator receive standby pump pressure from the left body system. the hydraulic oil flow rate is directly proportional to the engine speed. However. each system has both an engine-driven pump and an electric motor-driven standby pump to provide reliability of continued system operation. hydraulic fuses are installed to seal off the lines which provide normal and emergency slave pressure for actuation of the brakes. Each hydraulic system supplies hydraulic fluid under pressure to hydraulically operated components. Standby pump pressure for the inboard wing hydraulic systems is not considered essential to continuous aircraft maneuverability since the aircraft can be flown without assistance of the inboard spoilers. The front bomb door actuator receives normal and emergency pressure but it cannot be actuated by standby pump pressure while in flight. at 10% (windmill) rpm. 1B-52H-1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION Hydraulic pressure is provided by six separate hydraulic systems consisting of inboard and outboard right and left wing hydraulic systems and right and left body hydraulic systems. Standby pump pressure is used in case of failure of either an engine or an engine-driven pump. Due to accumulative tolerance buildup in pressure transmitters and pressure gages. A pressure relief valve is incorporated in each system to limit maximum pressure at 3850 psi with a rated flow of 16 gallons per minute. emergency pressure for tip gear extension. with exception of emergency tip gear extension. engine-driven and standby pump cutout pressures will indicate 3000 (±250) psi on the hydraulic system pressure gages. 1-273 . With exception of the inboard spoilers and the aft bomb door actuator. hydraulic fluid does not pass from one system into another. each hydraulically operated component has either or both emergency or alternate sources of pressure. Six engine-driven pumps and four electric motor-driven standby pumps provide normal and standby pressure for the six separate hydraulic systems. When pressure in any system falls below 350 (±150) psi. travel speed of the assembly is reduced onehalf which affects control of the horizontal stabilizer by reducing movement to one-half speed. including brakes and steering on the left gear only. there will be 1 1/2 gallons of oil flow per minute available for system operation. consequently. which have a rated flow of 25 gallons per minute with a working pressure of 100 psi. receive an alternate source of pressure from the standby pump installed in the right body hydraulic system.

Fluid flow limitation is obtained by a flow regulator installed in the pressure port of the hydraulic motor (to limit flow to 3 (±0. normal operation of any of these systems simultaneously or with any of the other systems connected to the right body hydraulic system may cause the pressure to drop to 1000 psi. 4 and No. 1B-52H-1 The functional components of each system are designed to operate throughout an ambient temperature range from –65° to 160°F with variations of pressure altitude from sea level to 60. right rear landing gear. the stabilizer trim should move 6 units every 10 seconds and the bomb doors should close in 3 to 5 seconds.3) gallons per minute). thus controlling the respective warning lights on the pilot’s side panel. and braking or steering may not show a drop in pressure but will show a pressure surge above 3000 psi when the operation cycle has been completed. Four lights located on the hydraulic control panel serve as a means for monitoring the main rudder/elevator pumps and the auxiliary (transformer) hydraulic pumps. A takeoff from cold soak conditions below –55°F will require preliminary controls exercise to obtain at least half speed operation. this will require 3 to 4 minutes of continuous spoiler cycling. Also. Each electric motor-driven pump has nominal fluid flow of 4 gallons per minute at 2700 psi and is rated for continuous duty at 2 gallons per minute to an altitude of 55. In addition to the four pressure switches used for pump failure monitor lights. Backup or standby pressure is supplied to each system by the installation of two hydraulic transformers (hydraulic motor and pump) which derive power from the left and right hand body hydraulic systems. left rear gear. The transformers have a zero flow delivery at pump differentials above 2800 psi and a flow delivery at differential pressures below 2470 psi. Under cold temperature takeoff conditions down to –55°F. two independent 3000 psi hydraulic pump and reservoir assemblies are installed to supply hydraulic power for the rudder and elevator actuators. provided engine No. right forward gear actuation. This surge will be noted whenever any of the systems are operated. Operation of the stabilizer. or crosswind crab. in the left body system. brakes. brakes or steering. The switch contacts are normally closed. PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS During normal operation of the stabilizer trim. Similarly. 1-274 POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION In addition to the systems described above. These two switches function in conjunction with the SAS electronics only. and brakes may not show a pressure drop on the left body system pressure gage due to the location of the pressure transmitter. At –65°F. if the left and right body systems are working properly. normal bomb door operation. two additional pressure switches are installed in the hydraulics. Normal pressure fluctuations of approximately 1500 psi will be experienced in the right body hydraulic system at initiation of rotary launcher drive in the secondary mode. 5 are operating at 82% rpm or above. The two systems are redundant in the sense that either system has the capability of supplying sufficient hydraulic pressure to operate each elevator and rudder actuator for mission accomplishment following the failure of the other. and air refueling doors will cause a drop in pressure indicated on the left body system pressure gage.O. Due to the locations of the pressure transmitter (figure 1-77).000 feet. normal operation of the forward landing gear. . These lights are controlled by a pressure switch connected to the sensing port of each hydraulic transformer pump and each power supply pump. The transformers are designed to maintain fluid isolation between the body systems and rudder/elevator hydraulic systems. half speed or better spoiler operation will provide adequate lateral control to allow takeoff without exercising the hydraulic system. Each transformer has a normal output of 2 gallons per minute. Sustained operation of any of these systems may cause the pressure to drop to 1000 psi. This pressure drop in either system with the resulting surge is normal. In particular.T. Contact points open at 700 psi maximum during increasing pressure and close at 350 (±50) psi on decreasing pressure. a drop in pressure may be noted on the right body hydraulic system pressure gage.000 feet. Each pressure switch is so located and isolated with a check valve so that it will detect pressure only from the respective transformer output or the main pump output.

Operation of the launcher is interrupted during operation of either the stabilizer trim system or the bomb door system. 1B-52H-1 ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULIC SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION Two separate and independent hydraulic systems are permanently installed in the aircraft to power the rotary launcher. A relief valve is installed in a line connecting the pump output pressure and left body hydraulic return lines. Selecting ON PRIMARY with the control switch supplies 28 volt dc power from the left TR BUS to energize the hydraulic pump control relay. The CSRL will not rotate while bomb doors are not fully opened or closed. 4 engine to pressurize the left body system hydraulic reservoir. 5 hydraulic pump through a solenoid operated. The light will come on when pressure decreases to 1300 (±100) psi and will go out when pressure increases to 1500 (±50) psi or when the launcher control switch is moved to the OFF or ON RH BODY position. the control switch must be returned to the OFF position to prevent depletion of the right body system hydraulic fluid. The pump is a variable delivery piston type. The control valve is energized by 28 volt dc power from the left TR BUS when the launcher control switch is placed to the ON RH BODY position. the control valve routes pressure from the right body main pressure line to the launcher quick-disconnect point. When the launcher is installed. In the event of left body hydraulic system fluid depletion. A hydraulic line failure downstream of the launcher power pump results in depletion of the left body hydraulic system fluid if operation of the launcher power pump is continued. 1 generator power box to drive the launcher power pump. 5 (right body) hydraulic pressure gage will indicate the available supply when operating the secondary launcher hydraulic system. When energized. return. and provides pressure relief at 3750 (±25) psi if the launcher pump malfunctions. the relay supplies three-phase ac current from the engine No. A pressure sensor is installed in the primary launcher hydraulic system to provide a warning of inadequate pressure to operate the launcher by illuminating the launcher low pressure warning light. Failure of the launcher power pump to shut down when the control switch is placed in the OFF position will not damage the pump. Failure of the left body engine driven pump does not affect operation of the launcher power pump as long as bleed air is available from either the No.O. the pump is controlled by a three position switch on the pilot’s hydraulic control panel. to the launcher manifold. 1-275 . Loss of the right body engine-driven pump or depletion of the right body system hydraulic will result in the secondary launcher hydraulic system being inoperative. The launcher power pump should not be operated unless a rotary launcher is installed in the aircraft as damage to the pump may occur. The primary system consists of an electric motor-driven launcher power pump which takes hydraulic fluid from the left body hydraulic system return line and supplies pressure to the launcher manifold quick-disconnect point. three-way hydraulic control valve in the right body hydraulic system.T. the launcher power pump should not be operated as overheating and pump failure results. NOTE • • The CSRL will not rotate while the landing gear is in transit as the landing gear hydraulic system has priority over the rotary launcher. The engine No. When energized. In the event of hydraulic line failure downstream of the solenoid operated control valve. Each system contains a pressure. Secondary hydraulic pressure for emergency operation of the rotary launcher is provided by the engine No. 3 or No. and case drain line connected to quickdisconnect fittings on the left and right lower longerons for mating with the launcher hydraulic lines.

under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.O.1 NO. TR Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic System Ground Cooling Control POWER FEEDERS – DC – RUD/ELEV HYD GRD COOLING CONTROL LLC/D11 Left TR Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic System Indicator Lights RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM – PRESSURE WARNING LIGHT PCBP/C10 Left TR Standby Hydraulic Pumps HYDRAULIC PACKAGE – STANDBY PUMP CONTROL – LH BODY LH OUTBD RH BODY RH OUTBD PCBP/C5 PCBP/C4 PCBP/C6 PCBP/C7 Left TR Left TR Rt. TR Rt. Hydraulic Pressure Gages Rotary Launcher Hydraulics Hydraulic Selector Switch Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic Pumps Control 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. 1B-52H-1 Hydraulic Power Supply System Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Engine-Driven Hydraulic Pump-Out Lights CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE HYDRAULIC PACKAGE – PRESSURE – WARN LT PCBP/C2 Left TR HYDRAULIC PACKAGE – PRESSURE – IND PCBP/C1 AC Bus 3 AGM 69A HYD CONTROL LLC/E27 Left TR Power Pump Low Pressure Light HYDRAULIC PACKAGE – PRESSURE – WARN LT PCBP/C2 Left TR PDUC Power Switch CSRL PDUC Navigator’s Side Panel Left TR RUDDER/ELEVATOR HYDRAULIC SYSTEM – PUMP CONTROL – NO. LLC LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP Figure 1-80 1-276 PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL . The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. This Section. 2 PCBP/C8 PCBP/C9 Left TR Rt.T. TR Engine Firewall Hydraulic Shutoff Valves – See EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION.

this section. Pressure for actuation of front and aft landing gear which are located on one side of the aircraft is normally supplied from the body system on that same side of the aircraft. Normally.O. 1-277 . The front main gear locks have the ground lockpin on one end of the streamer and a two-pin steering valve bypass key on the other end. one of which is supplied with normal system pressure and the other with emergency system pressure. The main landing gear doors are mechanically linked to the main landing gear and follow the cycle of operation selected by the normal landing gear lever or the landing gear emergency switches. The locks are stowed in containers (14. An emergency source of pressure is provided which allows separate control of the landing gear by individual switches. The left forward and left rear gear retract forward into fuselage wheel wells while the right forward and right rear gear retract aft into fuselage wheel wells. Section VII. The ground lockpins are inserted in each main landing gear drag strut and each tip gear side brace. 1B-52H-1 LANDING GEAR SYSTEM DESCRIPTION LANDING GEAR GROUND LOCKS The landing gear system is a composite of the main landing gear system and the tip gear system. Retraction and extension of each landing gear is accomplished by its hydraulic actuator with pressure supplied from the right and left body hydraulic systems. 4 and No. For information on landing gear steering and crosswind crab operation. see WHEEL BRAKE SYSTEM. see STEERING AND CROSSWIND CRAB SYSTEM. 5 respectively. For information on landing gear brakes. The wheel well section is hydraulically actuated and is controlled for proper sequence operation by mechanical linkage in the tip gear system. A single mechanical lock on the main landing gear drag strut locks the main landing gear in either the extended or the retracted position. Normal extension or retraction of the main landing gear is accomplished by positioning of the landing gear control lever. the emergency system pressure sources of the left front and aft landing gear are the same as the normal system pressure sources of the right front and aft landing gear. the tip gear tires contact the ground only under maximum weight conditions. The strut section is connected to the tip gear and follows the cycle of operation for the gear. All landing gear are hydraulically actuated through electrically operated valves. Most rear main gear also have bypass key facilities for use by maintenance when towing from the rear is required.T. There are no provisions for overriding these switches in an emergency. Landing gear system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-85. Emergency pressure is provided by connecting the pressure sources of the body systems to solenoid-operated control valves which are installed on the opposite side of the aircraft. Each main landing gear may be actuated by either of two solenoid-operated control valves. this section. figure 1-181) which are located beneath the left equipment rack in the aft end of the navigators’ compartment. Three pairs of landing gear ground locks (figure 1-81) prevent retraction of the landing gear on the ground. the emergency system pressure sources of the right front and aft landing gear are the same as the normal system pressure sources of the left front and aft landing gear. Although separate switches are used for emergency actuation. The tip gear locks are the smallest of the two types. The tip gear doors are in two sections. The dual wheel main landing gear are in a quadricycle arrangement with two side by side forward and two side by side rear. Oleo safety switches prevent inadvertent gear retraction on the ground. The function of the tip gear is to prevent damage to the wingtips during abnormal ground maneuvers and/ or high gross weight conditions. see COLD WEATHER OPERATION. Each ground lock is a pin-type lock with a red warning streamer attached. Similarly. The landing gear is fully retracted in 10 to 15 seconds or extended in 15 to 20 seconds. For cold weather retraction time. The tip gear are located between the outboard engine strut and the external tank strut and retract inboard and slightly forward into each wing. MAIN LANDING GEAR SYSTEM The main landing gear system (figure 1-82) utilizes power for operation from the left and right body hydraulic systems which receive main pump pressure from the engine-driven pumps installed on engine No.

1B-52H-1 Landing Gear Ground Locks Figure 1-81 1-278 .T.O.

O. 1B-52H-1 Main Landing Gear System GEAR UP GEAR UP LOCK SWITCH (Opens when gear is locked up) LANDING GEAR LEVER AND WARNING LIGHT GEAR DOWN NORMAL PRESSURE EMERGENCY PRESSURE RETURN ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS TO CROSSWIND CRAB CENTERING MOTER EMERGENCY CONTROL RELAYS RETRACT LANDING GEAR EMERGENCY SWITCH (Typical − Left) OLEO SAFETY SWITCH (Open on ground) TO OTHER SET OF GEAR (Not shown) RETRACT OFF LANDING GEAR EMERGENCY SWITCH (Typical − Right) OFF CENTERING SWITCHES EXTEND EXTEND EMERGENCY CONTROL RELAYS EMERGENCY OLEO SAFETY SWITCHES (Open on ground) POSITION SWITCH RELAY (De−energized when gear is locked down) FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM POSITION SWITCH RELAY (De−energized when gear is locked down) DOWN DOWN RIGHT GEAR EMERGENCY CONTROL VALVE LEFT GEAR EMERGENCY CONTROL VALVE UP UP UP LEFT GEAR NORMAL CONTROL VALVE DOWN RIGHT GEAR NORMAL UP CONTROL VALVE SHUTTLE VALVE TO RETRACTION LOCKOUT VALVE SHUTTLE VALVE LANDING GEAR ACTUATORS LEFT DOWN TO RETRACTION LOCKOUT VALVE RIGHT LANDING GEAR POSITION INDICATORS WARNING HORN LEFT THROTTLES FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM TYPICAL LANDING GEAR SYSTEM SHOWN − OTHER LANDING GEAR SYSTEM IS IDENTICAL RIGHT MAIN LANDING GEAR A31707 Figure 1-82 1-279 .T.

• The OAS overheat system automatic shutdown thermal switch will become armed. Standby pump pressure may be supplied as an alternate source of normal system pressure when the engine-driven pumps are not operating or not providing sufficient normal pressure. The normal gear up circuit supplies power to the crosswind crab centering motor through centering switches to ensure centering of the main landing gear prior to retraction. the landing gear struts are compressed actuating the oleo safety switches. NOTE When the landing gear oleos are extended after takeoff.T. the landing gear will free fall almost to the down and locked position. When the landing gear control lever is positioned.75 inch. a position switch is included in the circuit. • Cabin pressure will dump. Normal braking may be applied during the landing roll. • The OAS ground cooling system blowers will operate. • The strike camera heater control system becomes inoperative. • The AN/ALE-20 flare ejection circuit will become de-armed. This switch keeps the circuit energized until the landing gear reaches the full down and locked position. pressure is not supplied to the forward gear from the right body system standby pump. causing ice to form on the lip under icing conditions. • The rudder/elevator hydraulic system ground cooling blower will operate. A gear up lock switch de-energizes the circuits when the gear is up and locked. Mode 4 codes will zeroize if the Mode 4 code switch is not placed in HOLD position prior to turning the IFF off. 1B-52H-1 Each of the body systems is equipped with an electric standby pump which is energized by a separate standby pump switch. Similarly. pressure from the left body system standby pump will actuate the forward landing gear through the left normal pressure control valve and the right emergency pressure control valve. the operation of the above systems will be reversed. • The ground interphone panels become operative. • The engine stall prevention system becomes armed. . preventing flares from being ejected. • The flap warning horn will sound and the master caution light will illuminate if the throttles are at or beyond approximately 45° of travel and the flaps are not fully extended. After being unlocked by hydraulic pressure. LANDING GEAR OLEO SAFETY SWITCHES When the aircraft is on the ground. Due to the location of a check valve. • The antiskid valves will be deenergized and application of brakes prior to landing will result in locked brakes. • The ECM heater system becomes inoperative. The following systems are affected by actuation of the landing gear oleo safety switches: • The anti-ice airscoop heater for the rudder and elevator Q-spring inlet and the air conditioning scoop lip anti-ice shutoff valve will not be energized. Actuation of the emergency landing gear switches does not automatically center the landing gear. The oleo safety switches are also actu- 1-280 Change 12 ated in flight when the gear is extended and crabbed to an angle equal to or exceeding 14° through any combination of crosswind crab setting and rudder pedal movement. This circuit also includes oleo safety switches which prevent inadvertent retraction when either the left front or right rear main landing gear is on the ground and the oleo strut is compressed more than 0.O. pressure from the left body system standby pump is not supplied to the aft landing gear. The emergency gear up circuits include oleo safety switches to prevent retraction when either the right front or left rear main landing gear are on the ground. therefore. Standby pump pressure may be used for actuating the front or aft pair of landing gears separately from the other pair when the engine-driven pumps are not operating. Each landing gear emergency retract or extend circuit remains energized until the individual emergency switches are placed in OFF position. • If the safety switches have been cycled by a takeoff and landing. • The flight loads data recorder will not record. • The EVS FLIR window anti-icing system becomes inoperative. pressure from the right body system standby pump will actuate the rear landing gear through the right normal pressure control valve and the left emergency pressure control valve. • The landing gear cannot be retracted by either the normal or emergency controls.

LANDING GEAR SYSTEM CONTROLS Landing Gear Controls and Indicators are shown in figure 1-84. A reverse sequence ensures proper door and gear timing during the retraction cycle.T. When the wheel well door opens. which operates on TR power. Emergency tip gear extension is accomplished by actuating individual switches which are grouped with the emergency switches for the main landing gear. 1 and No. figure 1-6). A warning horn shutoff button (11. which is used to silence the horn.O. • • During retraction or extension of the landing gear by either the normal or emergency system. 1B-52H-1 TIP GEAR SYSTEM The tip gear system (figure 1-83) for each gear receives normal hydraulic pressure from the outboard wing hydraulic system. hydraulic pressure is directed to the wheel well door actuator and to the normal sequence valve. During retraction or extension of the landing gear by one system. There are no provisions for emergency retraction. The tip gear circuits pass through the main landing gear oleo safety switches to prevent inadvertent retraction on the ground. Normal system pressure to the left and right outboard wing hydraulic systems is supplied by engine-driven pumps installed on engine No. When the solenoid in the normal control valve is energized. a throttle must be advanced to reactivate the warning horn system. 3 and No. This is necessary to ensure proper warning horn operation for an unsafe gear condition. will sound again when another throttle is retarded. do not change the position of the control handle or the emergency switch while the gear is in motion since this procedure may rupture a hydraulic line.5° above IDLE position while any one landing gear is not down and locked. In gear down operation. NOTE When all throttles have been retarded and the shutoff button has been used to silence the warning horn. The horn sounds a warning when any throttle is retarded below a position 2. 1-281 . Emergency pressure for tip gear extension is provided by the inboard wing hydraulic systems which receive pressure from engine-driven pumps installed on engine No. 7. 6. do not actuate the other system while the gear is in motion since this procedure may rupture a hydraulic line. Each outboard wing hydraulic system includes an electric standby pump which provides an alternate source of normal system pressure when energized by an individual switch. Provided a gear has not locked. the normal landing gear lever actuates switches which energize the down circuit. mechanical linkage opens the normal sequence valve permitting hydraulic pressure to enter the tip gear actuator thus extending the tip gear.25° to 7. The tip gear system operates in an indirect manner. is located on the copilot’s side of the aisle stand. the horn. respectively. Landing Gear Warning Horn and Shutoff Button The landing gear warning horn is flush-mounted on the upper aisle domelight mounting plate.

T. 1B-52H-1 Tip Gear System NORMAL CONTROL VALVE FROM OUTBOARD WING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM DOWN UP FROM INBOARD WING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM EMERGENCY EXTEND CONTROL VALVE GEAR DOWN LOCK (Opens when gear is locked down) HYDRAULIC FUSE SHUTTLE VALVE GEAR UP LOCK (Opens when gear is locked up) MAIN GEAR OLEO SWITCH (Opens on ground) CHECK VALVE OFF NORMAL SEQUENCE VALVE (Lock control) GEAR UP LANDING GEAR LEVER AND WARNING LIGHT EXTEND TIP GEAR EMERGENCY SWITCH GEAR DOWN TPG NOT IN TRAIL TIP GEAR CAUTION LIGHT SEQUENCE VALVE TIP GEAR ACTUATOR WHEEL WELL DOOR ACTUATOR TO MASTER CAUTION LIGHTS WHEEL WELL DOOR (Gear retracts be− fore door closes) TIP GEAR MAIN PRESSURE EMERGENCY PRESSURE RETURN ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS MECHANICAL ACTUATION TIP GEAR EXTENDED A31708 Figure 1-83 1-282 .O.

O. 1B-52H-1 Landing Gear Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 LANDING GEAR EMERGENCY SWITCHES (6 PLACES) LANDING GEAR POSITION INDICATORS (6 PLACES) LANDING GEAR WARNING LIGHT TEST BUTTON 4 5 6 LANDING GEAR LEVER LANDING GEAR WARNING LIGHT TIP PROTECTION GEAR NOT IN TRAIL CAUTION LIGHT Figure 1-84 (Sheet 1 of 4) Change 20 1-283 .T.

The tip gear emergency extend system will override the normal system hydraulically. The normal landing gear retract and extend circuits are deenergized by a lock switch when the landing gears are actuated to either extreme position. have EXTEND.-OFF positions since there are no emergency retraction provisions for the tip gear. The emergency switches control forward direct battery power for the left forward and right aft main landing gear and aft direct battery power for the right forward and left aft main landing gear. one for each main landing gear. Operation of the main landing gear control lever does not affect the position of the landing gear when the emergency switches are placed in either RETRACT or EXTEND position. the emergency pressure will reposition the shuttle valve allowing emergency pressure to actuate the main gears. either the normal or the emergency retract circuits cannot be energized for retraction when the aircraft is on the ground. one for each tip gear. The other two switches. Due to actuation of the main landing gear oleo strut switches by the weight of the aircraft. the normal control valve is deenergized allowing the normal control valve to position itself so that trapped hydraulic fluid is returned to the reservoir.-RETRACT positions. Actuation of the emergency landing gear switches does not automatically center the landing gear. the normal main gear circuits are interrupted by the emergency main gear circuits. When the emergency circuit is energized. Emergency retract and extend circuits are energized until the emergency switches are returned to OFF position. The switch guards are spring-loaded and are designed to return the switches from other positions to the OFF position when the guards are closed.-OFF. Each switch operates an emergency control valve to direct pressure from an alternate hydraulic system for gear actuation.O. Four switches. The electrical emergency extend (all gear) and retract (main gear only) circuits are independent of the normal circuits. 1B-52H-1 Landing Gear Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. However. have only EXTEND. With normal pressure relieved.T. Each separate landing gear may be actuated independently of the others by use of the individual emergency switches. 1 CONTROLINDICATOR Landing Gear Emergency Switches (6 places) FUNCTION Guarded switches used for emergency actuation of the landing gear. Landing gear actuation is provided by individual emergency switches when certain gear have failed to actuate after placing the main landing gear control lever in the desired position. provided a normal system retract signal is not present. Figure 1-84 (Sheet 2 of 4) 1-284 .

5) to illuminate.T. This increase in operating effort is caused by the requirement to displace the steering system. The safety stop provides a positive GEAR DOWN latched position if the pawl on the landing gear control lever fails to remain in the GEAR DOWN position detent. The lever quadrant with visible detents at each end is located on the face of the instrument panel and in addition. Each tab indicator has three visual indicators to register landing gear position. causes landing gear warning light (No. 4 Landing Gear Lever The lever handle is in the shape of a miniature landing gear wheel to facilitate recognition. the landing gear control lever. when the landing gear lever is moved to GEAR UP. This mechanical linkage also adjusts the steering ratio selector unit to zero ratio. When the landing gear is up and locked.O. The appearance of a wheel symbol indicates a gear down and locked. 1B-52H-1 NO. The landing gear lever is mechanically linked to a steering ratio selector unit which prevents movement to GEAR UP until the steering ratio selector lever is in TAKEOFF LAND position. In changing positions of the landing gear lever. A gear in an intermediate position or when there is no dc power on the aircraft is indicated by slanting alternate black and ivory stripes. Figure 1-84 (Sheet 3 of 4) 1-285 . Landing gear lever movement actuates a group of switches which control the solenoids of the control valves and the first motion of the landing gear hydraulic actuator will unlock the locks for gear actuation in either the up or down position. Positions of the lever are GEAR UP. The GEAR DOWN position of the landing gear lever energizes the landing light and crosswind landing light circuits.-GEAR DOWN. The landing gear lever controls TR power for all warning and indicator systems and essential power for normal landing gear control including the tip gears. The landing gear lever is held by a spring-loaded pawl and a detent on the inside end of the lever making it necessary to pull out on the handle approximately 1/4 inch to move the lever from one position to the other. the word UP appears in the tab window. which must be pulled out approximately 1/2 inch in changing positions. The quadrant has a safety stop at a midpoint position between the detents. NOTE The effort required to operate the landing gear lever is increased if the rudder pedals are not in neutral. 3 Landing Gear Warning Light Test Button When pressed. the pawl travels the lever quadrant surface which has detents at each end for engaging the pawl in the GEAR UP or GEAR DOWN position. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 2 Landing Gear Position Indicators (6 places) Tab-window type landing gear position indicators display landing gear position. is held in GEAR UP and GEAR DOWN positions by an overcenter spring.

5 FUNCTION Landing Gear Warning Light (Red) A red landing gear warning light in the end of the landing gear lever warns of incorrect landing gear position. the red light in the landing gear lever illuminates. the red light goes out provided the warning horn is not blowing. which is retracted by a control lever spring. is fully seated in the lever quadrant detents. NOTE Flight at high indicated airspeeds and Mach numbers may produce enough wing twist to cause the tip protection gear doors to gap open. While the master caution lights may be extinguished by pushing to reset. The warning light circuit is deenergized to allow the warning light to go out when the landing gear lever pawl. 6 Tip Protection Gear Not In Trail Caution Light (Amber) Light is marked TPG NOT IN TRAIL and illuminates when a reversal of the tip protection gear is detected. When the tip gear is reversed. Figure 1-84 (Sheet 4 of 4) 1-286 Change 22 . Reduction of airspeed will correct this situation. or when the landing gear lever is not in the detent. This light and the master caution lights illuminate if a tip gear casters more than 120° either side of trail. As soon as the landing gear is locked in the selected position. However. flight may be continued under these conditions without affecting normal operation of the aircraft. When gear actuation is taking place and the landing gear position does not agree with the landing gear lever position or the landing gear warning horn is blowing.O. the strut resides on the inboard side of the wheel and may cause damage if retraction is attempted. the central caution panel light will remain on until the tip gear casters to a trail aft position. 1B-52H-1 Landing Gear Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. This will cause the landing gear warning light to go on and cause an intermediate tip gear signal to appear.T.

CPCBP LLC COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RLC PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-85 1-287/(1-288 blank) . GEAR NORMAL CONTROL – LEFT AFT RIGHT FWD RIGHT TIP LLC/C23 LLC/C22 LLC/C24 Left ESS Left ESS Left ESS RLC/F9 RLC/F10 RLC/F11 Rt. ESS LANDING GEAR – SQUAT SWITCH CONTR – LEFT AFT LEFT FWD RIGHT AFT RIGHT FWD PCBP/B7 PCBP/B6 PCBP/B9 PCBP/B8 Rt. Fwd Batt. ESS MISCELLANEOUS – CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL ESS DC CPCBP/E9 Rt. ESS Normal Gear Control MISCELLANEOUS – LANDING GEAR NORMAL CONTROL – L FWD L TIP RT AFT LDG. 1B-52H-1 Landing Gear System Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Emergency Gear Control CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE LANDING GEAR – EMERGENCY CONTROL – LEFT AFT LEFT FWD LEFT TIP RIGHT AFT RIGHT FWD RIGHT TIP PCBP/A4 PCBP/A3 PCBP/A2 PCBP/A6 PCBP/A5 PCBP/A7 Aft Batt. TR Gear Warning Light LANDING GEAR – SW & POS WARN PCBP/B3 Rt. ESS Oleo (Squat) Safety Switches Control Tip Gear Caution Light 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. ESS Left ESS Left ESS Rt. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. Aft Batt. Rt.O. ESS Fwd Batt. Left ESS Gear Position Indicators LANDING GEAR – POS IND PCBP/B2 Rt. ESS Rt. ESS Gear Warning Horn and Shutoff Button LANDING GEAR – POS & FLAPS WARN HORN PCBP/A1 Rt. ESS Rt.T.

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it will trail the other front gear which has steering avail- able. a forward drum. This valve was also incorporated on the rear gear so that towing from the rear could be accomplished. Section III. The bypass keys for the forward gears are attached to the ground lock streamers. a valve between the steering actuating cylinders on each forward gear must be opened by a steering bypass key (figure 1-81) to bleed pressure. During forward towing operations. the available turning angle of the forward gear relative to the new neutral is 55° in the direction of the crab setting and 55° minus the crab setting in the direction opposite the crab setting. a jackscrew. All three are interconnected. and a rear drum. See figure 1-87. NOTE Actuation of the crosswind crab system sets up a new neutral position for steering which does not affect the turning angle available with the takeoff and landing steering ratio but limits the turning angle available with the taxi steering ratio. The steering ratio selector unit mechanically limits steering angles for two conditions. 1B-52H-1 STEERING AND CROSSWIND CRAB SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION A means of steering the aircraft on the ground and of presetting the crab angle of the landing gear during crosswind landings and takeoffs is furnished by two separate yet integrated systems known as the steering and the crosswind crab system (figure 1-86). Movement of the forward drum moves the rear drum through linkage to mechanically operate the steering metering valves on each of the forward main gear. Steering is accomplished when the rudder pedals move mechanical and cable linkage through a ratio selector unit and a differential coordinating unit to the metering valves which hydraulically position the forward main gear. Change 4 1-289 . Emergency source of hydraulic pressure is not available for steering. The steering system and crosswind crab system are integrated through mechanical and cable linkage to a differential coordinating unit. The steering metering valves meter hydraulic pressure to the actuating cylinders which position each forward gear for steering or all four gear for crosswind crab. The maximum steering angle is reduced when rudder trim in the opposite direction is used. Centering springs are provided near each steering valve which only assist in returning the gear and rudder pedals to neutral whenever pressure on the rudder pedals is removed. These valves meter hydraulic pressure to the actuating cylinders to position the gear as desired. The left forward gear uses pressure from the left body hydraulic system and the right forward gear uses pressure from the right body hydraulic system. steering to the left is reduced when nose right trim is introduced. The differential coordinating unit has three main components. Steering and crosswind crab system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-89. See LANDING WITH ONE FORWARD GEAR STEERING FAILURE. under certain conditions. STEERING SYSTEM The forward main landing gear are steered by hydraulic pressure controlled by movement of the rudder pedals. A taxi ratio allows the forward gear to be turned to a maximum angle of 55° right or left of a center position with full rudder pedal travel. When the key is inserted into the steering metering valve receptacle.O. Rudder pedal movement for steering mechanically moves the forward drum in an amount determined by the ratio selector. however. With crosswind crab set and the steering ratio selector in TAXI. standby pressure can be used.T. The steering angle is reduced proportionally to the amount of trim used to displace the rudder pedals. The second ratio is used for takeoff and landing and restricts the turning angle to approximately 12° right or left of center. NOTE For maximum steering and rudder control. Cable and mechanical linkage from this unit operate steering metering valves on both forward and rear main gear. no rudder trim should be used. one pin secures the key in place and the other moves the bypass valve to bleed pressure. In the event of steering failure on one front gear. This is to prevent damage caused by hydraulic locking of the pistons in the actuating cylinders. For example.

RUDDER PEDALS FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM LANDING GEAR LEVER GEAR UP TAKEOFF LAND TRUNNION SWIVEL SHUTOFF VALVE GEAR DOWN TAXI STEERING RATIO SELECTOR LEVER STEERING METERING VALVE STEERING METERING VALVE STEERING RATIO SELECTOR UNIT Figure 1-86 (Sheet 1 of 2) STEERING COMPENSATOR VALVE MANUAL STEERING BYPASS VALVE (TOWING) OVERTRAVEL UNIT METERING VALVE ACTUATOR AND CENTERING SPRINGS OVERTRAVEL UNIT REAR DRUM FORWARD DRUM MANUAL STEERING BYPASS VALVE (TOWING) JACKSCREW CROSSWIND CRAB CENTERING MOTOR STEERING ACTUATORS DIFFERENTIAL COORDINATING UNIT STEERING ACTUATORS CROSSWIND CRAB CENTERING BUTTON CROSSWIND CRAB POSITION TRANSMITTER PUSH TO CENTER GEAR A31709 LEFT FORWARD LANDING GEAR Steering and Crosswind Crab System TRUNNION SWIVEL SHUTOFF VALVE T. 1B-52H-1 1-290 FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM CROSSWIND CRAB CONTROL KNOB RIGHT FORWARD LANDING GEAR STEERING COMPENSATOR VALVE .O.

FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM TRUNNION SWIVEL SHUTOFF VALVE TRUNNION SWIVEL SHUTOFF VALVE CROSSWIND CENTERING SWITCHES STEERING METERING VALVE STEERING METERING VALVE TO LANDING GEAR LEVER STEERING COMPENSATION VALVE STEERING COMPENSATOR VALVE Figure 1-86 (Sheet 2 of 2) OVERTRAVEL UNIT OVERTRAVEL UNIT TO EVS CROSSWIND CRAB POSITION INDICATOR (Left main landing gear only) STEERING ACTUATORS STEERING ACTUATORS CROSSWIND CRAB POSITION TRANSMITTER 1-291 A31710 STATIC LEFT REAR LANDING GEAR ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS MECHANICAL ACTUATION RIGHT REAR LANDING GEAR T. 1B-52H-1 NORMAL PRESSURE RETURN .O.

T. 1B-52H-1 Turning Angles Available With Maximum Crosswind Crab Setting Figure 1-87 1-292 .O.

The direction of the landing gear is preset by a crosswind crab control knob which mechanically operates the steering metering valves on each main gear.000 pounds. The landing gear can be preset and turned up to 20° left or right of center during the approach. These valves meter hydraulic pressure to the actuating cylinders to position the gear as desired. the gear is quickly centered by a pilot-operated centering button or by turning the crosswind crab control knob to center.O. 1-293 . The crosswind crab system is automatically centered when the landing gear lever is moved to the GEAR UP position. This system utilizes the steering actuators on the front main gear and a similar set on the rear main gear. The maximum of 20° crab will accommodate landings in crosswinds up to and including 43 knots blowing 90° to the runway at a landing weight of 270. STEERING AND CROSSWIND CRAB SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS A discussion of steering and crosswind crab system controls and indicators is contained in figure 1-88. The crosswind crab system provides a means of turning all four main gear to align with the runway while the aircraft is flown in a wings-level attitude compensating for drift. 1B-52H-1 CROSSWIND CRAB SYSTEM A crosswind crab system is provided on this aircraft to facilitate making crosswind takeoffs and landings and to reduce the hazards of crosswind conditions. Crab position of the aft gear is fed to the EVS for positioning the STV and FLIR sensors. On the ground after landing.T.

1B-52H-1 Steering and Crosswind Crab Controls and Indicators 1 2 CROSSWIND CRAB POSITION INDICATOR CROSSWIND CRAB CONTROL KNOB AND INDICATOR 3 4 CROSSWIND CRAB CONTROL CENTERING BUTTON STEERING RATIO SELECTOR LEVER Figure 1-88 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-294 .O.T.

mounted one above the other. Two movable pointers. this section. It is to be noted that the rear main gear can be steered only through movement of the jackscrew of the coordinating unit while the forward main gear are steered by movement of the rear drum of the coordinating unit. see LANDING GEAR OLEO SAFETY SWITCHES. it is necessary to lift up before turning. a simple needle. 1B-52H-1 NO. 1 CONTROLINDICATOR Crosswind Crab Position Indicator FUNCTION The crosswind crab position indicator shows in a relative plan view presentation the amount in degrees that the landing gear is turned to compensate for aircraft crab during crosswind conditions. The jackscrew positions the rear drum of the coordinating unit to move cable and mechanical linkage to operate the forward gear steering metering valves. and the upper pointer.T.O. both pointers of the crosswind crab indicator should match crab angle within 2°. The jackscrew also moves cable and mechanical linkage to operate the rear gear steering metering valves. upon aircraft taxiing. if an unobserved crab setting exists. indicates the forward gear. The indicator is an electrically operated instrument and receives power from the TR bus which is carried through two position transmitters. Figure 1-88 (Sheet 2 of 3) 1-295 . Therefore. the landing gear safety switch will be actuated causing certain aircraft systems to start operating or to shut down. indicates the rear gear. the lower pointer will move in a direction opposite that of the turn and the upper pointer will remain in the position of the crab angle. The crosswind crab control knob and indicator is recessed in the rudder trim control knob on the aft end of the aisle stand. NOTE • • 2 Crosswind Crab Control Knob After crosswind crab has been set. The control has an indicator in the form of a miniature aircraft which points to a degree scale to indicate the amount of nose left or right crab selected. The rear drum can be moved both by the jackscrew for crosswind crab and by the forward drum of the coordinating unit for steering by the rudder pedals. it is always considered that the aircraft is being turned into the wind at an angle to the runway. The lower pointer. cable linkage moves the jackscrew at the differential coordinating unit. When the crosswind crab control knob is turned for crab. When the aircraft is steered. indicate the degree of turn. NOTE When the main landing gear are extended and crabbed in flight to an angle equal to or exceeding 14° through any combination of crosswind crab setting and rudder pedal movement. For further information. The indicator has a diagram marked with a miniature runway and a scale calibrated from 0° to 20° both right and left. To move the control. The control knob can be turned while the aircraft is on the ground with responding control knob indicator movement without hydraulic pressure or electrical power. in the form of a miniature aircraft. Since the gear position is in the opposite direction from that indicated by the pointers. the gear will immediately actuate to a left or right crab position resulting in the aircraft rapidly departing centerline. one on the left forward gear and one on the left rear gear. This action allows steering of the forward gear even when the forward gear are preset for crosswind crab.

