You are on page 1of 18

Torio 1 

 
 
 
Proposal Paper Final 
by Nina Torio 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Torio 2 

Nina Torio 
Yuasa 
Expos 2 
March 15, 2016 
Standardized Testing 
Section One: Background 
It’s that time of the year again. Pencil sharpening, calculator punching, and answer 
bubbling galore. This is probably the most stressful, yet pivotal moment in a young student’s life. 
Students depend on these five or so hours to make or break their future education and career 
plans. In this time period, high school students take both ACT and SAT tests on top of other state 
standardized tests required by the Board of Education. As a crucial part of the college application 
process, standardized testing and test scores have great importance when it comes to a student’s 
future. At the same time, standardized tests have continued to pile up for high school students, 
and sometimes that can get a bit overwhelming. With that said, students should take fewer tests 
because there is an excessive and unnecessary amount of standardized tests that students must 
take. Moreover, the results from these tests, otherwise known as test scores, should be used to 
track student progress, not to label or estimate a student’s intelligence or success. 
To gain a better understanding about standardized testing, it is necessary to take a step 
back and look at how it came to be. The concept of standardized testing began in 1845 when a 
man named Horace Mann believed that school children should use written tests to enrich and 
supplement student education (Gershon 2015). A pioneer for standardized testing, he created 
different forms and designs of standardized tests, each serving a certain purpose for testing. In 

Torio 3 

turn, this also reflected what kind of content would be found in the test. Some of the very first 
forms of standardized tests were created to measure a student’s ability to think and perform a 
certain way (Gershon 2015). These tests eventually grew very popular and more started to be 
used. Livia Gershon, freelance reporter and writer for the ​
JSTOR Daily ​
states, “The Army Alpha 
and Beta Tests, developed during World War I to sort soldiers by their mental abilities, became a 
model for schools” (2015). As a prominently established model, it served as a way to distinguish 
between an academically prosperous or unsuccessful student (2015). More importantly, the 
effect of standardized testing on different ethnic groups that had very low respect for became a 
rising concern and progressively grew into a particularly controversial issue. Social inequality 
became a rising concern while the credibility and fairness of standardized testing was questioned 
at the same time. Indeed, the connection between social class structure and standardized testing 
made it clear that privileged American children score the best would be the most accurate 
conclusion to the dilemma. Not to mention, the continuing stereotype or assumption that many 
people are quick to express and recognize when discussing the topic of standardized testing is 
affecting many communities of students, teachers, and governmental figures. 
In addition to this, standardized testing has been a problem for many reasons. First of all, 
and probably the most important aspect of the issue, is the biased nature of the tests and the 
conflict between certain ethnic backgrounds with the more “superior” ones. Furthermore, there 
are many specific requirements or benchmarks that students must meet to be at least proficient in 
the given content they are being tested on. Concerning this, people have complained that there 
are way too many things to cover in one single standardized test at a time. With that said, the 

Torio 4 

creators of these tests feel the need to extend the test, which also means that the testing process is 
also extended.  
Another issue that came to mind deals with the test scores that students receive in result 
of completing the test to the best of their ability. Acceptance to many colleges are based on a 
specific test score that must be achieved. This might not be very fair to those who are smart, yet 
they have difficulties with test taking. By gathering these specific issues regarding standardized 
testing, it can be said that these have been around since the time the first test was created. As 
standardized testing became more structured and organized, many people continue to have things 
to say about it, including both negative and positive criticism. 
Year after year, changes have been implemented to the test as well as incidents associated 
with the subject pop up here and there. As a matter of fact, on March 5, 2016, College Board 
distributed and debuted the new and improved SAT. According to Stephen Wall, staff writer for 
The Orange County Register​
 states, “The new version of the SAT aims to measure what students 
learn in school rather than arcane vocabulary words such as lachrymose. Trick questions that 
some compared to brain teasers have been purged” (6). This shows that students will be testing 
on things that really count. Instead of time being wasted, students can count on the test being 
worth their time taking. It has been said that students favor this version over the older form of the 
SAT college entrance exam, and that is the ultimate goal regarding standardized testing.  
Even more, when looking at the bigger picture and focusing on who this issue ultimately 
affects, it always comes back to the hardworking students who hope to succeed and thrive in 
their academics. Everyday students like me and my other fellow classmates are all prime 
examples of individuals who have been trapped in such a system where standardized tests have 

