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Cody Sallee

ENGL 401
Prof Kirchmeier
4/5/2016

Peer Assignment
Invention:
Concept mapping is my favorite thing to do when discovering a topic
for an argumentative piece. Write a list of topics you know nothing about,
and a list of things you think you know about. Pick a few of them and make a
concept map on what you know, think you know, or want to know. After
creating concept maps of a few different topics, pick which one you like best
and advance it into the pre-writing stage.

Pre-writing:
Gather a list of sources for your topic, preferably internet sources.
Three sources total are needed for the assignment. Once the sources are
gathered, write a sort of annotated bibliography for each source. Write how
you might use each source in your paper and how they add to the strength of
your argument.

Drafting:

For the drafting part, write your introductory paragraph and your initial
argument. Try writing three different thesis statements. Write one following
body paragraph for each of your thesis statements. Additionally, write a
conclusion paragraph for each corresponding thesis statement. Finally, write
one counterargument for each of your thesis/conclusions.

Revision:

Brainstorm how your topic could be approached from a


different angle
Think of what could change about your topic and how that would affect
your argument.

Drafting the seed


Take ten to fifteen minutes to write several sentences about a different
angle to approach your topic. Put that writing away for a while and bring it
back out later. Then use it to open different perspectives in your main essay.

Get into the shoes of the author


Think of how Henry David Thoreau might write your argument. Think of
how he wrote his own works. Try to mirror his writing style and write your
argument from that perspective. Use these ideas to strengthen your
argument.

Ideas credited to Barry Lanes Revisers Toolbox