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Transition Project

SEFB 420-900

Student Summary
John Doe is a 17 year old African American male that attends High School. John is a
senior in high school set to graduate, with the minimum high school plan, in May of 2016. John
has only attended schools within the Independent School District system his entire life. In the
fifth grade, John was diagnosed with an intellectual disability and speech impairment. He began
to receive special education services in March of 2004 and continues to receive them today.
While in high school, John has excelled in many areas. He is a member of the football
team and really enjoys being involved with this activity as well as track. John is a shy individual
in academic and social settings. As far as attendance goes, John is rarely absent. He enjoys being
at school and being able to attend his football activities. Outside of school he likes to play video
games and hang out with his family.
Based off of teacher evaluations, it is clear that John is strong in math and working with
computers. He is said to be shy, but extremely kind. John is not afraid to ask questions and takes
his time when doing work. Feeling important is something that John has expressed he needs from
family, friends, and teachers. When he receives support, he works harder to accomplish the task
at hand. John is weak in English and needs support in reading, writing, and spelling. He is placed
in resource classrooms for English and History to help strengthen his weaknesses. John is a hard
worker and does not let his weaknesses stop him from trying to succeed.
John’s family consists of a mom, dad, two sisters, and one nephew. John’s mom is
currently not working; however, she previously worked at Texas A&M and Walmart. John’s
father drives trucks and unloads them. During the summer months, John has helped his dad with
the unloading, of his trucks, as a part time job. The truck driver job is the only job John has had.
John currently does not have a driver’s license. When necessary, John’s mother will drop him off

and pick him up. At home, John contributes by feeding the dog, cleaning his room, and taking
care of his nephew. Both John and his mother would like John to get a license but are unsure of
how to receive modifications for the written test. John’s mom is working to figure out how to
ensure that John receives a fair shot at getting a driver’s license. John’s family is extremely
supportive of John and his future.
John struggles with his reading, writing, and speech. According to his latest test scores,
John’s level of reading fluency is at a fifth grade level, and his reading comprehension is at a
third grade level. Based off of John’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), John is required to
spend 21% to 50% of his day in a resource room. He fulfills the previous IEP requirement by
being in a resource room for English and History. John is below average in receptive and
expressive levels of English proficiency. Although John’s speech is difficult to comprehend, he
best expresses himself orally. His IEP says that he will receive 20 minutes of speech therapy for
one day every three weeks. John has received speech therapy at the Brazos Valley Rehab Center
for the past three years, and plans to start therapy again once football season is over.
John’s test scores varied from subject to subject. On his end of course exams (EOC) John
received a “met level 2 satisfactory performance” in Algebra 1 and Biology. John got a “did not
meet satisfactory performance” in English 1 reading and writing, English 2, and U.S. History.
All of his EOCs were modified except for U.S. History. U.S. History was an accommodated test
so John was able to retest on this one. After the retest, he still did not reach satisfactory
performance. John’s ARD/IEP committee met and determined that John should still receive
credit for U.S. History. The committee came to this decision because John’s teachers said he
worked hard in class and his achievement levels were good.

After high school, John wants to stay in College Station and live at home. Right
now, John doesn’t have a dream job or a dream college that he wants to aim towards getting in
to. He shows interest in getting training in mechanics or welding. He likes doing hands on
activities and enjoys his current welding class. John’s mom would like to see John branch out
and meet new friends. She thinks that through working or further schooling, he will be able to
meet these new people. John is an independent individual; however John’s mom doesn’t see
John living on his own for at least another five years. John’s mom is concerned that John will
have nothing to do after graduation. She wants him to stay busy and to continue learning new
things. There is a plan for John to continue with his speech therapy after high school in order to
help him improve his speech. There are a few options being considered in regards to John’s
future. The first is admittance into Project SEARCH. When John’s IEP team discussed options
for his transition from high school, Project SEARCH was mentioned. There were also mentions
of getting involved with BVCIL or auto mechanic training. John is excited and determined to
succeed after high school.