O. A trunnion swivel shutoff valve is on each main gear and shuts off hydraulic pressure to the steering valves when the landing gear have retracted 38° to 60°. 4 Steering Ratio Selector Lever Used to select one of two steering ratios. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 3 Crosswind Crab Control Centering Button Used to center all four main landing gear from a turned position to neutral. This prevents any actuation of the steering metering valves by rudder pedal movement and returns the steering control system to center. a knob on the lever must be pulled up to free the lever from a detent position. It is covered with a moisture and dust-proof rubber cap which must be pressed to actuate the centering button. the circuit is energized to operate the centering motor. This condition can be avoided by placing the rudder pedals in the neutral position before moving the steering ratio selector lever. Since normally the landing gear lever will be positioned before using the emergency landing gear switches. This prevents steering action before the gear has cleared the wheel well during landing gear extension. To move the lever from either one of these positions. Centering cams in each gear maintain the gear at centered position as soon as oleos are fully extended. NOTE With the steering ratio selector lever in either the TAXI or TAKEOFF LAND position. When the landing gear lever is moved to GEAR UP. is supplied TR power. Figure 1-88 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-296 . The crosswind crab centering button controls an electric motor which turns the jackscrew in the coordinating unit in the desired direction to center all four gear. The centering button. 1B-52H-1 Steering and Crosswind Crab Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. This is the result of attempting to steer the landing gear to the new position as required by the steering ratio selector unit through use of the selector lever. This is done to prevent moving the landing gear lever up unless the ratio selector lever is in TAKEOFF LAND and to prevent moving the ratio selector lever while the landing gear are retracted. The direction of the motor is governed by two cam-actuated centering switches on the left rear main landing gear. When the lever is moved from one position to the other. The two ratios are TAXI. The ratio selector lever is mechanically linked to the landing gear lever. the landing gear will follow the rudder pedal displacement by a predetermined amount. power to the motor is interrupted causing all centering action to stop. When the left rear gear is centered. the linkage will adjust the steering ratio selector unit to a zero steering ratio. it mechanically adjusts the steering ratio selector unit to limit the angle of turn available. Moving the selector lever from one to the other position will be met by increasing resistance as the rudder displacement is increased from the neutral position.T. When either of these switches are actuated by the cam and the centering button is pushed. a push-type switch that is spring-loaded to OFF position. the ratio selector will usually be adjusted accordingly.-TAKEOFF LAND which allow steering of up to 55° and approximately 12° respectively.

1B-52H-1 Steering and Crosswind Crab Systems Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT 11 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Crosswind Crab Control Centering Button LANDING GEAR – CENTERING CONTR PCBP/B1 Rt. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.O. PCBP PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-89 1-297/(1-298 blank) . TR Crosswind Crab Position Indicator LANDING GEAR – CROSSWIND CRAB IND PCBP/B5 Left TR The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list.T. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.

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An antiskid indicator panel is installed on the copilot’s side panel for testing antiskid electrical circuits. A retraction lockout cylinder is connected to each spring cartridge assembly. Hydraulic pressure to the brakes is further controlled by an antiskid system. Parking brakes are also provided. The return springs return and hold the metering valves in the off position. There is a pressure gage on each accumulator which gives brake system pressure or air preload if the brake system is bled down. Both aft brake slave metering valves are normally supplied with slave pressure from the left body hydraulic system. The feel springs absorb linkage travel and hold spring tension on the metering valves. one located in each wheel well. Differential pressure in the normal slave line holds a control valve in the alternate slave line closed.O. The two forward main gear brakes are actuated simultaneously and the two rear main gear brakes are slaved to the forward brake systems. one for each rear main gear. No differential braking is provided. Slave pressure from either body system will open the slave metering valves of both aft gear to permit brake application from pressure supplied by the body system which corresponds with the side on which the gear is located. WHEEL BRAKE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM Each main landing gear has an individual brake system as shown in figure 1-90. Either slave line pressure can enter the two slave metering valves through a shuttle valve on each metering valve. Wheel brake system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-92. The shuttle valve positions according to pressure differential. This provides equal braking pressure on all four main gear. An antiskid system to automatically detect and correct a skid condition is on each wheel of the main landing gear. Pressure is supplied to the two slave metering valves through the normal slave line or the alternate slave line. one is brake actuation on each wheel of the forward main gear and the other is hydraulic actuation of the two slave metering valves. Brake application pressure is supplied to each aft main landing gear by individual slave pressure-operated metering valves. There is an accumulator for each main gear brake system. This reduced braking pressure. Toe pressure on the rudder pedals is transmitted to two main metering valves through mechanical linkages and a spring system of feel and return springs. Change 4 1-299 . is for the purpose of preventing undue stresses on the retraction mechanism by a sudden braking of the wheels. Brake pressure for the front and rear gear on the right side is supplied by the right body system and pressure for the front and rear gear on the left side is supplied by the left body system. Braking is accomplished by toe pressure on any or all of the rudder pedals. to limit the amount of brake pressure that can be applied to stop wheel rotation during gear retraction. 1B-52H-1 WHEEL BRAKE SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Each wheel of the main landing gear has hydraulic brakes. which contains a retraction lockout spring and a return spring. which amounts to approximately onefourth normal braking pressure. The brakes are of the segmented rotor multiple-disc type utilizing cerametallic brake linings. The alternate slave line control valve will open if the pressure in the normal slave line becomes appreciably less than the pressure in the alternate slave line.T. an alternate source of slave pressure is supplied to both valves from the right body hydraulic system. Hydraulic pressure from the main metering valves is used for two purposes. however.

O. 1B-52H-1 1-300 RUDDER PEDALS NORMAL PRESSURE BRAKE PRESSURE NORMAL SLAVE PRESSURE ALTERNATE SLAVE PRESSURE RETURN FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SUPPLY LINE CHECK VALVE RETRACTION LOCKOUT VALVE AIR PRESSURE ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS MECHANICAL ACTUATION HYDRAULIC PRESSURE FROM RETRACTION PORT − ONE TO EACH FORWARD NORMAL LANDING GEAR CONTROL VALVE PARKING BRAKE HAND PUMP AND HANDLE (Ground use only) PARKING BRAKE PRESSURE GAGE CHECK VALVE ACCUMULATOR Figure 1-90 (Sheet 1 of 2) MAIN METERING VALVE MAIN METERING VALVE DUAL ANTI−SKID VALVE DUAL ANTI−SKID VALVE ALTERNATE SLAVE CONTROL VALVE ANTI−SKID SWITCH ON OFF HYDRAULIC FUSES ANTI−SKID CONTROL UNIT RESTRICTORS Wheel Brake System ACCUMULATOR HYDRAULIC FUSES RESTRICTORS SKID DETECTOR A31711 PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE LEFT FORWARD MAIN LANDING GEAR RIGHT FORWARD MAIN LANDING GEAR .T.

O.FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM HYDRAULIC FUSES CHECK VALVE CHECK VALVE ACCUMULATOR ACCUMULATOR Figure 1-90 (Sheet 2 of 2) SLAVE METERING VALVE SHUTTLE VALVE SLAVE METERING VALVE SHUTTLE VALVE DUAL ANTI SKID VALVE DUAL ANTI SKID VALVE HYDRAULIC FUSES HYDRAULIC FUSES RESTRICTORS RESTRICTORS PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE LEFT REAR MAIN LANDING GEAR RIGHT REAR MAIN LANDING GEAR T. 1B-52H-1 A31712 1-301 PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE .

1B-52H-1 Wheel Brake System Controls and Indicators 1 2 PARKING BRAKE LEVER ANTISKID SWITCH 3 4 ANTISKID INDICATOR LIGHTS ANTISKID TEST SWITCH Figure 1-91 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-302 Change 17 .O.T.

-OFF. then release the brake pedals.O. As long as hydraulic pressure is available. indicates the individual brake has released. ON. Figure 1-91 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-303 . 1B-52H-1 NO. The switch has FLT. and is guarded to the ON position.T. A mechanical linkage from the parking brake lever locks the brake pedals in a brakes-applied position. Illumination indicates that the antiskid shield for the corresponding wheel brake is receiving power. all eight indicator lights should illuminate. When the switch is ON. 3 Antiskid Indicator Lights (green) One for each of the 8 main wheel brakes When illuminated with antiskid test switch in GND position. all eight lights should be illuminated. when illuminated with antiskid test switch in FLT position. Illumination indicates that the antiskid system has released for that particular wheel brake. the antiskid system is in operation. 2 Antiskid Switch Switch has two positions. CONTROL/INDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Parking Brake Lever Moving the parking brake lever aft while depressing the brake pedals sets the parking brakes. With the aircraft on the ground and the antiskid test switch in the GND position.-GND positions and is springloaded to OFF. indicates the antiskid shields have power. The parking brake may be released by merely depressing the brake pedals until the parking brake lever releases. With the aircraft in flight and the antiskid test switch in FLT position. 4 Antiskid TEST Switch FLT OFF GND Is used to test the antiskid system before taxiing and before landing.-OFF. the brakes will remain on.

At the end of the skid signal. The dual antiskid valve is then positioned to shut off pressure to the brake and opens a port to the return line releasing the brake pressure on that wheel. located on the copilot’s side panel. This valve is spring-loaded to the open position to allow pressure to reach the brakes. and an antiskid switch. The antiskid system is supplied with essential dc power from each main gear antiskid shield. Upon brake pressure release. the brake pressure is again restored to the wheel. The antiskid indicator is supplied with essential dc power from each main gear antiskid shield. The dual antiskid valve is electrically actuated through relays from a skid detector unit on each wheel. brake pressure is again restored to the wheel. Parking Brake Hydraulic Hand Pump The parking brake hydraulic hand pump is used to charge the left front gear accumulator pressure during towing operations. a dual antiskid valve for each gear. For further information. ANTISKID INDICATOR PANEL The antiskid indicator panel (figure 1-91). a signal is transmitted by the skid detector unit through the 1-304 relay unit to actuate the valve. see LANDING GEAR OLEO SAFETY SWITCHES. Approximately 70 double strokes are required on the hand pump to charge the accumulator for one or two brake applications with the antiskid switch OFF. a relay unit for each main gear. 1B-52H-1 Rudder Pedals Toe pressure on any one of the four rudder pedals will actuate the wheel brakes. this section. If the skid continues until wheel rotation stops. a locked wheel signal is transmitted through an additional relay to release brake pressure from that wheel. After a short time delay to permit the wheel to reach nonskid speed. is used to perform a cross check of the antiskid system. NOTE A skid or locked wheel condition on any one wheel does not affect braking on any other wheel. following a very short time delay.O. ANTISKID SYSTEM The antiskid system consists of a skid detector on each main gear wheel.T. . When any wheel is in a skid condition. The hand pump and handle are located on the right side of the forward wheel well. the wheel is free to rotate and again starts to accelerate.

differential wheel loadings due to turns and crosswinds. as during taxiing. There are two reasons for this loss in braking effectiveness with skidding. While taxiing on a slippery surface with the antiskid switch ON. it is possible to lose up to 50% of the effective braking due to locked wheel conditions. themselves. it should not be used to its maximum potential to purposely make all landing rolls as short as possible since this causes undue wear of the tires and brakes. Section V. the immediate action is to scuff the rubber. location of the wheel well doors affecting the airflow around the wheels. that is. Any heat at all radiating from a brake indicates that it has been operating satisfactorily even though no two brakes will be at the same temperature. but stopping the aircraft is dependent on the friction of the tires on the runway. If this occurs. merely stop the wheels from turning. WHEEL BRAKE LIMITATIONS See WHEEL BRAKE LIMITATIONS and TIRE LIMITATIONS. resulting in considerable delay on runway operations. the antiskid system automatically releases brakes on the affected gear (possibly all gear) when the aircraft is moving at a slow rate of speed. The amount of heat radiating from the brake depends on these variables: amount of braking needed to stop the aircraft. turning the antiskid switch OFF restores braking action without antiskid protection. When the antiskid switch is OFF. Although the antiskid system allows for immediate braking after touchdown. Usually some heat will be felt when approaching wheel brake rotor or housing with the hand. and difference in rpm settings of the antiskid systems. This frictional force. see figure 5-14. in turn. To provide minimum brake weight. the military specification to which the brakes are designed requires that they provide for only one maximum refused takeoff stop. Optimum braking occurs with approximately a 15% to 20% rolling skid. However. the remaining braking action with antiskid protection is more effective than full braking without antiskid. ANTISKID OPERATION The antiskid system is intended to prevent skids at high speed under light wheel loads and to provide optimum braking resulting in shorter stopping distances regardless of the surface conditions. 1B-52H-1 WHEEL BRAKE NORMAL OPERATION Brakes. As the amount of skid increases beyond this amount. Cold brakes on this aircraft may result from landing in a moderate headwind at light weight. on a long runway when little or no braking was done.O. First. Therefore. BRAKE DESIGN Aerodynamic braking should be utilized in an attempt to keep wheel brake usage to a minimum. NOTE Improper servicing of the shock struts or a malfunctioning landing gear safety switch may prevent transfer of the antiskid system from the ‘‘airborne’’ mode to the ‘‘ground’’ mode. Therefore. and with a full skid becomes even lower. It is possible that the overheated brakes may seize. the heat generated starts to melt the rubber and the molten rubber acts as a lubricant between the tire and the ground surface. the coefficient of friction decreases rapidly so that with a 75% skid. is dependent on the load imposed on the wheel. Under such a condition. The tendency for the tires to skid decreases considerably when the full weight of the aircraft is on the wheels. 1-305 . the wheel continues to rotate but has approximately 15% to 20% slippage on the surface so that the rotational speed is 80% to 85% of the speed which the wheel would have were it in a free roll. When loss of braking due to this condition is experienced. For brake energy limits. it is advisable to taxi clear of the runway using minimum braking before coming to a complete stop and not to apply the parking brake. the friction is approximately 60% of the optimum. lift should also be decreased as much as possible by extension of the airbrakes. consistent with safe operation. or when there is a definite malfunction or failure of a brake. amount of hydraulic pressure delivered to the brakes. braking action depends entirely on the pressure applied to the brake pedals.T. optimum braking action on landings cannot be expected until the tires are carrying heavy loads. the antiskid switch should be ON during takeoff and landing. Second. tearing off little pieces which act almost like rollers under the tire.

O.T. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. ESS Left ESS The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. 1B-52H-1 Wheel Brake System Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Antiskid Control Circuits and Panel Indicators 11 LANDING GEAR – ANTI-SKID CONTROL – LEFT AFT LEFT FWD RIGHT AFT RIGHT FWD CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 PCBP/B12 PCBP/B10 PCBP/B14 PCBP/B13 POWER SOURCE Rt. ESS Left ESS Rt. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. PCBP PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-92 1-306 .

The pilot chute then pulls out the main drag chute. For operating limits of the drag chute. NOTE If the door opens accidentally.-JETTISON. When the compartment door is opened. This rod must be removed before flight. NOTE A locking device on the control system operated by the drag chute compartment door prevents actuation of the jettison mechanism when the door is closed. JETTISON position causes release of the jettison mechanism and allows the chute to pull free of the aircraft. 1B-52H-1 DRAG CHUTE SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A 44-foot ribbon-type drag chute is provided for deceleration during the landing roll. the lever must be moved to DEPLOY before it can be moved to JETTISON position. LOCKED position holds the spring-loaded drag chute compartment door securely closed. thus deploying the drag chute. the chute will be jettisoned automatically by the drag chute mechanism. DRAG CHUTE LEVER A drag chute lever (10. sheet 1 of figure 1-1) aft of the rudder in the top of the tail section of the fuselage. The opening door pulls the ripcord and releases the spring-loaded pilot chute into the slipstream.-LOCKED. see AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS. This le- ver manually operates the drag chute release and jettison mechanisms through a cable system. a steel safety rod is provided to install through the aircraft skin and engage the door hinge arms. the drag chute is deployed. PERSONNEL SAFETY ROD To protect parachute loading personnel against inadvertent drag chute door opening. figure 1-6) is located on the copilot’s side of the aisle stand. The risers of the main chute are attached to the aircraft through a terminal held by the jettison mechanism.T. The parachute is installed in a compartment (3. Normally. Section V.O. 1-307/(1-308 blank) . A hinged stop prevents movement of the control lever from LOCKED to DEPLOY position without lifting the stop in order to prevent inadvertent deployment. Positions of the lever are DEPLOY.

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BOMB-DOOR-CLOSE TIMER A bomb-door-close timer is provided to supply a bomb door close signal when the OAS is operating the bomb doors during a conventional gravity release.O. latches. The aft bomb door latch actuator is supplied normal pressure by the right body hydraulic system through the aft main control valve. The left body hydraulic system supplies alternate pressure automatically to the forward bomb door actuator through the forward emergency control valve whenever the normal pressure is low or fails. etc). The bomb-door-close timer starts to work upon receiving the first bomb release pulse from the bomb release interval control and. The bomb or missile jettison systems will open the doors but will not close them. During ground operation. Both bomb door latch actuators are bused together by cable so that when hydraulic pressure is 1-309 1-309 1-312 1-315 1-315 1-315 1-316 1-316 available to either or both of the bomb door latch actuators. The OAS can operate the doors automatically. The right body hydraulic system supplies normal pressure to operate the forward and aft bomb door actuators through the forward and aft main control valves. Airloads will then position the bomb doors to some position between closed and full open depending on indicated airspeed. Six double-panel doors cover the bomb bay opening. the bomb doors may be unlatched by manually pulling the bomb door latch release cable in the aft wheel well. approximately 3 seconds after receiving the last bomb release pulse. The forward bomb door latch actuator is supplied normal pressure by the left body hydraulic system through the forward emergency control valve. 1B-52H-1 BOMB DOOR SYSTEM DESCRIPTION BOMB-DOOR-CLOSE TIMER CONTROLS AND INDICATORS NORMAL OPERATION OAS AUTOMATIC BOMB DOOR OPERATION OAS MANUAL BOMB DOOR OPERATION BOMB DOOR OPERATION WITH RADAR NAVIGATOR’S BOMB DOOR SWITCH BOMB DOOR OPERATION WITH PILOT’S BOMB DOOR SWITCH DESCRIPTION The bomb door system (figure 1-93) comprises doors. All actuation by the bomb door system affects the lower panels only. the OAS does supply power to close the bomb doors when operating in the bomb mode (and the bombing system switch is in AUTO) provided a bombdoor-open signal is not present at the preset time to go. it causes a continuous door close signal to be sent.T. The doors are latched at the forward and aft bulkheads of the bomb bay. the bomb door safety relay is energized and disables all bomb-door-close circuits (OAS. During the computer controlled bomb door open phase. The doors can be operated with the bomb door switch on either the pilot’s or radar navigator’s control panel. the center doors are mechanically linked to the forward and aft doors. the forward and aft latches will be released. The OAS does not actually supply a bomb door close signal following bomb release. Neither the forward or aft bomb door latch actuator has an alternate source of hydraulic pressure. A forward special weapon manual release handle is connected to the latch actuator cable to provide an emergency means of unlatching the bomb doors. Change 20 1-309 . Bomb door system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-95. with no power on the aircraft. The bomb doors are held closed by mechanical latches and held open by hydraulic pressure. The upper panels are hinged to provide a larger opening for ground service. manual. however. To secure simultaneous action of all doors. Bomb door operation (open/close cycle) (open only for normal jettison) (figure 1-93) is computer controlled for launch or normal jettison of bomb bay missiles. and the systems which control them.

1B-52H-1 Bomb Door System Figure 1-93 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-310 .O.T.

1B-52H-1 Figure 1-93 (Sheet 2 of 2) Change 4 1-311 .O.T.

T. 1B-52H-1 Bomb Door Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 PILOTS’ BOMB BAY & MISSILE JETTISON SWITCH PILOTS’ BOMB DOOR SWITCH RADAR NAVIGATOR’S BOMB BAY JETTISON CONTROL SWITCH PILOTS’ BOMB DOORS NOT LATCHED LIGHT PILOTS’ BOMB DOORS OPEN LIGHT 6 7 8 9 10 11 BOMB DOOR CONTROL VALVE LIGHTS (2) BOMBING SYSTEM SWITCH BOMB DOOR NOT LATCHED LIGHT BOMB DOOR OPEN LIGHT RADAR NAVIGATOR’S BOMB DOOR CONTROL SWITCH MASTER BOMB CONTROL (POWER) SWITCH Figure 1-94 (Sheet 1 of 3) 1-312 Change 20 .O.

4 Pilots’ BOMB DOORS NOT LATCHED Caution Light (Amber) Illuminates. The bomb-doors-open light receives TR power through the limit switch actuated by the forward bomb door radius rod on aircraft. Actuating this switch to CLOSED position de-energizes the jettison circuits if the jettison circuit is energized and will close the bomb doors. 3 Radar Navigator’s BOMB BAY JETTISON CONTROL Switch The radar navigator’s switch opens the bomb doors in the same manner as the pilot’s jettison switch (1). Each light will illuminate when the hydraulic pressure in the line is above 1500 (±50) psi and go out when the hydraulic pressure in the line is below 1300 (±100) psi.O. the bomb doors will be held open until the bomb-doors-close circuit is energized.T. indicates the bomb doors are fully open. 2 Pilot’s BOMB DOORS Switch Used to control operation of the bomb doors. 5 Pilots’ BOMB DOORS OPEN Light (Green) When illuminated. The light remains on until the bomb doors are closed and the forward bomb door is latched. This switch is inoperative for all CSRL gravity weapons and all nuclear and conventional missiles. The switch has OPEN. Actuating this switch to OPEN or CLOSED position energizes the bombdoors-open circuit or the bomb-doors-close circuit which positions the bomb door control valves to direct hydraulic pressure to the bomb door actuators. when the forward bomb door latch is unlatched.-CLOSED positions and is spring-loaded to OFF position. 6 FWD and AFT BOMB DOOR CONTROL VALVE Lights (Amber) (2) The bomb door control valve lights. indicate hydraulic pressure exists in the respective bomb door close line and that the bomb doors may be damaged if the bomb door open circuit is energized. and the bomb door safety switches are positioned so bomb release may be made by either the normal or jettison system. 1B-52H-1 NO. Momentarily pressing the switch energizes the jettison circuits using aft battery power. the bomb door open circuits are energized and all the weapons (internal and external) will be released in a safe configuration.-OFF. Figure 1-94 (Sheet 2 of 3) Change 12 1-313 . Activation will jettison only conventional gravity weapons. When the jettison circuits are energized. recessed in the panel to discourage inadvertent actuation. along with the MASTER CAUTION light. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Pilot’s BOMB BAY & MISSILE JETTISON CONTROL Switch Button type switch. Do not attempt to free a bomb door control (four-way) valve by opening the bomb doors as this procedure may damage the bomb door system. The light remains illuminated as long as the bomb doors are fully open. The bomb doors are held open while the jettison circuits are energized. when illuminated.

the bomb doors will be held open until the bomb-doors-close circuit is energized. energizes the bomb doors close circuit. NOTE The bomb doors cannot be operated with the OAS (bombing system switch in AUTO) when the special weapons select switch is in any position other than FWD RACK or AFT RACK. 10 BOMB DOOR CONTROL Switch Used to control operation of the bomb doors.-CLOSE positions and is spring-loaded to the unmarked OFF position. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION MASTER BOMB CONTROL PANEL 7 BOMBING SYSTEM CONTROL Switch Used to transfer control of the bomb doors from the OAS to the radar navigator’s bomb door switch. and the bomb door safety switches are positioned so bomb release may be made by either the normal or jettison system. The switch has AUTO--MANUAL positions. The light will remain on until the bomb doors are closed and the forward bomb door is latched. the OAS is prevented from dropping bombs if the bomb doors are not full open. 9 BOMB DOOR OPEN Light When illuminated. When positioned to ON. An open-type guard discourages inadvertent actuation. Power is supplied to this switch through relay contacts when the bomb doors are open and the bombing system switch is in MANUAL position. including bomb door control. Figure 1-94 (Sheet 3 of 3) 1-314 . 1B-52H-1 Bomb Door Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. When actuated to CLOSE with the bombing system switch in MANUAL and the master bomb control switch in ON position.T. TR power from the bomb indicator lights switch is supplied to the power-on indicator light and the bomb release circuits. In either position. AUTO position allows the OAS control of the bomb doors.O. 11 MASTER BOMB CONTROL POWER Switch The switch has ON--OFF positions.-OFF. The bomb-doors-open light receives TR power through the limit switch actuated by the forward bomb door radius rod on aircraft. Not applicable to CSRL releases. indicates bomb doors are fully open. energizes the bomb doors open circuit. The switch has OPEN. When actuated to OPEN with the bombing system switch in MANUAL and the master bomb control switch in ON position. 8 BOMB DOOR NOT LATCHED Light (Amber) Illuminates when the forward bomb door latch is unlatched. MANUAL position transfers control of the bomb doors to the radar navigator’s bomb door switch. The light remains illuminated as long as the bomb doors are fully open.

Weapons Control Panel Missile Launch Mode Switch – AUTO OAS MANUAL BOMB DOOR OPERATION The OAS can be used to manually open or close the bomb doors regardless of switch settings on the master bomb control panel. The bomb door control valve lights on the radar navigator’s front panel will illuminate if there is pressure in the bomb-door-close lines. in simulation mode a bomb door fault will not prohibit a simulated gravity release (non-CSRL simulation only). 4. For these SMOs (all. 3. 1B-52H-1 BOMB DOOR SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION The OAS and bomb door switches at the pilot’s and radar navigator’s stations are used for normal operation of the bomb doors.T. Door closure is accomplished 3 seconds after any release/launch. The No. Door opening for all missile launches is set at 3 seconds and non-modifiable.O. if CF-59 is used to close bomb doors after a gravity weapon delivery. Command OAS to FLY TO a gravity target. 3. When illuminated. The door opening time for all gravity releases is modifiable via FRMT 8 from 0 to 15 seconds and initializes at 3 seconds. To accomplish automatic OAS bomb door operation proceed as follows: CLUSTER RACK 1. except GWD SMO). The No. Bomb doors can be opened and closed both inflight and during ground operations by use of the CF-59 command. 5. 6. OAS AUTOMATIC BOMB DOOR OPERATION The OAS will automatically open the bomb doors at a predetermined time for gravity weapons releases from cluster racks or the CSRL and for missile launches from the CSRL. Monitoring the CF-5 display during use of CF-59 will allow the operator to reference bomb door status (OPEN. 2. This will not necessarily preclude release in any mode as long as CF-5 or the program display indicates a bomb door open status. 4 and 5 lights on the pilot’s hydraulic control panel will illuminate when the respective system pressure is low. Ensure ground personnel are clear of bomb doors before entering the CF-59 command. the master bomb control switch must be cycled to ensure the proper weapon release sequence is retained. or UNLTCHD). For gravity releases from the CSRL and all missile launches. Change 20 1-315 . except the GWD SMO) the OAS display is the only indication of the bomb door status that is used by the OAS to approve an automatic release. Command OAS to FLY TO a gravity target. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. Using either the pilot’s or radar navigator’s manual bomb door switch will always result in a master fault for bomb doors. CLSD. However. For gravity releases from cluster racks. Master Bomb Control Switch – ON Bomb Indicator Light Switch – ON Bombing System Switch – AUTO Release Circuits Disconnect – Connected DBRIC – Set ROTARY LAUNCHER 1. The bomb-doors-notlatched lights will illuminate when the forward bomb door latch is unlatched and they remain illuminated until the forward bomb door latch is latched again. However. 7. The OAS monitors a separate safety switch than the circuit which provides the bomb-door-open light indication at the pilot’s and radar navigator’s stations. 5 engine hydraulic pump supplies normal bomb-door-open and close hydraulic pressure. the bomb-doorsopen lights indicate the bomb doors are fully open and the bomb door system will now hold the bomb doors open until closing action is initiated. the OAS display must indicate an open bomb door condition in order to allow a release. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. the open and close signal is routed through the AIU. Hydraulic pressure is available for bomb door operation when either engine 5 or 4 is in operation. NOTE For SMOs that use the Armament Interface Unit (AIU) to open the bomb bay doors (all. the open signal is routed through the RIU and the bomb-door-close-timer provides the bomb door close signal. Exercise caution during ground operation of bomb doors with CF-59. 2.

O. Radar Navigator’s Bomb Door Switch – CLOSE Hold the switch in CLOSE position until the bombdoor-not-latched lights are out. then release. The bomb doors will remain closed. Master Bomb Control Switch – ON 3. To close the bomb doors with the radar navigator’s bomb door switch: Do not attempt to open the bomb doors with the pilot’s bomb door switch when the bombing system switch is in AUTO position and the OAS is operating in the bomb mode. 1. Bombing System Switch – MANUAL 4. 1-316 . Pilot’s Bomb Door Switch – CLOSED Hold the switch in CLOSED position until the bomb-door-not-latched lights are out. The bomb doors will remain open. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. as the bomb doors will keep cycling (opening partly and then slamming closed) until either the pilot’s bomb door switch is positioned to OFF or the bombing system switch is positioned to MANUAL. To close the bomb doors with the pilot’s bomb door switch: 1. 2. 4. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. then release. Pilot’s Bomb Door Switch – OPEN Hold the switch in OPEN position until the bombdoor-open lights illuminate. 3. then release. Loss of hydraulic pressure will allow the bomb doors to be positioned by the airstream loads to some intermediate position between full open and closed depending on indicated airspeed. 1B-52H-1 BOMB DOOR OPERATION WITH RADAR NAVIGATOR’S BOMB DOOR SWITCH BOMB DOOR OPERATION WITH PILOT’S BOMB DOOR SWITCH To open the bomb doors with the radar navigator’s bomb door switch: To open the bomb doors with the pilot’s bomb door switch: 1.T. 2. depending on indicated airspeed. 2. 1. then release. The bomb doors will remain open. Loss of hydraulic pressure will allow the bomb doors to be positioned by the airstream loads to some intermediate position between full open and closed. Engine 5 or 4 in operation. The bomb doors will remain closed. 2. Master Bomb Control Switch – ON Bombing System Switch – MANUAL Radar Navigator’s Bomb Door Switch – OPEN Hold the switch in OPEN position until the bombdoor-open lights are illuminated.

ABNS PCBP AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RFBNS RIGHT FORWARD BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-95 1-317/(1-318 blank) . Aft Batt. BOMB SYSTEM – BOMB DOOR CONTROL – POS IND ABNS/A20 Left TR BOMB SYSTEM – BOMB DOOR CONTROL – HOLD OPEN ABNS/A19 Left TR Bomb Door Control Valve Lights Bomb Door System Indicators Bomb Doors Not Latched Light Bomb Doors Open Light 11 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.O. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. 1B-52H-1 Bomb Door System Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Bomb Door Close Timer POWER SOURCE BOMB SYSTEM – BOMB DOOR CONTROL – BNS TIMER DOOR CLOSE ABNS/A17 Left TR BOMB SYSTEM – BOMB DOOR CONTROL – VALVE CHECK ABNS/A18 Left TR Bomb Door Control Valves and Switches BOMB SYSTEM – DOOR CONTROL – AFT MAIN VALVE FWD EMER VALVE FWD MAIN VALVE RELAYS RFBNS/B24 RFBNS/B22 RFBNS/B23 RFBNS/B25 Rt. Bomb Door Limit Safety Switches for Jettison Sequence MISCELLANEOUS – GAM-72 GEAR JETTISON & AGM-69A PCBP/E23 Aft Batt. ESS Bomb Door Emergency Opening During Jettison Sequence BOMB SYSTEM – JETTISON – CONTR PWR RFBNS/B18 RFBNS/B19 Aft Batt.T. ESS Rt. ESS Left ESS Rt.

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and two position transducers. this section. and controllability in turbulence. four filters. and lateral control systems. Two elevator actuators are incorporated in the pitch axis control system to provide an irreversible actuation system. See POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM. POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM A hydraulically powered rudder/elevator system (figure 1-96) is installed in the aircraft in conjunction with a yaw and pitch stability augmentation system (SAS) which provides dutch roll damping. in AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS. SAS commands are applied to the actuators in series with pilot inputs (i. this section. this section. The actuators position the rudder and elevators in response to pilot and/or electrical input commands. see HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS. Ailerons are not installed on the aircraft. one each for the right and left surfaces. reduced structural loads. The elevator actuators position the elevators in response to mechanical control inputs transmitted to each actuator from the control column or autopilot pitch axis and by electrical signals transmitted to each actuator from the SAS.e. this section. Autopilot commands are applied to the actuators in parallel with pilot inputs (i. The elevators and rudder are moved by hydraulically powered systems. The maximum rudder deflection is limited to ±19° for mechanical control inputs and ±10° for SAS inputs. For further information on component parts of the powered rudder/elevator system. The maximum elevator deflection is ±19° for mechanical control inputs and approximately ±5° for SAS inputs. in AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS. one per piston and cylinder assembly.e. Snubbing is provided in the last three degrees of rudder and elevator travel. For further information on the SAS. 1-319 . see STABILITY AUGMENTATION SYSTEM. RUDDER AND ELEVATOR ACTUATORS Flight control systems circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-102. the control column does not reflect elevator The rudder is powered by a single actuator while the elevator is powered by two actuators. Each of the actuators also incorporate two ‘‘load limit’’ devices.. see Stability Augmentation System (SAS). the control column is displaced when the elevators are displaced). see Stability Augmentation System (SAS). Lateral control is accomplished by spoilers which are part of a spoiler and airbrake control system. to permit control surface ‘‘blow down’’ to preclude inadvertent structural damage due to the added power of the system. This is due to the fact that only half power is available. For further information.O. rudder. 1B-52H-1 FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM STABILIZER TRIM SYSTEM LA TERAL CONTROL SYSTEM LA TERAL TRIM SYSTEM AIRBRAKE ACTUATION WING FLAP SYSTEM FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS DESCRIPTION Primary flight control of the aircraft is accomplished by three basic systems: the elevator. For further information on the electronic portion of the powered rudder/elevator system. 1-319 1-319 1-322 1-325 1-327 1-327 1-329 1-331 movement due to SAS inputs). which decreases authority in some flight conditions. The rudder and elevator actuators are dual tandem type units with each of the two cylinders utilizing power from one of the two rudder/elevator hydraulic systems. Each rudder and elevator actuator also employs two electrohydraulic control valves. Each actuator package consists of two shutoff valves. operating independently of one another (figure 1-96). It should be noted that the stability augmentation system and mechanical command ability is fully operational in the event of one complete hydraulic system failure. this section.. the rudder pedals do not reflect rudder movement due to SAS inputs). The only degradation in performance noted is a lower ‘‘blow down’’ speed. Each unit meters hydraulic fluid flow to an auxiliary servo actuator in response to an electrical signal. These electrohydraulic flow control valves are controlled by electrical inputs..e. SAS commands applied to the rudder hydraulic actuator are applied in series with pilot inputs (i.T.

For further information on force switch operation. . cranks and the forward elevator control quadrants. These levers are located near each pilot’s outboard armrest and below their respective side panels. • Rudder Trim Knob and Indicator The rudder trim knob and indicator on the aisle stand is the only control provided for rudder trim.T. The Q-spring tends to maintain the torque tube in the neutral position as set by adjustment of the trim knob. Use of rudder trim will displace the entire rudder control system including the rudder pedals. This may be accomplished with the autopilot operating provided care is taken not to displace either column sufficiently to cause autopilot disengagement. this pressure exerts a force on a cable which is attached to a Qspring arm on the rudder torque tube. RUDDER TRIM A ball bearing screw actuator. Reconnection of control columns after depressing disconnect lever is dependent on column being cycled through stowed detent or disconnect lever being pulled up before being reconnected. Either or both control columns may be manually disconnected from the cable system and stowed forward against the instrument panel. however. the column will be manually stowed for subsequent ejection. When the column has been reengaged after ejection sequence has been initiated. A force switch assembly is contained in each of the control rods located between the control column transverse shaft bell- 1-320 • Whenever either control column is disengaged and subsequently reengaged in flight. Ram air from the leading edge of the fin enters the two chambers and exerts a pressure directly proportional to indicated airspeed. and assist the control column into its stowed position. thus simulating airloads on a conventional rudder system. provide the pilots with a means of quickly terminating any unscheduled stabilizer trim movements that may result from stabilizer or autopilot system malfunction (except stabilizer trim reversal). CONTROL COLUMNS The control columns transmit control movements through separate control column disconnect mechanisms to the respective right and left forward control cable quadrant. grasp the control wheel. When disconnecting a control column. 1B-52H-1 RUDDER PEDALS The rudder pedals are conventional and are adjustable fore and aft by levers on the inboard side of each pedal. It also adds a resistance to pilot control force. This displacement moves the rudder by mechanical command input to the rudder actuator. moves the rudder torque tube to a new position relative to the Q-spring lever and provides rudder trim. Rotation of the knob actuates the trim screw and repositions the rudder torque tube to a new neutral trim which is maintained by the Q-spring. This device consists of two bellows chambers attached to fuselage structure. Tension in the cable tends to keep the Q-spring arm centered. Disconnect Levers The pilot’s and copilot’s control columns can be manually disconnected from the elevator system by pushing forward and downward on control column disconnect levers. where a pair of cables joins them into a single system. positive engagement will be confirmed by holding the other column rigid near neutral while applying a push/pull force to the column being engaged. A connection is provided between the disconnect linkage and the seat ejection system so that the column will be automatically disconnected and stowed during the seat ejection cycle. push down on the disconnect lever. when use of rudder is discontinued. see FORCE SWITCHES under STABILIZER TRIM SYSTEM. These switches. Q-spring force returns the torque tube to the neutral position.O. which is extended or retracted by a cable system attached to the rudder trim knob. NOTE After ejection sequence has been initiated. Movement of the rudder pedals in flight rotates the torque tube causing displacement of the Q-spring lever. this section. A vertical hinge incorporated into each pedal allows the pedals to be individually folded aft to provide additional leg room. thereby also centering the rudder control system. The columns will remain in position when manually disconnected. RUDDER ARTIFICIAL FEEL Rudder feel and centering is provided by a rudder Q-spring in the cable system. control column can be reengaged by pulling disengage lever up as far as possible and holding it until the control column is pulled aft and engagement occurs. although having no effect on the elevator system.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Powered Rudder/Elevator System Figure 1-96 1-321 .