Torio 5 

so much weight and importance in our lives. While the intentions of these kinds of tests are 
good, it could be nice if we can take tests in a more fair and sufficient manner. 
Section 2: Current Situation 
The current state of the problem of standardized testing has been, for the most part, very 
slow. It seems as if the problem has been easily looked over, waiting for the day someone 
decides to look at the problem and implement a secure plan to fix it. So far, a bill has been in the 
process of being drafted to get rid of the many requirements attached to standardized testing. 
American writer and lead education blogger at ​
NPR​
, Anya Kamentz reports that, “​
Annual tests 
for every child in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, plus one in high school, have been a 
centerpiece of federal education law since 2002. No Child Left Behind, the current incarnation of 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, requires them” (3). It is shown that the 
government is taking action on this issue and has made the effort to change standardized testing. 
However, these efforts have not completely proved to effectively bring an end to the problem.  
In addition, outside from the government setting, other people have expressed and shared 
their ideas for solutions, although they have not been implemented yet. For instance, it has been 
suggested that we replace annual tests (Kamenetz 8). On the other hand, other states have taken 
other routes in order to get around the problem or come close to resolving it. One solution that 
we already implement here in Hawaii has to do with “Performance or Portfolio­Based 
Assessments”. According to Kamen​
etz, “Schools around the country are incorporating direct 
demonstrations of student learning into their assessment programs. These include projects, 
individual and group presentations, reports and papers and portfolios of work collected over 
time. The New York ​
Performance Standards Consortium ​
consists of 28 schools, grades 6­12, 

Torio 6 

throughout New York State that rely on these teacher­created assessments to the exclusion of 
standardized tests. These public schools tend to show higher graduation rates and better 
college­retention rates, while serving a population similar to that of other urban schools” (25). 
 Back in middle school and in a couple of my high school classes, I was told to create 
these kinds of portfolios that consisted of my past work that I had saved in order to analyze my 
performance in each of my classes. To my surprise, it was actually a good learning experience 
being able to assess my performance and the quality of my work. Another solution to the 
problem involves “Social and Emotional Skills Surveys”. The author states, “Research shows 
that at least half of long­term chances of success are determined by nonacademic qualities like 
grit, perseverance and curiosity. As states expand access to pre­K, they are ​
including social and 
emotional measures​
 in their definitions of ‘high quality’ preschool. As one component of a 
multiple­measures system, all schools could be held accountable for cultivating this half of the 
picture… The Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland survey both students and 
teachers on social and emotional factors and use the results to guide internal decision­making. 
The district uses the ​
Gallup student poll,​
 a 20­question survey that seeks to measure levels of 
hope, engagement and well­being” (21­22). By doing this, states like Maryland assess their 
students in a manner that they feel is more fair and life applicable. Given that long­term success 
can be determined by analyzing an individual’s characteristics, this provides a pathway to step 
away from the overuse of standardized testing and to do something more different, yet still 
accurate. 
 
Section 3: Your Proposed Solution 

Torio 7 

As stated before, students should take fewer tests because there is an overwhelming and 
unnecessary amount of standardized tests that students have to take. Moreover, the test scores 
and other results from these tests should be used to track student progress, not to label a student’s 
intelligence or success. With that said, my first solution would be to recreate tests by editing 
down the content found in the tests to what is extremely necessary for a student to have 
knowledge about already, especially moving on to the college level. Lyndsey Layton, reporter 
for the ​
The Washington Post​
 reminds us that, “ ​
…  fewer assessments of higher quality are 
better. .  . What we have now across the country is confusing, hard to navigate and, I believe, 
abusive of both teacher and student time” (14). This solution will work better when compared to 
another solution because this is tending to the problem head on, not working around it. In doing 
so, I would like to see more students take standardized test, and at the same time, want them to 
feel that the test they are taking is important instead of being a waste of time. From my survey, 
60% believe that standardized tests are not necessary. However, after tweaking the test and 
reducing the content, I want to see more people consider standardized testing as a very necessary 
test ­ in working towards fewer, yet higher­quality tests ­ which will then be a measuring agent 
showing whether or not this solution was successful or not.  
Furthermore, cutting down the testing time of a typical standardized test would also be a 
great solution. Currently, students test for over four to five hours. The majority of the time, this 
gets very tiring and students may not perform as well as they would have liked to. I asked my 
fellow classmates exactly how long tests like these should last for. The majority of them said one 
to two hours max, and that is fairly reasonable. In essence, high school students are pleading for 
shorter testing hours because the long hours in a classroom is not necessary. Additionally, Kerr 

