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Jaime Hoonsan

ECE 232
4/23/16
Experiences

Experience: Bubble Play


Class average age:
The average age of the children in this class is 26 months old.

Developmental Area:
Sensory
Activity Plan:
This activity is to be supervised at all times. The teacher will fill a small plastic tub or sensory
table with water. Add in a few drops of hypoallergenic soap as the water is filling to create a
bubble layer. Add small spoons, bowls and sponges. Have a small group of 2-3 children explore
the water and bubbles with their hands.
Primary Objective:
Toddlers will explore various feelings and textures on their skin through water play.
Secondary Objective(s)
Toddlers will build their motor development through pouring and squeezing.
Experience description:
Materials
A small plastic tub, tepid water, measuring spoons, small bowls, sponges hypoallergenic soap,
food coloring or scented bubbles may be added to enhance the sensory experiences.
Scaffolding
The children have been practicing washing their hands. They have been very curious about the
water and soap as they wash. Several of them have commented bubbles as they wash.
Plan for carrying out experience:
I set up the experience in a sensory table. Then I encouraged children to participate by
participating myself. They were naturally drawn to the table by the fact that I was there and
doing something that was different than my typical interaction with them.

During this experience: I talked to the children as they were touching, squeezing, pouring etc.
As they experimented, I asked the children open ended questions such as: Do you feel the
bubbles? What is that delicious smell? Can you squeeze the water out of the sponge?

Outcome (was activity of interest to children why/why not, Was outcome what was
expected, did something happen that wasnt expected, what might be changed/added to
make experience more interesting to children, or other):
The outcome of this activity was just about what I expected. I think to add to the experience, I
could have either made the water cold or hot. I also could have added a drop or two of simple
essential oils such as lemon or lavender to enhance the smell. This would have added to the
sensory effect of the activity.

Assessment
A. How do I determine the success of this activity?
The children who chose to participate were definitely engaged. They smiled, touched the water
and bubbles, squeezed the sponges and dumped from the cups. They seemed to want to continue
the activity as it ended.
B. Did children change knowledge based on this experience? (Do I see this new
knowledge being displayed in other areas, when not being prompted by
caregiver, etc.)
After this activity, I saw a child point to the table where we had completed the activity, and heard
him exclaim to his mother bubbles as she arrived to pick him up for the day. The following day
when the children came inside from the playground, I head the same child say bubbles as he
was washing his hands at the sink.

Next step (Were children not ready for this experience and activity/expectation be lowered,
Does experience need to be repeated for further exploration, Should another aspect of
experience be explored by children, or other be specific):
The children were ready for this experience. This experience is one that can be used for children
much younger than this age group. This experience could definitely be repeated for all children,
and would benefit those who have not yet developed language.

Experience: Turkey Baster Painting


Class average age:
The average age of the children in this class is 26 months old.
Developmental Area:
Motor
Activity Plan:
Fill turkey basters with paint. Cover each participating child with a painting shirt or smock. Give
each painter paper and a baster full of paint. Have the children squeeze the paint on their paper,
dragging the baster through the paint as they work. Plan for the children to use their hands to
paint as well. Ask the children questions as they paint: What is this that you are painting with?
Have you ever seen a turkey baster before?
Primary Objective:
Toddlers will begin to develop fine motor control through squeezing.
Secondary Objective(s)
Toddlers will add a sensory experience to their bank through painting with their hands.
Experience description:
Materials
Non-toxic, washable tempera paint, turkey basters, large plain white paper.
Scaffolding
Art has been the highlight of the day for many children. They have experienced finger painting
and sponge painting. Their next adventure will include painting with a new object.
Plan for carrying out experience:
I set up the experience on the table. Then I encouraged children to participate by sitting at the
table. The children then joined me.
During this experience: I talked to the children as they were touching, squeezing, etc. I used
descriptive language about the color of the paint, the texture of the baster, and the texture of the
paint.
Outcome (was activity of interest to children why/why not, Was outcome what was
expected, did something happen that wasnt expected, what might be changed/added to
make experience more interesting to children, or other):
The outcome of the activity was nearly what I expected. During the activity, one child shot paint
out of the baster at another child. I did not expect for any of the children at this age to have fine

