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Pershing

able

Vol. 30, No. 4

56th Field Artillery Command

Reserve unit arrives
by R ichard

J. Clemenson

The 352nd Milimy Police Co. (Reserve) from In·
d1:tn T O\\'n Gap, Pa. arrived in the Command area
l3tc December and began pro\'iding ,dditional security to rnilimy communities in the Vil Corps area in
addi,ion ,o th< Schwabisch Gmiind Milimy Com·
munin·.
The ,ompanr orri,·ed in late December, and in
earl~· J.inuary "'ere distributed throughout the arc•
2nd sunrd assining undermanned units like the
194th :--.JP Co. pmol their communities.
According m Comp,ny Comm,nder Copt. D.-·id
Ullom, 1hr call to ser\'c came 2t the beginning of December and <augh, many soldius by surprise. As one
ioldicr put it, "I thought we might be activated
but . .. Germany?"
Before the unit could deploy, every soldier had to
requalify with their weapon, take a Common Task
Tm (CTT) and process all medical and dental records. During th2t period of rime "all records were
;~rut inized and C\'er'\· thing was carcfullr pl2nncd, •
Ullom uid.

After the sold iers finished preparing for the
deployment, they were given a crash course in the
Gcnnan language and some rime to bone up o n their
MP skills. Nearly r:wo weeks after receiving the notice, the company arrived in the community on December 21.
O nce in the United Smes Army, Europe (USAREUR) theater, they were again thrust into a two
week training period. Schw:ibisch Gmund MP smion
NCOIC Sgt. ht Class Junius Bradley said, "They
were given classes on law and order, use of force and
received their Transponu ion Motor Pool (TMP)
licenses.•
The integration into the 194th's system has gone so
well that it lead U llom to rave, .,Because we only
tnin two weekends a month and 10 have everything
go smoothly proves just how strong the leadership is
in the reserves."
The 194th MPs are equally pleased with the- new
tro0ps' arrival. "We can finally get some rest for the
fim time in three weeks," Pfc. Paul Bridgewater
sighed.

by Richard

,,_.,"""Look• okay! Slaff Sgl. Edward Zadrowskl, 352nd M.P.
Co. (reserves), checks for unsecure doors In HHSB's,
2nd Bn.. 9th FA, molor pool during a security check on
Hard1 Kaserne.

tthoto

by,...,.,'*"

Look, Look! Sgt.
James
Patton,
HHB, 561h FA

CMD,
window
shops during a
Command sponsored lrip to Ober·
ammergau.

J. Clemenson

For r:wo months, soldiers in the 352nd Military Police Co. (Reserve) had been walking o n pins and
needles waiting for word of their deployment to
Saudi Arabia.
Rumors of the unit's "inevitoblc" activation spread
quicker than a dead camel's stench, prompting many
soldiers to prcp•re themselves and their loved ones
for the worst. Meanwhile, suntan lotion sa.les were
booming in frigid Indian Town Gap, Pa., the unit's
home.
Finally, with tensions in the Pcrsia.n Gulf hearing
up 2nd a flood of their fellow reserve units deploying
to the Middle East, they got rhc call.
Bu, hold on troops, take off those sunglasses, put
down that lotion and say - "Wo ist dcr Bahnhof?"
On December 6, with m•n,r soldier's mentally
psyched for desert duty, the unit d ropped a "bomb"
on the "Weekend Warriors" and mid them they were
going on active duty to Germ,ny to hell? depicted
military police groups complete their mimon.
To many people this was viewed as a big bre,k.
True, they won't have to live on Meals Ready to Eat
(MRE), deal with Saudi customs 2nd more impomnt,
the Iraqi military. But like their fellow reserves in the
Persian Gulf, they also put their careers and lives on
hold to serve,
Cont inued on page 3.

Inside
the Cable

• Facts on passport, see page 2
• Anti-terrorism, see page 3
• Counseling program, see page 6

January 1991

Update FYI
Federal and State
Income Tax
Year 1990 income tax forms " 'ill be available for
soldiers and family members in the Comm,nd
Judge Advocate's Office, Building S~. Room ll2,
Bismarck Kaserne.
Once again, soldiers arc reminded of their obligation to file state tax returns to those states ,hai
tax either all or portions of military income.
Unit tax officers for each bancry or company
are being appointed to assist soldiers in preporing
their 1990 income taxes. Assistance on complex
issues which requires the assisuncc of an attorney
is available, however, the soldier must receive an
appointment through their tax o fficer.

