You are on page 1of 5

Mate Choice Lab Report 

 
Introduction: ​
MIRANDA 
The importance of understanding human evolution is intrinsic to nature. It is vital for 
people to understand the process of how humans came to be, as well as how they have developed 
and adapted to their environments throughout time. The process of mate choice and how it has a 
direct effect on reproduction, for example, is a key point to note in the study of human evolution.  
It has been concluded through a great number of scientific experiments that scent, being a 
prominent factor in mate choice and sexual selection, is correlated to survival instincts and how 
they have an impact on mate preference. When a woman is ovulating, or in other words the most 
fertile, she subconsciously gives off a distinct scent that results in men being more attracted to 
her. This scent reflects a woman’s healthy fertile system that will increase her chances of 
reproduction.  
A woman’s menstrual cycle on average lasts 28 days and has four key phases that 
distinguish when a woman is her most fertile. The four phases in order are: the  ​
menstrual phase 
(Days 1 to 5), follicular phase (Days 1 to 13), ovulation phase (Day 14), and the luteal phase 
(Days 15 to 28). The menstrual and follicular phases overlap and ultimately are the phases in 
which menstrual fluid start to exit the body and when a “pituitary gland secretes a hormone that 
stimulates the egg cells in the ovaries to grow” (Menstrupedia 2016). The Ovulation phase, 
otherwise known as the phase in which a woman is most fertile, is the phase in which the ovary 
releases the egg cell that has matured throughout the cycle. The ovulation phase ultimately 
extends along into the luteal phase. The luteal phase is the last phase in a woman’s menstrual 
cycle and is the phase in which the egg cell released during the ovulation phase remains in the 
fallopian tube and is the most fertile to sperm.  
The fact that men are subconsciously able to detect when a woman is her most fertile is 
vitally important to human reproduction. A woman has a short time span of about 24­48 hours in 
a month of being fertile, in contrast to a man’s ability to remain fertile at any time within a 
month. Thus, ​
men’s’ ability to detect a woman’s ovulation is fundamental to human reproduction 
because ovulation directly correlates to a woman’s capability of being fertile, and thus being able 
to reproduce offspring.  
A previous study conducted by Finnish scientists detected whether men are in fact more 
attracted to an ovulating woman’s scent, as opposed to a non­ovulating woman’s scent. 
Kuukasjarvi (2004)​
 tested whether the ability to detect ovulation is limited to solely males. The 
experiment was conducted by male and female raters who rated the sexual attractiveness of 
T­shirts' odors worn by 42 women using oral contraceptives and by 39 women without oral 
contraceptives. Males conclusively rated highest the sexual attractiveness of those women who 
did not use oral contraceptives at mid cycle. There was no significant preference in female raters 
of users and nonusers. The results ultimately concluded that men use olfactory cues to 
differentiate between ovulating and non­ovulating women.  

Although experiments such as ours have been conducted many times before, our 
approach is slightly different in the sense that we will be noting down the ages and ethnicities of 
the male participants. We are doing so because ethnicity and age ultimately might have a 
significant effect on scent preference. For example, a Latino man might find the scent of a Latin 
woman more attractive, and subsequently prefer that scent. 
 
Methods: ​
JESSIE 
Two female participants and fifty male participants are involved in this study. One of the 
two female is in her ovulating period (Shirt B) which ​
 occurs between 12 and 14 days before 
your period starts when one has a regular 28 days menstrual cycle​
, and the other female is not 
(Shirt A). They were each asked to wear one identical shirt over night, and put them in a zip bag 
every time they take it off for two nights. Fifty male participants are randomly selected at 
Pasadena City College. First, their age and ethnicity was asked and recorded because the culture 
influence and age could possibly impact the result of this study. Then, they were asked to smell 
those two t­shirts and rate their scent based on attractiveness, pleasantness, and intensity at the 
scale 1 to 7 which 1 is the lowest and 7 is the highest. Pleasantness and intensity are included in 
this study because we want to avoid the bias it might emerged when the experiment target is too 
obvious. Data didn’t show an obvious correlation between either two variables. One box ​
and 
whisker diagram will be created for each shirt which will provides a more clear result.  
 
