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"A flash of light, a <:loud of dust, and a hearty hi-yo • •. .
( see be l ow;

Bveryt hing you ever
wanted to :m ow about
German/Ar.1erican ,o/eek
(Page 8 )

TCI,

6 .

.. PERSHING IN EUROPE"

I04

lS MAY 1971

WllD-I Tli:: GOING GETS TOUJE , ••

a1~meets challenge
·:r.;Ji.T Wi 'VZ GOT EElU IS
:. l-!ORZ W/,R-LIKE co1;JIT I J!, .

BY JOHM B WARD

GRAFERWOEHR - For the HOolld. ti• in 4 1110ntha, Persh-

inpan of the 56th Artillery
Brigade have taken their giant, 10 ,000 pound mi11il11
to the 7th Aray ' • Orat.nvoehr Trainillg Center.

a ditfioilt t11t for the
Penhing 1yate11.
Said SGT Ronald Chapnan,
D Btry Aa1iatant Section
Chief Uld 7th Arfl1 Troope
Soldier of the Year , •The
duet .clop everything up :
tilter,, lock-pine, aJld acta
u an abruiv, on metal surfacH. It• 1 really tough on
ma intenance •••• But that '•

talion and its
equipment
performed fla,l•••:13 re gardlHs of the cond it ion8 , And
110bilit7T After 6 total days
of convoy and daily off-tber oad exerciaes, the mobility
of Pershing~ and its operator, • ability to keep it
IIObile ~ vae no longer a
111atter of question.
"Thia ia the best , aiost

PROBLEMS

The •n aJld Mchine1 of
the lat Battalion, Bl.It Artillery, under the oollllUZld
of I.:l'C Cheater P Cambell,
,pent 11er1 than ) veeka
training et the Oraf'em,o1hr
raDgea.
Readineaa teat•,
night 110YHtent1, conatmt
exerciaea, end nuaeroua • valuations aJld obser,atiODIJ
created IIIIOl'IUllental problema
in llliaaile and vehicle 11&111tenuice. But Sar,ice Batter.,'
of the 8lat 1 tbe outfit r1aponeibl1 tor lteepil'l( tbe
batta lion•• ·equipment on the
road, ..t the challenge wit h
its cuetomar,y experti11 the HIit &dept.neH that bu
11&de i t Bde • a beat 114.i nten&Jlc:e bat hr.,'.
OUST

Grafemroehr, renouned for
the dust that appears when
the ground driu out, poaed

whet Grat haa to otter 1110re war-like condition.M

a

,ERFOIIMAHCE

Pershing vu deaigned
with an a ll-weather capability a.lld excellent mobility.
And the 81.et '• ayatem bore
out ite des igners• expeetat)..on1 . Night operation.I end
the dust, ndd-day sun and
early 1110rning fog; the bat -

realistic training we can
get 11D,1Vhere.
Grafenvoehr
pro?ides apace, con1t ant ly
changing oolldi tions, and a
totally unknovn terrain on
which ve 1a11t conduct our
operations
e ffectiva:13 ,"
comment1!1 the Perfect Teu Is
CPI' Gary Wuhbun:i .
COMTIMUED OM PAGE 4

15 MAY 1971

SOMEBODY CARES
i., JOHN WARD

SCHWAEBISCP. (lKt;END ~ Ser19ant Bob !Amie i i not •
tortune teller. Alld be ian 1 t
playing the stock market .
But nevertheless, there is
: no one 111>re concerned with
the ruture than he.
Tbe 4th Battalion, 41at
Artillery NCO ia the·lllllll in
oharge or the Battalion Infonnation Office , an organi1ation created to assist
soldiers in 111&king tte tran-

vaa iDYented by lll'C Q:larlH
E ~ah, oonmarider ot the 4th
or the 41st, and a 111m who••
commitment to the welfare
or hi1 men enend1 beycm.d
their EI'S. A. lAinnie noted,
"The Colonel decided that we
should try to do 1omething
for returning aerYicemen. He
wanted to 1118ke bis aen aware
of what they would face at
home and prepare them to
cope with it,"

T::ERE AID~ AH AWFUL LOT OF GUYS Ill THE ARHY WHO HEED
A BREAK •• • "

1ition from 111ilitar:v to civi lie life.
Though moat
"short-timers"
feel
they
need little help , SGT Lennie
knave there ia more to getting out or the Arrq thari
packing cm.e•a bags and saying good-bye •
"So maqy guys leave the
Army without a marketable
skill ," eaya the well- spoken
Lennie . "And in doing 10,
they run a eerious risk of
becollling one lll()re of America's already 350,000 unemployed veterans aged 20-29•
These days, jobs an just
plain hard to colll6 by . "
SOT Lennie ia not an alarmist. He is a realist -and a
concerned one. Hie
Battalion Information Office

doctor...