To ensure a continuous hydraulic supply for bomb door operation and/or for stabilizer trim screw operation. When operated only on standby pressure.O. trim change electrical inputs in both the noseup and nosedown directions are paralleled to rotary launcher hydraulic interrupt relays. pitch trim is accomplished by hydraulically moving the entire stabilizer. The hydraulic pressure to the motors is metered by valves which are controlled by the cable system or a parallel electric trim control system through a followup system. NOTE If heater elements are not installed or are inoperative. Operation without heaters after cold soak at altitude may result in a reduced operation rate electrically and sponginess in the operation of the manual trim wheel. Pitch trim is not automatically adjusted when the wing flaps are raised and lowered. The electrical input into the followup system is equivalent to approximately seven units every 10 seconds of stabilizer travel. This inoperative condition could be caused by frost or ice buildup on the followup screws which may jam the screws and prevent stabilizer operation either manually or electrically until the frost or ice is melted. . the autopilot provides stabilizer trim through the followup system. STABILIZER TRIM SYSTEM Pitch trim of the aircraft is provided by the stabilizer trim system (figure 1-97). The mechanical spring provides supplemental artificial feel and a positive control column neutral position. Conventional elevator trim is not provided. The leading edge of the stabilizer is raised and lowered by a jackscrew driven by two hydraulic motors. Missile rotary launcher operation in the secondary mode places a high demand on the right body hydraulics system. Stabilizer Trim Wheels and Indicators Manual control of the stabilizer trim metering valve is provided by rotation of the stabilizer trim wheels on the aisle stand. Pilot effort required to maneuver the aircraft is increased at low airspeeds (providing trim stimulus) and decreased at high airspeeds (providing improved maneuvering capabilities) with positive centering at all airspeeds (increasing trim stability). the electric trim control system. In the event that Q-spring pressure is lost. The motor driving the screw is supplied with pressure from the right body hydraulic system while the left body hydraulic system supplies the motor driving the nut. Stabilizer speed is approximately four units every 10 seconds with both left and right body hydraulic systems operating and engines at idle and six units every 10 seconds with engines operating at 82% rpm and above. the stabilizer trim system may become inoperative under certain conditions of temperature and humidity. The indicators are calibrated in units of stabilizer leading edge movement from nine units AIRPLANE NOSE DN to four units AIRPLANE NOSE UP. The trim wheel face and periphery is painted in alternate black and white segments as a visual aid and reminder when the electric trim control system is being used. Trim position creeping. The pilot’s trim wheel is attached to the throttle shaft and operates through a chain sprocket linkage to move a trim indicator located forward and inboard of the wheel. or the autopilot. Operation of the elevator control system in either direction from neutral is immediately opposed by the resistance of the Q-spring and the mechanical spring. An alternate source of hydraulic pressure for the upper hydraulic motor (which drives the screw) is furnished by the right body standby pump.T. The copilot’s trim wheel and trim indicator are located opposite to the pilot’s trim indicator. this additional spring tension on the elevator system will provide partial feel. with one unit equalling 1° of stabilizer travel. Any trim accomplished using the electric trim control system will feed back through the cable system rotating the manual trim wheels and indicators. The manual trim wheels can be used to override the electric trim control system or autopilot trim system. One of the motors drives the screw and the other drives the nut. An automatically operated heating element is installed in each followup screw to prevent icing of the screw threads. This brake is completely released when hydraulic pressure is above 1000 psi. No standby pump is provided for the lower hydraulic motor (which drives the nut). is prevented by a hydraulically released brake on each hydraulic 1-322 motor drive. this speed is reduced to approximately one unit every 10 seconds. 1B-52H-1 ELEVATOR ARTIFICIAL FEEL Elevator feel and centering is provided by an elevator Q-spring in the cable system. When engaged. The mechanical followup system automatically returns the metering valves to the closed position when the stabilizer reaches the position called for by the cable system. The Q-spring consists of a single bellows chamber attached to the structure operating in conjunction with a preloaded mechanical spring to provide control centering force in the low speed range. Operation of either interrupt relay will result in interruption of the launcher hydraulic drive for the duration of the trim change and/or bomb door operation. due to airloads on the stabilizer when the hydraulic system is unpressurized.

Manual control of stabilizer trim is not affected by the cutout switch. Electrically controlled trim opposing the unscheduled trim movement continues to be available by means of trim buttons unless deactivated by the trim cutout switch or circuit breakers. the switches close and restore any unscheduled stabilizer trim not originally caused by the autopilot which will not reengage. These relays will switch 205-volt three-phase ac power to operate the trim control motor. two microswitches are actuated to open. 2) Nose down trim moves the trim indicator forward toward AIRPLANE NOSE DN. The pilot should manually return the switch to neutral with a positive thumb movement each time it is used. Stabilizer Trim Cutout Switch A guarded stabilizer trim cutout switch on the aisle stand is provided to disconnect the dc control circuits between the trim buttons and the stabilizer trim control relay coil. 1-323 . When such an opposing force on either control column reaches 24 to 36 pounds. The stabilizer trim function of the stabilizer and lateral trim buttons is inoperative when the autopilot PITCH ENGAGE switch is ON. care should also be taken to avoid inadvertent actuation of the switch when flying on autopilot. The buttons are spring loaded to an unmarked center OFF position. see SYSTEMS LIMITATIONS. NOTE The spring-loaded feature of the stabilizer trim switch should not be relied on to return the switch to neutral.T. 1B-52H-1 Stabilizer and Lateral Trim Buttons Stabilizer and lateral trim buttons are located on the outboard grips of the pilot’s control wheels. Guards are provided on the wheels at the stabilizer trim switch housings to prevent inadvertent actuation of the trim switches. A pilot’s reaction in responding to an aircraft pitch movement is an opposing control column force. Note that as control column force is reduced below the 24 to 36 pounds required to actuate the microswitches. This is accomplished by electrically disconnecting the control circuits between the trim buttons and the actuator clutches and power relays. Due to the possibility of the switch sticking. To initiate electrical actuation of the stabilizer trim. Positioning a button to a trim position will also supply TR power to the respective nose up or nose down clutch solenoid in the trim actuator. A runaway trim condition would result if a trim switch was stuck and the autopilot was disengaged. the manual trim wheel rotates aft. Force Switches Force switches are installed within the control column linkage to provide the pilots with an effective means of immediate interruption of unscheduled stabilizer trim movement (except stabilizer trim reversal as noted below). For operating limitations of the stabilizer trim system.O. One switch disengages the autopilot and the other deactivates the stabilizer trim in the unscheduled direction only. the trim switch will be actuated in short intermittent bursts when used during flight. either the NOSE UP or NOSE DN position is used. To aid in recognizing a malfunctioning electrical trim system before reaching an extreme out-of-trim condition. and the stabilizer leading edge moves down. Moving a button to either trim position closes a circuit to supply left TR power to one of two power relays. and the stabilizer leading edge moves up. and conversely. the manual trim wheel rotates forward. Actuation of the stabilizer trim button should produce the following visible results: 1) Nose up trim moves the trim indicator aft toward AIRPLANE NOSE UP. Section V.

T. 1B-52H-1 Stabilizer Trim System TO AUTOPILOT DISCONNECT CIRCUIT CONTROL COLUMNS FORWARD METERING VALVE FROM RIGHT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM HYDRAULICALLY RELEASED BRAKE PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL TRIM CONTR PILOT’S FORCE SWITCH JACKSCREW COPILOT’S FORCE SWITCH UPPER HYDRAULIC MOTOR STABILIZER AND LATERAL TRIM BUTTON CONTROL COLUMNS AFT NOSE DOWN CUTOUT FOLLOWUP LINKAGE LOWER HYDRAULIC MOTOR JACKSCREW NUT NOSE UP STABILIZER TRIM CUTOUT SWITCH STABILIZER NORMAL HYDRAULIC RELEASED BRAKE AFT AC POWER BOX TRIM INDICATORS STABILIZER TRIM ACTUATOR CIRCUIT BREAKER 3φ AC CLUTCH NOSE UP AFT AC POWER BOX 3φ AC TRIM CONTROL MOTOR NOSE DN STABILIZER TRIM WHEELS ON OFF PITCH ENGAGE SWITCH AUTO PILOT STAB TRIM SERVO PRESSURE RETURN FROM LEFT BODY HYDRAULIC SYSTEM ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS MECHANICAL ACTUATION METERING VALVE TO ROTARY LAUNCHER HYDRAULICS STABILIZER TRIM INTERRUPT RELAYS Figure 1-97 1-324 A31722 .O.

The net result is that the output movement of the differentials is the difference between opposing input signals. causing a reduction in lift and an increase in drag. Group A spoilers are powered by the outboard wing hydraulic system (hydraulic pumps on engines 1 and 7). At the same time. On each wing. 1-325 . when the airbrake lever is actuated. group B spoilers are powered by the inboard wing hydraulic system (hydraulic pumps on engines 3 and 6). Each wing is provided with seven spoilers which perform a dual function. spoiler control will be regained and roll control will still be obtained. a stabilizer and lateral trim button. The spoilers are full up (60°) at approximately 80° of wheel rotation. Adequate roll control is still available under these conditions. 1 thru 7 being on the left wing and 8 thru 14 on the right wing.T. which allow the metering valves to be operated by either airbrake control. the spoilers are raised symmetrically to act as airbrakes. All spoilers will rise on the wing toward which the control wheel is turned and. at the same time. a dead area exists. This will have no effect on the spoilers on this wing if they are already in the down position. one for each valve. the spoiler actuators do not have sufficient force to raise the spoilers full up. if engaged.O. 1B-52H-1 LATERAL CONTROL SYSTEM Lateral control and airbrake action are provided by a spoiler and airbrake system (figure 1-98). Because of this force limitation. figure 1-101) are provided for the pilots. the four outboard spoilers are mechanically linked to operate as a unit and are called group A. Rotation of the control wheels actuates hydraulically operated spoilers located on the upper surface of each wing just aft of the rear spar. When the control wheel is rotated. The metering valves permit this control movement without bottoming. When lateral control and airbrake control mechanisms are used simultaneously. permitting the lateral control system to override the airbrake system. The spoilers are numbered from left to right No. the spoilers are actuated to provide lateral control. Rising the spoilers interrupts the flow of air over the wing. Each wheel has. lateral control (including lateral trim). Each of the 14 spoilers has a separate hydraulic actuator. Each wheel has. or both simultaneously. on its outboard handgrip. the roll response with wheel position is not the same with airbrakes up as with zero airbrakes. NOTE At airspeeds above 250 knots. CONTROL WHEELS Dual control wheels (2. followup system. an autopilot and air refueling (IFR) boom release button. This will result in cancellation of airbrake action in cases where the spoiler signal equals or is greater than the airbrake signal. and an interphone-mike trigger switch. In addition. the metering valves in the opposite wing will be displaced in the opposite direction to lower spoilers. one for each group of spoilers. the differential mechanisms in one wing will be moved the total amount called for by both control systems and the spoilers will respond to the total control signal. The four metering valves are controlled through four differential mechanisms. or trim mechanism be jammed. Spoiler action for lateral control is initiated by control wheel rotation which mechanically opens hydraulic metering valves to supply pressure to the spoiler actuators. but when the control wheel is rotated beyond this area. Two overtravel spring cartridges located in each wing allow continued operation of the remainder of the system should a metering valve. Rotation of the control wheels will cause both metering valves in both wings to be displaced. the spoilers respond to the difference in the two. the differential mechanisms in the opposite wing will receive control movements in the opposite direction. on its inboard handgrip. an EVS NFOV (narrow field of view) select switch. In the area of spoiler blowdown. differential mechanism. Hydraulic pressure is metered by four metering valves. The three inboard spoilers are also mechanically linked to operate as a unit and are called group B. A mechanical followup system automatically returns the metering valves to the closed position when the spoilers reach the position called for by the control wheels or by the autopilot. NOTE The control wheels are not disconnected from the lateral controls when the control columns are disconnected.

6 & 7 AIRBRAKE CONTROL ACTUATOR (FOR GROUP "B" SPOILERS) AIRBRAKE LEVER AUTO PILOT LATERAL CONTROL SERVO DIFFERENTIAL UNIT (FOR GROUP) "B" SPOILERS) TO RIGHT WING SYSTEM AIRBRAKE SWITCH BOX CONTROL WHEEL AIRBRAKE CONTROL ACTUATOR (FOR GROUP "A" SPOILERS) DIFFERENTIAL UNIT (FOR GROUP "A" SPOILERS) PRESSURE RETURN FROM OUTBOARD WING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM FROM LATERAL TRIM SYSTEM NO. 1 SPOILER ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS MECHANICAL ACTUATION CHECK VALVE TO RIGHT WING SYSTEM FOLLOWUP LINKAGE METERING VALVE SPOILER NO. 2.T. NO. 5 SPOILER METERING WING FOLLOWUP LINKAGE FROM INBOARD WING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SPOILER NO. 5 ACTUATOR CHECK VALVE TO SPOILER ACTUATOR NO. 3 & 4 A31724 Figure 1-98 1-326 Change 17 . 1B-52H-1 Spoiler and Airbrake System NOTE Left wing system shown− right wing system similar. 1 ACTUATOR TO SPOILER ACTUATOR NO.O.

Rotation of the actuator drum relocates the neutral position for each centering mechanism which in turn tends to hold the entire lateral control system in a new position. figure 1-101) on the outboard handgrip of each control wheel. making readjustment of lateral trim necessary. 2. Lateral trim buttons on the control wheels control a single centrally located electrical trim actuator which is cable-connected to an actuator drum on the spoiler centering mechanism in each wing. The indicator pointer is a single needle pointed at both ends and will indicate on either scale. marked AR. degrees of spoiler position from 0° to 15° spoiler up with a separate scale for left and right spoilers. figure 1-101) has an OFF position and six positions. Maximum displacement of the neutral position is equivalent to approximately 20° of rotation to left and right of the zero control wheel position. and 6. Detents are provided at OFF position. the outboard spoiler and the inboard spoilers operate alternately as described in figure 1-101. positions 1. Position 1. Change 12 1-327 .O.T. used primarily for air refueling. The pointer is electrically connected to a position transmitter of the lateral trim actuator shaft. The indicator is calibrated in The airbrake lever (12. 4. Spoiler position does not necessarily correspond to indicated trim which is electrically positioned by the lateral trim actuator shaft. gives increased roll rate authority. figure 1-101) provides an indication of trim input which is comparative with spoiler position. Airbrake Lever Lateral Trim Indicator A single lateral trim indicator (6. The metering valves are opened in pairs so that the outboard spoilers move as a unit and the inboard spoilers move as a unit. Limit switches are incorporated within the electrical trim actuator to prevent the actuator from exceeding its maximum allowable travel. The airbrake control actuators reset the spoiler differential units to open the spoiler metering valves. AIRBRAKE ACTUATION Use of the spoilers as airbrakes is controlled by an airbrake lever which electrically controls solenoid valves in airbrake control actuators at each spoiler differential unit. The effect of lateral trim will be modified as airbrakes are applied. providing symmetrical airbrake action. Control for the airbrakes is available on emergency battery power. As much as 3° of trim indication may be necessary to compensate for tolerances in the lateral control system. 1B-52H-1 LATERAL TRIM SYSTEM An electrically controlled lateral trim system (figure 1-99) provides a means of obtaining lateral trim (lateral control neutral position). Stabilizer and Lateral Trim Buttons Lateral trim control is provided by a stabilizer and lateral trim button (1. item 12. sheet 4. figure 1-101). Lateral Trim Cutout Switch The 118-volt single-phase ac circuit for the lateral trim actuator can be disconnected by actuating the lateral trim cutout switch (9. When the airbrake lever is progressively moved through its full range (with the control wheel in neutral).

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Lateral Trim System Figure 1-99 1-328 .

The flaps are of the Fowler type with high lift-drag ratio resulting in shortened takeoffs and reduced landing speeds. The top needle in the indicator. When the flaps warning horn is energized. and through the flap warning horn switch. are located in the overspeed brakes on the outboard ends of each torque tube. The dual indicating system is provided to show any difference in position of the left and right wing flap sections such as would result from a broken flap torque tube. No emergency control system is provided for the flaps. 7. A flap torque tube driven by the power unit extends out each wing on the aft side of the rear spar. is marked R and indicates the position of the right wing flaps. the flaps rotate downward 35° with little rearward movement. An overspeed brake mechanism located at the outboard end of each flap torque tube functions automatically to modulate rate of flap movement in case of excessive rpm of the flap drive. This torque tube drives two jackscrews in each flap section to extend or retract flaps. leaving only 6° of rotation in the remaining 80% of flap extension. throttles for engines 3 and 5 or 4 and 6. WING FLAP POSITION INDICATOR A dual wing flap position indicator (5. For information on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing flaps. 1-329 . which are controlled by TR power. a landing gear squat switch. a signal is also sent to the master caution light to cause it to illuminate. throttles for engines 3 and 5 or 4 and 6 are beyond approximately 45° of travel (as indicated on the thrust gate guide rail) and flaps are not fully extended.T. Control of the wing flaps is accomplished by moving a lever with an airfoil-type knob (7. Engines 1. The overspeed brake limits the movement to a rate that will not cause damage to the free section or sections. The horn is activated by a series circuit energized by TR power through the horn.O. The indicator transmitters. however. The power unit consists of two 205-volt three-phase ac motors joined by differential gearing. has a hole in it. The signal will sound only when the aircraft is on the ground. Such excessive rpm would be induced by the slipstream acting to ‘‘drive’’ a flap section or sections which had been rendered ‘‘free’’ because of a broken torque tube. the flaps move rearward only. All four flap sections are simultaneously driven by a single power unit located in the fuselage aft of the center section gear spar (figure 1-100). Each motor is provided with an electrically released brake which will be released only when the motor is energized and putting out torque. The flaps are electronically controlled by a single flap lever. figure 1-101) on a detent quadrant located on the right side of the aisle stand. 1B-52H-1 WING FLAP SYSTEM WING FLAP LEVER The wing flap system includes four separate wing flap sections. figure 1-101) reads from 0% to 100% of wing flap travel. the remaining motor will extend or retract the flaps in approximately 120 seconds. Most of the drag increase occurs during the first 20% of the flap motion. should one of the two motors in the power unit be rendered inoperative. 2. During the first 37 1/2% of extension. and 8 are not included in this circuit. see Section VI. The bottom needle is marked L and indicates the position of the left flaps. This initial 20% rotates the flaps down 29° in approximately 12 seconds. For the remainder of the extension. WING FLAPS UP WARNING SIGNAL The wing flaps up warning signal is sounded by the landing gear warning horn.

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Wing Flap System Figure 1-100 1-330 .

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Flight Control System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 6 STABILIZER AND LATERAL TRIM BUTTON CONTROL WHEEL CONTROL COLUMN CONTROL COLUMN DISCONNECT LEVER WING FLAP POSITION INDICATOR LATERAL TRIM INDICATOR 7 8 9 10 11 12 WING FLAP LEVER RUDDER TRIM KNOB AND INDICATOR LATERAL TRIM CUTOUT SWITCH STABILIZER TRIM WHEELS AND INDICATORS STABILIZER TRIM CUTOUT SWITCH AIRBRAKE LEVER Figure 1-101 (Sheet 1 of 4) 1-331 .

As lateral trim is accomplished. When moved sideways to the L WING DN or R WING DN positions. on its inboard handgrip. 4 Control Column Disconnect Lever Used to manually disconnect the pilot’s and copilot’s control columns from the elevator system by pushing forward and downward on control column disconnect levers. Each wheel has.T. 5 Wing Flap Position Indicator A dual wing flap position indicator is provided which reads from 0% to 100% of wing flap travel. and assist the control column.-R WING DN. will close contacts to supply 118-volt single phase ac power to the lateral trim actuator. is marked R and indicates the position of the right wing flaps.O. centering spring loads are relieved when a neutral position is established for the lateral control centering mechanism of each wing. The top needle in the indicator. an EVS NFOV (narrow field of view) select switch. an autopilot and air refueling (IFR) boom release button. The bottom needle is marked L and indicates the position of the left flaps. the other pilot’s trim circuit is disconnected. has a hole in it. The dc control circuit to each trim relay is closed only when the other relay is deenergized. thus when one pilot is trimming the lateral control system. Only the first two positions and the center OFF position affect the lateral trim.-OFF positions and are spring loaded to OFF. When disconnecting a control column. a stabilizer and lateral trim button. 2 Control Wheel Dual control wheels are provided for the pilots. 3 Control Column The dual control columns transmit control movements. as provided by rotation of the lateral trim actuator drum. will allow the aircraft lateral attitude to remain as positioned by the control wheels after a stable trimmed condition has been established. grasp the control wheel.-NOSE UP. This relay. on its outboard handgrip.-NOSE DOWN. These buttons have L WING DN. Lateral trim is accomplished by coordination of trim button actuation with control wheel movement. The neutral trim position. Guards are provided on the wheels at the stabilizer trim switch housings to prevent inadvertent actuation of the trim switches. and an interphone-mike trigger switch. the buttons close contacts to supply TR power to one of two lateral trim relays. push down on the disconnect lever. The dual indicating system is provided to show any difference in position of the left and right wing flap sections such as would result from a broken flap torque tube. 1B-52H-1 Flight Control System Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. The trim buttons energize either the stabilizer or lateral trim circuits but not both at the same time. when energized. NOTE Use of a trim button does not position the control wheels. 1 CONTROLINDICATOR Stabilizer and Lateral Trim Button FUNCTION Stabilizer and lateral trim buttons are located on the outboard grips of the pilot’s control wheels. Each wheel has. Figure 1-101 (Sheet 2 of 4) 1-332 .

T. with one unit equalling 1° of stabilizer travel. 8 Rudder Trim Knob and Indicator The rudder trim knob and indicator is the only control provided for rudder trim. This switch must be in NORMAL (guard down) position before lateral trim can be accomplished. The indicator is calibrated in degrees of spoiler position from 0° to 15° spoiler up with a separate scale for left and right spoilers. Rotation of the knob actuates the trim screw and repositions the rudder torque tube to a new neutral trim which is maintained by the Q-spring. The indicator is a mechanical indicator calibrated in units of trim up to a maximum of 12 units nose left and 12 nose right. The manual trim wheels can be used to override the electric trim control system or autopilot trim system. 9 Lateral Trim Cutout Switch The 118-volt single-phase ac circuit for the lateral trim actuator can be disconnected by actuating a CUTOUT. When the switch is in CUTOUT (guard up) position. Figure 1-101 (Sheet 3 of 4) 1-333 . The copilot’s trim wheel and trim indicator are located opposite to the pilot’s trim indicator. 10 Stabilizer Trim Wheels and Indicators Manual control of the stabilizer trim metering valve is provided by rotation of the stabilizer trim wheels on the aisle stand. The indicator pointer is a single needle pointed at both ends and will indicate on either scale. The pilot’s trim wheel is attached to the throttle shaft and operates through a chain sprocket linkage to move a trim indicator located forward and inboard of the wheel.-NORMAL guarded switch on the left side of the aisle stand. Limit switches provide protection for both extension and retraction operations. the circuits are deenergized and the wing flaps are held in their last position. The trim wheel face and periphery is painted in alternate black and white segments as a visual aid and reminder when the electric trim control system is being used. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 6 Lateral Trim Indicator A single lateral trim indicator provides an indication of trim input which is comparative with spoiler position. Depressing the latch toward the flap lever allows the flap lever to be moved from OFF position on either side of the latch to the opposite detent. the circuit is broken and lateral trim is inoperative. When the lever is placed in the UP or DN position. An OFF position is located on either side of a spring-loaded latch-type stop which is in the middle of the detent quadrant. The indicators are calibrated in units of stabilizer leading edge movement from nine units AIRPLANE NOSE DN to four units AIRPLANE NOSE UP.O. a circuit is closed to supply TR power to left and right flap extend or retract relays. Spoiler position does not necessarily correspond to indicated trim which is electrically positioned by the lateral trim actuator shaft.-OFF.-DN positions with detents at UP and DN positions. 1B-52H-1 NO. As much as 3° of trim indication may be necessary to compensate for tolerances in the lateral control system. 7 Wing Flap Lever The wing flap lever provides UP. Any trim accomplished using the electric trim control system will feed back through the cable system rotating the manual trim wheels and indicators. This lever must be pulled up out of the detent before it can be moved from either the UP or DN position. When the lever is in OFF position.

is used primarily for air refueling and gives increased roll rate authority. FUNCTION 11 Stabilizer Trim Cutout Switch A guarded CUTOUT.-NORMAL stabilizer trim cutout switch is used to disconnect the dc control circuits between the trim buttons and the stabilizer trim control relay coil. Detents are provided at OFF positions 1. and 6. Manual control of stabilizer trim is not affected by the cutout switch in either CUTOUT or NORMAL position. 2. When this switch is in CUTOUT (guard up) position.-6.-4.-3. For normal electrical control of stabilizer trim. OFF position of the airbrake lever deenergizes the airbrake control circuits and permits the spoilers to provide lateral control only. Gradually moving the airbrake lever from one position to another will not result in a reduced rate of spoiler movement nor can they be stopped in any intermediate position. The lever has an OFF position and six operating positions marked 1.-2. 12 Airbrake Lever The airbrake lever operates six contacts in the airbrake switch box supplying emergency battery power to the solenoid valves at the hydraulic control units. 1B-52H-1 Flight Control System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. Figure 1-101 (Sheet 4 of 4) 1-334 Change 12 . These units mechanically open the metering valves which direct hydraulic pressure to actuate the spoilers. Position 1. this switch must be in NORMAL (guard down) position.T. marked AR. the outboard spoiler and the inboard spoilers will be operated alternately as follows: LEVER POSITION OFF 1 2 3 4 5 6 OUTBOARD SPOILERS 0° 10° 10° 40° 40° 50° 50° INBOARD SPOILERS 0° 0° 20° 20° 40° 40° 60° NOTE The spoilers move rapidly from one position to another as new positions are selected by the airbrake lever. 4.O.-5. When the airbrake lever is progressively moved through its full range (with the control wheel in neutral). the circuits are broken and the stabilizer trim cannot be operated electrically.

PCBP PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-102 1-335/(1-336 blank) . TR MISCELLANEOUS – LATERAL TRIM ACTUATOR PCBP/E9 AC Bus 3 FLIGHT INDICATORS – LATERAL TRIM PCBP/D2 Left TR MISCELLANEOUS – TRIM CONTR PCBP/E8 Left TR Flap Position Control Relays Lateral Trim Actuator Lateral Trim Indicator Rudder/Elevator Hydraulic System – See HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM CIRCUIT PROTECTION AND LOCATION. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. This Section Stabilizer and Lateral Trim Control 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. Emer Batt.O. MISCELLANEOUS – WING FLAPS – CONTROL – LEFT CONTROL – RIGHT PCBP/E6 PCBP/E7 Left TR Rt.T. TR Flaps Position Indicator FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLAP POS PCBP/D1 Left TR Flaps Up Warning Signal LANDING GEAR – POS & FLAPS WARN HORN PCBP/A1 Rt. 1B-52H-1 Flight Control Systems Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Airbrakes Control CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE MISCELLANEOUS – AIR BRAKE CONTR – INBD – OUTBD PCBP/E12 PCBP/E13 Emer Batt. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.

BLA .

is recommended. and reengaging at frequent intervals. A synchronization mode. 1-337 . allows the roll servo and pitch servo to align (i. Pressure signals from the Air Data Sensor Unit are processed by the FCS Processor to control elevator and stabilizer trim as required to maintain the aircraft at the pressure altitude existing at the time of selection. retrimming.’’ as used in this manual. The autopilot stabilization mode is always selected first before other autopilot control modes can be engaged. The autopilot stabilization mode is used to hold the aircraft in straight and level flight on a constant heading using pitch. consists of the entire digital automatic Flight Control System (FCS).e. In the event of automatic trim system failure.T. another autopilot auxiliary control mode. The followup system of the autopilot. or combat breakaway maneuvers). The autopilot can be operated with only roll stabilization or only pitch stabilization if desired. The autopilot will be used with caution during any critical phase of flight (i. 1B-52H-1 AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS AUTOPILOT SYSTEM AUTOPILOT NONSTEERING MODES AUTOPILOT PITCH AND ROLL STEERING MODES AUTOPILOT SAFETY FEATURES PITCH AND ROLL STEERING FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS STABILITY AUGMENTATION SYSTEM AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROLS AND INDICATORS AUTOPILOT NORMAL OPERATION PREFLIGHT OF THE AUTOPILOT PILOT’S OPERATION OF THE AUTOPILOT RADAR NAVIGATOR’S OPERATION OF THE AUTOPILOT AUTOPILOT DISENGAGEMENT AUTOPILOT AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM The word ‘‘autopilot. the fore and aft position of the control column should be monitored closely.O. Disengaging the autopilot. This can result in severe pitch down/up when either a change in attitude or power setting causes an automatic disconnect or when a manual disconnect is accomplished. is provided with the autopilot and operates anytime the autopilot is on but disengaged. The bomb mode. allows the autopilot to be integrated with the OAS. but particularly so during the critical flight phases mentioned above. An interlock system is provided as protection against improper operation of the autopilot and to ensure the pilot of primary flight control at all times. and heading signals provided by the AHRS. Automatic flight control systems circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-104. Autopilot stabilization is provided anytime ROLL ENGAGE and/or PITCH ENGAGE switches on the control panel are set to the ON position. The trim condition of the aircraft should be closely monitored at all times when using the autopilot..e. large amounts of stabilizer trim can be compensated for by the autopilot. air refueling. synchronize) to existing flight attitude and heading of the aircraft for smooth engagement of autopilot control modes. also called a followup system. If several units of nosedown stabilizer trim and aft position of the 1-337 1-337 1-338 1-338 1-339 1-342 1-342 1-348 1-348 1-350 1-351 1-352 control column are detected while flying with autopilot altitude hold engaged. To minimize the effect of an automatic trim system failure. The autopilot operates on TR power and 118 volt single-phase ac power. AUTOPILOT NONSTEERING MODES Autopilot stabilization and altitude hold are referred to as autopilot nonsteering modes because control column inputs are not used to command pitch and roll to the autopilot. The altitude hold mode is used to maintain the aircraft at a constant barometric pressure altitude. The autopilot provides automatic flight control with nonsteering and pitch and roll steering modes. Altitude hold cannot be engaged unless the pitch flight stabilization mode is engaged. roll.. the autopilot will disengage immediately. Aircraft attitudes and heading changes are made by a crewmember using the autopilot flight controller or by the OAS. be aware that autopilot disengagement by any means will cause abrupt pitchdown unless proper preventive steps are taken. low level. NOTE If dc or ac power to the AHRS is lost.

A column or wheel force exceeding approximately 30 pounds in flight stabilization 1-338 Change 10 mode or 40 pounds in steering modes will disengage the autopilot. and control column roll forces in nonsteering and steering modes. The autopilot will automatically trim the aircraft to assist the pilot in maintaining a pitch attitude and will trim to compensate for any gross weight or cg change.O. turns commanded by the OAS are limited in bank angle to 15 degrees. turns commanded with the control wheel are limited in bank angle to 40 and 45 degrees. the stabilizer and lateral trim button will continue to operate normally for trim of the spoilers and the stabilizer. turn. roll trim. the stabilizer trim portion of the stabilizer and lateral trim button will be inoperative. turns are limited in bank angle to 38 degrees by the autopilot. AUTOPILOT SAFETY FEATURES Force Override The autopilot can be disconnected with manual force applied to the pilot or copilot control column or wheel. NOTE When the PITCH ENGAGE switch is ON. and roll knobs. The flight controller turn knob. the pilot flies the aircraft through the autopilot by control column inputs in the same manner that he flies without the autopilot except that control column forces are considerably reduced. turn control is transferred to the OAS. In aerial refuel and low level modes. when rotated to the first detent. An accelerometer located in the digital amplifier unit detects changes in Gforces relative to autopilot pitch commands to provide g limiting in autopilot steering modes. Once the autopilot adjusts. this section. roll rate command is limited to 10 degrees per second. Further rotation of the turn knob to the full mechanical stop will command approximately 50 degrees of bank to facilitate a breakaway. Lateral control force stiffens when angle limits are approached. altitude. The pilot trims the aircraft laterally but need not apply any stabilizer trim. for maximum recommended bank angles applicable to existing gross weight.T. The autopilot will return the aircraft to its original attitude unless the pilot holds a particular change to pitch or bank angle for a sufficient period of time to allow the autopilot to adjust. A reduction of manual rudder requirements is realized through use of the yaw axis of the stability augmentation system and the hydraulically powered rudder system. Additional roll protection will disengage the autopilot if either pilot exerts a wheel force exceeding 30 pounds in flight stabilization or 40 pounds in steering modes. and pitch trim knobs are disabled in the steering modes. The maximum bank angle in aerial refuel mode is 40 degrees and 45 degrees in low level mode. and Mach number. 1B-52H-1 AUTOPILOT PITCH AND ROLL STEERING MODES Aerial refuel and low level modes of the autopilot are referred to as steering modes and are designed to substantially reduce the loads imposed during aerial refueling and to reduce pilot fatigue during low level mode of flight. the autopilot will maintain a constant attitude and will resist attempts to change that attitude. pitch rate. roll rate. Attempts to increase the bank angle beyond these limits will result in an autopilot disconnect. In the autopilot bomb mode. and control column forces. These signals to the autopilot are used to command the aircraft in pitch and roll in lieu of signals from the autopilot pitch.5 degrees per second for all modes. Roll Protection The autopilot monitors and limits roll attitude. Turn. NOTE When the ROLL ENGAGE switch is ON. Any bank angle between 8 degrees and 45 degrees established by the pilot will be held by the autopilot regardless of changes to power or airspeed. See PITCH AND ROLL STEERING FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS. Section VI. Roll rate com- . See COMBAT BREAKAWAY MANEUVERS. The autopilot limits the pitch rate command to 6. Changes in pitch attitude will also be maintained by the autopilot in low level mode regardless of changes in thrust or airspeed. With BOMB position of OAS selected. The pilot will feel very little resistance in the lateral controls for bank angles up to 8 degrees. Pitch Protection The autopilot monitors for excessive pitch attitude. it will aid the pilot in maintaining the new attitude. When using the aerial refuel and low level modes. will limit bank angle to approximately 39 degrees for nonsteering modes. Inputs by the pilot through the column generate electrical signals proportional to the force applied through force transducers in and below the control columns. respectively. If autopilot bomb and low level modes are selected together. Aerial refuel and low level modes differ in that during aerial refuel mode.