Torio 8 

and Lederman, writers from ​
The Huffington Post ​
claim tha​
t, “A ‘Testing Action Plan’ released 
by the Education Department over the weekend said too many schools have unnecessary 
testing… The department pledged to work with states and schools on ways to reduce time spent 
on testing, with federal guidance to the states expected in January” (11­12). This statement by 
Kerr and Lederman validate this solution because other people have also caught the problem as 
well. This solution would prove to be successful because of the already circulating actions being 
done to improve this issue. At the same time, I would expect costs, at most, to go towards the 
alteration of these standardized test, which would require paying specialized individuals to create 
the new form of the test. Altogether, costs would be very manageable and low maintenance. 
Even more, when analyzing test scores, the focus should be on how much a student had 
improved after taking each test, instead of staying fixated on a student’s current score, which 
would be a very logical and sensible solution. Focusing on how much an individual improved on 
specific areas of the test instead of the test as a whole may serve as a better way to utilize 
standardized testing. Writers of the GreatSchool Staff acknowledge that, “Test scores give you 
an indication of how students are performing at a particular school. But they don’t tell the whole 
story. The test scores you see on GreatSchools.org, as reported by the state Department of 
Education, compare groups of students from one year to the next but they don’t tell you about 
individual student progress. They don’t tell you about the richness of the curriculum…” (1). The 
essence of GreatSchool’s argument is that tests scores do not accurately define your success 
because they can only tell you so much about a person or about a specific school. Its role is to 
give you an idea of where you stand academically, but it doesn’t suffice alone.  

Torio 9 

Additionally, many of my classmates had some feedback about whether or not test scores 
can accurately define your success in the future. I received a good range of responses, but the 
response that stood out the most to me said that test scores don’t really have the capability of 
defining your success. One of my classmates suggested that every student has different strengths 
in different subjects, and since the test can be taken multiple times it may be accurate. However, 
the main point is that test scores should be used in a more flexible way so that students can be 
proud of their improvement and potential for the future, which can be measured by an increase in 
the number of satisfied test takers.  
On the other hand, one might say that standardized tests are completely biased and unfair. 
Sometimes you might find yourself struggling to answer certain sections or questions because 
you do not know a lot of content on the test. Interestingly, a classmate that completed my survey 
stated that they felt that standardized tests were unfair because they had heard about scores being 
rigged based on ethnicity. Noliwe M. Rooks of Time Magazine writes, “And if the standardized 
testing gap between racial minorities is bad, it’s nothing compared to the gap between the poor 
and the wealthy. For example, one recent ​
study​
 by the Annie E. Casey Foundation found that the 
gap for achievement test scores between rich and poor have grown by almost 60% since the 
1960s and are now almost twice as large as the gap between white students and children of other 
races. The playing field is far from level when we continue to use tests where we know at the 
outset that wealthy students will do better than less wealthy students and white and Asian 
students will outperform blacks and Latino” (4). Though this may be true, students should not 
use this as an excuse to limit themselves. While the battle and conflict between ethnicities may 
never go away, people should strive to have a more open and understanding mind towards this 

Torio 10 

issue. You may not be the best of the best, but you can work hard to get yourself to that point. 
Dwelling on the fact that your ethnicity is not superior over all others will just set you back even 
more from the things you can achieve during this time period. 
Section 4: Address Possible Objections 
Knowing that not everyone will not agree with my proposal, I understand that each 
person has different perspectives on certain ideas. With that said, I feel that the group of people 
who might object to my proposal would be the very creators of standardized tests, such as the 
well­known “College Board”. I feel that College Board would object my proposal because 
standardized testing is a very official and serious matter. Editing and minimizing the length as 
well as the time spent on these tests to certain standards that students and other test takers want 
might make them feel like they have lost their control and power in this process. 
Likewise, I also feel that parents will also fight back on the issue. Jose Vilson, math 
teacher, writer, and activist in a New York public school argues that parents should opt their 
children out of standardized testing (2014). Turning away from the fullness and pressure of 
standardized testing, Vilson believes that student success can be better evaluated when allowing 
students to take on more hands on learning experiences (2014) instead of wasting their time on 
tedious tests like these. The ideas expressed in the article are persuasive enough as Vilson is able 
to relate to many parents, students, and teachers about the issue, adding validity to his arguments. 
In addition to this, evidence shows that parents have acted against standardized testing by pulling 
their children out (Bellafante 2014). Ginia Bellafante, writer for The New York Times, states 
that close to 270 students in the New York City public school system has done this (2014). This 
was necessary for parents to do, though it may seem like it was down out of disrespect towards 