Transition Assessment Summary
Tests Administered:





Interest Inventory (High School)
Family Partners: Assessment of Strengths Activity
Life Skills for Effective Living Activity
Pre-ITP Parent Questionnaire
Career One Stop: O*Net Interest Profiler at My Next Move
Vocational Assessment: Student and Parent Interview

Interest Inventory (High School)

Test type
o Recreation

Rationale
o This inventory was the first assessment given. The purpose of this inventory is to
get to know the student’s interests.

Protocols
o No protocols were given for this inventory. I asked John the questions and then
recorded his answers. Additional questions were asked based off of information
provided.

Results
o The following are the main findings based off of the assessment.

John likes math but not reading.

He is on the football team. His favorite NFL team is the Cowboys.

He enjoys playing video games, watching TV, and driving trucks with his
dad.

He spends most of his time outside of school with his family.

He doesn’t know what he wants to do after high school.

Citation

No Author. No Date. Interest Inventory. No Location: No publisher.

Family Partners: Assessment of Strengths Activity

Test type
o Self-Awareness

Rationale
o This assessment is given so that the student can evaluate and recognize his
specific strengths. John was able to recognize what his strengths and weaknesses
are.

Protocols
o No protocols were given for this inventory. I asked John to finish the sentence and
then I wrote down what he said.

Results
o The following are the main findings based off of the assessment.

John likes his sense of humor.

He likes to have fun.

He is able to handle problems with his family.

He is glad he is able to read.

He likes to help others especially his nephew.

He feeds his dog every day.

Citation

Hartley, C. 2001. A Strengths-Based Communications Model. Interpersonal Skills for the
Helping Relationships.

Life Skills for Effective Living Activity

Test type
o Independent Living

Rationale
o John still lives with his parents and plans to for at least the next five years. This
activity evaluated whether or not he would be capable of living on his own. This
assessment evaluates the skills he would need in order to live independently. The
assessment evaluates the following skills: body-related skills, learning-how-tolearn skills, skills related to values, self-management skills, communication skills,
skills related to small groups.

Protocols
o The student rates themselves on a scale from 1-5 based on that specific skill.

5 is “I have a very high level of this skill.”

4 is “I have moderately high level of this skill.”

3 is “I am about average in this skill.”

2 is “I find this skill to be moderately challenging for me.”

1 is “I find this skill to be significantly challenging for me.”

o The student then rates each skill in terms of importance from 1-5

5 is very important

4 is moderate importance

Average importance

2 rather important

1 not important at all

Results
o John’s scores are as follows

Body-related skills

34/40 in skill level

36/40 in importance

Learning-how-to-learn-skills

45/45 in skill level

44/45 in importance

Skills related to values

10/10 in skill level and importance

Self-Management Skills

28/35 in skill level

32/35 in importance

Communication Skills

33/35 in skill level

30/35 in importance

Skills Related to Small Groups

20/20 in skill level

20/20 in importance

Citation

A Strengths-Based Communication Model: Interpersonal Skills for the Helping Relationship,
Hartley 2001

Pre-ITP Parent Questionnaire

Test type
o Vocational/Independent Living

Rationale
o This assessment was given to determine what supports would be necessary for
John in certain vocational and independent living areas. The assessment helped to
understand what supports John’s mom thinks John needs.

Protocols
o No protocols were given for this inventory. I asked John’s mom to answer the
questions that were asked. I recorded what her answers were.

Results
o The following are the main findings based off of the assessment.

John’s mom doesn’t think John would need many supports.

She wants John to go to school somewhere nearby.

John will live at home after high school.

John would need supports for transportation and employment placement.

Citation

No author. No date. Pre-ITP Parent Questionnaire. Round Rock Independent School District.
Special Education Department.

Career One Stop: O*Net Interest Profiler at My Next Move

Test type
o Career

Rationale
o This interest profiler helps to identify a person’s interests and then relate those
interests to specific job opportunities. The list of potential job interests is lengthy
and provides the student with a choice. The interest profiler is a great guide to use
when trying to discover potential jobs.

Protocols
o The interest profiler has 60 questions about work activities for different jobs.
Each question is to be read out loud. The student then decides if they strongly
dislike, dislike, unsure, like, or strongly like that specific activity. The student
then clicks the corresponding bubble and then moves on to the next questions. It
is important to inform student that there is no right or wrong answer.