PITCH AND ROLL STEERING FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS Aerial Refuel Mode The aerial refuel mode of the autopilot was designed primarily to substantially reduce the loads imposed on the aircraft during air refueling and will be utilized for all air refueling operations with tanker aircraft. The aircraft responses in the aerial refuel mode differ from the low level mode in that more rapid aircraft responses are obtained when wheel or column force is applied. thus reducing air- The characteristics of the following pitch and roll maneuvers while in aerial refuel mode may be observed by the pilot without the aid of a tanker. a change in pitch attitude reference is accomplished automatically by the autopilot when column force is maintained for a specific period of time. PITCH MANEUVERS The attitude hold and pitch attitude reference change features of the autopilot while in aerial refuel mode may be demonstrated by the following maneuvers. Reestablish the bank angle. rapid turn. When force is relaxed. or combination of pull-up and turn. it would be possible for the pilot to inadvertently exceed the load limits of the aircraft in a pull-up. Relax column force and observe that the aircraft starts recovery to the original 2 degrees noseup attitude. a G limiter function has been incorporated in the autopilot. with the PITCH ENGAGE and ROLL ENGAGE switches ON. Maintain level fight and observe that the restraining force necessary to maintain level flight gradually decreases until column force is zero. establishing a shallow bank angle and immediately relax force on the control wheel. A change to the pitch attitude reference may be accomplished by maintaining column force for some period of time. To prevent exceeding the physical limits of the aircraft. Thus. The amount of reference change is dependent on the length of time column force is maintained. Momentarily roll the aircraft left or right. and note that the wheel force will gradually decrease until the aircraft roll attitude is maintained at the new reference with zero wheel force. As an example. This characteristic allows smoother control inputs to maneuver the aircraft in the small envelope behind the tanker and also allows use of more of the envelope. When force is relaxed. establish an approximate 2 degree noseup pitch attitude by rotating the pitch knob. NOTE G Limiter Autopilot steering modes will reduce control column force requirements considerably with the additional assistance provided by the elevator servo. unless specific directives dictate otherwise. Change 10 1-339 . The G limiter function is set to limit acceleration from a minimum of 0. the aircraft will return to the original flight attitude. The pilot will find that using the aerial refuel mode will improve manual proficiency. When the pilot relaxes wheel or column force following momentary corrections. Consequently. NOTE The aerial refuel mode is not recommended for formation flying other than that required for air refueling operations. pushover. craft loads. The flight controller roll trim knob is effective only in the autopilot bomb mode and provides approximately 20 degrees maximum roll command to correct FCI standoff error.T. As a result of less elevator command. This mode provides stability in pitch and roll which will resist attitude changes due to tanker downwash or turbulence. when the equipment is operative. the aircraft will return to the original flight attitude. the autopilot accelerometer will sense the amount of acceleration and reduce the autopilot elevator command. ROLL MANEUVERS The attitude hold and roll attitude reference change features of the autopilot when in aerial refuel mode may be demonstrated by the following maneuvers. When column force reaches zero. Automatic stabilizer trimming occurs during autopilot aerial refueling operation whenever a continuous column force is applied. restrain the wheel. 1B-52H-1 mand is limited to 10 degrees per second with the autopilot bomb mode engaged. Any attempt by the pilot or copilot to increase applied control column force beyond 40 pounds will disengage the autopilot.2 g to a maximum of 1. Momentarily pitch the aircraft up or down approximately 2 degrees and immediately relax force on the control column. the aircraft attitude reference will have changed from 2 degrees noseup to level flight.8 g. the autopilot will restore the aircraft to the attitude existing prior to the correction. the pilot will observe more force is required on the control column to command the aircraft in pitch.O. As the pilot maneuvers the aircraft through any longitudinal attitude change. Place AERIAL REFUEL switch ON and push the control column forward until the aircraft rotates to level flight.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
Turns are accomplished by changing the roll attitude reference but the roll characteristics of the aerial refuel mode require a special technique. The
change in roll reference from wings level to a 30 degree bank angle, for example, may require maintaining a wheel force as long as 30 seconds. However, the time required to change the roll reference
may be shortened by slight overcontrolling. That is,
after the desired bank angle is established, a slight
increase in wheel force (through the use of cross
control) will increase the roll reference rate of
change. Returning to wings level after turning requires a similar procedure.
RECEIVER-TANKER CONTACT TECHNIQUES
The aerial refuel mode of the autopilot is designed
to be compatible with refueling altitude, airspeed,
and downwash characteristics of the tanker aircraft. Generally, each pilot must perform several
contacts with the tanker before the optimum air refueling technique is developed and full confidence
in this mode of the autopilot is realized.
NOTE

The pilot should be prepared to initiate a
switch or force disconnect prior to engaging
the AERIAL REFUEL switch since some
autopilot failures may result in a hardover
pitch and/or roll servo action. Force disconnects during this condition are easily initiated by resisting column or wheel movement until applied force exceeds the disconnect value.
Low Level Mode

The low level mode of the autopilot was designed to
aid the pilot in flying the aircraft at low altitudes
and to reduce pilot fatigue during this type of flying.
NOTE

The low level mode is not recommended for
penetrations, takeoffs, formation flying,
holding patterns, instrument approach procedures, landing, or flight at any altitude
other than that required for low level or low
level missions.
The pilot should be prepared to initiate a
force disconnect prior to engaging the LOW
LEVEL switch since some autopilot failures
may result in a hard-over pitch and/or roll
servo action. Force disconnects during this
condition are easily initiated by resisting

1-340

the column or wheel until applied force exceeds the disconnect value.
PITCH MANEUVERS
After engaging the low level mode, pitch maneuvers
are commanded through the autopilot by applying
force to the control column. Pitch characteristics
may be observed by gradually increasing control
column force. As force is increased, the column
starts to move with a corresponding change in aircraft pitch attitude. Allow the aircraft attitude to
change a few degrees by applying column force. The
column will return approximately to neutral as stabilizer trim occurs and the aircraft will be maintained in the new attitude. This attitude will be
maintained by the autopilot. Automatic trimming
may be observed during changes in aircraft speed
due to climbing or descending flight or by advancing or retarding the throttles. Apply a column force
and observe that trimming occurs.
ROLL MANEUVERS
Bank the aircraft left or right to a bank angle of 8
degrees or less. When wheel force is relaxed, the
autopilot will return the aircraft to wings level.
Bank the aircraft left or right to a bank angle
greater than 8 degrees. When wheel force is relaxed, the autopilot will maintain the aircraft in the
new bank angle. Continue the bank angle to approximately 30 degrees and note that wheel force
must be increased in order to keep the wheel displaced at this bank angle. The increase in wheel
force is called wheel stiffening and autopilot disconnect will occur at approximately 45 degrees of bank
angle or when approximately 40 pounds of wheel
force is reached. This roll force disconnect feature is
available in all modes.
OUT-OF-TRIM EFFECTS
Effects of an out-of-trim aircraft may be noted by
disengaging the autopilot, slightly reducing power
on engines 7 and 8, and reengaging the autopilot
low level mode. The same observation can be made
with the autopilot stabilization mode engaged. This
exaggerated out-of-trim condition illustrates the necessity of trimming the aircraft before engaging the
autopilot. Wheel displacement may be decreased by
advancing throttles for engines 7 and 8. Note the
aircraft heading is maintained constant. Heading
hold in autopilot stabilization is accomplished by
the lateral control servo operating the spoiler surfaces. If heading is drifting after autopilot stabilization is selected, the autopilot roll axis will compensate for drift and command the lateral control servo
to displace and rotate the wheel.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
OAS TIE-IN
The OAS tie-in (second station) mode may be selected while in autopilot stabilization, altitude hold,
or low level modes by positioning the autopilot
TURN CONTROL selector switch to BOMB. The
pilot retains autopilot pitch and manual rudder
control but autopilot roll and heading control is
transferred to the OAS. The autopilot limits bank
angle to 15 degrees (±3 degrees) below 18,000 feet
and to 38 degrees (±4 degrees) at or above 18,000
feet in NAV mode of the OAS. In BOMB mode of
OAS with autopilot stabilization or altitude hold
modes selected, bank angle is limited to 38 degrees
(±4 degrees). However, if the BOMB mode of OAS
and low level are selected, bank angle is limited to

15 degrees (±3 degrees). With the low level mode
engaged, pilot initiated pitch steering through the
control column simultaneously with OAS second
station roll steering may appear awkward at first,
requiring coordination between the pilot and radar
navigator. The autopilot will disconnect if the pilot
restrains wheel movement that accompanies second
station roll steering commands. Manual control of
the aircraft can be regained by overpowering the
autopilot aircraft in pitch or roll with sufficient column/wheel force or by pressing the autopilot release button. Second station control can also be disengaged, with roll steering return to the pilot, by
rotating the flight controller turn knob out of detent
or setting the autopilot TURN CONTROL selector
switch to PILOT.

1-341

T.O. 1B-52H-1

STABILITY AUGMENTATION SYSTEM (SAS)
A Stability Augmentation System (SAS) has been
installed in the aircraft to substantially reduce
structural fatigue damage rates and peak loads, to
provide improved dutch roll damping, and to improve controllability of the aircraft under turbulent
flight conditions. The SAS is an electrohydraulic
two-axis (pitch and yaw) system. The system utilizes three hydraulic actuators; one for the rudder
and two for the elevators. Each actuator responds
to mechanical and electrical input commands. The
mechanical commands come from the pilot or
autopilot. Electrical input signals come from the
SAS electronic control units. Each actuator has
dual electrohydraulic flow control valves. The electrohydraulic flow control valve is the point where
electrical signals become proportional hydraulic signals. Each servo unit provides its related control
valve. The flow control valve is an electrohydraulic
unit which receives SAS generated electrical signals. Electrical commands from the SAS transmitted to the electromechanical flow control valve
are in series with the mechanical commands. For
this reason, electrically commanded surface displacement of the rudder and elevators is not reflected by movement of the rudder pedals or control
column. Mechanical inputs to the rudder and elevators is limited to 19°. Electrical commands are
limited 10° authority in yaw and 5° authority in
pitch. For information concerning SAS flight
characteristics, see FLIGHT CONTROLS, Section
VI. For additional information on associated
hydraulic and mechanical changes to the aircraft,
see HYDRAULIC POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS and
POWERED RUDDER/ELEVATOR SYSTEM, this
section.
NORMAL OPERATION OF SAS

Pilot operation of the electronic portion of the SAS
consists essentially of engaging or disengaging the
yaw and pitch SAS switches. The yaw and pitch
SAS switches should not be engaged when transitioning from ground power to aircraft power. This is
necessary to avoid giving erroneous information to
the maintenance crew since the power changeover
with the switches engaged trips the maintenance
warning indicators on the electronic units in the 47

1-342

section. If the yaw channel fail light comes on during flight, the operation of the system is not impaired, but the failure of one rate channel is indicated. If it is a nuisance failure, it is often possible
to return the questionable channel to operation by
disengaging the yaw SAS switch and then returning it to the ENGAGE position.

AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROLS AND
INDICATORS
AUTO PILOT
Autopilot Flight Controller

The autopilot flight controller (figure 1-103) is located on the aisle stand. When the autopilot is engaged, the flight controller provides a means for
maneuvering the aircraft from the pilot’s or copilot’s
position through the TURN, PITCH, and ROLL
TRIM knobs.
Control Panel

The autopilot control panel is located on the aisle
stand (figure 1-103). Switches located on the control
panel are identified as POWER, ROLL ENGAGE,
PITCH ENGAGE, AERIAL REFUEL, LOW LEVEL, and ALT HOLD. A test switch is provided to
initiate preflight testing of the autopilot. A reset
switch, identified as VALID/INVAL, is provided to
indicate valid or invalid preflight test results.
BNS Steering (Autopilot) Light

A green BNS steering (autopilot) light on the radar
navigator’s panel (20, figure 1-103), will illuminate
when the autopilot turn control selector switch is
placed in BOMB position.
STABILITY AUGMENTATION SYSTEM
SAS Control Panel

The SAS control pane is located on the pilots’ forward instrument panel. The panel contains two
switches (figure 1-103) labeled YAW SAS and
PITCH SAS respectively, and a CHANNEL FAIL
light.

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Automatic Flight Controls and Indicators

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

AUTOPILOT AND IFR BOOM RELEASE BUTTON
AUTOPILOT TURN CONTROL SELECTOR
SWITCH
YAW SAS SWITCH
YAW CHANNEL FAIL LIGHT
PITCH SAS SWITCH
PITCH KNOBS (2)
TURN KNOB
ROLL TRIM KNOB
ROLL ENGAGE SWITCH

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

PITCH ENGAGE SWITCH
ALT HOLD SWITCH
VALID/INVAL RESET SWITCH/INDICATOR
TEST SWITCH
FCS POWER SWITCH
LOW LEVEL SWITCH
AERIAL REFUEL SWITCH
PITCH SAS OFF LIGHT
AUTOPILOT DISENGAGE LIGHT
YAW SAS OFF LIGHT

Figure 1-103 (Sheet 1 of 5)

Change 20

1-343

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Automatic Flight Controls and Indicators (Cont)

20

NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

BNS STEERING LIGHT

FUNCTION

1

Autopilot and Air Refueling (IFR) Boom
Release Button (2 places)

Autopilot release buttons, also referred to as inflight refuel (IFR) boom release buttons, are used to disengage autopilot control. Anytime either release button is pressed, both roll and pitch axes of the autopilot will be
disengaged, and MASTER CAUTION light and AUTOPILOT DISENGAGED light (No. 18) will come on. Pressing either IFR button a second
time will cause the lights to extinguish. The autopilot will disengage from
any nonsteering or steering mode and return to the synchronization
mode. The autopilot will remain disengaged and align all autopilot servos
to existing aircraft attitudes.

2

Autopilot TURN CONTROL Selector
Switch

The autopilot turn control selector switch is of the solenoid locking type
and has PILOT--BOMB positions for selecting either the autopilot flight
controller (PILOT) or the OAS (BOMB), respectively, for turn command
of the autopilot. Interlocks will return the turn control selector switch from
BOMB to PILOT position without disengaging the autopilot when the pilot’s turn knob is rotated out of center detent.
SAS CONTROL PANEL

3

YAW SAS Switch

The YAW SAS switch has two positions, ENGAGE- -DISENGAGE. The
ENGAGE position of the switch supplies power to the engage valves in
the hydraulic actuators and places the system in operation. It also supplies a reset pulse to the comparators when placed in the ENGAGE position. The DISENGAGE position removes power from the hydraulic actuator engage valves. The switch is a solenoid locking type switch and is held
in the ENGAGE position by dual coil electromagnets. If the logic circuitry
determines that the switch contacts should be broken, the electromagnets are released allowing the spring-loaded switches to return to the
DISENGAGE position.

4

Yaw CHANNEL FAIL Light (Amber)

A push-to-test yaw channel fail light serves to warn the pilot that a single
rate channel of the SAS yaw axis has failed.

Figure 1-103 (Sheet 2 of 5)

1-344

T.O. 1B-52H-1

CONTROLINDICATOR

NO.
5

PITCH SAS Switch

FUNCTION
The PITCH SAS switch has two positions, ENGAGE- -DISENGAGE.
The ENGAGE position of the switch supplies power to the engage valves
in the hydraulic actuators and places the system in operation. It also supplies a reset pulse to the comparators when placed in the ENGAGE position. The DISENGAGE position removes power from the hydraulic actuator engage valves. The switch is a solenoid locking type switch and is held
in the ENGAGE position by dual coil electromagnets. If the logic circuitry
determines that the switch contacts should be broken, the electromagnets are released allowing the spring-loaded switches to return to the
DISENGAGE position.
AUTOPILOT FLIGHT CONTROLLER

6

PITCH Knobs (2 places)

Interconnected pitch knobs labeled PITCH, are provided for adjustment
of the reference pitch attitude that will be maintained by the autopilot. Adjustment of the pitch knobs will command the elevator for climb or descent
for autopilot stabilization mode. The pitch knob is mechanically stiffened
in the autopilot altitude hold mode; forced rotation of the pitch knobs will
disengage the altitude hold mode and allow the pilot to adjust pitch as required for changing altitude. The pitch knob is disabled for autopilot steering modes. Forward rotation (GLIDE) of the pitch knobs results in aircraft
descent; aft rotation (CLIMB) will command the aircraft to climb.

7

TURN Knob

The turn knob, labeled TURN, provides coordinated turns in autopilot
nonsteering modes. Rotating the turn knob results in an aircraft turn in the
same direction as the knob is rotated. The rate of turn is proportional to
the speed of the aircraft and amount of bank commanded with the turn
knob. Moving the turn knob out of center detent puts turn control back to
the pilot regardless of the setting of the autopilot turn control selector
switch. Additional detents are located at points in the turn knob rotation
corresponding with approximately 10 degrees less than the maximum
bank capability of 50 degrees. The turn knob is disabled for autopilot
steering modes.
NOTE
When the turn knob is not in use, it should be in the detent at center position of total knob rotation. The autopilot will not engage
with either turn or trim knobs out of detent.

8

ROLL TRIM Knob

The roll trim knob is used principally to correct FCI standoff error when
the autopilot turn selector switch is in BOMB position. The roll trim knob
can only operate with autopilot stabilization, altitude hold, or low level
modes. The roll trim knob is disabled during aerial refuel mode of operation or whenever the turn control selector switch is set to the pilot position.
Use of the roll trim knob for lateral trim will deflect a spoiler and increase
drag causing the aircraft to roll. Lateral trim should normally be accomplished by fuel management.

Figure 1-103 (Sheet 3 of 5)

1-345

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Automatic Flight Controls and Indicators (Cont)
NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

FUNCTION
AUTOPILOT CONTROL PANEL

9

ROLL ENGAGE Switch

The ROLL ENGAGE switch has ON--OFF positions. ON position engages the lateral control servos. OFF position disengages the servos.

10

PITCH ENGAGE Switch

The PITCH ENGAGE switch has ON--OFF positions. ON position engages the elevator and stabilizer trim servos. OFF position disengages
the servos.

11

ALT (Altitude) HOLD Switch

The ALT HOLD switch has ON--OFF positions. In the ON position, the
autopilot will maintain the aircraft at a constant barometric pressure altitude. Barometric pressure signals from the air data sensor unit are processed to operate the elevator and stabilizer pitch trim servos as required
to maintain the pressure altitude existing at the time that the ALT HOLD
switch was set to ON.

12

VALID/INVAL Indicator/Reset Switch

When the TEST switch (No. 13) is pressed, the autopilot status will be
indicated as VALID or INVAL on the indicator.

13

TEST Switch

The TEST switch actuates a built-in-test (BIT) system to determine the
operational status of the autopilot. The system is wired through the aircraft squat switches and is therefore usable on the ground only.

14

FCS POWER Switch

The FCS POWER switch has ON--OFF positions. When the POWER
switch is set to the ON position, electrical power is applied and the synchronization mode of the autopilot is operational.
NOTE
In the event of any indicated malfunction of autopilot disengagement, place the POWER switch to the OFF position, thus assuring positive autopilot disengagement.

15

LOW LEVEL Switch

The LOW LEVEL switch has ON--OFF positions. In the ON position, signals are supplied from the force transducers which allow the pilot to control the aircraft through the autopilot. The turn knob and pitch knobs are
disabled when the low level mode is engaged. In the OFF position, power
is removed from the low level portion of the autopilot. The LOW LEVEL
switch will automatically return to OFF when the autopilot is disengaged
for any reason.

16

AERIAL REFUEL Switch

An AERIAL REFUEL switch has ON--OFF positions. In the ON position,
signals are supplied from the force transducers which allow the pilot to
control the aircraft through the autopilot. Turn, pitch, and roll trim knobs
are disabled when the aerial refuel mode is engaged. In the OFF position,
power is removed from the aerial refuel portion of the autopilot. The AERIAL REFUEL switch will automatically return to OFF when the autopilot
is disengaged for any reason.

Figure 1-103 (Sheet 4 of 5)

1-346

T.O. 1B-52H-1

NO.

CONTROLINDICATOR

FUNCTION
CENTRAL CAUTION PANEL

17

PITCH SAS OFF Light (Amber)

Push-to-test light marked PITCH SAS OFF warns the pilots that two associated channel failures of the pitch SAS have occurred and that the
holding coils for the ENGAGE switch have been released returning the
switch to the DISENGAGE position. Simultaneously with the illumination
of the PITCH SAS OFF light, the master caution light on the pilots’ panel
will illuminate.

18

AUTO PILOT DISENGAGED Light
(Amber)

Illumination of the AUTO PILOT DISENGAGED light (amber master caution lights also come on) alerts the pilot and copilot that ROLL ENGAGE
or PITCH ENGAGE switches have been returned from ON to the OFF
position. The warning lights operate with any autopilot mode selected.
The warning lights can be turned off by resetting the ROLL ENGAGE and/
or PITCH ENGAGE switches to ON, by momentarily placing the POWER
switch OFF then ON, or by pressing either autopilot release button.

19

YAW SAS OFF Light (Amber)

Push-to-test light marked YAW SAS OFF warns the pilots that two associated channel failures of the yaw SAS have occurred and that the holding
coils for the ENGAGE switch have been released returning the switch to
the DISENGAGE position. Simultaneously with the illumination of the
YAW SAS OFF light, the master caution light on the pilots’ panel will illuminate.
BNS STEERING PANEL

20

BNS Steering (Autopilot) Light (Green)

BNS steering (autopilot) light on the radar navigator’s panel, illuminates
when the autopilot turn control selector switch is placed in BOMB position.

Figure 1-103 (Sheet 5 of 5)

1-347

T.O. 1B-52H-1

AUTOPILOT NORMAL OPERATION
PREFLIGHT OF THE AUTOPILOT

During the following checks, do not allow
the stabilizer trim to drive more than 1/2
unit at a time when operating on standby
pumps. Hydraulic power is necessary at the
stabilizer jackscrew to allow the mechanism
to operate without slipping of the autopilot
stabilizer trim servo override clutch.
NOTE

This check may be performed after a reported malfunction has occurred, time and
conditions permitting, and at the discretion
of the flight crew.
1. Place body standby pump switches to STBY.
2. Place TURN knob and ROLL TRIM knob in
detent.
3. Place POWER switch ON.
4. Place ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches on and check autopilot BIT.
NOTE

Do not apply pressure to the control column
when engaging the pitch and roll modes. A
small force (approximately 4 1/2 pounds)
will prevent autopilot engagement. In the
event the autopilot does not engage, reposition the control column to the neutral position and recycle the autopilot pitch and roll
switches.
a. Press TEST switch on control panel; control
columns move forward and aft, control wheels rotate right and left. After approximately 30 seconds,
ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE switches release to OFF and AUTOPILOT DISENGAGED
warning light flashes momentarily. VALID light
comes on.
b. Press VALID/INVAL reset switch; VALID
light goes out.
5. Place ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches ON.
6. Check autopilot disengage functions:
a. Disengage autopilot by pressing pilot’s
autopilot release button; reengage autopilot and
check by pressing copilot’s autopilot release button.
b. Apply approximately 40 pounds lateral
force on the pilot’s control wheel to the right;

1-348

Change 4

autopilot should disengage. Reengage autopilot and
repeat to the left. Reengage autopilot and repeat
lateral force disconnect both right and left for copilot’s control wheel.
c. Place PITCH ENGAGE and ROLL ENGAGE switches ON. Push forward on the pilot’s
control column until the ROLL ENGAGE and
PITCH ENGAGE switches disengage. Reengage the
autopilot and pull back on the control column until
the ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches disengage, and again reengage the
autopilot. Repeat control column force disconnect
both fore and aft for the copilot’s control column.
7. With the autopilot disengaged, operate pilot’s
or copilot’s stabilizer trim button to NOSE UP and
NOSE DOWN; the manual trim wheels should rotate in the direction of the commanded trim.
8. Place PITCH ENGAGE and ROLL ENGAGE
switches ON. Operate the pilot’s or copilot’s stabilizer trim button to NOSE UP and NOSE DOWN; the
manual trim wheels should not rotate.
9. Place the ALT HOLD switch ON. Rotate the
pitch knob; ALT HOLD switch should return to
OFF. ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches should remain ON.
NOTE

It should be considered normal, when engaging the ALT HOLD switch on the
ground, for the ‘‘engage error’’ of the altitude control to originate a signal to which
the aircraft at rest on the ground cannot respond, causing the elevator and stabilizer
trim to be driven to their limits.
10. Rotate the TURN knob clockwise; the pilot’s
control wheels should rotate clockwise. Repeat for
the counterclockwise direction, then return the
TURN knob to detent.
11. Rotate the PITCH knobs in the CLIMB direction; the control columns should move aft and the
manual trim wheel should rotate for noseup trim.
Rotate the PITCH knobs in the GLIDE direction;
the control columns should move forward and the
manual trim wheel should rotate for nosedown
trim.
12. Place the autopilot TURN CONTROL selector
switch in BOMB. The OAS steering indicator
should indicate ON provided the OAS power switch
is ON and the OAS is in NAV or bomb mode.
13. Command a right turn with the OAS; the pilots’ control wheels should rotate clockwise. Command a left turn with the OAS; the pilots’ control
wheels should move counterclockwise.
14. Return the autopilot TURN CONTROL selector switch to PILOT.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
15. Place LOW LEVEL switch to ON.
a. Disengage autopilot by pressing pilot’s release button; reengage autopilot and check by
pressing copilot’s release button.
b. Apply approximately 40 pounds lateral
force on the pilot’s control wheel to the right;
autopilot should disengage. Reengage autopilot and
repeat to the left. Reengage the autopilot and repeat lateral force disconnect both right and left for
copilot’s control wheel.
NOTE

It may be necessary to move the control
wheel to the stops to apply sufficient force
to disconnect the autopilot.
c. Apply a sharp push-pull force to pilot’s control column; autopilot should disconnect. Reengage
and repeat using a sharp pull-push force. Repeat
using copilot’s control column.
d. With LOW LEVEL switch ON, move control
column forward. Control column should move easily
and remain where displaced by the pilot. The stabilizer trim should move while force is being applied
to the control column and should drive in the nosedown direction, possibly driving to the limit. Limit
stabilizer trim movement to 1/2 unit of displacement. While stabilizer trim is moving, apply a
5-pound force to control column in the opposite direction of trim movement and note that the stabilizer trim follows the force change.
e. Repeat step d using an aft control column
displacement.
f. Displace control wheel right using varying
amounts of displacement up to full travel. Note that
control wheel does return to neutral when force is
released. Repeat using left control wheel displacement.
g. Place autopilot TURN CONTROL selector
switch to BOMB.
h. Command a right turn with the OAS; pilots’
control wheels should rotate clockwise. Command a
left turn with the OAS; pilots’ control wheels should
rotate counterclockwise. During bomb mode of operation, the pilot will have the force override feature on lateral control to disconnect the autopilot.
The pilot will have pitch control through the control
column. Switching between PILOT and BOMB
modes of operation should not disconnect the
autopilot.
NOTE

The ROLL TRIM knob may be used to reduce standoff error as observed on the FCI

when the autopilot TURN CONTROL selector switch is in BOMB position.
i. Return autopilot TURN CONTROL selector
switch to PILOT. Return LOW LEVEL switch to
OFF.
16. Place MASTER REFUEL switch ON.
17. Place NORMAL SLIPWAY DOOR switch to
OPEN.
18. Place AERIAL REFUEL switch to on.
a. Disengage autopilot by pressing pilot’s
autopilot release button; reengage autopilot and
check by pressing copilot’s autopilot release button.
b. Apply approximately 40 pounds lateral
force on the pilot’s control wheel to the right;
autopilot should disengage. Reengage autopilot and
repeat to the left. Reengage autopilot and repeat
lateral force disconnect both right and left for copilot’s control wheel.
NOTE

It may be necessary to move the control
wheel to the stops to apply sufficient force
to disconnect the autopilot.
c. Apply a sharp push-pull force to pilot’s control column; autopilot should disconnect. Reengage
and repeat using a sharp pull-push force. Repeat
using copilot’s control column.
d. Move pilot’s control column forward and release; column should return to neutral. Move control column aft and release; column should return
to neutral. Repeat using copilot’s control column.
e. Move pilot’s control column forward and
hold in displaced position for 20 to 30 seconds. The
control column should remain in displaced position.
Repeat procedures by moving control column aft.
Repeat using copilot’s control column.
NOTE

If stabilizer trim drives, limit movement to
1/2 unit by using approximately 5 pounds
of force in the opposite direction of trim
movement.
Control column forces may appear higher
when using aerial refueling mode than
when using low level mode.

f. Rotate pilot’s control wheel right and release; wheel should return to neutral. Rotate wheel
left; wheel should return to neutral. Rotate control
wheel right and hold in displaced position for 20 to
30 seconds; wheel should remain in displaced position when released. Repeat using copilot’s wheel.

1-349

T.O. 1B-52H-1
19. Place the NORMAL SLIPWAY
switch to OFF.
20. Return the POWER switch to OFF.

DOOR

PILOT’S OPERATION OF THE AUTOPILOT

5. Place ALT HOLD switch to ON if constant altitude control is desired. The aircraft is now under
autopilot control on the roll and pitch axes.

Pilot’s inflight operation of the autopilot may be accomplished by the following procedure:
Check POWER switch ON.
Check aircraft wings level and ball centered.
a. The aircraft should be trimmed by fuel
management and thrust adjustments as much as
possible since manual trim will deflect the spoilers
and create drag. See FUEL MANAGEMENT FOR
LATERAL TRIM under CRUISE, Section II.
b. Use rudder trim, as required, to obtain
straight and level flight. Observe RUDDER TRIM
LIMITATIONS, Section V.
3. Check autopilot flight controller for:
a. TURN knob in detent.
b. ROLL knob in detent.
4. Place ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches ON.

NOTE

The aircraft should, with no more than two
overshoots, stabilize out on a ‘‘reference’’ altitude within the following stated tolerances from ‘‘engage’’ altitude during
straight and level flight.

1.
2.

The pilot should be prepared to immediately disengage the autopilot in the event of a
hardover indication following engagement.
NOTE


Upon engagement, there should be no engage transient exceeding 1/2 degree of pitch
or yaw and 1 degree of roll.
Autopilot stabilization may be engaged in a
normal climb or descent and the aircraft
will continue to fly that attitude until the
pilot moves his pitch knob.
If the autopilot is engaged when the aircraft
is banked for a turn, it will automatically
roll the aircraft to a near wings-level attitude.
The autopilot will not completely compensate for all lateral mistrim. If the aircraft
is not properly trimmed before autopilot engagement or becomes out of trim after engagement, the aircraft may fly slightly wing
low until the aircraft is retrimmed by fuel
management and thrust adjustments.
If the AHRS fails, the autopilot will disengage.

1-350

Yaw SAS is required to provide dutch roll
damping.

Below 30,000 feet
pressure altitude

(±) 30 feet

Above 30,000 feet
pressure altitude

(±) 0.1% engage
reference altitude.

During turns, deviation from the engaged reference
altitude should not exceed (±) 60 feet (for roll angles
less than 30°). ALT HOLD will be disengaged if the
flight controller pitch knob is rotated out of detent,
or when AERIAL REFUEL or LOW LEVEL mode is
selected.
6. Standard maneuvers may be executed with the
PITCH and TURN knobs. Climbs and descents may
be accomplished with the PITCH knob; turns may
be made with the TURN knob. A climbing or descending turn may be made with a combination of
the two knobs.
7. Steady displacement of the control wheel indicates asymmetrical fuel load or engine thrust requiring appropriate fuel management and/or thrust
adjustment to center the control wheel. See FUEL
MANAGEMENT FOR LATERAL TRIM under
CLIMB, Section II.
NOTE

During operation on autopilot, airbrake operation should be performed with caution to
avoid excessive longitudinal out-of-trim condition and to prevent possible automatic pilot disengagement.
During autopilot control with ALT HOLD
engaged, operation of the wing flaps is permissible. While operating flaps, a large but
not dangerous indicated altitude change
will result due to a change in airflow across
the static source. Lowering flaps results in
a gain in altitude; raising flaps will result
in a loss of altitude.

T.O. 1B-52H-1
8. The low level mode should be engaged after
stabilizing at an altitude consistent with the start
of low level flight with the aircraft trimmed. The
low level mode is engaged as follows:









POWER switch – ON
PITCH ENGAGE switch – ON
ROLL ENGAGE switch – ON

NORMAL and ALTERNATE SLIPWAY DOOR
switches are CLOSED

ROLL TRIM and TURN knob in detent
NOTE

The LOW LEVEL switch should be placed
ON immediately after placing the PITCH
ENGAGE and ROLL ENGAGE switches
ON to avoid low level flight in an autopilot
nonsteering mode.
In the event of a malfunction of the slipway
door system, the LOW LEVEL switch may
be engaged if the MASTER REFUEL
SWITCH is OFF or is cycled from ON to
OFF after the slipway door switches are in
the CLOSED position.
When engaging either the LOW LEVEL or
AERIAL REFUEL switches, the pilot and
copilot should not be exerting any force on
the control column. If either pilot is exerting a force on the controls when the LOW
LEVEL or AERIAL REFUEL switch is engaged, an engage transient will occur. The
action will be observed as a short pulse action on the control columns but will not
drive the control limit.

9. The air refueling system must be configured
for air refueling in order to engage the aerial refuel
mode. The aerial refuel mode is placed in operation
while approaching the precontact position (at
approximately 10 knots above refueling airspeed)
and will be engaged as follows:


POWER switch – ON

AERIAL REFUEL switch – ON
No other autopilot mode engaged
NOTE

LOW LEVEL switch – ON
No other autopilot mode is engaged (if ALT HOLD
is on, it will drop out)

ROLL ENGAGE switch – ON

Engaging the PITCH ENGAGE, ROLL ENGAGE, and AERIAL REFUEL switches (in
this order) should be accomplished as rapidly as possible to minimize the time the
autopilot is in a nonsteering mode.
When engaging the AERIAL REFUEL
switch, if the signal amplifier cycles from
ready to disconnect, push the reset button
and return air refueling system to ready
condition.
During aerial refueling, boom disconnects
caused by excessive pressure, exceeding the
boom envelope limits, or boom operator initiated disconnects, will not disengage the
autopilot.

RADAR NAVIGATOR’S OPERATION OF THE
AUTOPILOT

The offensive avionics system has no pitch control
over the aircraft. Turn control of the autopilot is
transferred to the OAS when the autopilot turn
control selector switch is placed in BOMB position.
When the autopilot is controlled by OAS, steering
commands are generated to the current destination.
The destination can be modified and steering commands generated to a selected destination with a
FLY TO NN ENTER command. The crosshair can
be placed over a point and a FLY TO + command
generates steering commands to the crosshair. If
the crosshair are moved, another FLY TO + command must be initiated for the aircraft to fly to the
new position. Moving the crosshair on the display
will not change direction of the aircraft without a
FLY TO + COMMAND.
NOTE

The radar navigator/navigator will inform
the pilots before inserting a FLY TO +, FLY
TO NN, or CF 73 command when OAS tiein (second station) is engaged.

PITCH ENGAGE switch – ON

1-351

T.O. 1B-52H-1
AUTOPILOT DISENGAGEMENT

Check elevator and rudder systems for artificial feel after autopilot disengagement if
flying in or leaving an icing condition. Icing
of the Q-spring ram air duct may result in
loss of artificial feel. If abnormally light
rudder or elevator control forces are encountered, abrupt control displacements
should be avoided to prevent overstressing
the aircraft. See ELEVATOR AND RUDDER CONTROL MALFUNCTION, this section.
If a constant large displacement of the control column indicates failure of the automatic trim system during flight on
autopilot, maintain column position manually after autopilot disengagement and retrim.

Disengagement for Out-of-Trim Condition

If large amounts of stabilizer out-of-trim and displaced control columns are observed when flying
with autopilot altitude hold engaged, disengagement should be accomplished using the following
procedure:
1. To prevent an abrupt pitchdown (up) upon disengagement, restrain control column movement by
attempting to maintain column in position observed.
2. Disengage autopilot by pressing release button. Expect sudden and possible heavy elevator
forces to be encountered to keep the control column
from snapping to neutral or ‘‘hands-off ’’ position.
3. Immediately apply stabilizer trim.
4. Use air brakes, if required.
NOTE

If elevator authority is insufficient to control a nosedown mistrim, airbrake extension should be used as a backup to the elevator for additional pitch authority.

1-352

Individual Servo Disengagement

Single axis control of the aircraft with the autopilot
is possible for some control modes if both autopilot
amplifier processors are operating properly. Separate ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches on the mode selector allow engagement of
autopilot roll (spoiler or lateral control) and pitch
(elevator) servomotors, respectively. A list of possible single axis control modes include:



Autopilot stabilization with only the roll axis engaged
Autopilot stabilization with only the pitch axis engaged
Altitude hold with only the pitch axis engaged

Both roll and pitch axes of the autopilot must be engaged to operate steering and OAS modes. Single
axis control with autopilot is accomplished by the
following procedure:
1. Disengage the autopilot using the autopilot release button on the pilot’s or copilot’s control wheel.
2. Set the appropriate ROLL ENGAGE or PITCH
ENGAGE switch either ON or OFF as desired.
3. Select the desired autopilot control mode. The
autopilot mode control logic will prevent engagement of incompatible modes. Attempts to engage
any noncompatible autopilot modes will result in
the appropriate mode select switch dropping to the
OFF position.
Complete Disengagement

Complete disengagement may be accomplished at
any time by pressing the pilot’s or copilot’s autopilot
release button on the respective control wheel, placing the ROLL ENGAGE and PITCH ENGAGE
switches to OFF, or placing the autopilot POWER
switch to the OFF position. The pilot or copilot may
also disengage the autopilot by applying sufficient
force to the control column. In nonsteering modes, a
column or wheel force exceeding 30 pounds will disengage the autopilot. In steering modes, a column
or wheel force exceeding 40 pounds will disengage
the autopilot.

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Automatic Flight Control Systems
Circuit Protection and Location
EQUIPMENT
Autopilot Power And Control

Autopilot Safety Disconnect
Switches
Stability Augmentation System
Pitch SAS

Yaw SAS

11

LLC

CIRCUIT
BREAKER
TITLE

CB PANEL/
LOCATOR
CODE 11

POWER
SOURCE

AUTOPILOT –
AC POWER
DAFCS POWER
INTERLOCK
OFF LIGHT
SERVO POWER

LLC/F29
LLC/F33
LLC/F34
LLC/F30
LLC/F32

AC Bus 3
Left TR
Left TR
Left TR
Left TR

AERIAL REFUELING –
DISC & ENGINE STALL CONT

RLC/F4

Rt. TR

LLC/D17
LLC/D18
LLC/D19
LLC/D20
LLC/D21

AC Bus 3
AC Bus 3
AC Bus 3
Left TR
Left TR

LLC/D14
LLC/D15
LLC/D16
LLC/D12
LLC/D13

AC Bus 3
AC Bus 3
AC Bus 3
Left TR
Left TR

FLIGHT CONTROLS – PITCH SAS –
AC 1
AC 2
AC 3
DC 1
DC 2
FLIGHT CONTROLS – YAW SAS –
AC 1
AC 2
AC 3
DC 1
DC 2

The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code
is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER
PANELS figure, under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I.
LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL

RLC

RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL

Figure 1-104

1-353/(1-354 blank)

BLA

T.O. 1B-52H-1

PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS
DESCRIPTION
AIR BLEED SYSTEM
MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH
MISSILE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
AIR SUPPLY REGULATION
AIR CONDITIONING PACK
AIR DISTRIBUTION
PRESSURE REGULATION
CONTROL POWER SUPPLY
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
NORMAL OPERATION
SYSTEM TURN-ON
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT COOLING AT
HIGH ALTITUDE
SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
SYSTEM GROUND OPERATION

DESCRIPTION
The pneumatic systems include the air bleed system and the air conditioning and pressurization
system. Pneumatic system circuit protection and
the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-112.

AIR BLEED SYSTEM
The air bleed system (figure 1-105) incorporates a
wing leading edge manifold and controls for collecting and routing high pressure hot air. This air may
be obtained either from the final stage compressor
of each operating engine or from an auxiliary air
source applied to a ground start connection on the
underside of each nacelle. The air bleed system is
the power source for engine starting and the air
source for heating, cooling, and pressurizing the
crew compartment. The system is designed so that
normal airflow is from the No. 2 nacelle through a
ram air heat exchanger (precooler) in the No. 2
strut into the distribution ducting in the wing leading edge and fuselage. On the ground, the landing
gear squat switch functions to fully open the cooling
air ejector valve at all times to allow maximum precooler operation. In flight, duct temperatures not to
exceed 190°C result from regulation of ram air
passing through the heat exchanger in the precooler. A bleed air overheat light comes on if the duct

1-355
1-355
1-357
1-357
1-358
1-358
1-358A
1-359
1-359
1-364
1-367
1-374
1-374
1-375
1-376
1-376

temperature exceeds approximately 210°C. In the
event of failure of the bleed air supply from No. 2
nacelle, either through duct failure or shutdown of
engines 3 and 4, emergency airflow may be obtained from No. 3 nacelle by placing the bleed selector switch (6, figure 1-110) on the aisle stand, in the
EMERG RH INBD position. This air does not pass
through a strut mounted precooler and therefore
may directly subject the distribution ducting and
the air conditioning system to bleed air temperatures of 232° to 399°C, depending on engine thrust
settings and OAT. The distribution ducting and the
routing it follows, particularly along the wing leading edge, are not designed for safe operation at temperatures above 246°C when the aircraft is below
25,000 feet.
Above 25,000 feet with low OAT conditions, adequate cabin heating may not be available with the
bleed selector switch in the NORMAL LH IN BD
position. This is caused by over-cooling of the bleed
air by the precooler, with the result that the bleed
air temperature may not be high enough to permit
adequate cabin heating. In order to minimize this
problem, the following instructions apply:
1. At altitudes below 25,000 feet, place the bleed
selector switch in NORMAL LH INBD position.
2. At altitudes of 25,000 feet or above, place the
bleed selector switch in EMERG RH INBD position.

Change 16

1-355

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Air Bleed System
ENGINE
NO. 1

ENGINE
NO. 2

ENGINE
NO. 3

ENGINE
NO. 5

ENGINE
NO. 4

TO NO. 2
NACELLE
ANTI−ICING

TO NO. 1
NACELLE
ANTI−ICING

ENGINE
NO. 6

ENGINE
NO. 8

ENGINE
NO. 7

TO NO. 3
NACELLE
ANTI−ICING

TO NO. 4
NACELLE
ANTI−ICING

STARTER STARTER
SELECTOR SWITCH
SWITCH (TYPICAL)
CARTRIDGE START
FLIGHT

PNEUMATIC
TO HYDRAULIC
RESERVOIR
PRESSURIZATION

NO. 2 STRUT HEAT
EXCHANGER COOLING
AIR EXHAUST

OFF

TO HYDRAULIC
RESERVOIR
PRESSURIZATION
MANIFOLD
TEMPERATURE
GAGE

NO. 1
STRUT
BLEED
VALVE

NO. 4
STRUT
BLEED
VALVE

NO. 3 STRUT
BLEED
VALVE

BODY
CROSSOVER
MANIFOLD
VALVE


TO ANTI−ICE MISSILE
ENVIRONMENTAL
CONTROL UNIT RAM
AIRSCOOP

MA

NI
F
VA OLD
LV
E
O
EN PEN
GI
F
NE OR
O STA
CA PE RT
N
CL UT
OS ION
E
ST AFTE
AR
R
T

TO ANTI−ICE AIR
CONDITIONING PACK
HEAT EXCHANGER
RAM AIR SCOOP

TO AIR
CONDITIONING
SYSTEM

FOR MISSILE
ENVIRONMENTAL
CONTROL DUCTING
PRESSURIZATION

CL

OS

E

MANIFOLD VALVE
SWITCH
Controlled by Master Switch and
Bleed Selector Switch of Air Condi−
tioning System to allow one valve
(not both) to be open while Mani−
fold Valve Switch is CLOSED. All
valves open when Manifold Valve
Switch is OPEN.