Torio 11 

all schooling systems. However, Lisa Guisbond, ​
an assessment reform analyst for the National 
Center for Fair and Open Testing (​
FairTest​
) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, clarifies and justifies 
that standardized testing is both unfair and misused, showing that there’s simply no need for it 
unless better assessments can be implemented into all schooling systems (2014). 
To those who may feel skeptical about my proposal, I want them to remember to have an 
open mind and to think of how it may feel to be in a student’s “shoes”.  The obstacles and 
preparation a student must go through to get to that desk on testing day may not be applicable 
and relatable in everybody’s life, but think about what everyone ideally strives to achieve in their 
life. Most would say success, happiness, money, family, etc. Also, think about the hardships and 
journeys one must go through to learn the content and showcase what they know on these 
standardized test. Just imagine how sweet success and victory will taste in the end when one 
score well and improves each time. Despite objections, my proposal should be attempted because 
it is the next step to solving the problem of standardized testing and will guide the next 
generation of test takers to newfound success. 
 
Section 5: Call to Action 
Implementing these small changes to standardized testing is very important if we want to 
make a more efficient and fair method of assessment. While most of us don’t want to take a test 
feeling that it is a complete waste of our time, that makes adjustments like these even more 
necessary. Although standardized testing may seem of concern to only a small group of high 
school students, it should in fact concern anyone who cares about their future and the generations 
after them. If we take action, we will be rewarded with more efficient standardized tests as well a 

Torio 12 

better system or analyzation method to assess test scores and the weight that it has. TEDTalk 
speaker, Ted Dintersmith, expressed, “We should strive to have schools that are full of 
possibility and hope, instead of placement and percentile” (2015). Dintersmith could not have 
been any more right about this. If we can find the right balance between education and personal 
success, we can produce better students that are ready to take on the world. 
To close, since the beginnings of the earliest known form of standardized testing until 
now, things have definitely changed. However, the “blueprint” and purpose of standardized 
testing has, for the most part, stayed the same. Sometimes, we forget about the importance of 
standardized testing because some of us just go through the motions. However, we should always 
remember that taking these tests is such a privilege and we should never take that for granted. 
Most of us take the test and stumble over a few or more questions that we just couldn’t figure out 
in the allowed time. While some would just let this surpass their minds, others would be bothered 
by the questions that they did not know how to answer. Curiosity and the drive to soak up as 
much knowledge as they can should be the mindset that everyone strives for, no matter the 
circumstances. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Torio 13 

 
 
 
Works Cited 
Bellafante, Ginia. "Standing Up to Testing." ​
The New York Times The Opinion Pages Room For 
Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 29 Mar. 2014. Web. 8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/nyregion/standing­up­to­testing.html?_r=0>. 
Gershon, Livia. "A Short History of Standardized Tests." ​
JSTOR Daily​
. N.p., 12 May 2015. 
Web. 3 Mar. 2016. 
GreatSchools Staff. "State Standardized Test Scores: Issues to Consider." ​
GreatKids​
. N.p., n.d. 
Web. 2 Mar. 2016. 
Guisbond, Lisa. "Say ‘Enough Is Enough’ With Student Testing." ​
The New York Times The 
Opinion Pages Room For Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 31 Mar. 2014. Web. 
8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/03/31/should­parents­opt­out­of­school­t
esting/say­enough­is­enough­on­student­testing>. 
Kamentz, Anya. "What Schools Could Use Instead Of Standardized Tests." ​
NPR​
. NPR, n.d. 
Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
Kerr, Jennifer C, and Josh Lederman. "This Is How Much Time Students Actually Spend Taking 
Standardized Tests." ​
The Huffington Post​
. N.p., 26 Oct. 2015. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. 

