You are on page 1of 6

Kenneth Kimble 

Mr. Lytle 
Comp II 
The Positive Impacts 
 

Most everyone that I know enjoys spending time sprawled out on the couch with a 

controller in their hands. Now, most people would look at them and think something along the 
lines of  “oh man, he’s back on the couch. I’m not going to see him for the rest of the day.” What 
if playing those video games were actually helping him? People don’t tend to look at the positive 
impacts of playing video games. Instead, they look at all of the bad surrounding the video game. 
For example, ​
according to a 2014 study by Douglas Gentile, Ph.D., associate professor of 
psychology at Iowa State University, ninety­seven percent of people ages eighteen to 
twenty­four spent an average of seven and a half hours playing violent video games. Dr. Gentile 
linked violent video games to violent behavior. The study goes on to state that of the 
ninety­seven percent who played violent video games, only twenty­five percent actually showed 
any signs of more aggressive behavior. Other studies have tried to link poor handwriting, 
obesity, and ADHD on video games. 
Another study links memory loss to playing video games. ​
Psychologist Gregory West  
and his team assembled a group of fifty­nine young adults (ages eighteen to twenty­four). They 
then split twenty six of those people off and had them play video games. The other group did not. 
After the group had played six hours of video games, Dr. West and his team asked all fifty­nine 
to navigate a ​
virtual­reality maze​
. At first the maze had landmarks that you could use to identify 
with. After several run throughs, the landmarks were taken away. The maze had to be ran from 

memory. ​
Overall, gamers and non­gamers were equally adept at navigating the maze, but they 
reported using different strategies. Eighty percent of video gamers used a response strategy, 
which means using sequences of turns, rather than environmental cues, to navigate. Only 
forty­two percent of non­gamers relied on memorized movement sequences. Dr. West’s study 
concludes that “People who display response learning strategies tend to have a bigger and more 
active striatum – a part of the brain that links simple stimulus­response­reward sequences 
together – and a smaller and less active hippocampus, which forms episodic, relationship­ based 
memories.” However, Dr. Daphne Bavelier, a cognitive neuroscience professor at the University 
of Geneva, believes otherwise. She states (in the same article) “There is no evidence in the data 
they present for a causal link,” she says, “but rather quite a chain of inferences from the 
behavioral results to the conclusions, not only of a decrease in hippocampal volume, but then 
also of a risk of developing neurological diseases.” 

 

Daphne Bavelier released a Ted Talk in 2012 titled ‘​
Your Brain on Video Games​
.’ It 
goes over how your brain changes after playing fast­paced video games. In her Ted Talk, she 
states how her research has proven that people who play fast­paced video games in moderation 
(ten to twelve hours a week) have better eyesight, are less distracted by other moving objects, 
and better at multitasking. She set up an experiment in which she tested her subjects before, 
during and after playing fast­paced video games. She found that the group of people who played 
the video games scored higher than her control group. The group that played video games were 
able to resolve particular shapes and figures from the surrounding clutter. She goes on to state 
that the test group also could track moving objects at different speeds better than her control 
group. Her test group was also less distracted by other moving objects while out in the ‘real 

world.’ In her Ted Talk, Dr. Bavelier states “ let me put it to you like this; you’re driving in rush 
hour traffic in the middle of a busy road. People are zooming by you on all sides. Kinda 
distracting right? Not so much for people who play fast­paced games, they are already used to it 
and therefore they are able to focus on their driving.” 
 

Another one of the books I have read  titled ‘​
The Good, The Bad and the Ugly: A 

Meta­analytic Review of Positive and Negative Effects of Violent Video Games​
’ details both the 
good and the bad of playing video games. This article uses a peer group over a wide rage of 
universities and labs to arrive at their conclusions. This means that one university does a 
particular study and the other universities and labs duplicate it and share their data. This article 
looks into aggression and tries to find a link between violent video games and increased 
aggression. Also, they found a higher increase in visuospatial cognition. Visuospatial cognition, 
simply put is visual perception of the spatial relationships of objects. Here is their results: 
Results indicated that publication bias was a problem for studies of both 
aggressive behavior and visuospatial cognition. Once corrected for publication bias, 
studies of video game violence provided no support for the hypothesis that violent video 
game playing is associated with higher aggression. However playing violent video games 
remained related to higher visuospatial cognition. 
The Conclusion: Results from the current analysis did not support the conclusion that violent 
video game playing leads to aggressive behavior. However, violent video game playing was 
associated with higher visuospatial cognition. 
 

Jane McGonigal is the director of game research and development at the Institute for the 

Future. She recently released a book called ‘​
Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and 

How They Can Change the World.​
’ Ms. McGonigal states that by the time people turn 
twenty­one, the average American kid will have spent 10,000 hours playing online games. The 
10,000 hour rule is the amount of time it will take someone to become an expert at something or 
master a new skill.  In her NPR talk she was asked about her book and why she feels the way she 
does. Her main response was: 
“games seem to tap into the psychological state called eustress, or positive stress. You know, 
normally we think about stress as very negative. It makes us anxious or frustrated or burnt out. 
But it turns out that if we have chosen a goal for ourselves, and if we feel in control of the work 
that we're doing, that stress is experienced very positively .We feel more motivated. We have a 
stronger drive. We set more ambitious goals. We're more likely to ask other people for help. And 
in fact, we become more likeable to other people because we're more optimistic, we're more 
energized, and so they actually are more likely to help us when we ask.”   
With all that has been said against video games in the past (1995­present), it's amazing to me 
how little there is to support their claim. The science just isn’t there. There is something to be 
said for moderation, but that is true for all things in life. So the next time that you see your friend 
laying on the couch playing their video games, instead of  thinking that they are wasting their 
lives away, why not ask them to join them? It could benefit you greatly. 
  
  
  
  
  

 
 
Bibliography 
“Merriam­Webster.” ​
Merriam­Webster​
. Merriam­Webster, n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://www.merriam­webster.com/dictionary/visuospatial​

“The Effects Of Prosocial Video Games on Prosocial Behaviors: International Evidence From 
Correlational, Longitudinal, and Experimental Studies.” ​
The Effects of Prosocial Video 
Games on Prosocial Behaviors: International Evidence From Correlational, Longitudinal, 
and Experimental Studies​
. Web. 29 Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://psp.sagepub.com/content/early/2009/03/25/0146167209333045.short​

“The Impact Of Video Games.” ​
The Impact of Video Games​
. Web. 29 Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://www.pamf.org/parenting­teens/general/media­web/videogames.html​

“Self­Control and Choice in Humans: Effects of Video Game Playing as a Positive Reinforcer 
☆.” ​
Self­control and choice in humans: Effects of video game playing as a positive 
reinforcer​
. Web. 29 Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0023969084900304​

“Video Games May Have Negative Effects On the Brain ­ D­Brief.” ​
Dbrief​
. N.p., 2015. Web. 29 
Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d­brief/2015/05/20/video­games­brain/#.vloqval90qe​

“Why Gaming Is a Positive Element in Life [INFOGRAPHIC] ­ BC­GB BaconCape.” ​
BCGB 
BaconCape​
. N.p., 2013. Web. 29 Nov. 2015. 
<​
http://bc­gb.com/blog/2434/gaming­positive­element­life­infographic/​

Bavelier, Daphne.  “Your Brain on Video Games.” ​
Daphne Bavelier:​
 Ted Talks. Web. 29 Nov. 
2015. <​
http://www.ted.com/talks/daphne_bavelier_your_brain_on_video_games​