Besides 1ick-call,
the
battalion surgeon performs
conducts
minor
surgery,
physicals , and runs both a
Dependent and an Obstetrics
clinic. He conducts regular
111Sterni ty and drug discuasions and is a lllf!mber ot the
Drug Alulesty Board. M it
these activities were notenough to keep him busy at
home, nery Monday Dr Murphy
has what one of his staff
calls "the road show."
He boards a ·-helicopter
a11d fliea to the 4lat•s
Boettingen field site, vhere
be conducts sick-call, tends
aches and pai na , and baa a
amall dependent clinic.
ETen with his bu.s7 schedule, the doctor still manages to tind time for his
special interest: p,yctiatry.
He sees most of Sehwaebiach
Gl!llend 1 1 psychiatr ic caees
and has even organized a
group therapy sNsion for

PNiF. 4 '

THE GIANT

Though he hu been unable
to verify it.
~nnie believes his is the only office of its kind in ~rope-an organization dedicated
primarily to readying veterans to face the world.
The preparation is of tvo
varieties.
"We try to provide
information on what
jobs are available i n the
States and whe rs. We •ve got.
materials on vo~ational and
technical training programs
as ,well as t he many govern~ental progrllllls designed to
provide jobs. We attempt to
~iscover a Dl8n 1 a special interests and then counsel,
advise, and make suggestions
about. career fields and opport\Jnit.ies •"

svr

•s0111e guys who were getting
prett7 heavily into drugs.~
"Each case bas to be takeP individually," he said of
his psychiatric work.
"The
peopl( I had in group therapy were using drugs out of
anger vi th ttie Amy. I t r ied
to get them to see things in
a different light. For instance, I asked them, 1Who
are you going to tn1rt with
dn.:gs, yourself or the lllilitary?' Withil'.I the lilllits of
the program, we were quite
successful.~
Dr ~rphy is well pleased
with his choice of profeeeion even though, as he says,
"sick-call dampErui the spirit of idealism."
But there
is more to the men than
stethoscopes and aspir i n.
"One of the things I Ul
most looking forward to," he
said with a wistful,
faraway look in his eyes, "is
buyir,g a Land Ronr after I
get. out of the An,,y and travelling around .Africa, 11
M a doctor?
"Nope. Just a tourist."

In the line of practi cal
education, the Battalion Information Office offers two
sophisticated
courses
in
oomputPr
progralllllling
ll!ld
color television repair.
"These are BPonsored by
RCA, 11 uys I.Atm:lie , "and they
give the soldier both classroom arxl correspondence inatruction, >.lso, the eo•Jrscs
car. be paid for througr, the
GI Bi 11, It.• s a good W8¥ for
an inter~sted f;Wf to sec~re
his future.•
For a soldier as concerr.ed with the
future as SO':'
Lennie is , tte word • short"
has an entire ly diffe r ent.
meening than it does to tte
1118jority of soldiE-rs who usr

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it.

"I hate the idea of a 0who•s been employed for 2 or
3 years in the Arrrry gettin r
out and endin~ up walki~f on
the streets looking for a
job," he says emphatically.
SGT Lennie •s dedioatio::
to hie job is impreasi ve. J..1;
he commented, "If! am able
to help just onr aoldi~r a
month, I •m hapw. More t.r.n:-.
one is just so mucl· bet t H .
Because there are an av.f '.: ;
lot of guy• in the Arrey wh,
need a break.~

graf
'continued from. page 1.

F.ffecti•e
tbe t rei uing
was•- and successful. N~v
equip111ent, tested for the
first time in 3urope, met
with the approval or both
its .Aaerican and German obae"era.
At the same time, the
81st, as a battalion, demonstrated that its equipment
is unqueetionably ready for
all combat contingenci es • .1.13
LTC Cambell has said of his
wiit•s position aa a conierstone of NATO'• defenses,
"We're ready for the challenge,"

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