Torio 14 

Layton, Lyndsey. "Study Says Standardized Testing Is Overwhelming Nation's Public Schools." 
Washington Post​
. The Washington Post, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
Prepare Our Kids for Life, Not Standardized Tests Ted Dintersmith TEDxFargo​
. Perf. Ted 
Dintersmith. ​
Youtube​
. TEDTalks, 25 Aug. 2015. Web. 14 Mar. 2016. 
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rvhb9aoyeZs>. 
Rooks, Noliwe M. "Why It’s Time to Get Rid of Standardized Tests." ​
TIME​
. N.p., 111 Oct. 
2012. Web. 2 Mar. 2016. 
Vilson, Jose. "It's Every Parent's Right." ​
The New York Times The Opinion Pages Room For 
Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 13 May 2014. Web. 8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/03/31/should­parents­opt­out­of­school­t
esting/its­every­parents­right>. 
Wall, Stephen. "Students Cram for New SAT, Which Has Fewer Questions, No Essay and Top 
Score of 1,600 Again." ​
The Orange County Register​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Torio 15 

 
 
Annotated Bibliography 
Bellafante, Ginia. "Standing Up to Testing." ​
The New York Times The Opinion Pages Room For 
Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 29 Mar. 2014. Web. 8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/30/nyregion/standing­up­to­testing.html?_r=0>. 
This article was written by Ginia Bellafante, an American writer, fashion critic, and critic 
for the New York Times. The article discussed about the importance of communities to 
stand up to standardized testing and to speak their minds about the issue. The idea of 
“opting out” of these tests was also an important focus of this article. Moreover, 
Bellafante shined the light on the students of New York City and the number of 
standardized tests they are required to take annually so that we may gain a better 
understanding about the issue. As a matter of fact, it is said that over 270 students 
decided to opt out of standardized testing, and this was a great piece of evidence that I 
was able to incorporate in my paper to show that parents may object to my proposals and 
just completely kick standardardized testing out the door per say. 
 
Gershon, Livia. "A Short History of Standardized Tests." ​
JSTOR Daily​
. N.p., 12 May 2015. 
Web. 3 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written by Livia Gershon who is a freelance writer based in Nashua, New 
Hampshire. This article talked about the history of standardized testing and how it has 
developed into the type of standardized testing we have today. In my paper, I used 
information about Army and Alpha and Beta Tests used during World War I to assess 
soldiers in order to provide evidence and supporting details about the background of the 
issue. 
 
GreatSchools Staff. "State Standardized Test Scores: Issues to Consider." ​
GreatKids​
. N.p., n.d. 
Web. 2 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written collectively by the GreatSchools Staff. GreatSchools is a 
non­profit organization aiming to educate parents on how to raise their children in a way 
that they may grow to reach their full potential. In this article, the GreatSchools Staff 
talked about how standardized tests “don’t tell the whole story”. In other words, 
standardized testing does not have the ability to assess all the aspects of a student because 
testing solely focuses on whether or not a student can achieve a certain score or not. In 

Torio 16 

my paper, I was able to incorporate in the idea of how standardized tests are so 
“one­sided” and incapable of accurately assessing a student. 
 
Guisbond, Lisa. "Say ‘Enough Is Enough’ With Student Testing." ​
The New York Times The 
Opinion Pages Room For Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 31 Mar. 2014. Web. 
8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/03/31/should­parents­opt­out­of­school­t
esting/say­enough­is­enough­on­student­testing>. 
This opinion page was written by Lisa Guisbond, an assessment reform analyst for the 
National Center for Fair and Open Testing and executive director of Citizens for Public 
Schools. In her opinion based article, Guisbond talks about how she opted her son out 
from their local standardized tests. She also expresses how these test are simply 
“overkill” and should be better assessed to ensure higher­quality testing. Additionally, 
she referred to these tests as “one­size­fits­all” tests and emphasized how important it is 
for people to have their voice heard in the community if they want to see any change in 
these assessments. In my paper, I used this information to construct my synthesis 
paragraph, explaining how standardized testing should not be used unless it is 
implemented properly.   
 
Kamentz, Anya. "What Schools Could Use Instead Of Standardized Tests." ​
NPR​
. NPR, n.d. 
Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written by Anya Kamenetz, National Public Radio’s (NPR) lead 
education blogger. This article talked about how people are taking action in hopes of 
changing the requirements or even eliminating standardized testing. The article also 
discusses a bill that is in the process of being drafted as well as the “No Child Left 
Behind Act”, which requires students grades 3 to 8 to take annual tests to check­up on 
their learning and to ensure proficiency in each subject. In my paper, I used the 
alternatives to standardized testing that Kamenetz expressed in order to ensure a more 
sound and sufficient testing method for students.  
 