GROUND START CONNECTION
SHUTOFF VALVE

TEMPERATURE SENSOR

CHECK VALVE

BLEED AIR
RAM AIR

ENGINE STARTER

NORMAL PRECOOLED AIR FLOW
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS

Figure 1-105

1-356

A31728

T.O. 1B-52H-1

When EMERG RH INBD is selected below
25,000 feet, an explosive condition may exist in the wing if fuel vapors have accumulated near the hot air ducting and the duct
temperature exceeds 246°C. Therefore, the
bleed air overheat light, and the manifold
temperature gage will be closely monitored
to prevent exceeding 246°C below 25,000
feet, since bleed air is not precooled in
EMERG RH INBD. The explosive danger
no longer exists above 25,000 feet, due to
the high auto-ignition temperature of fuel
vapor above this altitude.
Hazardous conditions exist at all altitudes
when combustible materials are stored on
hot air ducts or close to hot air duct outlets.

MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH

The manifold valve switch is used primarily for
engine starting and provides for airflow from any
engine to any other engine. For operation of the
manifold valve switch see 3, figure 1-110.

MISSILE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
SYSTEM
The missile environmental control system receives
engine bleed air (figure 1-105) from the body manifold for regulated pressurization of the environmental air distribution ducting. Right manifold
bleed air is supplied to a valve for anti-icing control
of the missile ram airscoop in the right wing leading edge.
The missile environmental control system supplies
conditioned air to the missiles and Missile Interface
Units (MIUs) or Weapon Interface Units (WIUs) on
both external pylons and the CSRL through the
Missile Conditioning Subsystem (MCS), This ensures MIU/WIU and missile temperature is maintained within a normal operating range. The system will operate when Missile/Weapons Interface
Unit (MIU) power is applied and the cabin air conditioning system is on.
The system is composed of two distinct circuits, a
temperature control circuit and a missile air circuit.
The temperature control circuit consists of a heat
exchanger, hot and cold air modulating valves, temperature controller, missile circuit temperature sen-

sor, and ram air inlet temperature sensor. The missile air circuit consists of a fan, fan differential
pressure switch, pressure regulator, missile overtemperature switch, two wing leading edge bypass
valves, and four pylon breakaway valves. Both circuits contain ducting for routing air and wiring required for operation and control of the system.
The missile circuit fan circulates conditioned air
through a closed loop to the cruise pylon and CSRL
missiles. The air is cooled or heated to the desired
temperature as it flows through the heat exchanger
core. The missile circuit air temperature is monitored by a sensor installed in the heat exchanger
outlet duct. Ambient temperature is sensed by the
ram air inlet temperature sensor. These signals allow the controller to determine the three modes of
operation for the MCS system: warmup mode, normal heating mode, and normal cooling mode. The
MCS controller adjusts airflow through the hot or
cold air modulating valves to provide the required
missile supply air temperatures.
The right wing ram airscoop provides cooling air to
the missile dc power supplies installed in a rack immediately aft of the heat exchanger. The missile dc
power supplies are powered anytime an MIU is
powered on. The power supplies require cooling air
when powered on.

On the ground, the missile dc power supplies
can be operated for a maximum of two minutes without cooling air being suppled to the
right wing root ram air scoop. If necessary to
reapply MIU power without cooling air, a
minimum cooling period of 20 minutes between power applications is required
Conditioned air is supplied to both cruise missile
pylons and ICSMS stub pylons. In addition conditioned air is supplied to the weapon stations on the
cruise missile pylons. The HSAB on the ICSMS pylon and HSAB mounted weapons do not receive
conditioned air.
Self-sealing valves at the pylon interface assure
conditioned air is not lost into the atmosphere after
the pylon is jettisoned or when no pylon is installed.
After pylon separation or when no pylons are installed, the leading edge bypass valves open allowing supply air to return to complete the cooling
loop.

Change 16

1-357

T.O. 1B-52H-1
Proper operation of the missile environmental control system is continuously monitored. Improper operation of the system is indicated when a reverse
video ECU (Environmental Control Unit) appears
on the MFD. Fan failure, as sensed by the fan differential pressure switch, missile circuit air temperature above 140°F or below 46°F, missile circuit
temperature sensor failure, or ram air inlet temperature sensor failure will generate this display. Also,
an overheat condition, as sensed by the missile circuit overtemperature switch, will cause the fan to
shut down and result in a fault indication on the
MFD. The ECS/MCS controller incorporates a builtin-test (BIT) feature which allows isolation of defective components. The system requires 28 volt dc for
control and 118/205 volt ac 400 Hz power for major
component operation.
For further information on missile environmental
control system and anti-icing, refer to the appropriate weapon manual.

AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
The air conditioning system (figures 1-106 and
1-107) provides crew compartment ventilation with
filtered temperature controlled air, piped cooling to
electronic equipment, pressurization, and emergency ram air ventilation. High pressure hot air from
the air bleed system (figure 1-105) provides the energy to air condition and pressurize the crew compartment. The bleed air ducting contains a thermal
switch which is connected to an amber press-to-test
warning light on the pilot’s instrument panel to
warn of bleed air overheat. Additionally the master
caution light will come on when the bleed air overheat light comes on. The bleed air overheat light
comes on at 210°C. In case of bleed air overheat
another thermal switch is located in the air conditioning pack (ACP) compressor discharge duct
which will shut the ACP down if the temperature
exceeds 224°C. Bleed air, which has been partially
cooled by a temperature controlled precooler in the
No. 2 strut, is admitted to the system by the air
conditioning system pressure regulator and shutoff
valve, which is operated electrically by the cabin
pressure (air conditioning) master switch on the
aisle stand. From the air conditioning shutoff valve,
bleed air passes through a catalytic filter then divides. Part of the hot air passes through a flow control valve and is cooled by the ACP. A water separator downstream of the ACP removes moisture from
the cooler air. The remaining uncooled bleed air

1-358

Change 16

passes through a pressure regulator valve and is
mixed with the cooled air and ducted to the crew
station lower outlets to maintain the desired cabin
temperature. The remainder of the air cooled by the
ACP is ducted into the pressurized compartment
where it supplies cooling to electronic equipment
and crew station overhead outlets. Cabin pressurization is provided by regulating the discharge of
cabin air through combination cabin pressure safety and outflow valves. Ram air ventilation of the
crew compartment and some cooling of electronic
equipment may be obtained by positioning the air
conditioning master switch in RAM to shut off conditioned air, open the emergency ram airscoop, and
open the outflow valves. For ground operations, the
OFF position is used when the ground cooling cart
is connected to the ground cooling connection in the
forward wheel well to cool electronic equipment and
ventilate the compartment. Also, cooling air can be
obtained by selecting 7.45 when bleed air is available through an air cart connected to No. 2 nacelle
or from an engine run.
AIR SUPPLY REGULATION

The bleed air supply is normally taken from engines 3 and 4 and precooled in a ram air heat exchanger in the No. 2 strut before delivery to the air
conditioning system. An emergency (not precooled)
bleed air supply from engines 5 and 6 is available
when selected with the bleed selector switch on the
aisle stand. Bleed air passes through two pressure
regulator valves and a flow control valve, which
control the airflow through the air conditioning system. The airflow divides downstream of the catalytic filter, one stream going through the ACP to be
cooled, and the other stream is used for cabin heating.
A mixture of heated and cooled air from the pack
goes to the foot outlet ducts and can be varied hot
to cold. A portion of the total bleed airflow, depending on the position of the temperature modulating
valves, bypasses the ACP in maintaining a selected
cabin temperature. The temperature modulating
valves are electrically controlled from a combination switch-rheostat (temperature selector) on the
copilot’s side panel for the upper zone and on the
radar navigator’s front panel for the lower zone.
This provides the cabin with two zone automatic
temperature regulation. Control of the quantity of
air to each crew station is provided by controls at
the crew stations.

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Extreme caution must be exercised by all
crewmembers when stowing and securing
gear aboard the aircraft. Care will be taken
to ensure that gear is safely secured and is
not stowed on or near heating ducts, outlets, electrical wiring, and electronic equipment. Periodically during flight, each crewmember should check ducts, outlets, electrical wiring, and electronic equipment in his
immediate area to see that they are free of
combustible materials. For location of
mixed air ducts and outlets, see figure
1-108.
NOTE

Ensure that the sensors (51 and 52, figure
1-106) are free from any coverings or obstructions for proper operation.
AIR CONDITIONING PACK

The ACP located in the left forward wheel well
cools the hot bleed air by means of an air-to-air
heat exchanger and an air cycle machine. The heat
exchanger uses ram air as the coolant which is obtained through a duct from the anti-iced airscoop in
the leading edge of the left inboard wing panel. The
air cycle machine consists of a compressor wheel,
an expansion turbine, and an axial blower directly
coupled together. The bleed air is partially cooled
with the first pass through the primary side of the
heat exchanger. It is then compressed to a higher
pressure by a pass through the compressor. This is
followed by another pass through the secondary
side of the heat exchanger. The air is then subjected
to a decrease in pressure and temperature in passing through the expansion turbine. The cold air output must be warmed above freezing to prevent ice
blockage of the water separator and to prevent extremely cold air from entering the cabin. An electronic controller automatically maintains an above
freezing temperature in the cold air output by oper-

ating a modulating anti-icing valve to bypass bleed
air from upstream of the first stage of the heat exchanger into the output of the air cycle machine.
The amber press-to-test warning light, located on
the pilot’s center instrument panel, is connected to
a thermal switch in the bleed air duct to warn of
overheat. The bleed air overheat light and the master caution light come on when bleed air temperature exceeds 210°C. If the bleed air overheat light
comes on, see FAILURE OF BLEED AIR PRECOOLER under PNEUMATIC SYSTEM MALFUNCTIONS, in Section III.
NOTE

210°C should not be construed as a limiting
temperature for ACP operation. Illumination of the bleed air overheat light is an indication of higher than normal temperatures in the bleed air supply manifold for
the air conditioning system following a precooler malfunction. Due to the location of
the overheat temperature sensor, the overheat light may also illuminate if EMERG
RH INBD is selected following loss of normal bleed air supply. Operation of the ACP
with manifold temperature above 210°C is
permissible so long as the temperature does
not exceed 246°C. For more information see
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM, this section.
The ACP is equipped with a thermal switch in the
compressor discharge duct which is set at 224°C.
This switch is wired to the ACP flow control valve
and the cabin temperature control system (CTCS)
shutoff valve. These valves will close when the temperature at the switch reaches 224°C. This shuts off
bleed air to the ACP and cabin distribution system.
Closure of the overspeed pressure switch or water
separator overtemp switch will also shut the system
down. The system will not automatically reset
when bleed air temperature decreases. The system
can manually be reset by placing the air conditioning master switch to RAM or OFF and then back to
a pressurization position.

Change 10

1-358A/(1-358B blank)

BLA

T.O. 1B-52H-1
Water Separator

The water separator removes part of the moisture
precipitated by refrigeration of engine bleed air to
minimize fogging and snow conditions in the cabin.
The separator is installed with an automatically
controlled bypass just downstream of the air cycle
machine. Water collected is drained overboard. The
water separator bypass valve opens at any altitude
as a fail-safe feature if a malfunction or a freeze-up
restricts airflow.
AIR DISTRIBUTION

Cabin air is distributed by separate mixed air foot
outlet spray tubes at all crewmembers’ feet, by auxiliary cold air overhead outlets at all stations, and
by piped forced air cooling to electronic equipment.
The foot outlets are intended to provide the normal
air distribution for the crew, while head outlets provide an auxiliary source of cold air for cooling. The
cold air supply is divided between crew and equipment cooling so the crew will receive a major portion of the cold air output with all outlets open. The
crew has positive shutoff capability of each air outlet at their station. Closure of crew outlets may result in increased noise level. Quantity of air output
from pilots’ and defense station foot outlets is variable by means of push-pull knobs which simultaneously operate the butterfly valves in mixed air
supply ducts. The system is equipped with a cooling
effects detector (CED) in the cold air branch to the
electronics which provides automatic flow output
modulation of the ACP. The ACP will thus increase
air flow delivery when the crew outlets are opened
and decrease when they are closed. A ram air temperature switch will cut out the operation of the
CED above 32°C ram air conditions to allow maximum cooling capability to the cabin. The piped cooling to the electronic equipment is supplemented by
circulation of cabin air through the electronic compartments to the controlled outflow valve(s) located

at the left side of the upper deck and the right side
of the lower deck. Pressurized cabin air is used for
environmental control of the EVS turrets. For further information, see EVS ENVIRONMENTAL
CONTROL AND TURRET WINDOW WASH SYSTEMS under ELECTRO-OPTICAL VIEWING SYSTEM (EVS), this section. For control of airflow at
individual air outlets, see AIR CONDITIONING
SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION, this section.
PRESSURE REGULATION

Cabin pressure is regulated by controlling the outflow of air from the cabin. The cabin pressurization
equipment includes one automatic pressure regulator, a pneumatic relay, and two outflow valves
which also function as safety valves. A repressurization rate control is incorporated in the regulator
to limit the rate of cabin pressure increase to not
more than 1 psi per minute.
NOTE

A three-position test valve handle on the
regulator is marked TEST ONLY-DIFF
OFF- -TEST ONLY-ALL OFF- -FLIGHT.
The handle may be used during ground
maintenance testing, but at all other times,
it should be safety wired to FLIGHT. If the
handle is not in FLIGHT, the cabin will
pressurize ahead of the selected schedule
until the handle is returned to FLIGHT position. Access to regulator for purpose of
checking the handle position is only gained
by crawling forward of the navigators’ station on the floor under the navigators’ table.
The lower deck outflow valve is located on
the right side of the aircraft about 4 feet up
from the floor. The pressure regulator is located slightly above, inboard and aft of the
outflow valve near the top of the compartment.

Change 4

1-359

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Air Conditioning Pressurization and Pneumatic
System
AIR DUCT COLOR CODE
VALVES POSITIONED FOR NORMAL USE
ENGINE BLEED AIR
24

RAM COOLING
PACK OUTLET AIR
ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT COOLING AIR
RECIRCULATED CABIN COOLING AIR FOR INS
22
MIXED AIR

23

21

PNEUMATIC

13

15
14

1718
16

19

20

12
11
10

6

7

8

9

5
4

39

3
2

40

1

43

41
42

44

46
45
47
48
49

53

52

51

50

1
2
3
4
5

PILOT’S STATION LOWER OUTLETS
UPPER ZONE TEMPERATURE SELECTOR
PILOT’S STATION AIR OUTLET CONTROL
PILOT’S STATION UPPER OUTLETS
SPRAY BAR
A31729

Figure 1-106 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-360

Change 19

T.O. 1B-52H-1

25

27

26

28

29

30
31
32

33

34

35
36
38
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

37

CTCS CONTROLLER
OUTFLOW VALVE AND EXHAUST
PRESSURE CONTROL REGULATOR
NAVIGATOR’S STATION UPPER OUTLETS
VENTS
PNEUMATIC RELAY
COOLING FAN RH REMOTE RACK
RECIRCULATED AIR INLET SCREENS
ORIFICE
LOW AIRFLOW DETECTOR
DEFENSE STATION LOWER OUTLETS
DEPRESSURIZATION DUMP CONTROL VALVE
DUCT TEMPERATURE SENSING ELEMENT
DEFENSE STATION AIR OUTLET CONTROLS
DEFENSE STATION UPPER OUTLETS
CATALYTIC FILTER
FLOW CONTROL SENSOR
FLOW CONTROL SHUTOFF VALVE
RIGHT WING RAM AIRSCOOP
MCS HOT AIR MODULATING VALVE
ORIFICE
PRESSURE REGULATOR (41 PSIG) AND
SHUTOFF VALVE

28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

BODY CROSSOVER MANIFOLD VALVE
ACS/MCS CONTROLLER
ORIFICE
MCS COLD AIR MODULATING VALVE
PACK RAM AIRSCOOP
RAM AIRSCOOP ANTI-ICING SHUTOFF VALVE
SUCK-IN DOOR
AIR CONDITIONING PACKAGE
OVERSPEED PRESSURE SWITCH
PRESSURE REGULATOR VALVE (PSIG)
HOT AIR MODULATING VALVES
WATER SEPARATOR
GROUND COOLING AIR INLET DUCT
COLD AIR MODULATING VALVES
ORIFICE
WATER SEPARATOR OVERTEMPERATURE
SWITCH
44 CABIN EMERGENCY RETRACTABLE RAM
AIRSCOOP
45 PACK ANTI-ICE TEMPERATURE SENSOR
46 COOLING EFFECT DETECTOR
47 SUPPLY AIR TEMPERATURE SENSORS
48 ORIFICE
49 LOWER ZONE TEMPERATURE SELECTOR
50 NAVIGATOR’S STATION AIR OUTLET
CONTROLS
51 LOWER ZONE TEMPERATURE SENSOR
52 UPPER ZONE TEMPERATURE SENSOR
53 WINDOW WASH AIR PRESSURE REGULATOR
A31730

Figure 1-106 (Sheet 2 of 2)

Change 19

1-361

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Air Conditioning System
(TR)
(118V AC)
BLEED VALVES
STRUT
STRUT NO. 3

MA

NI
V FOL
O AL D
EN PEN VE
GI
NE FOR
ST
AR
CL CAU OPE T
OS TI N
O
ST E AF N
AR
TE
T
R
CL
OS
E

5

5

5

(118V AC)
CTCS
PWR

(LTR)
CABIN EMER
RAM AIR CONT
5

AC POWER

5

AC SYSTEM
POWER
(TR)
CONTROL

NO. 4
1&4

AND BODY
CROSSOVER

MANIFOLD
VALVE
SWITCH
OP
7.45 PSI
COMBAT
4.50
OFF
PSI

ALT
PNEU
START
CONT

5

CL

CABIN
TEMPERATURE
CONTROL RELAY

EMERG
RH
INBD
BLEED
SELECTOR SWITCH

FROM
NO. 2 STRUT
(NORMAL
SOURCE)
OP

7.45 PSI

TO PRESSURE
REGULATOR
4.50 PSI
SOLENOID
RESET

EMERG

NORMAL
LH
INBD

NORMAL

CABIN PRESSURE
MASTER SWITCH

COMBAT
4.50 PSI

RAM
OFF

RAM

INBD ENG
START RELAY
AUTO
NORMAL

DUMP

CL

TO
MOD
VALVES

CABIN
TEMPERATURE
CONTROLLER

CL
NO. 3
STRUT
BLEED
VALVE

NO. 1 STRUT BODY
BLEED VALVE CROSSOVER
MANIFOLD
VALVE

OP

CLOSE

NO. 4 STRUT
BLEED VALVE

FILTER
FROM
RAM AIR
SCOOP IN WING
(PACK COOLANT)

ANTI−ICE
COOLING
VALVE
EFFECT
DETECTOR

AIR
CONDITIONING
PACK

HEAT
EXCHANGER

CTCS
SHUT OFF
AND PRES. REG
VALVE

COOL

WARM

COOL OFF WARM
AUTO
NORMAL
MANUAL
COOL
WARM
PILOT’S
TEMPERATURE
CONTROL

THRU LANDING
GEAR SQUAT
SWITCH
TO PRESSURE
RELEASE SOLENOID
CONTROL
VALVE
RELAYS
CABIN EMERGENCY
RAM AIR SCOOP
MOTOR

AIR CONDITIONING
SHUTOFF VALVE

BLEED
CONTROLLER
AIR
OVERHEAT
ACS/MCS
WARNING
LIGHT

CABIN
PRESSURE
RELEASE
SWITCH

COOL
WARM
OFF
MANUAL
NAVIGATOR’S
TEMPERATURE
CONTROL

CLOSE
OPEN
CABIN EMERGENCY
RAM AIR SCOOP
(SHOWN RETRACTED)

TURBINE

CABIN EMER RAM
AIR SCOOP
(115 V AC)

COOLANT
EXHAUST
FLOW
CONTROL
VALVE
COOL AIR
TO PRESSURIZED
COMPARTMENT
HOT AIR
TO PRSSURIZED
COMPARTMENT

A31731

Figure 1-107 (Sheet 1 of 2)

1-362

T.O. 1B-52H-1

(OUTSIDE
HANDLE)

STATIC
PORT

LOWER
ZONE
HOT VALVE
UPPER
ZONE
COLD
VALVE

UPPER
ZONE
HOT VALVE

LOWER ZONE
COLD VALVE

STATIC PORT

SE
D

GROUND
AIR
CONNECTION
(FWD WHEEL
WELL)

TO
ACS/MCS
CONTROLLER

COOLING EFFECT
DETECTOR
PIPED COOLING
TO ELECTRONIC
EQUIPMENT
P
U
UPPER L
L

HEAD
OUTLETS

OUT
FLOW
VALVE

RADAR NAV

NAVIGATOR

UPPER
(LH)
PRES−
SURE
REGU−
LATOR
FROM
COMBAT
4.50 PSI
POSTION
OF MASTER
SWITCH

C
LO

EMERGENCY
CABIN PRESSURE
RELEASE HANDLES

P

STATIC
PORT
PRESSURE
RELEASE
SOLENOID
VALVE
(NORMALLY
CLOSED)

FROM
ACP

HOT BLEED AIR

D
U
M

FROM PRESSURE
RELEASE (DUMP)
SWITCH RAM POSITION
OF MASTER SWITCH AND
LANDING GEAR SQUAT
SWITCH

T
O

NAVIGATORS
STATION

LOWER

FOOT OUTLETS

O
P
E
N

LOWER AFT

HEAD
OUTLETS
PNEU−
MATIC
RELAY

P
U
UPPER L
L

EW OFFICER
DEFENSE STATION

OUT
FLOW
VALVE

T
O
O
LOWER P
E
N

FOOT OUTLETS

LOWER
RH

CHECK VALVE

CITCUIT BREAKER

TYPICAL
HEAD OUTLET
PILOT AND COPILOT
PILOTS
STATION

HEAD
OUTLETS

MOTOR OPERATED
SHUT OFF VALVE
SOLENOID CONTROLLED AIR
ACTUATED SHUT OFF VALVE
(NORMALLY & FAIL−SAFE
CLOSED)

ROTATE
90° TO OPEN
OR CLOSE
(TYPICAL PILOT
AND COPILOT)
COPILOT

AIR OUTLET VALVE

PILOT

AT LOWER OUTBOARD
CORNERS OF INSTRUMENT PANEL
FOOT
OUTLETS

ENGINE BLEED AIR (HOT)
PRECOOLED BLEED AIR
PARTIALLY COOLED AIR
COOLED AIR
RAM AIR
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS
MECHANICAL ACTUATION
PRESSURIZED COMPARTMENT

RIGHT
SIDE

(PILOTS)

(COPILOTS)

LEFT
SIDE

A31732

MIXED AIR

Figure 1-107 (Sheet 2 of 2)

1-363

T.O. 1B-52H-1
The control of cabin pressure is entirely automatic
and normally involves the following operational
ranges:
• Unpressurized operation from ground level to
8000 feet in which cabin pressure is maintained
substantially at ambient pressures.
• Isobaric operation in which the cabin pressure is
maintained at essentially an 8000-foot pressure
level. Isobaric operation will be maintained until
the pressure differential from cabin to ambient
equals 4.50 or 7.45 psi (figure 1-109) depending on
the schedule selected with the master switch.
NOTE

When changing the cabin pressure differential from 7.45 to 4.50 psi, an overshoot of
cabin altitude may occur. This momentary
overshoot of up to 3000 feet higher than expected should be considered normal. Figure
1-109 depicts cabin altitude versus aircraft
altitude for the two pressurization schedules.
Both outflow valves (left side upper deck and right
side lower deck) serve the following functions:
• Relieve overpressure by allowing air to flow overboard to prevent cabin pressure from exceeding a
differential of 8.0 psi with respect to ambient pressure.
• Relieve negative pressure by allowing ambient
air to flow into cabin to prevent cabin pressure from
becoming less than 0.37 psi lower than ambient
pressure.
• Regulate normal outflow of air in response to the
automatic signals supplied by the regulator.
• Dump cabin pressure when a dump signal is initiated by turning the master switch to RAM, by
turning the emergency cabin pressure release handles to DUMP, or by selecting DUMP with the cabin
pressure release switch.

1-364

The crew compartment cannot be pressurized when
the cabin pressure release solenoid valve is open.
This valve will be open under any one of the following conditions:
• Pressure Release Switch in DUMP (electrically)
• Air Conditioning Master Switch in RAM (electrically)
• Emergency Cabin Pressure Release Handle in
DUMP (mechanically)
• Aircraft weight on wheels actuates landing gear
squat switch relays (electrically)
• Main landing gear extended and crabbed in flight
to an angle of 14° or more through any combination
of crosswind crab setting and rudder motion actuates landing gear squat switch relays (electrically).
Up to 8000 feet, this is not critical since cabin pressure is regulated to approximately 0.25 psi (1/2 inch
Hg) above atmospheric or substantially ambient
pressure.
CONTROL POWER SUPPLY

The body crossover manifold valve and the No. 3
strut bleed valve are operated by 118-volt singlephase ac motors. Strut No. 1 and 4 bleed valves are
operated by solenoids which are supplied TR power.
TR power is supplied to operate the following:
• Cabin pressure release solenoid value
• Pressure regulator 4.50 psi solenoid
• Air conditioning system pressure regulator and
shutoff valve
• Cabin temperature control relay which connects
118-volt ac power to the electronic cabin temperature control system controller for automatic operation of the cabin temperature modulation valves.
The emergency cabin ram airscoop is operated by a
118-volt single-phase ac motor.

T.O. 1B-52H-1

Hot/Mixed Air Duct Locations and Outlets
EW AND GUNNER’S STATION

PILOTS’ STATION

NOTE
Although this air is
mixed. It is possible for
duct temperatures to in−
crease to a dangerous
level.

NAVIGATOR’S STATION

RADAR NAVIGATOR’S STATION

A31733

Figure 1-108

1-365

1B-52H-1 Cabin Pressure Schedule Figure 1-109 1-366 .O.T.

AIR OUTLET CONTROLS Air Outlet Knobs Two knobs at pilots station and defense station. see AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION. Head Outlets The pilots’ head outlets (figure 1-107) do not have remote control knobs but are regulated directly by the outlets themselves. may be opened or closed by 90° rotation of the cylindrical portion of the outlet. ball-mounted at the forward end of the spray tube. Each pilot’s movable head outlet. Each head outlet other than the pilots’ has. in addition to remote control of shutoff and quantity at the station. The air outlet knobs at the de- fense stations are grouped in a cluster with the auxiliary heat knob. 1B-52H-1 AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM CONTROLS AND INDICATORS System controls and indicators are described in figure 1-110. By an arrow-indicated turn-clockwise-to-lock feature. The knobs on the radar navigator’s left sidewall. this section. For control of airflow at individual air outlets. 1-367 . this section. see AUXILIARY HEAT KNOB. a separate built-in control of the direction and amount of air flowing from the particular outlet. For operation of defense station auxiliary heat knob.T. and three at navigators’ station marked AIR OUTLET (figure 1-107) remotely control shutoff and quantity of airflow from outlets at that station and may affect the overall distribution as described under AIR DISTRIBUTION. and those at the lower part of each end of the pilots’ instrument panel are placarded PULL TO OPEN for increased airflow.O. the knobs may be set at a desired intermediate point between all the way in and out. The air outlet knob at the top of the cluster associated with the placard UPPER controls head outlets airflow at that station. those between the EW officer and gunner.

T. 1B-52H-1 Pneumatic Systems Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 CABIN ALTIMETER MANIFOLD TEMPERATURE GAGE MANIFOLD VALVE SWITCH TEMPERATURE CONTROL SELECTOR (2 PLACES) CABIN PRESSURE (AIR CONDITIONING) MASTER SWITCH 6 7 8 9 10 BLEED SELECTOR SWITCH PRESSURE RELEASE SWITCH HOT AIR CAUTION LIGHT CABIN AIRFLOW LOW WARNING LIGHT EMERGENCY CABIN PRESSURE RELEASE (DUMP) HANDLE Figure 1-110 (Sheet 1 of 6) 1-368 Change 20 .O.

1B-52H-1 Figure 1-110 (Sheet 2 of 6) Change 20 1-369 .O.T.

Figure 1-110 (Sheet 3 of 6) 1-370 .O.45 PSI or COMBAT 4. In OPEN position. air conditioning system control of the body crossover manifold and No. are a combination switch-rheostat.-CLOSE manifold valve switch is guarded to the CLOSE position. then in 5000-foot increments from 50.000 feet. with separate means of regulation. The OPEN position. and removes TR power from the solenoid-operated No. This results in hot bleed air being interconnected between all engines through the body crossover manifold. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 Cabin Altimeter The single pointer Type MA-2 cabin altimeter marked CABIN PRESSURE ALT on the eyebrow instrument panel is graduated to indicate cabin pressure altitude in 1000-foot increments to 50. The instrument is a selfcontained unit requiring no external power source.000 feet. The temperature selector has a range marked AUTO COOL to AUTO WARM which selects temperatures from 54° to 96°F.T. 3 strut bleed valves is discontinued. The gage is electrically operated by TR power through a temperature sensor bulb in the manifold at the air conditioning duct lead-off.-OFF. Allow 15 to 20 minutes for the cabin temperature to stabilize at the selected setting when the temperature control selector is in AUTOMATIC. used primarily for engine starting. The guarded CLOSE position restores 118-volt single-phase ac to the air conditioning system controls for management of bleed air source selection. provides for airflow from any engine to any other engine by supplying 118-volt single-phase ac to open the motor-driven body crossover manifold and No. 2 Manifold Temperature Gage The manifold temperature gage indicates the temperature from 0° to 300°C in the air bleed manifold.-WARM and MANUAL TEMPERATURE CONTROL with COOL.50 PSI position for cabin temperature control circuits to be energized. 1 and 4 strut bleed valves. Marking of AUTOMATIC RANGE with graduations marked COOL.-NORMAL. one at the copilot’s station and one at the radar navigator’s station. 4 TEMPERATURE CONTROL Selector (2 places) Two rotary temperature control selectors. See figure 5-1 for gage markings. and TR power to open the normally closed solenoidoperated No. 1 and 4 strut bleed valves which resume their normally closed positions. 3 strut bleed valves. NOTE • • The cabin pressure (air conditioning) master switch must be in 7. automatic and manual.-WARM positions indicate two modes of controlling cabin temperature.000 to 80. 1B-52H-1 Pneumatic Systems Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. 3 MANIFOLD VALVE Switch The OPEN.

provided the cabin pressure (air conditioning) master switch is in either RAM or OFF position.T. Holding the knob in the WARM position further opens the cabin temperature hot air modulating valve providing a warmer air mixture. Moving the spring-loaded knob from OFF to the WARM or COOL position allows for manual adjustment of the air temperature by setting up a new ratio of hot to cold air. airflow will close the valves. OFF position does not dump cabin pressure which. which is used to open the ram airscoop.O. hot and cold air ducts as required.-OFF. 4 CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION TEMPERATURE CONTROL Selector (Cont) When the knob is positioned on the AUTOMATIC RANGE.45 PSI.-7. Once energized. will bleed down by normal leakage. To provide adequate external air for pneumatic engine start without external power a circuit breaker marked ALT PNEU START CONT is installed to supply battery power to energize the air conditioning shutoff and flow control valves. 3 strut bleed valve closed. RAM position also dumps cabin pressure by supplying TR power to open the cabin pressure release solenoid valve. ac power is switched to the electronic automatic cabin temperature regulator for cycling the modulating valves in the respective zone. The emergency cabin ram airscoop is driven closed by 118-volt single-phase ac in every position of the switch except RAM position. 1B-52H-1 NO. Also.-COMBAT 4. NOTE Care should be taken when adjusting the temperature manually to preclude going beyond the desired detent. Either RAM or OFF position shuts off the hot air supply to the air conditioning system by supplying 118-volt single-phase ac to close the air conditioning shutoff valve and. and is accessible to both pilots. to close the body manifold crossover valve while maintaining the No. RAM or OFF position removes TR control power and 118-volt single-phase ac from temperature control circuits preventing the 205-volt three-phase ac operating power from reaching temperature modulating valve motors.50 PSI cabin pressure (air conditioning) master switch is grouped with the pressure release and bleed selector switches. when the manifold valve switch is in CLOSE and the bleed selector switch is in NORMAL LH INBD position. to drive the valve toward open or toward closed in maintaining the temperature selected. however. 5 CABIN PRESSURE (Air Conditioning) MASTER SWITCH Four-position RAM. while holding the knob in the COOL position further opens the cold air modulating valve providing cooler flow. Rotating the knob to OFF position removes the power from the cabin temperature modulating valves which then remain stopped at the last position to which cycled. Figure 1-110 (Sheet 4 of 6) 1-371 . causing a constant ratio of hot to cold air to be delivered to the cabin regardless of temperature.

the switch will be in the guarded RESET position and will be energized by TR power through the cabin pressure master switch. Also. The master caution light also comes on. 8 HOT AIR (Bleed Air Overheat) Warning Light (Amber) The HOT AIR light on the central caution panel comes on when the bleed air in the manifold duct exceeds 210°C. Figure 1-110 (Sheet 5 of 6) 1-372 . 2 strut to the air conditioning system. 9 CABIN AIRFLOW LOW Caution Light (Amber) The CABIN AIRFLOW LOW press-to-test caution light at the radar navigator’s station comes on when the flow of air in the duct delivering piped cooling to electronic equipment becomes insufficient to safely cool the equipment. 7 PRESSURE RELEASE Switch A guarded RESET.O. With the bleed selector switch energized. Raising the guard and actuating the switch to DUMP position energizes the cabin pressure release solenoid valve to the open position causing the connected outflow valves to open and dump cabin pressure.50 psi solenoid in the pressure regulator to shift the regulator from high (7. 3 strut bleed valve and open the body crossover manifold valve thus providing the normal precooled bleed air supply from the No.-DUMP pressure release switch is grouped with the cabin pressure master switch and the bleed selector switch and is accessible to both pilots. During pressurized operation. 1B-52H-1 Pneumatic Systems Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. Lifting the guard and moving the switch to EMERG RH INBD position reverses the electrical connections thus closing the body manifold crossover valve while the No.50 PSI position provides a low differential pressurization schedule by connecting TR power to the 4. 7. the guarded NORMAL LH INBD position connects 118-volt single-phase ac power so as to simultaneously close the No.45 PSI or COMBAT 4.45 psi) to low pressure differential operation.50 PSI positions close the emergency ram airscoop while at the same time opening the air conditioning shutoff valve to admit bleed air to the air conditioning system from the air bleed system according to positions of the manifold valve switch and the bleed selector switch. COMBAT 4.T.50 PSI positions energize the temperature control circuits for either manual or automatic operation and remove power from the cabin pressure release solenoid valve which then closes to permit cabin pressurization according to the selected schedule. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 5 CABIN PRESSURE (Air Conditioning) MASTER SWITCH (Continued) Both 7. 3 strut bleed valve opens to provide an emergency hot (not precooled) bleed air supply to the air conditioning system.45 PSI and COMBAT 4. 6 BLEED SELECTOR Switch Guarded NORMAL LH INBD--EMERG RH INBD bleed selector switch is grouped with the cabin pressure master switch and the pressure release switch and is accessible to both pilots.45 PSI and COMBAT 4. NOTE The manifold valve switch must be in the guarded CLOSE position and the cabin pressure (air conditioning) master switch must be in either 7.50 PSI position for the bleed selector switch to be energized.

T. The handle on the pressurized side of the door is lockwired. CLOSED position of the handle permits the cabin pressure release solenoid valve to return to the normal spring-loaded closed position allowing the outflow valves to resume the selected pressurization schedule. NOTE • • The emergency cabin pressure release handle is lockwired to CLOSED position to prevent inadvertent opening of the valve by partial actuation of either the outside or the connected inside handle. 10 CONTROLINDICATOR EMERGENCY CABIN PRESSURE RELEASE (DUMP) Handle FUNCTION An emergency cabin pressure release (dump) handle with DUMP.-CLOSED positions is provided just above each side of the pressure bulkhead door.O. 1B-52H-1 NO. The lockwiring is designed to break when either handle is actuated intentionally. A guard is installed around the handle on the pressurized side of the door to prevent inadvertent depressurization caused by clothing or equipment catching on the handle during movement of a crewmember. Moving the handle to DUMP position mechanically actuates the cabin pressure release solenoid valve to the open position causing the connected outflow valves to open and dump cabin pressure. Figure 1-110 (Sheet 6 of 6) 1-373 .