Results: ​
JOHN 
The box­plot below shows the data gathered for Shirt A (Figure 1) and Shirt B (Figure 2). 
For attractiveness, 75% of our participants gave Shirt A a rating of 3 and below. In comparison, 
75% of our participants gave Shirt B a rating of 5 and below. Also, the median for Shirt B is 4, 
which is twice the median of Shirt A. Regarding pleasantness, the majority (75%) of our 
participants rated each shirt between 1­5. However, Shirt A’s median is one point above the 
median of Shirt B. Under intensity, the results almost parallel the results found in measuring 
pleasantness. The majority of our participants rated each shirt between 1­4. In this case, the 
intensity of the scent from Shirt A was 0.5 above the intensity of the scent from Shirt B. Overall, 
Shirt B had a much higher rating for attractiveness, but its ratings for pleasantness and intensity 
were almost identical to those of Shirt A.   
 
 
 

 
 
Figure 1: The results for Shirt A. As seen above, Attractiveness has a median of 2, 
Pleasantness has a median of 3, and Intensity has a median of 3. This data shows Shirt A is 
less attractive than Shirt B. 
 

 
Figure 2: The results for Shirt B. As seen above, Attractiveness has a median of 4, 
Pleasantness has a median of 2, and Intensity has a median of 2.5. This box­plot shows our 
participants found Shirt B more attractive than Shirt A. 

Discussion: ​
SAMANTHA  
The results of the experiment supported the hypothesis that men are attracted to the scent 
a woman excretes when she is ovulating.  The scent produced by the ovulating participant (shirt 
B)  was rated more attractive than that of shirt A.  The pleasantness and intensity of the scent 
produced similar results on both of the shirts.  However, the median for intensity and 
pleasantness were higher in shirt A.  Because shirt B was deemed more attractive, men may be 
more likely to select the ovulating woman to mate.  Preference between ethnicities was similar 
and did not produce any substantial differences.  
Although most men were interviewed alone, in some of the cases, the participants were in 
groups.  This might have cause some bias and might have produced different result if every 
participant was interviewed alone.  The exact time period of ovulation is also tricky since there 
was no clinical way available to test the participant’s point in her cycle.  It was just assumed that 
the participant’s midpoint in her cycle meant that she was ovulating.  If infact the “ovulating” 
participant was not in the follicular phase, the data would be invalid.  Another point is that 
pleasantness, intensity, and attractiveness may have a subjective definition, and might possess 
different meanings to the individual participants.  This is why it is important to look into research 
done by others.   
A previous study done by Kuukasjarvi (2004) used the similar t­shirt experiment, but 
instead tested scent attractiveness of women using oral contraceptives versus none.  This 
experiment also let women and men smell the shirts.  The results were similar in that males 
prefered odors from women in their ovulatory phase. Attractiveness ratings also peaked in a 
study by ​
Havlíček, Dvořákov, Barto, and Flegr, (2006) in ​
the follicular phase in contrast to the 
lower ratings during menstruation.  ​
Instead of the three categories in this experiment, their study 
consisted of four: attractiveness, pleasantness, intensity, and femininity.  Intensity in their study 
was also similar to the results shown in this study: higher scent intensity in the non ovulatory 
phase than in the ovulatory phase.  It is important for males to detect a woman’s fertile phase as 
shown in these studies.  When a female ovulates, she gives off signals to the male that she is 
ready to mate and produce offspring.  For animals and humans alike, more offspring makes a 
subject more biologically fit.   
In the future, many other experiments can be conducted to determine the true 
attractiveness of men to scents released by women during ovulation.  One important topic is 
finding exactly where in the brain these specific pheromonal actions take place, and how they 
relate to animals. The scent was previously thought to be concealed, but detectable by men. In 
turn, human pheromones are important to learning more about sexual selection and human 
behavior. 
 
 
 
 

Works Cited 
 
Havlíček, J., Dvořákov, R., Barto, L., & Flegr, J. (2006). Non­Advertized does not Mean 
Concealed: Body Odour Changes across the Human Menstrual Cycle. ​
Ethology​
, ​
112​
(1), 81­90. 
doi:10.1111/j.1439­0310.2006.01125.x 
 
Kuukasjarvi, S. (2004). Attractiveness of women's body odors over the menstrual cycle: The role 
of oral contraceptives and receiver sex. Behavioral Ecology, 15(4), 579­584. Retrieved February 
12, 2016. 
 
http://menstrupedia.com/articles/physiology/cycle­phases