Kerr, Jennifer C, and Josh Lederman. "This Is How Much Time Students Actually Spend Taking 
Standardized Tests." ​
The Huffington Post​
. N.p., 26 Oct. 2015. Web. 3 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written by Jennifer C. Kerr and Josh Lederman, writers for the 
Huffington Post. This article talked about the amount of time students take to prepare for 

Torio 17 

standardized test as well as how many hours students put in actually taking the test. They 
also discussed how the obsession with testing should be greatly reduced so that students 
do not have to waste their time on unnecessary testing. In my paper, I was able to utilize 
the information Kerr and Lederman presented about a “Testing Action Plan”, by the 
Education Department, in order to cut down testing to the minimum, yet sufficient 
requirement. This evidence showed that things have been done to tend to the issue of 
standardized testing.  
 
Layton, Lyndsey. "Study Says Standardized Testing Is Overwhelming Nation's Public Schools." 
Washington Post​
. The Washington Post, n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
 
This article was written by Lyndsey Layton, reporter for The Washington Post. This 
article focused on how fewer standardized tests of higher quality would be more 
beneficial to both students and teachers. She also emphasizes on the fact that in testing 
the current way that we do, it is simply a waste of both teacher and student time because 
the tests are not being taken seriously. This is due to the overload and excess material that 
students are supposed to have learned already. In my paper, I included key information 
about how standardized tests could be more impactful and worth taking if it was of better 
quality. The first time I read this statement, it immediately caught my attention, and it 
perfectly works as a supporting detail in my paper.  
  
Prepare Our Kids for Life, Not Standardized Tests Ted Dintersmith TEDxFargo​
. Perf. Ted 
Dintersmith. ​
Youtube​
. TEDTalks, 25 Aug. 2015. Web. 14 Mar. 2016. 
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rvhb9aoyeZs>. 
This TEDTalk was presented by Ted Dintersmith, a leading venture capitalist. In this 
presentation, Dintersmith talked about how students have been mislead by the schooling 
system. While the current educational system merely focuses on students meeting certain 
standards when testing, he suggests that students be taught important life skills that would 
mean more to them than things they learn in their math lesson. He made it very clear that 
he believes in the potential each and every student has to thrive in this world, and that can 
only happen if they are better prepared with these skills. The words of wisdom 
Dintersmith shared in this TEDTalk inspired me as I wrote my paper and helped me 
further my ideas and thoughts about the appropriate way test scores should be utilized.  
  
Rooks, Noliwe M. "Why It’s Time to Get Rid of Standardized Tests." ​
TIME​
. N.p., 111 Oct. 
2012. Web. 2 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written by Noliwe M. Rooks, author, writer for Time, and associate 
professor at Cornell University in Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender and Sexuality 

Torio 18 

Studies. This article interpreted the more personal side of standardized testing. It talks 
about how race and ethnicity has contributed to the issue and how people respond to this 
conflict. Even more, Rooks clarifies that there is a correlation between race, income, and 
student success, which brings up the question about whether or not this type of testing is 
fair and reliable. In my paper, I used a quote explaining about a “gap” that has grown 
between the tests scores between the poor and wealthy. The increased percentage 
between these two social classes showed that standardized testing favors one group of 
people over another, and that is not fair to the remaining.  
 
Vilson, Jose. "It's Every Parent's Right." ​
The New York Times The Opinion Pages Room For 
Debate​
. The New York Times Company, 13 May 2014. Web. 8 Mar. 2016. 
<http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2014/03/31/should­parents­opt­out­of­school­t
esting/its­every­parents­right>. 
This opinion page was written by Jose Vilson, math teacher, writer, and activist in a New 
York City public school. In his opinion based article, he expresses that it is every parent’s 
right to opt their children out from standardized testing. He also states that opting out 
from testing allows students to be assessed by more important things that test scores like 
their character, while a more hands on learning experience can have more prominence in 
all educational systems. In my paper, I was able to use Vilson’s ideas about a parent’s 
option to opt their children out from testing as a counterargument or possible objection. I 
say that because, though my proposal aims to alter these tests, others may want to 
completely get rid of them.  
 
Wall, Stephen. "Students Cram for New SAT, Which Has Fewer Questions, No Essay and Top 
Score of 1,600 Again." ​
The Orange County Register​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Mar. 2016. 
This article was written by Stephen Wall, staff writer of The Orange County Register. 
This article talks about the new and improved SAT college entrance exam that applied on 
March 5, 2016. It is said that the new SAT is a better rendition of the past SAT form 
because it actually tests students on things that are taught at school. Furthermore, trick 
questions were also removed, guessing is no longer penalized, and test taking time was 
shortened. These changes contribute to the goal of creating a more realistic and more 
bearable test. In my paper, I used this information to show what has currently been down 
to improve standardized testing today. This was perfect timing as improvements had been 
done very recently.