45 PSI before reaching 10. If excessive noise tends to blank out interphone and radio communications. Such operation will overspeed the ACP to destruction. the air conditioning master switch may be positioned to RAM during low altitude operation at power settings which cause difficulty in communications. NOTE • SYSTEM TURN-ON For normal pressurized operation. Advance throttles back to desired setting. the lockwire may be stretched or broken and cabin pressure may be inadvertently dumped. such takeoffs should be made with the air conditioning system on RAM.45 PSI (or COMBAT 4. Use of RAM setting during low level operation for extended periods of time may result in OAS equipment and/or pressurization compartment overheating.O. 1B-52H-1 AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION • • When EVS window washing action is initiated during RAM operation. Should this occur.45 PSI (or COMBAT 4.000 feet. monitor the manifold temperature gage. 2. the emergency cabin pressure release handle will be set positively to CLOSED.50 PSI may be selected. Emergency Cabin Pressure Dump Handle – CLOSED For the cabin to be pressurized. Do not run the ACP with the heat exchanger ram air duct plugs in place in the wing. throttle back engines 3 and 4 to approximately 0. the air conditioning system should be used from the ground up (except that ram air is used during takeoff) and is placed in operation as follows: 1. move cabin pressure release switch to DUMP position in order to provide additional airflow for cooling of electronic equipment. During extended periods of unpressurized operation. If the temperature reaches the red line. On climbout. according to cabin temperature selector switch settings and availability of pneumatic system hot air.T. To prevent possibility of damage to electronic or other equipment from water in the form of rain which is not removed from bleed air during takeoff. the lines and pump will remain full of water until the cabin is pressurized. according to operational requirements) 1-374 • • • • Valves in the bleed air temperature control system have a tendency to stick when the environmental control system (ECS) is first turned on after takeoff causing the bleed air overheat light to come on. Cabin Pressure Release Switch – RESET 3. . return master switch to 7. is provided with the air conditioning master switch in 7. Heating or cooling. If the release handle is cocked slightly from the shallow CLOSED position detent. Manifold Valve Switch – CLOSE 4. The system must then be returned to 7.45 PSI within 10 minutes after the cabin airflow low warning light illuminates to prevent overheat damage to the OAS equipment.50 PSI) whether the cabin is pressurized or not. and to prevent windshield and instrument fogging. Bleed Selector Switch – NORMAL LH INBD 5. Line freeze should be expected if the aircraft is exposed to a low temperature environment prior to cabin pressurization. to which position it has been lockwired.04 EPR below the highest EPR of remaining engines until the bleed air overheat light goes out. At this time the bleed air temperature should have returned to normal operating range. Cabin Pressure (Air Conditioning) Master Switch – 7.

sufficient thrust to provide adequate airflow for electronic equipment cooling should be maintained (depending on the flight condition) on these engines. it may be necessary to accomplish a check of the following items in order to keep the cabin airflow low warning light extinguished. Cabin Temperature Selectors – AUTO 7.000 feet). During RAM operation the Missile Conditioning Subsystem (MCS) should not be operating. The check may also be used to determine that a system malfunction does not exist when erratic temperature control is experienced. Air Outlet Knobs – Set To obtain maximum comfort for all crewmembers. upper and/or lower. Any time inadequate equipment cooling is indicated by the OAS low flow light. the optimum position for each control knob is shown in figure 1-111. 1. it may be necessary to refer to the procedure outlined under ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT COOLING AT HIGH ALTITUDES. The pilots’ head outlets should be fully closed at all times except during ground or low altitude operation. Figure 1-111 1-375 . While operating at altitudes above 40. air distribution may become unsatisfactory and it will then be necessary to return the control knobs to positions as specified in figure 1-111 before satisfactory control may be established. With the aircraft at high altitudes (above 40. With increased changes in control knob settings. this section. 1B-52H-1 6. crew outlets. Throttle setting for engines 3 and 4: If possible.T. to keep the cabin airflow low warning light extinguished.O. Position of the cabin temperature selectors: If it is necessary to maintain low thrust settings on engines 3 and 4. it will also be necessary to maintain a low cabin temperature setting.000 feet. Depending upon changes in altitude and differences experienced at the individual stations. Air Outlet Knob Positions NORMAL OPERATION LOCATION OUTLET POSITION Pilot/Copilot Stations Lower Upper Knob Full Out Directional Nozzles and Spray Bars As Desired EW Officer/Gunner Stations Lower Upper Knob Full Out Knob As Desired Navigator/Radar Navigator Stations Lower Aft Lower Forward Upper Knob Full Out Knob Full Out Knob As Desired NOTE • • • These knob positions should provide adequate crew comfort without further adjustment for changes in flight conditions. the controls may be further adjusted with slight variations as necessary. 2. may be closed to the extent acceptable for crew comfort to increase equipment airflow. ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT COOLING AT HIGH ALTITUDE Altitude has a direct bearing on operation of the air conditioning pack.

SYSTEM SHUTDOWN The system is normally shut down by opening a pilot’s side window approximately 2 inches and placing cabin pressure master switch in RAM position to relieve the small residual cabin pressure built up during ground operation of the air conditioning system. 1B-52H-1 3. Ground air conditioning may also be obtained by the ground operation of an engine in No. Otherwise. This pressure may impose sufficient load on the door to cause injury to anyone in its path when it is unlatched. as noted by means of the cabin altimeter.O. but any reduction of airflow for crew outlets will tend to build up back pressure and furnish more air for electronic equipment cooling. 2 nacelle. a small residual cabin pressure will build up during ground operation of the air conditioning system. An unusually high residual cabin pressure. NOTE All of the previously mentioned items should be checked before determining that an actual malfunction of the system exists. a residual cabin pressure must build up to balance the spring pressure before the outflow valve will open to permit the necessary airflow for ventilation. 1-376 opening a pilots’ side window before closing the entry door will prevent buildup of residual pressure. The residual pressure is due to the need to maintain the outflow valve preloaded to the closed position by a slight spring pressure when the cabin is depressurized. if operating. place cabin pressure (air conditioning) master switch in OFF position. Prior to ground operations. one of the pilots’ side windows will be opened approximately 2 inches before the main entry door is opened or closed. . or by attaching an external air supply to the ground start connection at No.45 PSI position to ensure cooling of electronic equipment. can be relieved by turning the air conditioning master switch to RAM and then opening the side window. SYSTEM GROUND OPERATION To obtain air conditioning for ground operation from a connected external air conditioning unit. placing the bleed selector switch to EMERG RH INBD position and further operate per steps 5 thru 7 of SYSTEM TURN-ON. Position of air outlet controls: The air outlets will not need to be completely closed. The air conditioning master switch should then be returned to the 7. To obtain air conditioning for ground operation from an external air supply attached to the ground start connection at No. With the crew compartment closed and the air conditioning system operating. operate the air conditioning by following the procedures for SYSTEM TURN-ON. To prevent injury to ground crewmen.T. 2 nacelle and system operation per steps 3 thru 7. 3 nacelle.

3 & BODY XOVER RLC/C26 RLC/C27 Rt. TR Emergency Cabin Ram Air Scoop MISCELLANEOUS – CAB EMER RAM AIR CONTR ABNS/A1 Left TR Air Conditioning System 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. TR Manifold Air Temperature MISCELLANEOUS – MANIFOLD AIR TEMP RLC/E23 Rt. TR Cabin Temperature Modulation Valves Power CTCS PWR ECM/D1 Ac Bus 5 Controls and Air Flow Low Warning Light CABIN AIR CONDITIONING – CONTROL RLC/C25 Rt. TR AC Bus 5 Controls and Bleed Air Overheat Light MISCELLANEOUS – BLEED AIR SYSTEM RLC/E23 Rt. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.T. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. 1B-52H-1 Pneumatic Systems Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE Air Bleed System Bleed Valves CABIN AIR CONDITIONING – BLEED VALVES – STRUT NO.O. ABNS ECM AFT BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL ECM CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RLC RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-112 1-377/(1-378 blank) . 1 & 4 STRUT NO.

BLA .

NACELLE. 1B-52H-1 ANTI-ICING SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION ENGINE. nacelle. and scoops anti-icing switch provides control for the use of engine bleed air for anti-icing of the engine inlet components. The modulating valve incorporates two overheat controller temperature sensing elements to maintain an 85°F anti-icing temperature and two overheat thermoswitches to shut off bleed air should nacelle temperature exceed 120°F. For anti-icing each engine nose cowl. In addition. while systems circuit protec- tion and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-116. and scoops anti-icing (figure 1-113) is accomplished thermally by hot air bled from the engine high pressure compressors except for the Qspring ram air inlet and cabin emergency ram airscoop which are heated electrically. each duct has a thermal restrictor and a TR powered relay-controlled motor-driven shutoff valve. Anti-icing systems controls and indicators are described in figure 1-114. AND SCOOPS ANTI-ICING SYSTEM Engine. The modulating valve provides sufficient volume at safe temperatures and pressures for anti-icing the engine nose cowl. nacelles. except for EVS windows. by means of a duct on each side of each engine.T. ENGINE. as an individual system on each engine. windshield. the nose cowl cap covers between the engines are equipped for bleed air anti-icing. Engine inlet guide vanes and nose domes receive hot compressor bleed air independently. An engine. and solenoid-operated to open when the air bleed system is pressurized and the solenoid is energized by TR power. NACELLE. The engine. Nacelle anti-icing uses hot air from the air bleed system through a shutoff valve in each nacelle to prevent ice formation on the leading edges of the nose cowls. NOTE To prevent engine damage caused by formation of ice which enters the inboard engine inlet area of the nacelles. 61-015 Two additional switches operate electrical heaters for all pitot tubes. The nacelle anti-icing shutoff valves are air actuated. AND SCOOPS ANTI-ICING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION PITOT ANTI-ICING PITOT ANTI-ICING NORMAL OPERATION WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICING AND WINDOW DEFOGGING WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICING AND WINDOW DEFOGGING NORMAL OPERATION EVS TURRET WINDOW ANTI-ICING 1-379 1-379 1-383 1-384 1-384 1-384 1-385 1-385 DESCRIPTION Anti-icing is provided for the engines. scoops. fail-safe-to-closed. hot air from the shutoff valve is directed through a modulating valve at each engine. windows. being located on the anti-ice control panel located on the left side of the pilots’ instrument panel. A rotary switch is provided for the selection of a normal or high rate of heat for windshield anti-icing and defogging. and pitot heads. and scoops anti-icing switch provides inflight relay control of power used to open a solenoid valve which connects anti-icing bleed air to the missile environmental system ram airscoop located in the right wing leading edge (figure 1-113). nacelle. AND SCOOPS ANTI-ICING SYSTEM ENGINE. and air conditioning pack heat exchanger ram airscoop (figure 1-113). nacelle. Controls for anti-icing of EVS windows are at the radar navigator’s station. the left pitot heat switch controls the Q-spring ram air inlet heaters. with all controls. nacelles. NACELLE.O. 1-379 .

and the right wing ram airscoop. On all aircraft except 60-0017. receives anti-icing air from the air bleed system through a shutoff valve which is air actuated. The missile airscoop anti-ice valve receives relay controlled TR power from the RH AIRSCOOP ANTI-ICE circuit breaker located on the RH forward dc power panel. and scoops anti-icing system. . The Q-spring ram air inlet is electrically anti-iced by 118-volt single-phase ac and relay controlled by TR power. and scoops anti-icing switch also controls the electric heaters for the cabin emergency ram airscoop and anti-icing of the movable external guide vanes for the angle of attack computer. the emergency ram airscoop is electrically heated and will also cycle approximately 1 minute open and 15 seconds closed to prevent ice formation when the engine. The missile airscoop anti-ice valve receives relaycontrolled TR power through the control panel 1-380 Change 10 switch (3. and solenoid-operated to open when the air bleed system is pressurized and the solenoid energized by TR power.O. which supplies the ram air coolant to the air conditioning pack heat exchanger. for inflight use only. failsafe-to-closed. figure 1-114) and the landing gear squat switch relay. 1B-52H-1 The ram airscoop in the left wing. nacelle.T. and scoops anti-icing switch is ON and the air conditioning master switch is in RAM. TR power to turn on both bleed air and electrical anti-icing of scoops is supplied through the landing gear squat switch relay. No provisions are made for emergency operation of the engine. when aircraft weight is off the wheels. 61-015 The engine. nacelle. nacelle. The cabin emergency ram airscoop is electrically anti-iced by 118-volt single-phase ac and relay controlled by TR power.

Nacelle.O. and Scoops Anti-Icing System Figure 1-113 1-381 .T. 1B-52H-1 Engine.

O. FUNCTION 1 RIGHT PITOT HEAT Switch The ON position of the switch energizes the pitot tube heaters on the right side of the aircraft to prevent pitot tube stoppage by icing.-NORMAL. 61-015 This switch also controls the electric heaters for the cabin emergency ram airscoop. ON position makes the connections to supply TR power to energize the various solenoids and relays which cause the anti-icing air valves to open and turn on the electrical heater power. OFF position deenergizes the solenoids and relays. nacelle leading edge areas. and the cabin emergency ram airscoop. NORMAL position causes the main windshield window power transformers to be energized to produce the lower of two output voltages for anti-icing the main windows with the necessary ac power supplied to operate the electronic temperature control units. 1B-52H-1 Anti-Ice System Controls and Indicators CONTROLINDICATOR NO. HIGH position switches connections to the main windshield window power transformers so they produce the higher output voltage required for anti-icing the main windows (1 thru 4L & R) under the most severe icing conditions. nacelle. causing engine. NORMAL position also causes the auxiliary window power autotransformers to be energized to heat the auxiliary windows for defogging. 4 WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICE AND DEFOGGING Switch The three-position OFF. 3 ENGINE NACELLE AND SCOOPS Switch The ON. OFF position removes power from the heaters. and scoop anti-icing to be shut off.T. and scoops anti-icing switch controls anti-icing of engine inlet components. In OFF position. The left pitot heat switch also controls the Q-spring ram air inlet heater. 2 LEFT PITOT & Q-SPRING HEAT Switch The ON position of the switch energizes the pitot tube heaters on the left side of the aircraft to prevent pitot tube stoppage by icing.-HIGH rotary selector windshield anti-ice and defogging switch electrically controls application of power to autotransformers supplying the respective window heater voltages as required. Figure 1-114 1-382 Change 12 . nacelle.-OFF engine. the ram airscoop lip in the left wing. no power reaches the autotransformers and ac power is removed from the main windshield window electronic temperature control units so windows will not be heated. OFF position removes power from the heaters.

and nacelle anti-icing should be turned off. Therefore. taxiing. temperature. The engine and nacelle anti-icing system was designed to prevent the accumulation of ice in the inlet section of the engine. and scoops anti-icing will be turned ON prior to encountering ice.3°C) of the OAT with or without visible moisture. throttle setting should be reduced (if flight conditions permit) before anti-ice is activated to prevent or reduce engine damage. Proper operation of the anti-icing system is indicated when a noticeable EPR drop on all engines is noted upon actuating the anti-icing control switch to ON.000 to 15. 1-383 .T.09 10.FEET EPR Below 5000 1. Engine.07 5000 to 10. nacelle. 2. NOTE • • When descending under possible inlet icing conditions. and scoops anti-icing switch will be turned ON during night flights below 20. and scoops.12 15.000 and above 1. NACELLE. 1B-52H-1 inlet guide vanes. Throttle settings should be consistent with minimum EPR’s for use of anti-ice heat and ignition should be turned on until engine stabilizes. Anti-icing should be used only as necessary in prevention of icing and not for prolonged periods in dry air. nacelle.000 1. whenever there is any indication or suspicion that icing conditions may exist.18 To prevent loss of thrust and possible engine damage due to ice ingestion. Possible icing conditions are indicated by either of the following speed. starter switches should be placed to CONT prior to final thrust reduction.000 feet when the OAT gage reading is below 10°C. Flight above 250 knots IAS if the OAT true is below 32°F (0°C) and with visible moisture present. Visible moisture is defined as rain. and moisture combinations: 1. nacelle. and takeoff. If the descent is being made for a landing and inlet icing conditions are anticipated. nacelle. nacelle. and scoops anti-icing should remain ON at all times during icing conditions. and scoops anti-icing consists of turning the control switch ON before entering suspected icing conditions and turning the switch OFF as soon as there is no further need for anti-icing. If ice should form. Thus it is essential that icing conditions be anticipated. engine. the engine. engine. Ground operation and at speeds below 250 knots IAS if the OAT true is 47°F (8°C) or below and the dewpoint is within 4°F (2.O.000 1. Starter switches may be placed to CONT prior to descent for low level operations or landing and left in CONT until climb out of low level or after final landing. To attain proper anti-icing for the engine. During night flights an inadvertent encounter of icing conditions or unobserved ice buildup is more likely to occur. starter switches should be placed in CONT and remain in CONT until sufficient thrust for anti-ice heat has been reestablished and stable engine operation obtained. Indiscriminate or prolonged use of engine and nacelle anti-icing may cause cracking of • • No EPR drop noted on one or more engines upon actuating the engine and nacelle antiicing control switch would indicate possible malfunction of the anti-icing system and known or suspected icing conditions should be avoided. not to remove it. the engine will be operated at or above a minimum EPR that will provide adequate anti-icing. the following minimum EPR values must be maintained: • • ALTITUDE . When the possibility of encountering icing conditions no longer exists. or fog with visibility 1 mile or less. wet snow. AND SCOOPS ANTI-ICING SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION Normal operation of engine. This includes static ground operation. ENGINE. If ice is inadvertently allowed to build up on the engine inlet.

Heater power to the auxiliary windows is interrupted by individual thermal snap switches on the inner surface of each window as protection from overheating. the following procedure will be observed: 1. Inner surfaces of the main windows are defogged by part of the anti-icing heat being conducted through the laminated glass. the information will be recorded on Form 781 to facilitate maintenance inspection. WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICING AND WINDOW DEFOGGING The main windshield windows and all auxiliary windows except the panes at each side of the upper center window are heated for anti-icing or defogging by means of transparent electrically conductive film between the glass laminations. Airbrakes may be required to maintain the desired speed schedule. Such stalls. turning the anti-icing off momentarily may eliminate the stall. To avoid stall conditions or reduce the intensity. descend to an altitude at which the engine stall will no longer occur. 1-384 PITOT ANTI-ICING NORMAL OPERATION Pitot heat switches should be ON prior to takeoff or in flight whenever icing conditions are anticipated to prevent ice formation and loss of airspeed indication. however. nacelle. There is no emergency provision for pitot anti-icing. which is No.000 feet should. If the stall condition is not eliminated by increasing thrust. The auxiliary windows. Engine compressor stalls which are characterized by a recurring ‘‘bang’’ at the rate of about one per second may occur from 1 to 5 minutes after anti-icing is turned on.T. and the pilot’s and copilot’s escape hatch windows. Anti-icing can then be turned on after the engines have stabilized at the reduced throttle settings. 1B-52H-1 Icing conditions which lead to use of the engine. NOTE To reduce engine compressor stalls. If due to the amount of thrust adjustment required. PITOT ANTI-ICING Left and right pitot heat is powered by 28-volt ac power. to prevent possible engine damage. to the maximum extent possible. Switches should be turned OFF after landing. difficulty is experienced in maintaining proper airspeed. 6L & R. If anti-icing is required and compressor stall is experienced. The auxiliary windows include those numbered 5L & R. as selected by the windshield anti-ice and defogging switch.000 feet. 1 thru 4L & R.O. 3. have the conductive film next to the inner pane with the primary purpose of defogging the inner glass surface. Return to normal thrust settings until such time as anti-icing is no longer required. If a prolonged stall (more than 1 minute) has been encountered. The main windshield windows are numbered (figure 1-115) left and right from the center. Section III. may not produce harmful effects. and scoops anti-icing system at altitudes above approximately 25. The left and right pitot tubes provide input to the parameter scheduling unit of the stability augmentation system (SAS). Altitude computer pitot heaters are supplied 118-volt ac power. Main windshield windows 3L & R are the pilot’s and copilot’s sliding windows. except 6L and R which are unheated. Increase engine thrust (not to exceed NRT) to approximately 99% RPM. see ENGINE COMPRESSOR STALL under ENGINE MALFUNCTIONS. If engine continues to stall at high thrust settings. When either sliding window is opened. if experienced for only a short duration. a limit switch also opens removing power from the autotransformer supplying both 3L (or R) and 4L (or R) so main windshield windows 3 and 4 will not be anti-iced while the sliding window on that side is open. . The main windshield windows may be heated at either of two heating rates while only a single heating rate is provided for the auxiliary windows. and are anti-iced by having the conductive film next to the outer pane. reduce throttle setting to IDLE. anti-icing should be turned off when making engine deceleration above 15. prolonged operation with the stall condition should be avoided. be avoided. AC power at the necessary voltages for heating the respective conductive films to the required operating temperature for each heated window is supplied by 118-volt ac autotransformers. 2.

T. see EVS ENVIRONMENTAL POWER CONTROL PANEL under ELECTRO-OPTICAL VIEWING SYSTEM (EVS). The FLIR window is made out of germanium and contains a sensor which is connected to a temperature controller to maintain a temperature range from 86°F to 98°F. 1B-52H-1 WINDSHIELD ANTI-ICING AND WINDOW DEFOGGING NORMAL OPERATION NORMAL position of the windshield anti-ice and defogging switch will give the longest main windshield service life and will provide satisfactory antiicing and defogging under normal flight conditions. EVS TURRET WINDOW ANTI-ICING Anti-icing and defogging of the FLIR and STV turret windows is provided when the FLIR and STV turret air switches on the EVS environmental power control panel are placed on. Leave the switch in this position as long as satisfactory anti-icing and defogging is obtained. 1-385 . 2. This window contains a sensor which is connected to a temperature controller to maintain a temperature range from 86°F to 98°F. Turn windshield anti-ice and defogging switch to NORMAL prior to takeoff. Heating power is 118-volt ac. when the FLIR window heat system is energized. To prevent damage to the heated windows. The temperature controller is connected through a squat switch relay to prevent inadvertent FLIR window heat operation while the aircraft is on the ground. therefore. Heating power is 118-volt ac. The STV window heat system is not connected to the squat switch and may be operated safely while the aircraft is on the ground. The following procedure is recommended: 1.O. this section. operate on NORMAL 15 minutes before turning switch to HIGH position. For additional control information. The STV window is heated by means of transparent electrically conductive film between the glass laminations. The switch should be set to HIGH at any time the NORMAL setting does not provide satisfactory anti-icing or defogging of main windshield windows. lethal voltage is present on the window surface. This germanium window is used as an electrical semiconductor. 3. Turn the switch to OFF after landing.

T. 1B-52H-1 Windshield and Window Numbering Figure 1-115 1-386 .O.

under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. 2 ENGINE – ANTI-ICE CONTROL – POD 3 POD 4 POWER SOURCE LLC/D32 LLC/D33 Left TR Left TR RLC/C22 RLC/C23 Rt. TR AC Bus 5 Rt. CPCBP EVS LLC COPILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL EVS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RLC PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-116 1-387/(1-388 blank) . TR Left TR PCBP/C12 PCBP/C13 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 PCBP/D6 AC Bus 3 CPCBP/E4 AC Bus 5 ANTI-ICE – AIR SCOOP SHUTOFF VALVE LLC/D34 Left TR STV Window Anti-Ice Power 115 AC-PHASE A – STV WINDOW HTR 115 AC-PHASE B – STV WINDOW HTR 115 AC-PHASE C – STV WINDOW HTR EVS/E2 EVS/F3 EVS/J3 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 Window Anti-Ice ANTI-ICE – LEFT – AUX WINDOW RELAYS WINDOW CONT UNITS WINDOW RELAYS ANTI-ICE – RIGHT – AUX WINDOW RELAYS WINDOW CONTR UNITS WINDOW RELAYS MISCELLANEOUS – WINDOW HEAT POWER – AUX WINDOWS LEFT 1 2 LEFT 3 & 4 LEFT WINDOW HEAT POWER – AUX WINDOWS RIGHT 2 RIGHT 3 & 4 RIGHT LLC/D31 LLC/D29 LLC/D30 Left TR AC Bus 3 Left TR RLC/B26 RLC/B24 RLC/B25 Rt. TR Rt. TR EVS/Q2 EVS/R2 Rt. 1 NO. TR PCBP/E5 PCBP/E1 PCBP/E2 PCBP/E3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 CPCBP/D12 CPCBP/D10 CPCBP/D11 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 AC Bus 5 EVS Window Anti-Ice Control DC POWER – CONTROL – FLIR ENV DC POWER – CONTROL – STV ENV Pitot & Q-Inlet System Anti-Ice ALTITUDE COMPUTER – PITOT HEAT – LH RH FLIGHT INDICATORS – LEFT PITOT & FAIR HTR MISCELLANEOUS – RH PITOT & FAIR HTR Ram Air Scoops Anti-Ice 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure.O. 1B-52H-1 Anti-Icing Systems Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Engine and Nacelle Anti-Icing CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 ANTI-ICE – POD CONTROL – NO.T.

BLA .

and miscellaneous instruments. and the SAS parameter scheduling unit. and the EVS IAS transducer is supplied by the top ports. Instruments circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-122. two pitot-static tubes. the OAS equipment. airspeed. Change 16 1-389 .T. The right forward pitot tube supplies impact pressure to the copilot’s airspeed indicator. and flight loads recorder. See the POSITION CORRECTION charts in Part 1 of T. electrically operated instruments. Static pressure for the pilot’s altimeter. Mach information is computed from pitot and static pressure and is supplied to the Mach indicator on the pilots’ instrument panel. The static lines from both tubes are connected together and supply static pressure to the altitude computer. The bottom ports provide static pressure for the true airspeed computer. The aft pitot-static tubes provide impact and static pressure to the AIMS altitude computer. and flight loads recorder. The impact pressure line from the left aft tube is capped and not used. Two pitot tubes are located aft of the forward radome on the lower left and lower right of the control cabin. altimeter. radar altimeter. Three static ports are located on each side of the control cabin. instruments depending on a static source may vary in accuracy. The param- eter scheduling unit provides gain signals to the yaw electronic control unit of the stability augmentation system (SAS). and vertical velocity indicators. True airspeed information is supplied to the true airspeed indicator on the radar navigator’s front panel and on the pilots’ instrument panel. 1B-52H-1-1 for the correction desired under a particular condition. Each port is interconnected with the corresponding port on the opposite side of the aircraft. The center ports provide static pressure for the copilot’s airspeed. The left forward pitot tube supplies impact pressure to the pilot’s airspeed indicator. the navigator’s altimeter. PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM NOTE Due to the location of static ports relative to airflow under different conditions of flight. Two pitot tubes are located just below and just aft of the pitot tubes described above. The right aft tube provides impact pressure to the altitude computer. These pitot tubes supply impact pressure through a manifold valve to the parameter scheduling unit. this section. Four pitot tubes. The Attitude-Director Indicator (ADI) and the Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) are covered under FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM. and temperature to compute true airspeed. pitot pressure. the autopilot equipment. 1B-52H-1 INSTRUMENTS DESCRIPTION PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM TRUE AIRSPEED COMPUTER ALTITUDE COMPUTER PITOT-STATIC INSTRUMENTS MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENTS ATTITUDE HEADING REFERENCE SYSTEM (AHRS) 1-389 1-389 1-389 1-391 1-391 1-397 1-399 1-402 DESCRIPTION The instruments in this subsection include pitotstatic operated instruments. autopilot equipment.O. the true airspeed computer. the EVS IAS transducer. The Attitude Heading Reference System (AHRS) is also included in this subsection.O. TRUE AIRSPEED COMPUTER The aircraft is equipped with a true airspeed computer which uses static pressure. Two pitot-static tubes are located forward of the wing leading edge on the upper left and upper right of the aft control cabin. vertical velocity indicator. and six static ports (figure 1-117) provide impact and static pressures to operate the pitot-static instruments. and the OAS equipment.

O.T. 1B-52H-1 Pitot-Static System Figure 1-117 1-390 .

For IFF functions this corrected altitude is encoded to the nearest 100-foot level and is furnished to the IFF transponder. the two altimeters have failed in the servo mode or have been placed in STBY. With both flags showing. upon interrogation. 1B-52H-1 ALTITUDE COMPUTER (CPU-66) PITOT-STATIC INSTRUMENTS The CPU-66 altitude computer provides the same inputs to both the AAU-19/A altimeter and the AN/ APX-64 IFF. they use information supplied by the altitude computer. figure 1-118) is located at both the right and left sides of the pilots’ instrument panel. the pilots can observe the airspeed indication and the maximum allowable airspeed indication at the same time. Mach number indications from 0. the altimeter altitude displayed will correspond to the computer altitude.0 are also provided in this range as a reference for the Mach number index adjustment. which in turn automatically relays the corrected altitude as a pulse train to the Ground Control Center.92 and corrects for position error. Stops limit the maximum speed pointer travel in the range from 200 to 600 knots.O. visible through a window in the dial. When the pointers coincide. The operating mode of the AAU-19/A altimeter (RESET or STBY) has no effect on the CPU-66 computer inputs to the IFF transponder. If both altimeter flags are showing and the system self tests in mode C properly. With an altimeter setting of 29. The computer measures pressure altitude referenced to standard sea level pressure of 29. By the use of two pointers. is graduated from 0 to 100 in 2-knot increments for sensitive indications.92. and the indicated airspeed pointer moves up the scale with increasing airspeed. The mode C self test check will not detect blockage of static lines to the computer. The pitot-static instruments include: For altimeter functions. A triangular index at the edge of the dial is set to the aircraft maximum allowable Mach number by an adjustment made at the rear of the instrument case. this corrected altitude is used to drive the altimeter display when the altimeter is in servo mode. Periodic mode C checks while cruising and a check prior to a change of altitude should be made to assure correct computer operation. copilot’s or both altimeters fail (STBY flag showing) the computer may still operate properly and transmit correct altitude data to the transponder. With both altimeter flags showing simultaneously it may be determined if the altimeters or computer failed by using the IFF self test feature for mode C. figure 1-118) is located at both the left and right sides of the pilots’ instrument panel.T. Altimeter settings other than 29. the maximum Mach/airspeed for the existing flight condition has been reached. A rotating drum. This adjustment governs the rate of change of the maximum airspeed pointer to indicate the Mach airspeed of the aircraft for any flight altitude or airspeed. the computer may be assumed to have failed. In this case.6 to 1. Indicated Airspeed Indicators A Type L-7A indicated airspeed indicator (B. a subsequent failure of the computer would not be indicated to the pilots since the same AAU-19/A STBY flag is used to indicate a failure in the altimeter or the computer. If either the pilot’s. The airspeed dial is graduated from 50 to 650 in 10-knot increments.92 introduce a corresponding difference between the altimeter altitude displayed and the computer altitude. the maximum airspeed pointer moves down the scale from the upper limits with lowering pressure altitude. • • • • • • The pilot’s and copilot’s indicated airspeed indicators The pilot’s and copilot’s vertical velocity indicators The Mach indicator The pilots’ and navigators’ true airspeed indicators Navigators’ altimeter The pilot’s and copilot’s AAU-19A altimeters (when in the STBY mode) When the AAU-19A altimeters are in the RESET mode. 1-391 . In operation. provided the mode C enabling switch on the control panel is in the ON position. Vertical Velocity Indicators An MS28049 vertical velocity indicator (C. only a failure within the computer. and the system does not self test in mode C.

receiving power from the true airspeed computer through a Mach indicator switch on the pilot’s side panel (9. the 60° low altitude warning symbol in the disc is filled with alternate diagonal fluorescent and black stripes. The MA-1 is identical and performs in the same manner as the AAU-8/A altimeter except that positive stops are not provided on the barometric scale to preclude missetting the scale by excessive rotation. The ME-5 is a servo-type indicator. At zero altitude indication (and below). the intermediate pointer 10. Three concentrically mounted pointers indicate hundreds. The instrument has a range of 0. Rotating the knob in the lower right corner of the instrument while in its normal (out) position will move the index on the main dial.000-foot pointer is part of a black disc next to the main dial with a 60° low altitude warning symbol segment cut out of the side opposite the pointer. A rotating subdial is also provided which reads in hundredths and is graduated from 1 to 10. . A true airspeed indicator (E.0 which is indicated on a stationary dial by a rotating pointer. and ten thousands of feet with reference to a single dial scale uniformly graduated from 1 to 10. All Mach numbers given in this flight manual are indicated Mach unless otherwise noted. The power to operate this indicator is supplied by the true airspeed computer. The small 10. This provides a conspicuous warning of approaching lower altitudes when descending from operational altitudes. one on the main dial and one on the subdial which rotates with the subdial scale.000 feet for each major graduation on the dial up to the maximum possible altitude reading of 80. With increasing altitude. These indices can be moved by the pilot to any value of Mach number desired as a reference without affecting the reading or adjustment of the instrument. figure 1-118) is a remote indicating unit. One is the position error inherent in the pitot-static system and the other is the instrument error inherent in the mechanism of the instrument itself. the magnitude of the instrument error is not known to the pilot but will be within the maximum allowable tolerance of ±0. however. The long pointer indicates 1000 feet in one revolution. thousands.000 feet. 1-392 Altimeter (Navigators’) A Type AAU-8/A altimeter (F.O. A cutout and reference mark on the main dial permit reading of the subdial. the needle and the subdial will indicate the appropriate Mach reading.O.03. the diagonal stripes are progressively covered until. 1B-52H-1-1. Refer to Part 1 of T. Positive stops are provided at or near the extremes of the barometric scale so that the scale cannot be misset by excessive rotation. figure 1-118) located on the left side of the pilots’ instrument panel indicates the ratio of aircraft speed to the speed of sound at the particular pressure altitude at any time during flight.000 feet in one revolution. A main dial and subdial in the true airspeed indicator repeat airspeed information transmitted from the true airspeed computer. A red power-off flag will appear when power to the Mach indicator is off and will remain in view for approximately 40 seconds after Mach indicator switch is turned ON when power is available. no stripes are showing. When power is turned ON and the true airspeed computer is warmed up sufficiently. if there is no power on the instrument. and the small pointer 10. figure 1-118) is located on the navigator’s instrument panel.0 inches of mercury as displayed in the Kollsman window located between the 2 and 3 on the main dial. NOTE A Type MA-1 altimeter may be installed in the aircraft although it is not recommended. The zero setting knob on the front of the instrument sets the pointers to read from any ground pressure altitude between 28.T. NOTE The Mach indicator ideally would give a true Mach reading. However. figure 1-118).1 and 31. 1B-52H-1 Mach Indicator True Airspeed Indicator A Type ME-5 Mach indicator (D. figure 1-118) located on the pilot’s instrument panel and on the radar navigator’s front panel (G. The magnitude of the position error is shown on the POSITION ERROR chart in Part 1 of T. at 16. This rotation of pointer and subdial scale will not affect indicator reading.000 feet.O. Movable indices are located on the face of the instrument.5 to 1. The cutout filled with the diagonal stripes is also used as an indication of a correctly zeroed altimeter during the preflight check. Since no calibration is available. there are two sources of error in the system. movement of the subdial index may cause movement of the subdial and the main dial pointer. 1B-52H-1-1 for a further discussion of these errors and a method of inflight determination of the Mach number. Depressing and rotating the knob will allow adjustment of the index on the subdial.

the altimeter will not reset but will operate normally in the standby mode. the computer could deliver erroneous data to the altimeters. The altimeter is placed in servo mode by momentarily positioning the reset-stby lever to RESET. 1-393 . readings between the two modes should correspond within 75 feet. In addition. • • If the altimeter cannot be switched to STBY manually due to a switch malfunction.T. NOTE Relay failure Monitor failure If the computer pneumatic sensor were to fail or become locked in a particular position. This is to compensate for large altitude position errors in some airplanes. In the servo mode.were to occur. the altimeter will reset. the STBY mode can be acquired by momentarily opening the ALT CMPTR circuit breaker (for approximately 3 seconds). All error sensing is downstream of the sensor and as a result there is no monitor function applied to the sensor itself. If the malfunction was transient. or pitot head damage . on interrogation. This condition can be circumvented by operating the pilot’s altimeter in RESET and the copilot’s altimeter in STBY. Both altimeters will then display data derived from separate sources and provide a means of comparison and independent backup. placed the mode C enabling switch to the OUT position and advise the ARTC center.such as pitot or static source icing. ice or water blockage in static lines. The single pointer repeats the 100-foot indications of the drum. serving both as a vernier for the drum and as a quick indication of the rate and direction of altitude change. A failure monitor circuit will automatically return the system to standby mode and the STBY flag will appear for any of the following malfunctions: • • • • • • Primary power failure Servo amplifier or motor failure Switch failure The CPU-66 computer error sensing system senses error in a servo loop that takes its input from a pneumatic sensor within the computer. altitude (standby mode) by as much as ±4500 feet without the altimeter monitor inadvertently switching the altimeter to the standby mode. The altimeter correction card is not used in the servo mode. Since a single CPU-66 computer drives both altimeters in the servo mode. The aircraft could experience a large change in altitude before the AAU-19/A error detection circuit would react and switch the system to standby. The altimeter has a counter-drum-pointer display. figure 1-118) is on the pilot’s and copilot’s instrument panels. The STBY flag will disappear. The AAU-19/A altimeter also has a means of monitoring internal failures which will revert the altimeter to STBY. no means of comparison between AAU-19/A altimeters is available if both are in RESET. it is designed to be capable of accepting electrical signals from the computer which differ from the uncorrected pneumatic If it is determined that the altitude computer (CPU-66) has failed or is delivering erroneous data. or system failures . If the fault remains. • SERVO MODE Servo mode is designed to be the primary mode of operation and should be used unless failure prohibits. When in the standby mode. attempt should be made to reset to the servo mode. the allowable difference between servo mode readings of two altimeters is 75 feet at all altitudes and speeds. the basic pressure altitude indication of the instrument is servo-corrected for position error by the CPU-66 altitude computer. The altimeter will revert to standby and operate as a pneumatic altimeter. Erroneous data would also be delivered to the transponder and relayed. 1B-52H-1 Altimeter (Pilot and Copilot) A Type AAU-19/A altimeter (A. The RESET-STBY lever is spring loaded to an unmarked neutral position between RESET and STBY positions.O. In addition. Inflight. The altimeter can be operated in either the servo (computer controlled) mode or the standby (static pressure) mode as selected by the RESET-STBY lever. a STBY flag will be in sight on the instrument face. leaks. If the altimeter reverts to standby mode automatically. The counters and drum provide a direct digital readout in thousands and hundreds of feet. A barometric pressure set knob and barometric scale are provided for adjusting the altimeter setting. A field elevation check should be made in both modes using ±75 feet as the maximum altimeter error allowable in either case. to the ground radar agency.

When configured with external weapons. The vibrator minimizes mechanical friction. If the altimeter’s internal vibrator is inoperative. When the altimeter is in the standby mode.O. When the altimeter is operating in standby mode. enabling the instrument to provide a smoother display during altitude changes. The altimeter correction card is for a clean configuration and serves as a baseline correction. altitude corrections can be computed by applying the applicable chart correction. the appropriate altimeter correction card for the current aircraft configuration will be used to fly corrected altitude for traffic separation. Should vibrator failure occur. The card reflects position error only and is based on an average gross weight of 325. such as 1800 to 2000 feet or 2800 to 3000 feet. refer to Part 1 of T. Normally 1 to 3 seconds are required for this to happen due to the time delay built into the instrument to prevent nuisance trip-offs. do not force the setting. and should use any appropriate altitude backup information available. The pointer hangup can be minimized by tapping the altimeter case. from Part 1 of the performance manual. 1B-52H-1-1.O. . 1B-52H-1 STANDBY MODE In the standby mode. A black-on-red STBY flag will be in view. the altimeter will continue to function but a less smooth movement of the instrument display will be evident with changes in altitude. For further information concerning the use of the altimeter correction card. The altimeter may be shifted from servo to standby mode by holding the RESET-STBY lever in the STBY position until the STBY flag appears. the appropriate altimeter correction card for the current aircraft configuration will be used to fly corrected altitude for traffic separation. If this occurs. to the clean configuration altimeter card. Pilots should be especially watchful for this failure when their minimum approach altitude lies within the 800 to 1000 foot part of 1-394 Change 18 the scale. momentary locking of the barocounters may be experienced. If locking occurs. The instrument will be in standby mode when aircraft power is first applied and will remain in standby mode until the RESETSTBY lever is momentarily placed to RESET. During normal use of the barometric setting system. Application of force may cause internal gear disengagement and result in excessive altitude errors in both standby (STBY) and servo (RESET) modes. the altimeter operates solely from the static pressure system.000 pounds and a standard day temperature. Altimeter Correction Card An altimeter correction card and holder are located on the pilot’s glare shield.T. • • When the altimeter is operating in standby mode. an internal vibrator will operate continuously. indicating that the instrument is providing a normal static pressure reading and that displayed altitude is not corrected for position error. the required setting may sometimes be established by rotating the knob a full turn in the opposite direction and approaching the setting carefully. the 100-foot pointer may momentarily hang up when passing through ‘‘0’’ or 12 o’clock position.