motor skills that would be strong enough to accomplish this! In the future, I might add an adult
sized turkey baster to the mix of basters. Doing this would benefit a child who has developed
stronger muscles in his/her hands and help to further strengthen them.
Assessment
A. How do I determine the success of this activity?
The children who chose to participate were quiet for several minutes when they started this
activity. It took a few minutes for them to really get the hang of getting the paint out of the
basters. The quietness and the intent of the children indicated to me that they knew that
something was supposed to happen. They were determined to make it happen, and to me this
means that the activity was successful.
B. Did children change knowledge based on this experience? (Do I see this new
knowledge being displayed in other areas, when not being prompted by caregiver,
etc.)
After this activity, I did notice in the following days that the children wanted to turn every
painting activity into a finger painting activity.
Next step (Were children not ready for this experience and activity/expectation be lowered,
Does experience need to be repeated for further exploration, Should another aspect of
experience be explored by children, or other be specific):
The children were ready for this experience. Those children who had a more difficult time with
the baster were able to participate because the paint eventually dripped from the baster, allowing
them to use the tip of the baster and their hands to paint. This experience could also be repeated
later on to help measure fine motor development growth.

Experience: Diaper Change Talk


Class average age:
The average age of the children in this class is 9 months old.
Developmental Area:
Language
Activity Plan:
During diaper change time, approach the child gently. Say the childs name as you are
approaching. Tell the child that you are going to change their diaper. Explain each step of the
way what is going to be happening. Such as: Now Im going to pick you up. Or Im going to
lay you down on the changing table Engage the child in a conversation and ask open ended
questions such as Does the wipe feel cold? or Is your diaper wet? Allow ample time for the
child to respond. Reply warmly to expand the childs verbal communication
Primary Objective:
To increase language awareness and provide opportunities for practicing language.
Secondary Objective(s)
Toddlers will add a sensory experience to their bank through painting with their hands.
Experience description:
Materials
Diapers, Wipes
Scaffolding:
The children have been learning about communication from birth. Today, they will explore
communication through interaction with their caregiver during their normal daily activities.
Plan for carrying out experience:
Approach a child who needs his or her diaper changed. Talk to him about what needs to be done.
During this experience: I explained what would transpire and spoke about what was going on
throughout the entire experience.
Outcome (was activity of interest to children why/why not, Was outcome what was
expected, did something happen that wasnt expected, what might be changed/added to
make experience more interesting to children, or other):
The outcome of this activity was that infants seemed to want to engage more, and sought out
more face-to-face connection time. I also noticed that some of the infants who previously
disliked changing time no longer cried during diaper time. To make the experience more

interesting for the infants, I might add some new visual stimulation to the changing area. This
would also give us new things to talk about during changing time.
Assessment
A. How do I determine the success of this activity?
I am able to determine the success of this activity because of the engaged communication
between myself and the infant. I am also able to determine the success of this activity because
the infants no longer protested when it was changing time.
B. Did children change knowledge based on this experience? (Do I see this new
knowledge being displayed in other areas, when not being prompted by caregiver,
etc.)
I am able to see that the knowledge of the children changed because the bond that I have with the
infants was further secured. I can see that the they seek me out more often and desire further
communication.
Next step (Were children not ready for this experience and activity/expectation be lowered,
Does experience need to be repeated for further exploration, Should another aspect of
experience be explored by children, or other be specific):
Infants are born wired for communication. This activity should be something that takes place
during diaper time more often than not. The communication can be about a multitude of things,
and can be changed based on themes or interests of the infant.

Experience: Fruit Exploration

Class average age:


The average age of the children in this class is 26 months old.

