You are on page 1of 5

DECISIONS 
The Adaptive School 
PD/PLC Strategies and Professional Development 
 
Decisions 
Strategy 

Process 

Tips 

Close the Discussion 



Display decision options 
Explore advantages/disadvantages  for each option 
Group selects option to use  

Goal is efficiency, consistency, 
clarity, and flexibility 

Combine Opposites 



Two members are selected 
By end of day must bring new recommendation to group 
Group tries to combine new ideas 

Used when group is stuck 

Decision Options 



Executive Function Review 
Fallback position agreed on if group cannot decide 
Subgroup research and authority review  

Combine with additional 
strategy within it 

Eliminate the Negative 



Create list of options 
Ask: “Any items you would be okay with removing” 
A member suggests, ask if all agree for discussion...if not, 
remove 
If an objection, no discussion, don’t remove 

Saves time by eliminating 
items the group agrees to 
remove in efficient manner 

Increase collaborative culture 
through joint construction of 
goal 


Draw and display desired state map 
Explain process and define goals 
Group describes desired state 
Develop behavioral state (What would one see and hear in this 
state?) 
Identify resources needed to achieve 
Develop plan for fulfillment 



Explain topic, task, and process 
Check for understanding 
Brainstorm ideas and record on chart 

Keep each step separate and 
only advocate on positive of 
purpose 


Existing State­Desired 
State 

Focusing Four 




Garmston, R. J., & Wellman, B. M. (1999). ​
The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups.​
 Norwood, MA: Christopher­Gordon Publishers. 


DECISIONS 
The Adaptive School 
PD/PLC Strategies and Professional Development 




Seeking 12­18 ideas 
Ask questions and seek clarity 
Members advocate terms 
Apply strategy Rule of One­Third 
Use process to narrow choices 

Forced­Choice Sticker I 





List options on flip chart 
Distribute stickers to group 
Instruct members to spend all stickers 
Define value of stickers (preference, cost) 
Stickers represent vote and are binding 

Clarify all options and values 
prior to handing out stickers 

Forced­Choice Sticker II 






Chart and post all options to select from 
Invite members to stand by chart of choice 
Members discuss why they chose that option 
Provides advocacy statement 
Group fields questions and seeks clarity 
Group receives stickers and spends them 

Discourage spending all 
stickers on one option and 
prior dialogue is valued 

Freeing Stuck Groups 

Facilitator: “What’s stopping us from making a decision?” or 
“Who would be willing to meet with___and___ to develop a 
proposal for our next meeting?” 

Reference and include Naive 
Questions and Close the 
Discussion into this strategy 

Is/Is Not 

In one column: facts known about the problem, where it is, what  Include data gathering and 
its effects are, when it occurs, and so on 
use as example; if needed, 
In second column: facts known not to be part of the problem 
provide categories within each 
column 


Not A or B but C 

Ask for members to provide a third option [C] that might contain 
and combine both A and B 

Used when group is polarized 
on two options; List desirables 
about A and then desirables 
about B or subgroups do this 
first; Stay away from negatives 

Garmston, R. J., & Wellman, B. M. (1999). ​
The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups.​
 Norwood, MA: Christopher­Gordon Publishers. 


DECISIONS 
The Adaptive School 
PD/PLC Strategies and Professional Development 
1­2­6 







Paired Weighting 




Ranking 






Individuals complete writing on naming an area to work on this 
year 
Pair meet, share, and agree on a statement 
Each pair meets with two pairs together and agree on one 
statement 
Write and post on large displayed paper 
Members ask for clarification and originators advocate 
Rank ideas through Rule of One­Third 
Subcommittee takes on role to research and collect evidence 

Best with large groups prior to 
issues being known 

Individuals compare each item with every other item according 
to importance: Which is more important, A or B? A or C? A or 
D? And so on 
Participants go through items, comparing each pair and circling 
their preferences 
Count up all As, Bs, and so on 
Count across on the given recording sheet 

Facilitator must prepare option 
recording sheet; can be 
complicated and needs time; 
provides more objective and 
systematic decision making 

Distribute 10 option slips to each member 
Each member labels options A, B, C, and so on 
Each member ranks options according to preference (10=high 
and 1=low) 
Gather slips and separate according to letter 
Add up the numerical values for each letter 
Post results on flip chart 

Useful way for decision 
making when group has 
limited trust early on; can be 
more precise than Rule of 
One­Third 

Can be cumbersome to do in 
a full group but provides clarity 
on movement and information 
flow 

Responsibility Charting 



List all major responsibilities on the left side of the chart 
List names of team members and other people related 
Review responsibilities (code it R), who can authorize (Code it 
A), support members (Code it S), members needing to be 
informed (Code it I) 

Rule of One­Third 


List all items on large displayed paper 
Use colors to assist in 
Instruct members to choose ⅓+1 items that are unranked (if 12,  decoding of information and is 

Garmston, R. J., & Wellman, B. M. (1999). ​
The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups.​
 Norwood, MA: Christopher­Gordon Publishers. 


DECISIONS 
The Adaptive School 
PD/PLC Strategies and Professional Development 
a quick way to agree and rank 
items 

then choose 5) 
Members raise hands for facilitator to record number for each 
item 
Group adopts and use item list
 

Six­Position Straw Poll 



Members given straw poll and record answers 
Collect and tally responses 
Page 272 

More efficient with technology 
usage 

Slip Method 


Efficient method when group 
is in infancy stage of trust 



Distribute large number of 3x5 index cards to each member 
State problem in “How to” language (How to increase student 
attendance” 
Members write one idea per card 
Collect and categorize cards 
Present, study, and discuss
 

Sufficient Consensus 






Determine a figure, such as 80%, that represents consensus 
Members clarify and advocate for items 
Members inquire about reasoning of different choice 
Minority­voices must be heard and explored 
Call for voting (hands) 
Announce results 

No members has the right to 
block a group; seek to 
determine if choice is principle 
or preference 

Thumbs Up 

The facilitator or any member can call for a thumbs­up to 
determine degree of agreement 
Thumbs up=1, Thumbs down=no, Thumbs sideways=doesn’t 
matter or don’t know 
Call for show of hands and announce results 

Any thumbs sideways must 
explain their point and can be 
used to reach Sufficient 
Consensus 



100% Consensus 




In groups of six or fewer assign one facilitator 
Define facilitator’s role as calling on people and keeping process intact; chart exactly what people 
say 
Facilitator poses question 
Round­Robin members contribute 1 sentence 

Garmston, R. J., & Wellman, B. M. (1999). ​
The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups.​
 Norwood, MA: Christopher­Gordon Publishers. 


DECISIONS 
The Adaptive School 
PD/PLC Strategies and Professional Development 


“Is there anyone who cannot live the first sentence?” and so on 
Members can reword sentences 
Repeat process for all sentences 

 

Garmston, R. J., & Wellman, B. M. (1999). ​
The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups.​
 Norwood, MA: Christopher­Gordon Publishers.