Results
o The following are a few examples of the jobs the interest profiler recommended

welder, barber, mechanic, truck driver, cargo inspector, security
management

o Graph of numbers related to realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising,
and conventional were provided to show which type of jobs student preferred.

Citation

Career One Stop: O*NET Interest Profiler at My Next Move. (n.d.). Retrieved November 30,
2015, from http://www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip

Vocational Assessment: Student and Parent Interview

Test type
o Vocational

Rationale
o This interview helped to determine what jobs John would be good at while also
enjoying them. The questions evaluated various skills and job interests to best
evaluate the student.

Protocols
o No protocols were given for this inventory. I asked both John and his mother to
answer the questions. I recorded their responses and provided feedback on each
one.

Results
o The following are the main findings based off of the assessment.

John is a hard worker.

He is shy and does not communicate much.

He has computer and welding skills.

Does not have driver’s license.

He helps his dad unload trucks during the summer months as a paid job.

Citation

Vocational Assessment: Student Interview, Joe Green Education Services,
Joe Green 1990

Self-Advocacy Plan
John has a learning disability that affects his reading, writing, and speech. John also has
been diagnosed with a speech impediment. John is a senior in high school and is set to graduate
on the minimum plan in June of 2016.
John does not know what he wants to do with the rest of his life. Fir a short term goal,
John wants to stay in school for a while longer, so he will be applying to the 18+ program here in
College Station. John hopes that he will be able to find his true passion while being enrolled in
the 18+ program. After completion of the 18+ program, John will either apply to Project
SEARCH or enter the work force. The outcome of his future will be determined on how well he
thrives in the 18+ program.
The only job John has ever had is a summer job with his dad. At this job, John helps his
dad unload and load up trucks. John was paid minimum wage throughout the summer. John
spent his money on clothes and shoes at the mall.
After graduation, John will continue to live at home with his parents. He will work on
specific independent living skills such as cleaning, cooking, and doing chores while living at
home. John wants to be living on his own in the next five years.
While living at home, John will become involved in the community through social events
and city sports teams. He will become a member of a city football team as either a player or an
aide. John will be involved with the Brazos Valley Center for Independent Living.

Education:

John will use phone alarms/calendar to remind him of tasks that need to be completed.

John will talk to the teacher about any questions he may have about the course work.

John will request extra time on assignments and test if needed.

John will take notes on in class discussions and study them to prepare for tests and
quizzes.

Employment:

John will inform his boss and coworkers that if they do not understand what John has
said, then they need to ask him again until they understand.

John will ask for help from his supervisors when he stumbles across specific jobs he
doesn’t know how to accomplish.

Independent Living:

John will inform his mom of which night he will cook each week.

John will ask his mom to help him budget the money he makes.

John will keep track of the household chores he needs to complete.

Recreation/Leisure:

John will inform his friends that his speech can sometimes be hard to understand. He will
tell them to make sure he repeats what he was saying until they understand.

John needs to tell people that he is shy at first but will eventually break out of his shell.

John will seek out acquiring a driver’s license, but until then his mother will transport
him wherever he needs to go.

John will keep track of the community events going on throughout the week.

Transition Outcomes and Objectives
Recreation and Leisure
Desired Outcome:
John will consistently participate, for one year, in a community football team within one month
after graduation.

Explanation of Outcome:
John’s favorite activity in high school is playing on the football team. Being a part of the
team keeps him active and social. By participating on a community team, John will be able to
continue doing what he loves while also involving himself within the community. Being a part of
the football team has helped John make friends while in high school. Therefore the new football
team could also help John create friendships and skills that are important to have after high
school. John’s IEP does not list any recreation and leisure activities. However, the information
acquired through informal assessments helped understand what John really enjoys. This
information helped to create the desired outcome goal for recreation and leisure.

Parent/student input:
John has expressed a passion for athletics and football. John is upset that he will not be a
part of any team once he is out of high school. His mother expressed the most concern in regards
to what John would be involved in after high school. She is worried that he will end up just
sitting around the house all day playing video games. John’s mother is excited to hear about
opportunities within the community that will get her son to leave the house to go have fun.