T. 1B-52H-1 Pitot Static Indicators 1 2 3 4 STANDBY FLAG 100-FOOT POINTER BAROMETRIC SCALE RESET – STBY LEVER 5 6 7 8 100-FOOT DRUM BAROMETRIC PRESSURE SET KNOB 1000-FOOT COUNTER 10.O.000-FOOT COUNTER Figure 1-118 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-395 .

T.O. 1B-52H-1 Pitot Static Indicators (Cont) 9 MACH INDICATOR SWITCH Figure 1-118 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-396 Change 17 .

this is an acceptable risk.O. Normally. Emergency dc power is supplied to the heading indicator clutch at all times. the gyro system will continue to function. Section III. figure 1-119) permits zeroing the horizon line with reference to the miniature aircraft (6. If any of the three flight gyro circuit breakers trip and cannot be reset. figure 1-119). In the event of ac electrical power failure on the No. power is supplied to the pilot’s and copilot’s attitude indicating systems. The emergency instrument inverter is designed to function during aircraft power failures and not during a single instrument failure. figure 1-119) located on the left side of the pilot’s instrument panel has ON. this section. If TR power is lost. 1B-52H-1 MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS Horizontal Situation Indicator See FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM. figure 1-119) located on the upper portion of the instrument is read against a lubber line fixed on the instrument mask. A spring-loaded push-to-set type synchronizing knob (3. figure 1-119) and causes the OFF flag to appear. cages the attitude sphere (5. the indicator receives dc power from the forward/aft battery. the system will not function properly. A calibrated compass card (1. If two circuit breakers trip. Change 18 1-397 . located on the pilot’s instrument panel. figure 1-119) appears upon loss of all power to the indicator. The ATT warning flag indicates the attitude information displayed on the pilot’s and/or copilot’s attitude director indicator may be erroneous and the standby attitude indicator should be checked to determine proper attitude references. an emergency flight gyro inverter will supply 115-volt three-phase ac power to the pilot’s attitude indicator and C-2A heading indicator (gyro). When the gyro power switch is in OFF position. when pulled. NOTE • • • When one of the flight gyro power circuit breakers trip. The standby attitude indicator receives dc power from the emergency instrument bus. Section III. In the ON position. therefore.T. resulting in an inflight emergency. The allowable drift rate is ±8 degrees per hour minus the earth’s rate. the emergency instrument bus receives power from the forward TR bus through the left essential bus. The heading indicator (gyro) may be the first or only indication of a heading system malfunction.-OFF positions. 3 generator bus. with flight gyro circuit breaker(s) tripped and AHRS failure. 3 generator bus routed to the flight gyro transformer. this section. the instrument should be periodically reset to correct for drift beyond the capabilities of the leveling system. figure 1-119) is located on the left side of the pilots’ instrument panel. the inverter supplies lighting power for the pilot’s attitude indicator. The mask has a cutout in the lower portion (2. The flight gyro transformer reduces the ac power to 115-volt ac which is supplied to the pilot’s and copilot’s attitude indicating systems and C-2A heading indicator (gyro). See BATTERY LOADS. The pitch trim and caging knob is springloaded. The inverter utilizes emergency dc power and is auto- matically controlled by a gyro power switching relay when the gyro power switch is in ON position. for further information concerning the emergency flight gyro inverter. Standby Attitude Indicator A standby attitude indicator (D. Attitude-Director Indicator See FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM. See Instrument Operation under COMPLETE AC POWER FAILURE. NOTE • • The heading indicator (gyro) should be monitored throughout the flight for correct magnetic or grid heading and reset as necessary. power is cut off to the instruments and the inverter. An OFF flag (10. figure 1-119) is located on the lower left portion of the indicator and is used to realign or calibrate the dial to known references. This instrument receives 115 volt three-phase ac power as controlled by the gyro power switch on the pilot’s side panel. In addition. The gyro system operates on 205-volt three-phase ac aircraft power from the No. Do not allow the knob to spring back when released or damage to the indicator may result. figure 1-119) and. The condition which caused the circuit breaker to trip could damage the emergency inverter. and the C-2A heading indicator (gyro). Type ARU-30/A3. C-2A Heading Indicator (Gyro) A Type C-2A heading indicator (gyro) (A. A pitch trim and caging knob (7. The heading indicator (gyro) is an unslaved-type gyro which provides auxiliary headings for navigational purposes and is also used to provide headings in the event of failure of the main compass system. provides a continuously operating source of attitude reference in case of primary attitude indicator malfunction. do not pull the remaining circuit breakers unless the AHRS has also failed. Gyro Power Switch A gyro power switch (4. However. figure 1-119) which shows reciprocal heading.

1B-52H-1 Radar Altimeter AN/APN-224 RADAR ALTIMETER TIE-IN A Type AN/APN-224 radar altimeter (B. The OFF flag (12. push-to-test. to set the low altitude limit index cursor (14. if the aircraft is flying at an absolute altitude less than 5000 feet. If the aircraft absolute altitude is above 5000 feet. An altitude indicator needle (15. figure 1-119). If the aircraft absolute altitude is below 5000 feet and the indicator is on. power is supplied to the indicator and the receiver-transmitter. The radar altimeter OFF flag does not indicate all failures of this system. figure 1-119) tests the low altitude caution light (13. 1-398 Change 18 RADAR ALTIMETER LOW CAUTION LIGHT An amber press-to-test radar altimeter low caution light (11. the indicator low altitude caution light. figure 1-119) indicates altitude from 0 to 400 feet in 20 foot increments.T. figure 1-119) is located adjacent to each pilot’s radar altimeter. 1. If the indicator does not display a reading of 1000 (±100) feet when the system test light is ON. and to test the lights and the radar altimeter system. If the altitude indicator needle has disappeared behind the mask (16. when visible. and 1000 to 5000 feet in 500 foot increments. During normal system operation the flag is withdrawn and a black background appears in the window. and the radar altimeter system. The radar altimeter will indicate only the highest terrain detected within its 90 degree conical shaped pattern. The radar altimeter provides absolute altitude inputs to the OAS for altitude calibration and weapon delivery functions. the green system test light (18. figure 1-119). 2. 3. figure 1-119). The instrument provides for measuring the absolute altitude from 0 to 5000 feet. the RDR ALT LOW light (11. 3. the system test light. When the control knob on either indicator is rotated clockwise. This will turn on the system and remove the OFF flap from view. rotary switch used to control power to the indicator and receiver-transmitter. and set the respective index cursor to the desired altitude. figure 1-119) on the pilots’ instrument panel will come on. figure 1-119). The system will function without degrade up to 45° of pitch and roll and 2200 fps of climb or descent. the indicator needle will appear from behind the mask and rotate in a counterclockwise direction to indicate the aircraft absolute altitude. whichever is greater. The radar altimeter low caution light operates on right TR power. If the needle indicates an absolute altitude less than the altitude set by the cursor. the receiver-transmitter has failed or is unreliable. 400 to 1000 feet in 50 foot increments. Rotate the radar altimeter control knob clockwise out of the detent enough to move the index cursor to any indication between 0 and 5000 feet. After a warmup of approximately 1 minute. The radar altimeter control knob (17. the indicator needle will be behind the mask and the OFF flag will be visible. Momentarily pressing the control knob (17. A defective receiver-transmitter is indicated by the system test light being out during system test. . Each caution light illuminates when its associated radar altimeter indicated altitude is below the altitude at which its cursor is set. An adjustable low altitude limit index cursor (14. The caution light will be out any time the needle indicates an absolute altitude greater than the altitude set by the cursor. The following procedure is used to place the radar altimeter in operation and may be accomplished in one continuous action.O. Radar Altimeter Normal Operation The radar altimeter is to be used in conjunction with the terrain avoidance system and will be included in the pilot’s normal instrument scanning pattern for a continuous cross-check with other terrain clearance information. The radar altimeter operates on 115 volt ac power from generator bus No. The indicator needle should point to 1000 (±100) feet. and the RDR ALT LOW light should come on. indicates an off condition or system power failure. this section. out of the detent. the indicator is defective. Predicted error tolerance is 3 feet or 4% of indicated altitude. figure 1-119) is a detented. System test is accomplished by setting the index cursor to 1500 feet and pressing the control knob. The cursor can be manually set to any altitude between 0 and 5000 feet by rotating the radar altimeter control knob. figure 1-119) is provided on the circumference of the indicator dial. figure 1-119) is located on each side of the pilots’ forward instrument panel. the indicator needle will point to the aircraft absolute altitude. The radar altimeter also provides absolute altitude inputs to the EVS which are displayed on the EVS monitors. NOTE The control knob on either the pilot or copilot radar altimeter indicator will turn on the system and the respective radar altimeter indicator. For additional information. see EVS MONITOR under ELECTROOPTICAL VIEWING SYSTEM (EVS). figure 1-119). The other indicator remains off unless it is turned on. figure 1-119) and the absolute altitude is less than 5000 feet. the amber low altitude caution light on the indicators and the amber RDR ALT LOW lights (11.

2V battery provides backup power. The OFF flap will appear and the indicator needle will rotate clockwise until it disappears behind the mask. MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENTS Accelerometer An accelerometer (A. The display has six digits for a twenty-four hour indication and a sweep second indication. Reset the index cursor to the desired absolute altitude. except for back lighting for the clock face. both controlled by successive depressions of a START. The pointer should rest off the scale with power off. figure 1-120) is located on the pilots’ eyebrow panel. 1B-52H-1 4. Two auxiliary pointers indicate and maintain maximum plus and minus accelerations until they are reset. during the first 5 seconds of operation on aircraft power. The instrument contains three pointers. Setting time and switching between the clock and elapsed time modes are accomplished by using the SEL and CTRL pushbuttons.O. 55 5 50 10 15 45 ETC 40 20 Electronic Clocks (If Installed) Electronic clocks (figure 1-118A) are installed at the left and right sides of the pilot’s instrument panel and at the electronic warfare station. 35 25 30 CTRL SEL A85919 Figure 1-118A Outside Air Temperature Gage The electronic clock indicates hours. SELF-TEST The clock has a self-test feature that illuminates all segments. Electronic Clock 60 Spring-Wound Clocks (If Installed) A Type A-13A clock (C. The air temperature gage is operated by an electrical resistance thermometer bulb located flush with the body skin on the lower left side of the forward pressurized section of the radar navigator’s escape hatch. rotate the radar altimeter control knob on both the pilot and copilot indicators counterclockwise into the detent. They are spring-wound 8-day clocks and have a winding knob on the lower left corner. figure 1-120) is located on the eyebrow instrument panel between the oil pressure gages.T. A Type G-10 outside air temperature gage (D. figure 1-120) is provided on the left and right sides of the pilots’ instrument panel. Change 18 1-399 . The temperature range of the gage is –70° to +50°C. To turn the system off.-RESET knob on the upper right corner. are provided. A sweep second hand and minute totalizer. when aircraft power is not available.-STOP. Usually powered by aircraft 28 VDC power. minutes and seconds for Clock (C) and Elapsed Time (ET) modes. and should register outside air temperature with power on. 5. The accelerometer is a selfcontained unit requiring no external connections. The dial is calibrated in g units from –2 to +4 g’s. figure 1-120) is located on the left side of the pilot’s instrument panel and near the center of the instrument panel at the navigators’ station. Magnetic Standby Compass TIME SET SEQUENCE • • • • • • • Press Press Press Press Press Press Press and hold SEL – Hours digits will flash CTRL – Hour digits will increment SEL – Minute digits will flash CTRL – Minute digits will increment SEL – Second digits will flash CTRL – Second digits will increment SEL – Returns to normal clock mode SELECTING ELAPSED TIME (ET) OR CLOCK (C) MODE • • Press SEL – Clock changes to Elapsed Time mode Press SEL – Clock changes to Clock mode ELAPSED TIME OPERATION Pressing CTRL in the ET mode: 1st – Starts elapse timer 2nd – Stops elapse timer 3rd – Resets elapse timer 4th – Repeats cycle (starts timer) • • • • A pilot’s magnetic standby compass (B. the main pointer giving continuous indications. using the reset knob on the front of the instrument. a self-contained 3.

1B-52H-1 Miscellaneous Electrical Instrument Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 COMPASS CARD RECIPROCAL HEADING WINDOW SYNCHRONIZING KNOB GYRO POWER SWITCH ATTITUDE SPHERE MINIATURE AIRCRAFT PITCH TRIM AND CAGING KNOB BANK SCALE BANK POINTER 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Figure 1-119 1-400 OFF FLAG RDR ALT LOW CAUTION LIGHT OFF FLAG LOW ALTITUDE CAUTION LIGHT LOW ALTITUDE LIMIT INDEX CURSOR ALTITUDE INDICATOR NEEDLE MASK RADAR ALTIMETER CONTROL KNOB SYSTEM TEST LIGHT .O.T.

1B-52H-1 Miscellaneous Instruments Figure 1-120 1-401 .T.O.

Set magnetic variation as applicable. Position mode select switch to SLV. 1B-52H-1 ATTITUDE HEADING REFERENCE SYSTEM (AHRS) MANUAL FAST SLAVE The AHRS consists of an AN/ASN-134 Attitude Heading Reference Set. an electronic control amplifier (ECA). Roll erection cutoff is applied when turn rate exceeds 8° per minute. COMP Mode Operation The COMP (compass) mode is the least accurate mode and should only be used if gyro stabilization is unreliable. DG Mode Operation The DG (directional gyro) mode can be used when the slaved magnetic heading data is considered unreliable or undesirable (e. gyro stabilized magnetic heading data is supplied to the OAS. Heading slaving cutoff is applied when longitudinal acceleration is in excess of ±0.g. Set hemisphere selection as applicable. These accuracies are degraded if the aircraft is moved during the 1 minute turn-on.1° in the slaved mode and ±1. a gyro reference unit (GRU). and a compass compensation unit (CCU). 4. erection/slaving cycle.01 g) and/or turn rates exceed 8° per minute. If the aircraft is moved during the first 40 seconds after power on. earth rate corrected directional gyro heading data is supplied to the OAS. Set hemisphere selection as applicable. The AHRS heading will then slave to the MAD heading at a rate of 30° per second and the aircraft can be moved (43 seconds after AHRS power application minimum) with minimum degradation of the AHRS attitude and heading. figure 1-121). In this mode. Corrected heading information for the AHRS must be manually set using the Heading Sync knob (1.T. The AHRS must be operated in the DG mode during an alternate true heading calibration in order to update the heading in the alternate navigation mode. a magnetic detector.01 g). grid navigation). Set magnetic variation as applicable. The attitude heading reference set consists of an AHRS control panel (figure 1-121) located on the copilot’s side panel. three cutoffs are incorporated for inputs to the AHRS directional gyro. 1. such as during alert. 4. therefore if PUSH TO SYNC is used in other than straight and level flight.5° is present. and an attitude switching relay box. and 40 to 60 seconds the heading is being slaved and synchronized to the MAD. Set latitude dial for each two degree change in aircraft latitude. The AHRS also provides a heading output through the OAS to the navigator’s MFD with accuracies of ±1.5° of the magnetic azimuth detector (MAD) heading output for heading in the slaved mode. Accomplishment of an alternate true heading calibration or emergency setting true or magnetic heading using FRMT 8 will not automatically update the heading in the AHRS.055 g (±0. AHRS Operation TURN-ON The AHRS system becomes fully operational 1 minute after turn-on with accuracies of ±1° vertical for altitude and ±0. 2. Pressing the knob will synchronize the heading to the MAD output at a rate of 30° per second. Set hemisphere selection as applicable. . Pushing and holding the fast erect switch (6. the heading sync/slew knob should be pressed at least 40 seconds after AHRS power on.055 g (±0.O. 3. Pitch erection cutoff is applied when longitudinal acceleration exceeds ±0. the cutoffs will be applied. Position mode select switch to COMP. The AHRS uses 115 volt three-phase ac power. In this operating mode. 1. errors can be introduced into the system.6° in the COMP mode. 2. 3. 4. To prevent errors from entering the system during accelerations. If the aircraft has to be moved prior to the 1-minute cycle completion. figure 1-121) increases the erection rate to 25° per minute if a vertical error greater than 0. Errors in the system will result because the cutoffs interrupt the normal erection/slaving of the AHRS. The OAS does not accept this heading data.. The AHRS control panel provides a manually actuated HEADING SYNC/SLEW knob for fast slaving of the heading indicator to the MAD heading when in slaved mode. During 20 to 40 seconds the system is leveling. 2. 1. a pilot’s and a copilot’s attitude select switch located on the forward instrument panel. 1-402 Change 4 INFLIGHT OPERATION Slaved Mode Operation The SLV (slaved) mode is the normal operating mode. non-gyro stabilized magnetic heading is provided to the pilots’ indicators only. The first 20 seconds of the cycle are used for caging and gyro spinup. In this mode. MANUAL FAST ERECTION The normal vertical erection rate for AHRS following completion of the 1-minute start cycle is approximately 1° per minute. Set latitude dial for each two degree change in aircraft latitude. Set latitude dial for each two degree change in aircraft latitude. Manual fast slave activation overrides the acceleration cutoffs. Position mode select switch to DG. Set heading using the heading sync knob. 3.

NOTE When in slaved mode the heading SYNC/ SLEW knob should be used only in straight and level flight. Pushing and turning the knob in the DG mode provides a heading drive rate signal to the ECA proportional to knob rotation and direction. Two metal guards are located adjacent to the AHRS control panel to preclude inadvertent actuation of the heading SYNC/ SLEW knob.T.O. 1 5 6 7 MAGNETIC VARIATION SWITCH FAST ERECT SWITCH MODE SELECT SWITCH CONTROLINDICATOR HEADING SYNC/SLEW KNOB FUNCTION The heading SYNC/SLEW knob marked PUSH TO SYNC HDG. 1B-52H-1 AHRS Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 HEADING SYNC/SLEW KNOB SYNCHRONIZATION INDICATOR LATITUDE DIAL HEMISPHERE SELECTION SWITCH NO. initiates the automatic synchronization function of the ECA. This automatic synchronization function bypasses the synchronization limits within the system and slaves the HSI display to the magnetic azimuth detector. when pushed in the SLV mode. Figure 1-121 (Sheet 1 of 2) 1-403 . This function occurs automatically when the AHRS is turned on in SLV mode. Use in other than straight and level flight can induce large heading errors in the system.

NOTE Placing mode select switch in COMP records a malfunction on the mission data recording tape. 4 HEMISPHERE SELECTION SWITCH A two-position toggle switch having N--S positions is used to select either the Northern or Southern hemisphere for proper earth’s rate correction. 1B-52H-1 AHRS Controls and Indicators (Cont) NO. The switch has a positive detent which prevents rotation to or from the OFF position without pulling out on the knob. full scale oscillations of the synchronization indicator during low level flight or turbulence should be considered normal.T. 5 MAGNETIC VARIATION SWITCH A three-position toggle switch having –15. 6 FAST ERECT SWITCH The switch when pushed and held. 0. The synchronization indicator is operative only in the slaved mode. The DG (directional gyro) mode provides an earth rate corrected directional gyro heading output with a drift rate of approximately 1° per hour. 7 MODE SELECT SWITCH A four position rotary mode select switch has OFF. Fast erection in both pitch and roll occurs at 25° (±5°) per minute. provides inputs for earth rate and magnetic coriolis corrections in both SLV and DG modes. +15 positions provides magnetic variation approximation to the heading processor for computing true heading used for earth rate correction of the vertical gyro.5 degrees. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 2 SYNCHRONIZATION INDICATOR The synchronization indicator indicates the relative error between the AHRS magnetic heading and the magnetic heading input to AHRS from the Magnetic Azimuth Detector (MAD) and displays magnetic system alignment within ±02. For magnetic variation greater than 8° East.-SLV.-DG. The COMP (compass) mode provides a non-gyro stabilized magnetic heading output.-COMP positions and selects the mode of operation of the AHRS. between 8° East and 8° West set 0. set –15. The dial should be updated in flight for each 2° of latitude change in aircraft position regardless of operating mode. and greater than 8° West set +15.O. Roll fast erection will not engage if the aircraft turn rate is greater than 8° per minute. 3 LATITUDE DIAL The latitude dial when set to the appropriate latitude. When moved out of the OFF position.5°. commands the vertical gyro to fast erect if the respective pitch or roll errors are greater than 0. Figure 1-121 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-404 . The SLV (slaved) mode of the AHRS provides a gyro stabilized magnetic heading output. Because of the positioning of the MAD in the wing. a relay in the ECA is actuated providing three-phase power for AHRS operation.

T. TAS and Mach Indicators 11 CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS A B C FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS DIR IND C-2 FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS EMER INV The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. Bus MISCELLANEOUS – FREE AIR TEMP IND LLC/B26 Left TR Radar Altimeter OAS NAV – RDR ALTM AUXBNS/D5 AC Bus 3 Radar Altitude Low Lights MISCELLANEOUS – LOW ALT– WARNING LT PWR RLC/E24 Rt.O. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. TR FLIGHT INDICATORS – STANDBY ATTITUDE PCBP/D5 Emer Inst. 1B-52H-1 Instruments Circuit Protection and Location EQUIPMENT Attitude Heading Reference System CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 POWER SOURCE OAS NAV – AHRS – A B C AUXBNS/D1 AUXBNS/D2 AUXBNS/D3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 MISCELLANEOUS – ALT CMPTR LLC/C31 AC Bus 3 PCBP/D11 PCBP/D13 PCBP/D14 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 PCBP/D10 Emer Inst. Bus MISCELLANEOUS – TAS IND LLC/B30 AC Bus 3 Altitude Computer and Pilots’ Altimeters in Servo Mode C-2A Heading Indicator Normal Power Emergency Power Outside Air Temperature Gage Standby Attitude Indicator True Airspeed Computer. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. Bus PCBP/D9 Emer Inst. AUXBNS LLC AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL LEFT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP RLC PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL RIGHT LOAD CENTRAL CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-122 1-405/(1-406 blank) .

BLA .

VOR. roll. In addition. Figure 1-123 illustrates the flight director system data flow. ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATORS (ADI) Pitch and Roll Attitudes The ARU-49/A attitude director indicators (figure 1-124). nav system select panel switches. display the aircraft pitch and roll attitude. the pilot’s attitude director indicator is Pitch and roll attitudes are displayed in the standard manner with the pitch scale located on the attitude sphere and the bank pointer and imprinted bank scale located on the lower half of the instrument. Inputs from systems external to the flight director system are provided from the TACAN. During power failure on No. The pilot’s and copilot’s attitude director indicators are interconnected to provide an attitude comparator warning system. Glide slope information can be obtained from the raw data glide slope indicator or the pitch steering bar. horizontal situation indicator. the localizer information is presented by the bank steering bar/course deviation indicator provided the proper navigation mode is selected. altitude. the pitch and bank steering bars will be in view. A description of the various components of the attitude director indicator is given below. The copilot’s turn rate is supplied by the AHRS. Pitch and roll is supplied by either the AHRS or MD-1 gyro. The copilot’s ADI will lose all functions. ILS/VOR. flight director controls. therefore. and rate of turn. and course in all phases of instrument flight. ILS APP or GPS for display. Change 21 1-407 . The longer the duration of acceleration (or deceleration).T. 3 generator bus. the greater the indicated error and the longer it persists when acceleration (or deceleration) ceases. and yaw coordination information. 3 generator bus. Flight director system circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-125. ILS. powered by the flight gyro emergency inverter and automatically supplies attitude and rate of turn information. If power failure occurs on the No. The system also provides a visual display of steering commands which the pilot follows to attain and hold any desired attitude. but are inoperative. glide slope receiver and GPS IU systems. and position. 3 generator bus. including attitude. The MD-1 and AHRS both receive power from the No. NOTE An error in the pitch indication of the attitude indicators is generated during accelerations or decelerations. The error is indicated in a nose-high direction during and after a forward acceleration and in a nosedown direction during and after deceleration. CPU-4A flight director computer. and a turn rate gyro (pilot’s ADI). pitch. as determined by attitude select switches. Pitch error may reach one bar width during a high gross weight takeoff.O. rate of turn. The mode select switch on the nav system select panel selects TACAN. the dc-powered standby attitude indicator must be used by the copilot under complete ac power failure conditions. The flight director system consists of the following primary equipment: attitude director indicator. heading. 1B-52H-1 FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM DESCRIPTION ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATOR (ADI) ATTITUDE SELECT SWITCH HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR (HSI) NAVIGATION SYSTEM SELECT PANEL FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM CONTROLS AND DISPLAYS NORMAL OPERATION 1-407 1-407 1-409 1-409 1-409 1-410 1-419 DESCRIPTION NOTE Some of these instruments have red warning flags which may be difficult to see at night. heading. The pilot’s and copilot’s attitude indicators receive pitch and roll signals from the MD-1 or the AHRS gyro systems. The erection system reduces the error at about the same rate it was generated. The flight director system provides the pilot and copilot with a display of airplane attitude.

1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Data Flow Figure 1-123 1-408 Change 3 .O.T.

with the MODE SELECT switch in GPS. and an amber ALT light at the bottom. HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR (HSI) A Type AQU-2/A horizontal situation indicator (figure 1-124) is located on both the pilot’s and copilot’s instrument panel. The IUS (IU Software) will provide the HSI with range and bearing to the selected Navaid along with steering indications when the GPS is selected on the Navigation System Select Panel MODE SELECT switch. and the INST CONTROL switch. It has a green NORM light at the top of the pushbutton. or ILS APP for display on the flight director indicators. The INST CONTROL switch has PILOT. on the aisle stand contains the navigation MODE SELECT switch. failure detection is limited to the indicators. The navigation system select panel (figure 1-124). periodic manual comparison of the ADIs with the standby attitude indicator is required when either attitude select switch is in the alternate position. and is independent of the source selected at the other station.-COPLT positions and selects whether the pilot or copilot has control of the course and heading set knobs on the HSI. ILS. The ALT light at the pilot’s station indicates selection of the MD-1 pitch/roll data for the pilot’s ADI and EVS monitor. either the station is not within 200 nm. the radio course indicator. a TACAN station identifier is not generated by the IU and therefore is not supplied to the Interphone system. TACAN. and the directional indicator (heading system).T. Change 21 1-409 . The NORM light at the pilot’s station indicates selection of AHRS pitch/roll data for the pilot’s ADI and for the pitch and roll bars on the pilots EVS monitor. The NORM light at the copilot’s station indicates selection of MD-1 pitch/roll data for the copilot’s ADI and EVS monitor. 1B-52H-1 ATTITUDE SELECT SWITCH GPS IU/TACAN Emulation HSI Operation The attitude select switch (35.O. NOTE During IU/TACAN emulation operation. In the event of loss of all ac power. NAVIGATION SYSTEM SELECT PANEL When the pilot’s or copilot’s attitude select switch (but not both) is in the alternate position both ADIs are using the same attitude source. It is an electrically operated instrument and replaces the bearing distance indicator. The MODE SELECT allows selection of GPS. no information will be available from either the pilot’s or copilot’s HSI. The absence of the audio identifier has no effect on IU/ TACAN emulation. figure 1-124) is an alternate action pushbutton switch located above the ADI at the pilot’s and copilot’s station. Under this condition. The ALT light at the copilot’s station indicates selection of AHRS pitch/roll data for the copilot’s ADI and EVS monitor. When the IU is unable to determine the selected TACAN station. It is used to select the pitch/roll data source for the respective station ADI. Therefore. The attitude comparator warning system cannot detect a failure of a single attitude source. the HDG SELECT switch. the Range Indicator Warning Flag will be displayed and the TACAN bearing pointer will rotate. The HDG SELECT switch has MAN and NOR positions and controls the input source for signals to the bank steering bar on the attitude-director indicator. or the Navaid database contains more than one Navaid with the same TACAN channel within 200 nm of the aircraft current position. VOR. See figure 1-123 for data flow.

1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 GLIDE SLOPE INDICATOR (OUT OF VIEW) ATTITUDE SPHERE COURSE WARNING FLAG PITCH STEERING BAR BANK STEERING BAR SHIELD BANK STEERING BAR/COURSE DEVIATION INDICATOR BANK SCALE PITCH TRIM KNOB ATT WARNING FLAG BANK POINTER TURN AND SLIP INDICATOR OFF FLAG ATT TEST PUSHBUTTON MINIATURE AIRCRAFT GLIDE SLOPE WARNING FLAG GLIDE SLOPE INDICATOR 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 GLIDE SLOPE DEVIATION SCALE RANGE INDICATOR RANGE INDICATOR WARNING FLAG BEARING POINTER (HEAD) HEADING MARKER LUBBER LINE COMPASS CARD COURSE SELECTOR WINDOW COURSE ARROW (HEAD) TO-FROM INDICATOR (TO SHOWN) COURSE DEVIATION INDICATOR COURSE SET KNOB BEARING POINTER (TAIL) HEADING SET KNOB COURSE ARROW (TAIL) (SOME HSIS) AIRCRAFT SYMBOL COURSE DEVIATION SCALE Figure 1-124 (Sheet 1 of 9) 1-410 .T.O.

and moves to display pitch and roll. 37 38 HEADING SELECT SWITCH NAV MODE SWITCH CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION A ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATOR 1 Glide Slope Indicator (out of view) Location of stowed glide slope indicator. the pitch steering bar is out of view. The bar operates in ILS APP mode only. The course warning flag will come into view in GPS IU/TACAN Emulation mode when the IU determines the TACAN emulation data is unreliable. When not in operation and normal power is available. 4 Pitch Steering Bar A pitch steering bar indicates whether the aircraft has the proper pitch to intercept the glide slope correctly. 3 Course Warning Flag A course warning flag comes into view when any course signal selected by the pilots’ nav mode select switch fails or becomes unreliable.O. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 2 of 9) Change 21 1-411 .T. 2 Attitude Sphere The attitude sphere is a sphere marked with the artificial horizon and the pitch reference scale. 1B-52H-1 34 35 36 LAMP TEST BUTTON ATTITUDE SELECT SWITCH INSTRUMENT CONTROL SWITCH NO.

8 Pitch Trim Knob Turning the pitch trim knob zeroizes the horizon line with reference to the miniature aircraft. VOR. the bank steering bar is out of view behind the bank steering bar shield (No. It performs the same function with respect to an omni-range beam if the AN/ARN-14 is tuned to an omni-range station and the nav mode select switch is in ILS. the bank steering bar operates when the heading select switch (located adjacent to the navigation system select panel on the pilots’ aisle stand) is in MAN position. Cross-check the bank steering bar with the bank pointer on the attitude-director indicator to preclude the possibility of exceeding a bank angle of 30° . 1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. If the CPU-4A computer is calibrated properly and when centering the bank steering bar.T. FUNCTION A ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATOR (Cont) 5 Bank Steering Bar Shield The bank steering bar shield covers the bank steering bar when normal power is available and the nav mode select switch is not in an ILS mode (ILS or ILS APP). 6 Bank Steering Bar/Course Deviation Indicator A bank steering bar indicates whether the aircraft has the correct bank angle and rate of turn to intercept the localizer beam ‘‘on course’’ if the AN/ARN-14 is tuned to an ILS frequency. ILS. In addition.’’ When the nav mode select switch is in GPS. or ILS APP mode of operation. an initial bank angle of 30° (+0°/–5°) will be indicated. NOTE When in TACAN. The bar will then operate in conjunction with the heading set by the heading set knob and will indicate the correct bank angle and rate of turn to intercept the desired heading ‘‘on course. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 3 of 9) 1-412 Change 3 . 5).O. the course warning flag will appear when the ARN-21 or ARN-14 fails or signals from the URN-3 beacon or the VOR or ILS stations are lost or become unreliable. Continued display of this warning flag after the heading select switch has been positioned to MAN does not indicate faulty operation of the bank steering bar. 10) to indicate aircraft bank. TACAN or VOR and normal power is available. 7 Bank Scale Used with Bank Pointer (No.

pitch trim positions differ by more than 6° (±1°) in pitch for more than 1 second. 13) on the pilot’s or copilot’s ADI is pressed and held for at least 2 seconds. 1B-52H-1 CONTROLINDICATOR NO. When the gyro power switch is turned ON. 10 Bank Pointer Indicates aircraft bank (roll) on the bank scale (No. 11 Turn and Slip Indicator Indications of aircraft rate of turn and slip are provided by the needle and ball arrangement at the bottom center of the instrument. and when compensated for. 9 ATT Warning Flag FUNCTION An ATT warning flag comes into view. the pilot and copilot OFF flags are in view. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 4 of 9) 1-413 . (3) When the comparator and related circuits fails. both OFF flags should disappear in approximately 60 seconds. (2) When the attitude sphere position between the pilot’s and copilot’s indicators differs in roll by more than 6° (±1°) for more than 1 second.O.T. When the gyro power switch is OFF. (4) When the ATT TEST pushbutton (No. in the pilot’s and copilot’s attitude director indicators. Turn rate information is provided by the rate of turn gyro for the pilot’s needle and by the AHRS for the copilot’s needle. Interruption of any two phases of ac power to the flight gyro transformer causes the copilot’s OFF flag (normal mode) to appear. under the following conditions: (1) When the power is off to one or both indicators or is lost to the comparator circuits. it is possible that a malfunction of the attitude indicator portion of the attitude-director indicator might be determined only by cross-checking it with the turn and slip indicator and the other remaining flight instruments. The OFF flag does not appear during every attitude indication failure. 12 OFF Flag The OFF flag appears upon interruption of power to the attitude indicating system. 7). NOTE The ATT warning flag indicates the attitude information displayed on the pilot’s and/or copilot’s attitude director indicator may be erroneous and the standby attitude indicator should be checked to determine proper attitude references. Therefore.

O. 17 Glide Slope Deviation Scale Used with glide slope indicator (No. 1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. When the copilot’s ATT TEST pushbutton is pressed. In GPS IU/TACAN Emulation mode the warning flag will be visible when either the selected TACAN station is not within 200 nautical miles of the aircraft. This checkout indicates that the attitude comparator warning system is functioning properly. the copilot’s attitude sphere rotates 10° (±1°) in both the roll and pitch axes and the pilot’s and copilot’s ATT warning flags appear. The pilot’s and copilot’s attitude sphere will always give a right roll and pitch up indication. FUNCTION A ATTITUDE-DIRECTOR INDICATOR (Cont) 13 ATT TEST Pushbutton An ATT TEST pushbutton is provided for checking the operation of the attitude comparator warning system. 18) will be covered by the range indicator warning flag if the TACAN radio system is not tuned to a surface beacon that is within 300 nautical miles of the aircraft and will also be covered if the TACAN station is not transmitting a signal of dependable strength. 19 Range Indicator Warning Flag The range indicator display (No. B HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR 18 Range Indicator A range indicator will give a digital display of the line-of-sight distance (up to 300 nautical miles. 200 nautical miles in GPS mode) to a URN-3 surface beacon.T. The indicator operates when the nav mode select switch (No. 2). 14 Miniature Aircraft The miniature aircraft is a fixed symbol representing the aircraft and is used as the attitude reference against the movable sphere (No. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 5 of 9) 1-414 Change 20 . 16 Glide Slope Indicator The glide slope indicator indicates on a glide slope deviation scale (No. 16) to indicate aircraft vertical position (above or below) relative to the glide slope. When not in operation. When the pilot’s ATT TEST pushbutton is pressed. 17) whether the aircraft is above or below the glide slope. the pilot’s attitude sphere rotates 10° (±1°) in both the roll and pitch axes and the pilot’s and copilot’s ATT warning flags appear. or the Navaid database contains more than one Navaid with the same channel as the selected TACAN within 200 nautical miles of the aircraft. 15 Glide Slope Warning Flag A glide slope warning flag comes into view during ILS or ILS APP mode of operation when the glide slope equipment fails or a glide slope signal of dependable strength is not being received. 38) is in either ILS or ILS APP position and the ARN-14 is tuned to an ILS frequency. the glide slope indicator is stowed out of view in the upper left corner of the indicator.

The TACAN radio system must be tuned to the surface beacon and the surface beacon must be within 300 nautical miles of the aircraft. or to an omni-range station. 24 Course Select Window The course selector window gives a digital display of the desired course selected by the course set knob. a URN-3 surface beacon. VOR. however. Bearings indicated by the bearing pointer will always be magnetic. The heading marker rotates with the compass card after the desired heading is selected by the heading set knob (No. 23 Compass Card The rotating compass card provides an indication of aircraft heading when referenced to the lubber line (No. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 6 of 9) Change 21 1-415 . The course arrow will rotate (in step) with the compass card. 1B-52H-1 CONTROLINDICATOR NO. 38) is in TACAN position. 20 Bearing Pointer (Head) FUNCTION A bearing pointer (head) that indicates the bearing heading to an Emulated TACAN. and GPS modes. NOTE Aircraft headings indicated by the compass card will be related to magnetic north or gyro north depending on whether the AHRS compass system is in slaved or gyro operation. reset with the course set knob when changing the instrument control switch position from the pilot’s or copilot’s setting. if intercepted and flown. The bearing pointer indicates bearing to an omni-range station when the nav mode select switch is in VOR position and then only if the omni-range radio (ARN-14) is tuned to that station. The bearing pointer is inoperative when the omni-range receiver (ARN-14) is tuned to an ILS station. if the ARN-14 is tuned to an ILS frequency. 30). The bearing pointer indicates bearing to a URN-3 surface beacon when the nav mode select switch (NO. 26 To-From Indicator A TO-FROM indicator that indicates whether the selected course. The bearing pointer indicates the bearing to a GPS emulated TACAN station when the Nav mode switch is in the GPS position and the TACAN radio system is tuned to the proper channel which must be within 200 nautical miles of the aircraft.T. 22 Lubber Line The fixed reference line representing the nose of the aircraft used to read compass card and heading marker headings. NOTE The digital display in the course selector window should be checked and. the pointer references the omni-range station. 21 Heading Marker A heading marker that indicates a desired heading. ILS APP. if necessary. will take the aircraft to the selected facility. For all other positions of the nav mode select switch. TACAN. 25 Course Arrow (Head) A course arrow (head) that indicates the desired course selected by the course set knob during ILS.O. or vice versa. The pointer references the surface beacon if the nav mode select switch is in TACAN or GPS. 22). the pointer is not visible.

the course deviation indicator rotates in conjunction with the course set knob. The course set knob is also used to provide the course setting to the IU for GPS/TACAN Emulation. In GPS mode the CDI provides information relative to the emulated TACAN station. B FUNCTION HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR (Cont) 27 Course Deviation Indicator A course deviation indicator referenced to the course arrow that indicates whether the aircraft is left or right of the desired course or localizer beam. 20). The course set knob will be quite warm to the touch when the system is operated for extended periods of time in moderately high ambient temperatures. the HSI is indicating the aircraft is on course. the course set knob has no functional effect on the course deviation indicator. 32 Aircraft Symbol An aircraft symbol is fixed on the face of the HSI and oriented to the nose of the aircraft. Each dot represents 5° of deviation from course or 1/4 of the localizer width. the course deviation indicator provides information relative to the desired course provided TACAN radio or ARN-14 is tuned to the respective surface beacon or omni-range station. on some HSIs. 25). however. indicates the reciprocal heading of the Course Arrow ( No. 25). 28 COURSE SET Knob The course set knob used to set the course arrow and the digital display in the course selector window to the desired course. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 7 of 9) 1-416 Change 3 . the course set knob should not be moved or spun in a rapid. 29 Bearing Pointer (Tail) The tail indicates the reciprocal heading of the bearing pointer ( No. 33 Course Deviation Scale The course deviation scale is made up of equally spaced dots that are perpendicular to the course arrow (No. jerky motion. 31) of the course arrow.T. When the nav mode select switch is in VOR position and the ARN-14 tuned to an ILS frequency. For all other conditions. 31 Course Arrow (Tail) The tail. NOTE • • To prevent course counter malfunctions. The deviation indicator provides information relative to the localizer beam when the nav mode select switch is in ILS or ILS APP and the ARN-14 is on and tuned to an ILS frequency.O. When the course deviation indicator is aligned with the head (No. 1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. 25) and the tail (No. NOTE The heading set knob will be quite warm to the touch when the system is operated for extended periods of time in moderately high ambient temperatures. 30 HEADING SET Knob A heading set knob is used to set the heading marker to the desired heading.

