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UPPER LIMB ABDUCTORS TEST

Positions:

Patient stands, feet apart by 30, head-neck-eyes in neutral position,


eyes open, mouth closed no dento-dental contact.
Practitioner stands behind the patient on the side to test.

Technique: The practitioner asks the patient to abduct to 90 the upper limb to test
and to extend it.
The practitioner stabilizes the tested shoulder with his medial hand on
top of it. With his lateral hand and forearm, he puts pressure above the
wrist and evaluates the muscular resistance of the abductor muscles

SARL IRFOR Modle dpos.

Results:

if we find a muscular weakness on one side, a dysfunction could be


located in the:
- Upper limb,
- Cervical spine,
- Feet,
- Craniosacral axis,
- Manducatory apparel,
- Ocular sensor.
This test enables us to evaluate the stress level of the patient. When
correlating this test with the wrist extensor muscles test, we can
determine that:
- If the weakness of the upper limb abductor muscles is
ipsilateral to one of the wrist extensor muscles: the
dysfunction is located in the temporomandibular joints.
-

If the weakness of the upper limb abductor muscles is


contralateral to one of the wrist extensor muscles: the
dysfunction is located in the cervical spine or the ocular
sensors.

This test also highlights the efficiency of soles or


heelpieces: if we observe a muscular weakness when
these elements are in place, it means they are useless.

SARL IRFOR Modle dpos.