IEP Objective:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

By July of 2016

given that he has
joined a sports team
of his choosing

John will
consistently
participate in a
community football
team

by attending at least
two practices a
week and every
game.

Timeline/steps to achieve outcome:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

End of April 2016

given a computer to
research
opportunities

John will learn
about sports in the
community

listing at least two
possible football
teams to join and
the organization
they are affiliated
with.

John will
apply/tryout for a
football team

completing at least
two applications or
tryouts.

Beginning of June
2016

given his acceptance John will join the
to a football team
team

responding to his
acceptance no more
than four days after
he gets accepted.

End of June
2016/Beginning of
July 2016

considering the
football team
chosen

purchasing the
correct uniform.

Middle of May 2016 given his previous
research

For 1 whole year
(July 2016-July
2017)

John will acquire
relevant team
equipment
John will regularly
attend practices and
games

Education
Desired Outcome:
After graduating from high school, John will begin work in an 18+ program focusing on
independent living and vocational skills.

Explanation of Outcome:
Based off of many assessments, John’s grades, and IEP goals it has been determined that
John is best fit for an 18+ program. John still requires certain skills within education,
employment, and independent living categories. The 18+ program is designed to help gain and
further certain skills for each student. John still needs some sort of structure in his life and this
program provides just that. John has the credits necessary to graduate high school and to begin
the 18+ program.

Parent/student input:
John has expressed that he wishes to continue schooling within a structured setting. He
has been given an explanation of what the 18+ program is and he seems to want to be involved
with it. John’s mom is also supportive of the idea of this program. She thinks John will be able to
thrive in a setting geared towards his needs. Everyone within John’s support system is in
agreement that the 18+ program is the appropriate setting for John.

IEP Objective:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

By March 2016

given the
application to the

John will submit the

by having all criteria

18+ program

application

filled out.

Criteria
(measurement)

Timeline/steps to achieve outcome:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

by December 2015

given a computer to
research
opportunities

John will access the by finding the
requirements needed program’s official
to enter the 18+
website
program

By January of 2016

given his previous
research

John will begin the
application process

by completing half
of the necessary
criteria

By February 2016

given his previous
research

John will finish the
application

by completing the
second half of the
necessary criteria

By March 2016

given his completed
application

John will proof read
and submit
application

by correctly
completing all the
necessary criteria

By end of March
2016

John will be
accepted into the
18+ program

Independent Living
Desired Outcome:
After graduation, John will live at home and contribute to the household by cooking once a
week, cleaning his room twice a week, and doing at least two chores a day. By the age of 22,
John will move out of his family home.

Explanation of Outcome:
Through life skills, independent living, and informal assessments, John has shown
minimal skills in the area of independent living. John does not contain the necessary abilities to

live independently after high school. John will need support from his family in this time of
transition. He will need his mom for transportation to and from activities. John does not cook for
himself and does minimal chores around the house. In order to eventually reach the point of
being able to live independently, John will begin to implement different independent living skills
such as cooking, cleaning, and chores within his family home. John’s IEP does not list any goals
for independent living. John does not have the skills needed to live independently.

Parent/student input:
John has expressed that he wants to live at home for at least five years before he moves
out. John’s mom originally said it would take John ten years before he would be capable of
moving out of the family home. After discussing and reviewing ways to prepare John for
independent living, John’s mom was able to see and understand how it would be possible for
John to move out in 4 to 5 years. John is unable to cook for himself, but does chores such as
feeding his dog every day. John’s mom is open to the idea of implementing more responsibilities
for John within the home.

IEP Objective:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

By May 2016

given a computer
for research and
access to Microsoft
Excel

John will create a
household
requirements chart
that contains boxes
to check off once
cooking/cleaning/ch
ores are completed

by finding one
recipe for each of
the next 8 weeks
and then inputting
recipe and other
chart requirements
into an excel
document.

Timeline/steps to achieve outcome:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

By April 2016

given access to a
computer for
research

John will research
and print off food
recipes

needs 8/10 recipes
approved

given access to a
computer

John will create and
excel chore chart

8 recipes listed,
areas to check off
chore completion

By May 2016

Employment
Desired Outcome:
After finishing the 18+ program, John will use skills learned to find a part-time job in his desired
field.