The NORM light at the pilot’s station indicates selection of AHRS pitch/roll data for the pilot’s ADI and for the pitch and roll bars on the pilots EVS monitor. The attitude comparator warning system cannot detect a failure of a single attitude source.O. The ALT light at the pilot’s station indicates selection of the MD-1 pitch/roll data for the pilot’s ADI and EVS monitor.T. When the switch is in PILOT position and the pilot rotates his course and heading set knobs. Pressing the button will light the respective green NORM and amber ALT lights. NAVIGATION SYSTEM SELECT PANEL 36 INST CONTROL SWITCH An instrument control switch located on the navigation system select panel on the aisle stand has PILOT. 1B-52H-1 NO.-COPLT positions and selects whether the pilot or copilot has control of the course and heading set knobs on the HSI. It is used to select the pitch/roll data source for the respective station ADI. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 8 of 9) Change 3 1-417 . The reverse of the above condition will be true when the instrument control switch is in COPLT position. Under this condition. When the pilot’s or copilot’s attitude select switch (but not both) is in the alternate position both ADIs are using the same attitude source. CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION C ATTITUDE SELECT SWITCH 34 LAMP TEST BUTTON The lamp test button is located adjacent to the attitude select switch on both the pilot’s and copilot’s forward instrument panel and is used to test the bulbs in the respective attitude select switch. The ALT light at the copilot’s station indicates selection of AHRS pitch/roll data for the copilot’s ADI and EVS monitor. 35 ATTITUDE SELECT Switch The attitude select switch is an alternate action pushbutton switch located above the ADI at the pilot’s and copilot’s station. See figure 1-123 for data flow. It has a green NORM light at the top of the pushbutton. Both pilot’s and copilot’s horizontal situation indicators and attitude indicators are fully operative regardless of the position of the instrument control switch. Therefore. and an amber ALT light at the bottom. and is independent of the source selected at the other station. failure detection is limited to the indicators. periodic manual comparison of the ADIs with the standby attitude indicator is required when either attitude select switch is in the alternate position. The NORM light at the copilot’s station indicates selection of MD-1 pitch/roll data for the copilot’s ADI and EVS monitor. the corresponding information will be displayed on the copilot’s HSI and the copilot will not be able to change these settings.

see INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM (ILS) EQUIPMENT. and the range and bearing from the NAVAID to the aircraft. the selected heading rather than the selected course is commanded by the bank steering bar. The switch has MAN. Continued display of the course warning flag after the heading select switch has been positioned to MAN does not indicate faulty operation of the bank steering bar. the flight director system operates the same as when the switch is in NOR position with the exception of the bank steering bar. this section. In the GPS position the GPS emulated TACAN provides the currently selected NAVAID three letter identifier and channel. FUNCTION NAVIGATION SYSTEM SELECT PANEL (Cont) 37 HDG SELECT Switch A heading select switch located on the navigation system select panel on the aisle stand is marked HDG SELECT. if any of the navigation receivers fails or the signal is lost or unreliable. the information displayed on the flight director indicator is determined by the position of the mode select switch. the instrument landing system-approach mode of navigation is selected. Figure 1-124 (Sheet 9 of 9) 1-418 Change 21 . The bar indicates zero deflection when the aircraft has the correct bank angle to arrive at the selected heading. 1B-52H-1 Flight Director System Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. In TACAN position.-TACAN. the omnirange radio navigation system is selected and may be placed in operation as noted under OMNI-RANGE RADIO AN/ARN-14. this section. this section. the course warning flag (No. for further information. In MAN (manual) position. the instrument landing system mode of navigation is selected.-VOR. see AUTOMATIC APPROACH EQUIPMENT. NOTE • • 38 Nav MODE SELECT Switch With any of the course navigation modes selected on the pilots’ nav mode select switch. the TACAN system may be placed in operation in the normal manner as outlined under NORMAL OPERATION OF TACAN RADIO. In ILS APP position. for further information. In ILS position.-ILS. check that the heading select switch is in NOR position. The bank steering bar comes into view and responds to the heading set by the heading set knob on the horizontal situation indicator. To fly a specific course rather than heading. If the heading select switch is in MAN position.-NOR positions and controls the input source for signals to the bank steering bar on the attitude-director indicator.T.-ILS APP positions. The rotary switch has GPS. In VOR position. In NOR (normal) position. The heading can be maintained by keeping the bank steering bar at zero deflection.O. 3) will appear. The autopilot localizer and glide slope can be energized only when the nav mode select switch is in ILS or ILS APP position respectively and the omni-range radio system is on and tuned to an ILS frequency.

Monitor course deviation indicator. steer aircraft toward CDI to center it. Place nav mode select switch to VOR or TACAN. 3. the bank steering bar may be used to maintain aircraft heading after wind drift correction has been established. and the CDI should show the aircraft deviation from the selected course. with the IUS and the DDLC loaded. Set course set knob. the bank steering bar may be used to maintain aircraft heading after wind drift correction has been established. Rollout will be complete when desired heading is reached. turn aircraft to heading of selected course. 2. Select desired frequency on TACAN or VOR receiver. b. NOTE If desired. the indications given in step 4. Turn aircraft to desired heading. 6. 7. 3. GPS IU/TACAN NAVIGATION To fly a selected GPS/TACAN emulation course. Change 21 1-419 . Maintain heading by keeping bank steering bar centered. and the CDI should show the aircraft deviation from the selected course. steer aircraft toward CDI to center it. 4. 3. NOTE In this submode of operation. Check position of course deviation indicator. TACAN OR VOR NAVIGATION To fly a selected TACAN or VOR course. Check position of course deviation indicator. Select desired channel on the TACAN receiver. also will occur. bank aircraft to center bank steering bar. 5. As CDI approaches aircraft symbol.a. If heading select switch is in MAN. Rotate heading set knob to align heading marker with desired magnetic heading on compass card. proceed as follows: 1. indicating overshoot or undershoot. NOTE If desired. proceed as follows: 1. Place nav mode select switch to TACAN or VOR. 4. If CDI is offset. as desired. rolling out of turn as heading marker centers under lubber line.T. 1B-52H-1 FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEM NORMAL OPERATION TURNS TO AND MAINTAINING HEADING To select and fly a particular magnetic heading using the bank steering bar or heading marker. 2. Reduce bank angle as necessary to keep bank steering bar centered. 7. The intercept heading to be flown should be determined on the basis of prescribed instrument flying techniques. Set course set knob. The intercept heading to be flown should be determined on the basis of prescribed instrument flying techniques. indicating overshoot or undershoot. The course window should indicate the same course. Place heading select switch to NOR. Rotate course set knob until head of course arrow aligned with desired course on compass card. Monitor course deviation indicator.O. Establish intercept heading. 2. 4. Place heading select switch to NOR. As CDI approaches aircraft symbol. Place heading mode select switch to NOR or MAN. Check movement toward aircraft symbol. Place nav mode select switch to GPS. turn aircraft to heading of selected course. turn aircraft to center heading marker under lubber line. Establish intercept heading. Rotate course set knob until head of course arrow aligned with desired course on compass card. Check movement toward aircraft symbol. 6. 5. a. proceed as follows: 1. If heading select switch is in NOR. If CDI is offset. The course window should indicate the same course.

Set course set knob. Therefore. the bank steering bar is unreliable. When the nav mode select switch is moved from ILS to ILS APP. This bank angle limit automatically restricts corrective maneuvering which may be required to keep the aircraft on the localizer approach course. NOTE Failure to place the heading select switch to NOR causes the bank steering bar to command headings toward the selected heading rather than the ILS approach course. disregard the bank steering bar and use the CDI as reference to align the aircraft on the localizer. NOTE • • In ILS APP mode. 1-420 Change 3 If the published front course is not set in the course selector window. monitor glide slope indicator. check that CDI is centered under aircraft symbol. 2. Check course deviation indicator. indicating aircraft is on localizer course. 5.T. In the ILS mode of operation. Therefore. centering the bank steering bar results in an aircraft flight path along the center line of the localizer approach course. 4. (The position of the glide slope indicator when pitch steering is initiated depends primarily on the pilot technique. 8. 7. steer aircraft as necessary to keep bank steering bar centered. Consequently.) . When indicator approaches center. When rollout on localizer front approach course is complete. the maximum bank angle required to center the bank steering bar is reduced from 30° to 15°.O. NOTE The published front approach course must be set in the course selector window for all ILS approaches to obtain accurate directional indications on the HSI course deviation indicator. When flying aircraft on localizer approach course. proceed to step 9. 3. when the course is approached. When the aircraft heading is within 90° of the published front approach course. The pitch steering bar comes into view when switching to ILS APP. This should prevent bracketing and apparently large intercept angles during the ILS approach. Place heading select switch to NOR. Center bank steering bar. 1B-52H-1 ILS APPROACH NOTE The following operating procedure shows the normal method of using the flight director system to intercept a localizer course and glide slope in conjunction with an ILS approach. Select localizer frequency on VOR/ILS receiver and identify station. it might be necessary to complete the intercept without using the bank steering bar in strong crosswinds. The aircraft should be on course and nearly aligned with the inbound heading before using the bank steering bar in the ILS APP mode. The steering bar should provide an intercept angle to the localizer course of up to 45° and. Place nav mode select switch to ILS APP. The head of the course arrow should point to the same course on the compass card. The flight director commands up to a 45° angle of intercept to the localizer course without regard to the location of the outer marker and/or glide slope intercept point. pitch steering corrections should not be made at this time. 6. Specific instrument flight procedures. command a turn inbound to place the aircraft on the localizer course. the pilot is responsible for properly positioning the aircraft by use of the other nav aids or radar before following the bank steering bar commands to the localizer course. which vary from base to base. the flight director computer does not compensate for wind which may cause localizer standoff. Place nav mode select switch to ILS to obtain steering information from bank steering bar. Rotate the course set knob to set localizer front approach course in the course selector window. If bracketing occurs. However. • • 1. Then use the bank steering bar to complete the approach. are not considered. wind drift corrections are accomplished automatically.

O. Bus OAS NAV – AHRS – A B C AUXBNS/D1 AUXBNS/D2 AUXBNS/D3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 Attitude Source Select SELECT CONTR PCBP/C11 Rt. Bus Pilot’s Emergency Attitude Data Source (MD-1) Power Pilot’s Normal Source (AHRS) Attitude Data Source Power Pilot’s Rate of Turn Gyro 11 CB PANEL/ LOCATOR CODE 11 The definitions for the acronyms used to designate the circuit breaker panel names are as shown in the following list. NOTE The pitch and bank steering bars do not indicate direct ILS localizer nor glide slope information. The locator code is the row and column location of the circuit breaker as marked on the circuit breaker panel depictions shown in the CIRCUIT BREAKER PANELS figure. Keep pitch and bank steering bars centered. Flight Director System Circuit Protection and Location CIRCUIT BREAKER TITLE EQUIPMENT Attitude Director Indicators Copilot Attitude Data Source Power FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS A B C FLIGHT INDICATORS – FLIGHT GYROS EMER INV POWER SOURCE PCBP/D11 PCBP/D13 PCBP/D14 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 AC Bus 3 PCBP/D9 Emer Inst. Cross-check as necessary the glide slope indicator and CDI to ensure the aircraft is on course and glide slope. AUXBNS AUXILIARY BNS CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL PCBP PILOT’S CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL Figure 1-125 Change 3 1-421/(1-422 blank) .T. The pitch and bank steering bars command attitude correction directly proportional to glide slope and localizer deviations to correct to or maintain the ILS flight path. Adjust aircraft pitch attitude to center pitch steering bar. TR Horizontal Situation Indicators (HSI) FLIGHT INDICATORS – RADIO NAV IND AC RADIO NAV IND DC PCBP/D8 PCBP/D7 AC Bus 3 Rt. 10. TR FLIGHT INDICATORS – RATE OF TURN PCBP/D3 Emer Inst. under the ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEMS subsection in Section I. 1B-52H-1 9.

BLA .

attitude heading gyroscope set (AHRS). depending on aircraft altitude. known as distance interrogation pulses. the relative bearing Bearing and range information is displayed on the horizontal situation indicator (HSI) (figure 1-124) located on the pilots’ instrument panel. Three rotary knobs. Doppler radar. In addition. see figure 1-132. IFF radar. marker beacon receiver. radar warning receiver. rendezvous radar. Each station may be identified by a tone identification signal in International Morse Code. These response pulses are received by the receiver portion of the TACAN radio and are converted into a range indication which is displayed on the range indication of the HSI. Navigation equipment circuit protection and the location of the applicable circuit breakers is contained in figure 1-130. provide a means by which a desired TACAN channel may be selected. the aircraft can obtain range and bearing indications from other air-to-air equipped aircraft when they are at altitudes lower than the B-52. The nav mode select switch is used to select TACAN for display of the flight director system. radar altimeter. Channels are equally divided between X and Y channels and are spaced at 1 megahertz to provide a total of 252 operating channels available. The TACAN radio and surface beacons form a radio navigation system which enables the aircraft to obtain continuous indications of its range and bearing to any selected surface beacon located within line-of-sight distance from the aircraft up to 300 nautical miles. or if an internal malfunction occurs. 1B-52H-1 NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION TACAN RADIO AN/ARN-118(V) TACAN RADIO CONTROLS AND INDICATORS TACAN RADIO NORMAL OPERATION GPS IU/TACAN EMULATION OMNI-RANGE RADIO AN/ARN-14 INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM (ILS) GLIDE SLOPE EQUIPMENT AN/ARN-31 or AN/ARN-67 MARKER BEACON RECEIVER AN/ARN-32 INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM INDICATORS OMNI-RANGE RADIO/ILS CONTROLS AND INDICATORS IFF TRANSPONDER SET AN/APX-64 (AIMS) AN/APX-64 IFF CONTROLS AND INDICATORS AN/APX-64 IFF NORMAL OPERATION 1-423 1-423 1-425 1-427 1-428 1-428Y 1-428Y 1-428Y 1-428Y 1-428Y 1-429 1-430 1-431 1-434 DESCRIPTION The navigation equipment (figure 1-126) includes a TACAN radio. located on the TACAN control panel. OAS. a malfunction may have occurred and the test should be repeated manually by pressing the TEST switch. The TACAN control panel (figure 1-127) is located on the pilots’ overhead panel. however. GPS IU/TACAN Emulation. Placing the TACAN-ODR (VHF omnidirectional range) marker mixer switch to ON position provides the tone identification signal in the crewmember’s headset. The B-52 TACAN installation is not designed for air-to-air operation. At the beginning of the test. These signals. The test may be terminated at any point by changing the TACAN channel or changing the mode selector. The receiver-transmitter of the TACAN radio initiates the interrogation process by radiating pulse signals. omnirange radio. are detected at the particular surface beacon installation or cooperating aircraft to which the TACAN radio is tuned. If the TEST light comes on at the end of the test. The TACAN performs an automatic self-test whenever signals become lost or unreliable. The test takes approximately 20 seconds and is indicated by a distance reading of zero miles.T. fire control radar. Bearing information may be received even though interrogation pulses are not being transmitted by the TACAN radio. and EVS. This reference signal is displayed as a bearing indication on the HSI. a relative bearing pointer indication of 180° (+3°).O. pointer may slew to 270° for 2 to 4 seconds prior to slewing to the 180° test position. the station transmits a reference signal which can be received by the TACAN radio anytime the receiver portion is in operation. causing the station to respond with its own transmitted pulses. TACAN RADIO AN/ARN-118(V) The AN/ARN-118 TACAN(V) (Tactical Air Navigation) radio is provided to operate in conjunction with surface navigation beacons and suitably equipped aircraft. course deviation bar centered (provided 180° is set in course window). For antenna locations. glide slope equipment. and TO-FROM arrow indicating TO. Change 21 1-423 . The ARN-118 only provides range to other aircraft when interrogated.

and Radar Navigator Pilot. and navigator’s stations GLIDE SLOPE AN/ARN-31 60-001 Thru 60-062 AN/ARN-67 61-0001 thru 61-040 Indicates glide angle for landing Pilot and Copilot 15 miles Operates through omni-range radio GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM * AN/ARN-151(V) GPS navigation Navigator IFF AN/APX-64 MARKER BEACON AN/ARC-32 OAS RADAR * • Aircraft recognition • IFF Mode 4 Navigators’ station Pilot Line-of-Sight Pilot’s side panel Receives location marker signals on navigation beam Pilot and Copilot Low altitude Operates through omni-range radio AN/APQ-166 Provides bombing.O. copilot. and radar navigator’s station OFFENSIVE AVIONICS SYSTEM * AN/ASQ-176 Navigation and Weapon Delivery Navigators Navigators’ station OMNI-RANGE RADIO AN/ARN-14 Indicates lateral alignment with runway and used for VHF navigation Pilot and Copilot RADAR ALTIMETER AN/APN-224 Measures terrain clearance Pilot and Copilot RENDEZVOUS RADAR * AN/APN-69 Aerial rendezvous Navigator 150 to 200 miles Navigator’s side panel TACAN AN/ARN-118 UHF navigation Pilot and Copilot 300 miles Pilots’ overhead panel Line-of-Sight Pilots’ instrument panel NOTE * Description of this equipment can be found in T. copilot. navigation. 1B-52H-1 Navigation Equipment TYPE DESIGNATION FUNCTION OPERATOR HORIZONTAL RANGE LOCATION OF CONTROLS ATTITUDEHEADING GYROSCOPE SET AN/ASN-134 Provides attitude and heading reference Copilot Copilot’s side panel DOPPLER RADAR * AN/APN-218 Groundspeed and wind drift Navigator Navigators’ front panel ELECTROOPTICAL VIEWING SYSTEM AN-ASQ-151 Low level flight assist Pilot. radar navigator. and low level flight assist Pilot. Figure 1-126 1-424 Change 20 Pilots’ overhead panel .T.O. Copilot. Copilot. and Navigator Line-of-Sight Pilot. Radar Navigator. 1B-52H-1-12.

5) X-Y channel selector knobs. bearing information from a selected surface beacon is received. Figure 1-127 (Sheet 1 of 2) Change 21 1-425 . 3 Function Selector Switch A five-position function selector switch has OFF.-REC. In the A/A T/R position. 1B-52H-1 TACAN Radio Controls and Indicators 1 2 3 4 CHANNEL INDICATOR WINDOW VOLUME CONTROL KNOB FUNCTION SELECTOR KNOB UNITS CHANNEL SWITCH NO. In the REC position. In the T/R position. cooperating aircraft must be contacted to establish proper operating channel spacing (to simulate a surface beacon signal) before bearing information can be obtained. units (No. and (No. relative bearing is calculated and slant range distance to the surface beacon is measured.-T/R.-A/A REC. both distance and bearing information can be received from a suitably equipped aircraft after proper operating channels have been established.-A/A T/R positions. 8). NOTE GPS IU/TACAN emulation is not possible when the TACAN function selector switch is set to OFF or to an Air-to-Air mode (A/A REC or A/A T/R).T. 2 VOL Control Knob The volume control knob is used to adjust the volume of the audio identification signal received from the beacon/aircraft through the headset. the system is deenergized. In the OFF position. This fundamental bearing is the angle to surface beacon referenced to magnetic north. In the A/A REC position. 4). a suitably equipped. 5 6 7 8 X-Y CHANNEL SELECTOR KNOB TEST SWITCH TEST LIGHT TENS CHANNEL SELECTOR KNOB CONTROLINDICATOR FUNCTION 1 CHANNEL Indicator Window Displays the TACAN channel set by the tens (No.O.

The selector knob is also used to select the channel for GPS IU/TACAN emulation . The selector knob is also used to select the channel for GPS IU/TACAN emulation. 7 TEST Light A red TEST light comes on to indicate a malfunction in the TACAN units. NOTE During IU/TACAN emulation operation. a TACAN station identifier is not generated by the IU and therefore is not supplied to the Interphone system. all bearing and distance information is valid. 6 TEST Switch A momentary TEST switch located on the TACAN radio control panel is used to initiate a confidence test to determine if an internal fault has occurred in the TACAN units. The channel selector knobs used on these control heads contain built-in mechanical stops to prevent rotation past the twelve (12) position on the hundredth/tenth digit channel settings. 7) being on. Figure 1-127 (Sheet 2 of 2) 1-426 Change 21 . When the light comes on. 1). 5 X-Y Channel Selector Knob The X-Y channel selector knob is used to set the X or Y function on the channel and displays X or Y in the channel selector window (No.O. Pressing the switch in the T/R (transmit) mode initiates a test of the TACAN units. Direction of knob rotation must be reversed when the stop is reached. The channel selector knobs used on these control heads contain built-in mechanical stops to prevent rotation past the nine (9) position on the units (ones) digit channel setting. bearing information is valid. 1). Direction of knob rotation must be reversed when the stop is reached. press the TEST switch (No. a malfunction is indicated and all range and bearing information should be disregarded. The absence of the audio identifier has no effect on IU/TACAN emulation. Do not attempt to override this mechanical stop. If the light is on after 2 seconds (end of the test cycle). If the test is repeated in the REC (receive) mode and the TEST light goes out. 6) to initiate a test of the TACAN units. with the MODE SELECT switch in GPS. 4 Units Channel Selector Knob FUNCTION The units channel selector knob is used to set the third digit (ones digit) of the channel and displays the digit in the channel selector window (No. The light flashes at the beginning of each test cycle to indicate the bulb is operational. 1B-52H-1 TACAN Radio Controls and Indicators (Cont) CONTROLINDICATOR NO. A malfunction is indicated by the TEST light (No. Do not attempt to override this mechanical stop.T. If the light goes out at the end of 20 seconds. 8 Tens Channel Selector Knob The Tens channel selector knob is used to set the first two digits (hundreds and tens) of the channel and displays the digits in the channel selector window (No 1).

Nav mode select switch in TACAN position: a. 1B-52H-1 TEST indicator light coming on are available indications of loss of TACAN. the TACAN radio AN/ARN-118 28-volt dc circuit breaker also provides power for relay switching of the course deviation indicator warning flag and course warning flag functions. channels 1 thru 11. control of the warning flags reverts to VOR regardless of the position of the nav mode select switch. bearing and range to the selected TACAN beacon is indicated on the HSI. check if TEST light is on. If this circuit breaker pops out. the HSI indicates bearing and range to the TACAN beacon and deviation from the selected course to the TACAN beacon (except for zero position during TACAN search). and the AN/ ARN-14 set tuned to an ILS frequency. To turn the TACAN system off. 3. the warning flags will remain out of sight if the VOR is receiving a reliable signal. Contact cooperating aircraft to establish operating channels. momentarily depress TEST switch to initiate a test cycle. Read bearing and/or range display on HSI after 5 seconds. 1. The CDI of the HSI responds to the omni station except when an ILS station is selected. place the function selector switch to OFF position. 2. and 121 thru 126 should not be used. In TACAN mode. (If the TACAN system goes into search. the appearance of the TACAN range indicator warning flag. With function selector switch in T/R. However. TACAN RADIO Normal Operation The following procedure is used to place the TACAN system in operation: 1. GPS IU/TACAN emulation is not possible when an air-to-air mode is selected on the TACAN control panel. Place NAV mode select switch to TACAN position. 3. The use of Y channels is recommended to reduce the possibility of DME interference (if cooperating aircraft is equipped with Ychannel capabilities). If light goes out after 20 seconds. Nav mode select switch in VOR position: a. the CDI goes to the null or zero position and remains until TACAN once again locks onto the station. then the CDI provides localizer information. • • • NOTE The channel of the receiving aircraft must be either 63 channels above or 63 channels below the cooperating aircraft channel and within the 1 thru 126 X.) b. Pull NAV AIDS interphone mixer switch out to identify selected beacon.or Y. Set function selector switch to A/A REC position (for bearing information) or A/A T/R position (for range and bearing information if cooperating aircraft has bearing-transmit capabilities). the HSI provides range to the TACAN beacon only. Change 21 1-427 . 2. With function selector switch in T/R and omni-range power switch in ON position. loss of TACAN aural signal. With function selector switch in T/R and omni-range power switch in OFF position. Set channel selector knobs to desired channel. • NOTE In TACAN mode of operation. 4. NOTE If HSI bearing pointer rotates continuously clockwise.channel range. If light is on. abandon the approach and change to a reliable instrument approach system. To prevent possible interference from IFF or transponder signals. distance-bearing information is valid. perform SELF TEST of TACAN system by pressing SELF TEST button on control unit and note readouts for proper indications. TACAN AIR-TO-AIR OPERATION • • NOTE Due to antenna configuration. Set function selector switch to desired mode of operation. If TACAN is being used for an approach and the range indicator warning flag comes into view or the TACAN TEST light comes on. Adjust volume of audio signal with the volume control knob on TACAN control panel. 2. 58 thru 74. the HSI indicates omni bearing and TACAN range. the omni-range power switch in ON position. and the course deviation indicator (CDI) on the HSI indicates deviation from the selected course to the TACAN beacon. INTEGRATED TACAN OMNI-RANGE OPERATION 1. air-to-air operation may be impaired or inoperative unless the cooperating aircraft is at lower altitudes.T.O. when the TACAN radio is inoperative due to this circuit breaker being out. and • If TACAN indicators readouts appear unreliable during flight. 5. b. With TACAN function selector switch in T/R and omni-range power switch in OFF position.

reset the operational mode to Normal Mode by pressing down on the center of the crown before changing screens. TACAN CONTROL PANEL The TACAN control panel is used with GPS IU/TACAN Emulation to select the TACAN channel for emulation. the Bullseye(s) range and bearing will be hidden until the Declutter Menu is removed. For additional information on the IU. NOTE During IU/TACAN emulation operation. respectively. Do not accomplish a TACAN penetration and/or approach with the navigation mode selector in the GPS position. There are two modes of operation of the IUS. The first mode occurs when the OAS is operating with a full Flight Management System (FMS) load. 1B-52H-1-12. These displays are available using the EVS monitors when the MFD is selected on the MFD Control Panel (figure 1-127C). . The second. the MFD Control operates in two different modes of operation. When in Declutter Mode. along with GPS data. If the currently displayed screen is the Mission Route Screen. 1B-52H-1 GPS IU/TACAN EMULATION As part of the aircraft Global Positioning System (GPS). less capable mode occurs when the OAS has failed or is operating with Block II (Nuclear) software. When FMS is communicating with the IU the system operates in Normal Mode.O. on two video situational displays available on the EVS monitor. However. the data associated with the set channel is obtained from the Navaid data base stored on the DDLC. The normal mode is used for switching to the Destination Data Screen and for changing the scale of the map. When the channel is set on the control panel. then changing MFD screens on one monitor will change the display on the other monitor as well. The IU Software (IUS) is loaded from the DDL into the IU by commands entered on the Programmable Keyboard (PKB) also located at the Navigators Station. 1-428 Change 22 The GPS receiver is not certified for instrument procedures. TACAN Emulation. The GPS position on the NAV MODE switch on the Navigation System Select Panel also provides GPS navigation and TACAN emulation to the pilots’ HSIs. The switch is used to select the video source for the EVS display. the GPS Interface Unit (IU) provides GPS navigation and TACAN emulation to the pilots’ monitors. make sure that the Declutter Mode is not active. The system also has a limited operating capability with no OAS data available. Figure 1-127B lists the data available in the different modes of operation. with the MODE SELECT switch in GPS. in Section I of T. the MFD screen will display the Declutter Menu. the MFD screen will not display the Declutter Menu (figure 1-127D). The absence of the audio identifier has no effect on IU/ TACAN emulation. When in Normal Mode. and the Destination Screen (figure 1-127E). OAS data is also supplied and displayed to the pilots.T. When the FMS is not communicating with the IU (Block II Software) the system is in the Stand-Alone Mode. TACAN Emulation will not function when the TACAN is OFF or in an Air-to-Air mode (A/A REC or A/A T/R). GPS Navigation. setting one control to the MFD position and one to the EVS position will allow one monitor to display MFD screens and the other monitor to display screens associated with the EVS mode. If both the pilot’s and copilot’s MFD Controls are set to the MFD position. Pilots’ Controls and Displays The GPS system interfaces with the pilots through two displays. a TACAN station identifier is not generated by the IU and therefore is not supplied to the Interphone system. and Pilots’ displays are affected by the operational mode. The two displays are the Mission Route Screen/Moving Map Display (figure 1-127D). If Declutter Mode is active. The IU control panel and the Digital Data Loader (DDL) for the IU are both located at the Navigator’s Station. GPS derived emulation of TACAN information is also available on the HSIs. MFD CONTROL PANEL The MFD Control Panel’s toggle switch (figure 1-127C) must be set to the MFD position before either IU/TACAN display may be viewed. NOTE When the Declutter Menu is displayed. Declutter mode of operation is used for setting the Declutter Level on the map and for setting the number of look–ahead flight legs in the mission route. When the Mission Route Screen is displayed on the MFD. To change screens on the MFD press the crown on the display mode control switch to the left or to the right. and the PKB refer to GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM. DDL.O. Declutter Mode can be identified by the presence of the Declutter Menu (figure 1-127D). Figure 1-127A shows GPS IU/TACAN Emulation Data Flow.

the compass rose rotates in one degree increments matching the heading. The original dash . Destination points are identified by their numeric Destination ID. A small triangle above and/or below the range value indicates larger or smaller selectable range is available. If the destination has an asterisk (*) behind it. The map can be displayed in 200. mid–range arc represents the 50 NM range from the center of the aircraft. The heading is displayed in a box at the top of the compass rose. As an example. A dash . 25.dot line will be drawn from the aircraft position at the time that the Fly-To command was issued to the Fly-To Destination Point. [AMI] It will be displayed as h:mm:ss up to 9:59:59. When flying to a Fly-To Destination Point that is not on the route.O. Change 22 1-428A . The map is oriented magnetic heading up as indicated by the M beside the heading. All Fly-To crosshair destination points will be represented as navigation points and thus will be drawn as a filled in circle.5 nautical mile ranges. When a Fly-To destination is defined. A number indicating the range in nautical miles (NM) of the moving map is displayed in the upper left corner of the map box. To return to the route.dot line will not change with the aircraft position. Bullseyes. a filled in destination will be used to represent the Fly-To Destination Point.T. The map also displays destinations. While in Declutter Mode (Declutter Menu displayed) the range cannot be changed and the arrows are not displayed. and 12. the destination is treated as an overfly destination. 100. if the map range displayed in the upper left corner of the map box is 100 NM. and Navaids that are found to be within the selected map scale. 1B-52H-1 Mission Route Screen/Moving Map Display The Mission Route Screen provides situational awareness to the pilots. the radial and DME at the bottom of the map will be replaced by FLY TO X-HAIR. This condition occurs when there are two or more consecutive destinations with the same Lat/Long. Depending on the mode of operation (figure 1-127B). define the Fly-To Destination Point as one of the destination points on the route. Figure 1-127D lists the destination symbols. minutes. The dash . WCMD and JASSM SMOs. Fly-To destinations are identified by flying to destinations out of sequence or by flying to crosshair points. the display may include the following items when they occur within the selected range: • • • • • • • • All NAVAIDS contained in the GPS IU software All OAS destinations The active destination Associated NAVAIDS Selected NAVAID Fly-To destination Bullseye 1 and 2 Range and bearing from the associated NAVAID to the Current Destination • Range and bearing from the selected NAVAID to the aircraft when in GPS mode • Range and bearing from each Bullseye to the aircraft • Current Declutter Level • Selected number of look-ahead flight legs • True Air Speed (TAS) in Knots • Ground Speed (GS) in Knots • Wind Direction and Speed • Time-To-Go to destination Less [AMI] in seconds when within 200 seconds of the destination. Otherwise. Less [AMI] It will remain as 200 seconds until the actual time to go is less than 200 seconds. the mission is reloaded. this indicates that the destination has been identified as a turn short destination. 50. There is also a mid–range arc drawn on the map that represents half the distance of the scale. this indicates that this destination is in a stack of destinations located at this position. or a different mission is loaded. and seconds • Magnetic Heading (HDG M) • Heading Error • Ground Track • Viewing Range • Error Messages • Less [AMI] Launch Acceptability Region (LAR) for JDAM. [AMI] in hours.dot line will remain on the MFD screen until a new Fly-To Destination Point is defined. The track indicator is used to display the ground track and moves along the compass rose as needed to accurately depict the ground track. The Time-To-Go to the destination is displayed at the top or the map display. the Destination ID XH is used. When flying to a cross hair. If a destination has a dash (–) in front of it. The scale is measured from the center of the aircraft symbol (aircraft present position) to the top of the compass rose. As the heading changes. IDENTIFYING DESTINATIONS ON THE MISSION ROUTE MAP The center of each destination symbol represents the latitude and longitude of that destination. Destinations in the route are connected by straight lines and are not intended to depict the actual flight path of the aircraft.

Each Bullseye bearing true or magnetic selection is determined by the Bullseye bearing true or magnetic selection. Normal and Declutter. Bullseyes are identified by a symbol on the display. small triangles will appear above and/or below the viewing range if there are larger and/or smaller scale factors available for selection. Will remain on the map until a new Fly-To is detected. CHANGING THE MISSION ROUTE MAP SCALE In order to change the viewing range on the Mission Route Screen. Less [AMI] To the right of each Bullseye symbol is the Bullseye identifier. TYPES OF LINES DISPLAYED ON THE MISSION ROUTE MAP There are three types of lines that are displayed on the Mission Route Map.5NM leading to inherent rounding differences. IDENTIFYING BULLSEYES ON THE MISSION ROUTE MAP The center of the Bullseye symbol represents the point at which the latitude and longitude for that Bullseye is defined. There are two modes for the MFD. M or T follows the bearing of each Bullseye indicating if the bearing is true or magnetic. The viewing range can be changed by pressing the crown of the display mode control switch forward to increase the viewing range and aft to decrease the viewing range. WCMD and JASSM will be displayed on the moving map when provided by OAS (see figure 1-127D). The Navaid symbol outline is filled in when that Navaid is the selected Navaid. Valid Navaids are VORTAC. Dashed – Connects the Current Destination to the Current Destination’s Associated Navaid.T. They are: 1. NOTE [AMI] Bullseye data is calculated independently by the GPS IU/TACAN displayed at the pilot’s MFD and Prime Mission Data displayed at the navigator’s station. An asterisk precedes the BE that represents the IUS selected Bullseye. the range and bearing from each Bullseye to the aircraft will be displayed on the left side of the screen below the wind speed and direction (see figure 1–127D). Resolution at the pilot station is 0. Dash . In addition to displaying the indicators on the moving map. 2. the MFD must be in Normal Mode. To the left of each Navaid will be its three letter identifier and channel. Bullseyes are displayed until IU power has been cycled. Connects sequential destinations in the route. BE1 or BE2. 1B-52H-1 IDENTIFYING NAVAIDS ON THE MISSION ROUTE MAP The center of each Navaid symbol (figure 1-127D) represents the latitude and longitude of that Nav-aid. An asterisk preceding the BE represents the FMS selected bullseye. the mission is reloaded. BE1 or BE2. Mission Route Screen/Moving Map Display Operation The MFD Mode of Operation only applies when the displayed screen is the Mission Route Screen. or a different mission is loaded.O. Solid – Identifies the planned route. Drawn from the current A/C position at the time that the Fly-To is defined to the Fly-To point. the range and bearing from each Bullseye to the aircraft will be displayed on the left side of the screen below the wind speed and direction (see figure 1–127D. An M or T following the bearing indicates magnetic or true and is determined by the FMS Bullseye Bearing Reference. VOR/DME and TACAN stations. Less [AMI] IDENTIFYING LAR ON THE MISSION ROUTE MAP The outline of a Launch Acceptability Region (LAR) for JDAM. Changing the range on the pilot’s display will change the copilot’s display and vice versa. 3. Small variations in bearing and range between the two 1-428B Change 22 systems should be expected. The range and bearing will be updated dynamically as the aircraft location changes. While in Normal Mode.Dot – Fly-To line. [AMI] To the right of each Bullseye symbol is the Bullseye identifier. The MFD Mode is determined by the presence or absence of the Declutter Menu Pressing down the center of the crown on the display mode control switch toggles between Normal and Declutter modes.05 NM while the navigator station is 0. . In addition to displaying the indicators on the moving map.

Heading select switch is in the MAN position 2. The default number of viewable flight legs is 5. Nav Mode Select switch is in the GPS. The pilot/copilot can change the declutter modes on the Mission Route Screen by pushing the crown of the display mode control switch either to the left or to the right. Decreasing the number of viewable flight legs past one will have a similar effect except the value will be set to the maximum number of destinations in the mission. All four blocks highlighted . Therefore continued selection will return the operator to the original declutter mode. DP (xx). The Time-To-Go field at the top-center of the screen displays Less [AMI] the value 200 when the actual time to go is greater than 200 seconds. TACAN. The pilot/copilot can change the number of viewable flight legs on the Mission Route Screen by pushing the crow