Winter Tennis
Although winter season temperatures and snov.•
conditions on outdoor couru in Bavaria aren't
suitable for tennis activities, your Armed Forces
Recreation Center (AFRC) offers beginners and
experienced aces an opponunity to enjoy a variety
of programs and activities in the comfort of heated
indoor facilities in Garmisch.
AFRC's Tennis University and Tennis for Skiers programs provide intensive r:wo to five-day instruction•! packages or innovative tennis/ski Op·
tions.
Four- and five-day Tennis University programs
feature instruction, use of equipment, court practice, video , nalysis, ball machine drills, strategy
sessions, swim ticket, welcome buffet, fruit or juice breaks, local tnnsponation to and from ocrivity sites and awards buffet.
Tennis for Skiers is designed for those active
folks who'd like 10 enjoy skiing and tennis in the
same winter sportsweek vacation. Two- and thrcedar instructional prognms arc available, as well as
private and group lessons, hitting alleys. ball machines and racquet rentals.
AFRC winter tennis activities arc offered 6 Ja·
nuary- 6 April. Group Travel bus transportation
is also available for organiud groups participating
in programs at AFRC in Bavaria.
For details and reservations, ask your local ITT,
Recreation Center or contact: AFRC Tennis Activities, APO 0905l, Telephone - ETS: 4402-S75 or
C IV: 08821 -750-575.

_.,_
1t'1 mine! Howard
Bratcher (righl) and

teammate , James
Winder, jump for
a lose ball in the
Comman<S basket·
ball tournament at
Hardt Gym.

Pershiflfil Cable
.January 1991

Protect yourself from
crime and terrorists
Awareness and common sense are two protective
measures soldiers and their families can take to 'deter
crime and possible terrorist threats in their communities.
Military intelligence officials indicate that terrorists
conduct surveillance as part of the planning process.
Any individuals who display "undue interest" could
be po tential terrorists or just "curious onlookers."
Therefore, 10 be on the safe side, all suspicious activity should be reported to your local military police
(MP) station or military intelligence (Ml) offic,e.
Intelligence officials define "undue interest" as individuals who ask detailed questions or show unusual
interest in facilities, military personnel, and places
frequented by the military.
Individuals who are seen loitering around or driving slowly by installations and observing activities for
extended periods of time may possibly be conducting
surv<-illance.
Taking photographs, notes, or making sketches of
facili~ies, and equipment may also be considered as
surve-illance, according to MI officials.
MI officials advise that if you notice suspicious
persons, vehicles, or objects (brief cases, unattended
packages, parcels, etc.) that it should be reported immediately.
When reporting, you should note as much details
as possible. For example: license numbers, description and appearance, exact time and location of activity and any other pertinent details, according to Ml
officials.
Also, people should be suspicious of personal mail
wher,ever the following is noticed, lack of, or fictitious address on the envelope, excessive postage, unusual size/shape (rigid, lopsided, bulges, soft spots,
oily stains, protruding wires, aluminum foil, etc.), incorrect spelli.ng, a.nd mail stamped/marked (personal,
confidential, exclusively for, handle with care, and
fragile).
MI indicates that postal services in your communiry arc aware of these suspicious markings and may
hold such leturs, parcels, or pachges while they are
screened.

P,
~
....
..=- -

Military news
Black History Month
For more information, contact your unit's

Equal Opportunity representative. In Schv.•abisch
Gmund, contact Sgt. 1st Class Kelly at ETS
4275-606 or Staff Sgt. Estrella at ETS 4275 - 765.
In Neu-Ulm, contact Sgt. 1st Class AcoSta at ETS
4275-447.