Explanation of Outcome:
Based off of many assessments, John’s grades, and IEP goals it has been determined that
John needs to acquire more skills through the 18+ program before he starts applying for jobs. He
has had jobs in the past but those have been during the summer when he is not busy. If able, John
will apply for part-time jobs through the 18+ program. John’s IEP does not mention anything in
regards to employment.

Parent/student input:
John has expressed that he wishes to continue schooling within a structured setting. He
does not know what type of job he wants in the future and hopes that the 18+ program will guide
him in the right direction. John’s mom agrees with John and thinks he needs to acquire a few
more skills in an educational setting before he decides what job he wants.

IEP Objective:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

By high school
graduation

given a computer
for research

John will compile of as measured by his
list of potential part- interests and
time jobs
capabilities.

Timeline/steps to achieve outcome:
Timeframe (time
limit)

Condition
(specific)

Behavior (action)

Criteria
(measurement)

During high school

given resume
formatting
directions

John will compile a
resume

as measured by his
current
achievements and
job titles.

Three months from
18+ completion

given a computer
for research

John will compile a
list of potential parttime job
opportunities

as measured by his
interests and
capabilities

After 18+
completion

using the list of job
possibilities

John will apply and
interview for jobs

by getting hired by
one of those jobs

Recorder __Emily Frazier___________

Date of Analysis _11/8/15______________

Company _Walmart________________

Job Title __Truck Loader/Unloader______

Supervisor’s Name/Title:
Did not want name or number disclosed. I offered to keep his information private if he would
answer a few questions for me.

Salary __$15.25/hour_____ Work Schedule & hours: vary from week to week_

1. PERSONAL REQUIREMENTS
Personal Appearance
0 ( ) Grooming unimportant

2 ( ) Neatness/ Cleanliness required

1 ( ) only hygiene required

3 (x) Grooming very important

Behavior
0 ( ) Wide Variety accepted

2 (x) Unusual behavior not acceptable

1 ( ) Unusual behavior accepted if infrequent
Communication
0 ( ) Non/minimal
1 ( ) Key words needed

2 (x) Sentence/impaired speech accepted
3 ( ) Sentences/clear speech required

Attention
0 ( ) Frequent prompts available
1 ( ) Intermittent props/ high
Supervision

2 (x) Intermittent prompts/low supervision
3 ( ) Infrequent prompts/low supervision