Developmental Area:
Health and Nutrition
Activity Plan:
During snack time, gather the different fruits on the table. Sit with the children and talk to them
to see if there are any amongst them that recognize any of the whole fruits. Engage the children
in a conversation about how these foods are healthy for them and will help their bodies stay
healthy and grow. Ask open ended questions such as: How do you think this tastes? See if the
children recognize any of the fruits prior to cutting them. Keeping food allergies in mind, the
fruits may be served as a snack, adding in a sensory aspect to this activity.
Primary Objective:
To expand the childrens knowledge about healthy food and nutrition.
Secondary Objective(s)
Toddlers will hear new, descriptive words to add to their language bank.
Experience description:
Materials
1 whole apple, 1 whole banana, 1 whole pear, 1 whole orange
Scaffolding
The children are already familiar with the items that are packed in their lunches, although some
of them may not know what the whole food looks like before it is peeled. This activity will
familiarize them with what the entire food looks like prior to peeling.
Plan for carrying out experience:
I set the fruit out on the table, I then sat down at the table and waited for children to join me.
During this experience:
I used descriptive language to talk about each fruit. I named each piece of whole fruit before
showing the children the inside of each fruit and allowing the children to eat the fruit. As the
children were eating the fruit, I talked about how eating healthy foods such as these will help our
bodies grow strong.

Outcome (was activity of interest to children why/why not, Was outcome what was
expected, did something happen that wasnt expected, what might be changed/added to
make experience more interesting to children, or other):
The children were very interested in this activity. Many of them already knew what the fruits
were, but there were a few who did not know what each fruit was. To make this more
complicated, I might add more exotic fruits to the mix.
Assessment
A. How do I determine the success of this activity?
The children who chose to participate were definitely engaged. They smiled, wanted to touch
both the whole fruit and the cut fruit. They just seemed happy to be interacting in this activity.
B. Did children change knowledge based on this experience? (Do I see this new
knowledge being displayed in other areas, when not being prompted by caregiver,
etc.)
After this activity, the teacher read a book that had pictures of fruit in it. Some of the children
excitedly shouted out the names of the fruits as they saw them in the book.
Next step (Were children not ready for this experience and activity/expectation be lowered,
Does experience need to be repeated for further exploration, Should another aspect of
experience be explored by children, or other be specific):
The children were ready for this experience. This experience is one that can be used for children
much younger than this age group. This experience could definitely be repeated for all children,
and would benefit those who have not yet developed language.

Experience: A Pro-Social Experience


Class average age:
The average age of the children in this class is 26 months old.
Developmental Area:
Social Emotional
Activity Plan:
Speak ahead of time with the parent, asking him to come in briefly to allow the children to see
his wheel chair and his interactions with his child. When the parent arrives, ask him to speak
with the children about how he gets around. Be ready and available for children who may be
fearful of this situation, addressing the childs feelings. Ask the father open ended questions, and
allow the children to do the same.
Primary Objective:
To increase social / emotional awareness among 2 year olds.
Secondary Objective(s)
Toddlers will hear new, descriptive words to add to their language bank.
Experience description:
Materials
None
Scaffolding :
Our program has a wide variety of differing abilities amongst parents and children, including one
father who is paraplegic and uses a wheel chair. Some of the children have noticed the difference
and are starting to ask questions.
Plan for carrying out experience:
I planned this activity for a time when it would be least disruptive to the schedule.
During this experience:
Isabels father wheeled himself into the classroom. I approached him and began to talk to him. A
couple of the children came over and pointed. One boy said wheels as he pointed. I replied
Yes, his chair has wheels to help him move around. Another child seemed fearful and needed
me to hold her.
Outcome (was activity of interest to children why/why not, Was outcome what was
expected, did something happen that wasnt expected, what might be changed/added to
make experience more interesting to children, or other): The outcome of this activity was

about what I expected: a wide range of emotions and questions that would be typical of the
majority of social interactions in many age groups.
Assessment
A. How do I determine the success of this activity?
I can determine that this activity was a success because of the new language that was
developed, and the curiosity that the children displayed, and my answers as well as Mr.
Steves answers to the childrens curiosity.
B. Did children change knowledge based on this experience? (Do I see this new
knowledge being displayed in other areas, when not being prompted by caregiver,
etc.)
I believe that the children gained a bit of knowledge from this experience because on the
following day after this activity, Mr. Steve wheeled his chair to the windows outside of the
classroom. The children seemed delighted to see him- even the child who was fearful.
Next step (Were children not ready for this experience and activity/expectation be lowered,
Does experience need to be repeated for further exploration, Should another aspect of
experience be explored by children, or other be specific):
Some of the children were ready for this experience and some were not. Honestly the children
were all over the place emotionally during this experience. Some were very curious, some were
fearful and some did not notice that an experience was happening as they were engaged in other
activities that proved more interesting at that moment.