. ; 'MH-+++4-

Customs Reveal Money-Saving Options

Photo by Bllefemlch

Nothing here. Spec. Terrence Nichols, HHC, 38th Slgnal
Bn. conducts a security check on a vehicle at the front
gate or Bismarck Kaserne.
As a reminder, Schwabisch Gmiind and Neu-Ulm
communities are advised that under no circumstances
should you attemp, to stop suspicious activity or
handle suspicious obj,ctS, or containers, according to
Ml officials.
More importantly, people should not hesitate to
report suspicious activities. It is much better to report an incident that turns out to be harm.less than
not to report an incident that could end in tragedy,
according to MI officials.
(Eur-release)

Reserves
Continued from page t.
In some cases big sacrifices were made.
For Spec. Frank Kessler it meant losing a decent
payir,g job at Continental Airlines. With the help of a
cousin, Kessler had managed to get a job in the tool
shop, but the deployment trashed those ideas three
days before he was supposed to start.
In spite of the loss, the three-year reserve veteran's
care-free attitude still remains. When someone asks
him about the lost job, he simply shrugs, "You gotta
do what you gotta do.• He is quick 10 add, "There is
only one bad thing. The hockey boxscorcs arc a day
late."
For now Kessler tries to look on the bright side of
his predicament. "It's more hardcore over here and
that's good because you get to know your job and
the people better," he said.
Kessler's friend, roomatc and neighbor Spec.
Douglas Lawrence agrees. " It's more strict over here.
But because of that you can learn from the people
you work with and live with,• he said.
Back in Indian Town Gap, five miles separates
Lawrence from Kessler. On the weekend that they

3

suit up for the Army, they drive to work together.
These days the two live approximately five yards
apart in their room, but have much more in common
than being roommates and neighbors.
Although Lawrence didn't lose a job and has many
opportunit.ies for employment because of his police
academy experience, he and Kessler both miss family
and their girlfriends.
"I really miss my little sister and girlfriend and try
to write or call as much as possible," Kessler said.
"Not as much as me," Lawrence interrupted. "I try
to call once a week and the first week I got here I was
calling every few days."
With all the changes Kessler, Lawrence and the
others have gone through Company Commander,
Capt. David Ullom and his staff try to • keep in tune
with their feelings" as Ullom put it.
"They give up more than the average soldier," Ullom said. "Not only have they left families behir,d in
a moment's notice, but they also left jobs that they
might not be able 10 get back,", he added.

People stationed overseas can save money by
picking the right residency status when clearing
customs in the United States. They can claim either returning resident or nonresident exemptions
when on leave or temporary duty. Each status has
a different set of exemptions.
"If you arc taking expensive foreign-made items
with you," says SPC Pittman, Customer Service
Representative for the Goppingcn Customs Office, "the nonresident may be better." Personal effcctS enter the States duty-free provided you export them after your visit. If you claimed returning resident status, you would pay duty on the retail value of the items exceeding 400. The dutyfree exemptions for alcohol are the same for each
residency status but not for tobacco. • A returning
resident can impon 200 cigarettes and I 00 cigars,•
Pittman added, "a nonresident can import 50 cigars or 200 cigarcnes or two kilograms of smoking
tobacco, or a proportionate amount of each."
Which exemption is better? Get the "U.S. Customs Highlights for Government Personcl"
pamphlet at your local 42d MP GP customs offic,.
The Goppingen Customs Office is located in Bldg
30(, Cooke Barracks Housing Area, or call ETS
4253-765 or 657.

Snowboarding
After a successful implementation period last
winter, recreation officials at AFRC in the Bavarian Alps have decided to continue offering snowboarding activities for followers of this exciting
new sport, which combines the thrill$ of alpine
skiing with the athletic approach of surfing and
skateboarding.
"Learn To" Snowboard Spcmswuks at AFRC
Bcrchtesgadcn and Garmisch provide five days of
instruction, lif, passes, local transportation to and
from slopes, Bavarian Welcome buffet, group
photo, mementos and Farewell buffet. Optional
• Apres Ski" evening activities such as night skiing,
torchlight sled rides, movie night and disco are
available. Suggested minimum age for participation is 16 years. Meals, lodging and equipment
rental are arranged separately.
AFRC daily ski programs in Bavaria and nearby
Aumia arc also available for experienced snowboarders. Equipment and clothing rental for "board hounds" are available at all three AFRC resorts.
AFRC "Learn To" Sportswecks are offered in
Bcrchtesgaden, 9-14 December, 6-Jl January,
3- 8 February and 3-8 March and in Garmisch,
16- 22 December and 6 January - 9 March.
Snowboarding
For details and reservations, contact:
AFRC Berchtesgaden, Snowboard Reservations,
APO 09029, ETS: 4415-623/823 or CIV:
08652-58-623/823, AFRC Garmisch, S.nowboard
Reservations, APO 09053, ETS: 4402-575 or CIV,
08821-750-575.