Change in Task/Routine
0 ( ) No changes

2 (x) 4-6 changes/day

1 ( ) 2-3 changes/day

3 ( ) More than 7 changes/day

Interactions
0 ( ) Minimal

2 (x) Social interactions infrequent

1 ( ) Polite responses only

3 ( ) Frequent social

2. TIME/TRAVEL FACTORS
Work Schedule
0 ( ) Negotiable days/hours

2 (x) Part-time M-F/days

1 ( ) Part-time nights/weekends

3 ( ) Full-time M-F/days

4 ( ) Full-time/nights/weekends
Transportation
0 ( ) on bus route

2 ( ) Car pool/van pool available

1 (x) off bus route

3 ( ) other _____________________

Time Telling
0 ( ) Time skills unimportant

2 ( ) Time telling to hour required

1 ( ) Must identify break times only

3 (x) Time telling to minute required

Mobility
0 ( ) Sitting/Standing in one area

2 ( ) Stairs/minor obstacles

1 ( ) Moderate mobility required

3 (x) Rigorous ambulation required

3. WORK TOLERANCE
Endurance
0 ( ) Short day/many breaks
1 (x) Short day/few breaks

2 ( ) Full day/many breaks
3 ( ) Full day/few breaks

Strength
0 ( ) Not important

2 ( ) Moderate strength needed

1 ( ) little strength needed

3 (x) Great strength needed

4. PERFORMANCE SKILLS
Initiation of Work
0 ( ) Staff will prompt to next task

2 (x) some prompts to next task

1 ( ) some prompts to initiate work

3 ( ) Independent initiation required

Task Sequencing
0 ( ) Single task

2 (x) 4-6 tasks in sequence

1 ( ) 2-3 tasks in sequence

3 ( ) 7 or more tasks in sequence

Work Speed
0 ( ) Slow rate acceptable
1 ( ) Moderate, steady pace

2 (x) Occasional fast pace required
3 ( ) constantly fast pace required

5. FUNCTIONAL ACADEMIC SKILL REQUIREMENTS
Reading
0 ( ) none

2 (x) Simple texts

1 ( ) Simple words/signs/symbols

3 ( ) Newspapers/magazines

Math
0 ( ) None

1 ( ) Simple Counting 2 ( ) Addition/subtraction/whole numbers

3 (x) Multiplication/division/whole numbers
4 ( ) Decimal/fraction/mixed # operations

Money Skills
0 (x) None

1 ( ) Coin/bill recognition

3 ( ) Money counting

2 ( ) Coin/bill values

4 ( ) Change making from $1

5 ( ) Change making from $10
Writing
0 ( ) None

1 ( ) Manuscript name 2 ( ) Cursive signature

3 (x) Simple lists/notes

4 ( ) Phone messages 5 ( ) Letter/composition

6. EMPLOYER CONCERNS
Employer’s Attitude toward Workers with Disabilities
(x) Very Positive

( ) Indifferent

( ) Somewhat positive

( ) Negative

Employer’s Financial Requirements
( ) No financial incentives requested (x) Minimum wage offered
( ) Tax credits/incentives requested

( ) Salary below minimum wage

7. ENVIROMENTAL FACTORS
Safety of Work Area
( ) Safe work area
( ) Moderately safe area

(x) some safety concerns
( ) Many safety concerns

Atmosphere
( ) Friendly/open

( ) Unfriendly/indifferent

(x) Busy/relaxed

( ) Busy/tense

( ) Slow/relaxed

( ) Slow/tense

Cleanliness/Orderliness
( ) Very dirty/disorderly

( ) Very clean/neat/orderly

(x) Fairly clean/orderly

( ) meticulously clean/orderly

8. JOB ANALYSIS/SPECIFIC INCREMENTS OF WORK
Work Area _Unloading/Loading Zone _____________________
Duties: Pull aside proper items to be loaded into the trucks. Load the boxes/items into the truck.
Duties: Unload items from the truck and place in the appropriate areas.
Expected Work Speed / Time in this area (in/out)
_Work until required trucks are loaded/unloaded. Speed of work depends on current
progress.______

Comments:
This job changes from day to day. It was difficult to acquire a set daily schedule. As mentioned
at the top of the form, the worker did not want his information to be given out. As a courtesy to
my source, I have left it off any documents.
Adapted from: Fadely, 1987.

JOB CHARACTERISTICS I LIKE
NAME: Emily Frazier and John Doe

JOB SITE: Walmart

Directions: WHAT I LIKE column: Circle the job characteristic that you like best in each box
WHAT IS HERE column: Circle the job characteristic in each box that best describes
what is at this job.
MATCHES column: Circle YES if the first two columns are the same. Circle NO if
they are not.

WHAT I LIKE

WHAT IS HERE

Work Alone
Lots of People Around
Quiet Workplace
Noisy Workplace
Work Close to Home
Distance to Job Doesn’t Matter
Weekdays Only
Weekends Too
Easy Job
Challenging Job
Dress Up for Work
Do Not Dress Up

Work Alone
Lots of People Around
Quiet Workplace
Noisy Workplace
Work Close to Home
Distance to Job Doesn’t Matter
Weekdays Only
Weekends Too
Easy Job
Challenging Job
Dress Up for Work
Do Not Dress Up

Standing Up
Sitting Down
Moving Around
Working Morning
Working Afternoons
Working Nights
Co-Workers My Age
Co-Workers Age Doesn’t Matter
Thinking Work
Physical Work
Detail Important
Detail Not Important
Job Same Every Day
Job Difference Every Day

Standing Up
Sitting Down
Moving Around
Working Morning
Working Afternoons
Working Nights
Co-Workers My Age
Co-Workers Age Doesn’t Matter
Thinking Work
Physical Work
Detail Important
Detail Not Important
Job Same Every Day
Job Difference Every Day

Work With People
Work With Things

Work With People
Work With Things

MATCHES?

YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO

YES/NO

YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO

Important to Work Fast
Not Important to Work Fast

Important to Work Fast
Not Important to Work Fast

Little Supervision
Little Supervision
A Lot of Supervision
A Lot of Supervision
Work Outside
Work Outside
Work Inside
Work Inside
Adapted from: Martin & Marshall 1992.

YES/NO
YES/NO
YES/NO

Job Analysis Narrative
Rationale
John has shown interest in being a loader for truck companies. John’s father drives trucks
and has John help him out over the summer. John knows that he enjoys this job and would like to
do it in the future. This job is perfect for John! The job keeps him active and healthy because of
the constant physical activity. This job will also allow John to converse in a relaxed setting. John
often feels pressure to say the “right” things in a formal setting.

Summary of Job
This job would be considered a part-time job. As a truck loader/unloader, the hours vary
from day to day. A lot of the hours depend on how efficiently the trucks are taken care of. John
would be responsible for loading the correct items in the correct places to complete orders. He
will also be unloading trucks and placing those items in the designated areas. This job requires
minimal paperwork so that will help make the job more enjoyable to John.

Does the job match?
Even though most of the job aspects match what John wants in a job, John is still not sure
what he wants to be employed in. John is hoping to receive guidance through the 18+ program
that will help him determine what type of job he would prefer. As of now, John is just focused on
the next step rather than the next few steps in life. The transition planning process is causing
John to think more about his future, but he still is unsure of exactly what he wants to do.

Next steps
John wants to continue in exploring his employment options. He hopes to enter into the
18+ program and then eventually Project Search. Through these educational programs. John will
gain a better understand of the different jobs that are available to him. The very next step is to
apply to the 18+ program so that John can gain independent living skills.

Student Progress Summary
Education
Over the course of the semester, John’s plan for future education has changed. Originally,
the IEP team believed John was ready to enter into Project SEARCH. After multiple assessments
and further evaluation of scores, it has been determined that John would be better suited in the
18+ program. There are still assessments being done to verify the appropriate placement.
However, as of John’s last ARD on November 4, 2015 the IEP team determined that the 18+
program would be the best fit for him. The next steps for John are uncertain because the 18+
program still has a few details to figure out before they begin the process of admitting students.
As of now, John must wait and stay in contact with his school transition worker so that he
receives the information he needs. John has been informed of the change in timeframe to
complete his goal for employment. Once the 18+ program is set up, the school transition
coordinator will notify John of a change in goal timeframe.
Another change that has occurred since the start of the plan, involves the cooperation of
the family. At the start, John’s Mom was open to the idea of 18+ or Project SEARCH. However,
John’s mom informed the transitions coordinator that her husband is not on board with this new
plan. The IEP team provided John’s parents with information and is currently waiting to see if
the parents feel comfortable enrolling John in the 18+ program.

Employment
There have not been any changes in regards to John’s future occupation. John still does
not have a particular career in mind. He has been introduced to what it would be like to work as a
truck loader/unloader and really seemed to enjoy what that job has to offer. However, John does

not show the want or need to acquire a certain job. The job analysis was not very helpful in
John’s case. The next steps for employment include continuing with his education and
completing a resume by graduation.

Recreation/Leisure
John has not yet looked into certain recreation/leisure activities. Once the football season
ends, he will begin his search for other activities to do in the community. The goals for John in
this area remain the same. By July of 2016, John will become involved with a local sports team
of his choosing. He is most excited about the recreation aspect of his transition plan. John has a
love for football and cannot wait to be a part of another team.

Independent Living
The goals for independent living remain the same. John will be living at home after
graduation; however, he will be expected to help with chores and cooking in order to build
independent living skills. John has been following the timeline thus far and has really tried to
show growth in this area. By May of 2016, he is expected to come up with a list of recipes to
cook for himself. His mom expressed how John is doing a great job helping around the house.
One aspect of independent living that hasn’t been talked about in a while is the idea of John
getting a driver’s license. John and his mother both want him to obtain a driver’s license.
However, John’s mom is unsure of how John will do on the tests. I have yet to see or hear of any
progress in this area. If John had a driver’s license it would be extremely helpful towards
building independent living skills