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Year 12: English

Literature

Year 12 English
Literature
Differences between new A Level and
old AS/A2 system
Demands of the course
Independent reading and writing
Difference in expectations between KS4
&5

Equipment you will need to buy


A4 note pad (for notes and longer
pieces)
Poetry anthology

Poems of the Decade, selected by


William Steghart
ISBN (10): 0571325408
ISBN (13): 978-0571325405

Born Yesterday &


Nettles
Work in pairs
Take one poem each; annotate for
all/any aspects of language,
structure/form that strike you as
interesting/significant
Then, work together; make notes on
the backs of the poems and/or
further annotations: Consider the
presentation of childhood in
these poems.

2.1) Poetry: Genetics by


Sinad Morrissey
In what ways do we take after our
parents or other members of our
families?
Is it easy for us to recognize our own
resemblances to others?
How do we feel about these
resemblances?

Vocabulary
Quarry: (n) excavation pit from
which building stone etc. is obtained;
(v) to extract/obtain (e.g.) from/as if
from a quarry
Demure: (adj.) shy, modest,
reserved

Listen/Read
What is the poem about (overall
focus/theme)?
How does the speaker/poet feel
about her subject? What clues are
there to this?
Look at the form and structure of the
poem: what do you notice; what
might the significance of this form
be?

Villanelle

A1 b A2
a b A1
a b A2
a b A1
a b A2
a b A1 A2

19 lines
5 x tercets (3-verse
stanza)
1 x quatrain (4-verse
stanza)

A1 and A2 are the


refrains
A1 and A2 repeated
alternately as third verse
of subsequent stanzas
A1 and A2 final couplet
of quatrain

A1 b A2
a b A1
a b A2
a b A1
a b A2
a b A1 A2

My fathers in my fingers, but my mothers in my


palms.
I lift them up and look at them with pleasure
I know my parents made me by my hands.
They may have been repelled to separate lands,
to separate hemispheres, may sleep with other lovers,
but in me they touch where fingers link to palms.
With nothing left of their togetherness but friends
who quarry for their image by a river,
at least I know their marriage by my hands.
I shape a chapel where a steeple stands.
And when I turn it over,
my fathers by my fingers, my mothers by my palms
demure before a priest reciting psalms.
My body is their marriage register.
I re-enact their wedding with my hands.
So take me with you, take up the skins demands
for mirroring in bodies of the future.
Ill bequeath my fingers, if you bequeath your palms.
We know our parents make us by our hands.

Are there any


significant
language patterns
(repeated images,
symbols,
metaphors; use of
semantic fields)?
What might there
significance be?

I know my parents
made me by my
hands
quarry for their
image by a river
the skins
demands | for
mirroring in bodies
of the future

2.2) Inheritance, by Eavan


Boland
What does the title alone suggest to
you?
Might it suggest any possible
connections to Genetics, by Sinead
Morrissey?

What do Morrissey and Boland


have in common?
Morrissey (b. 1972)

Boland (b. 1944)

Born and raised in


Ireland (Portadown,
County Armagh;
Belfast)
Lived in Japan and
New Zealand before
returning to Belfast

Born and raised in


Dublin
Lives between
America and Ireland

Vocabulary
Three Rock Mountain: Irish mountain range, part
of Dublin Mountains
Bobbin: a cylinder or cone holding thread, yarn, or
wire, used especially in weaving and machine sewing
Fretful: feeling/expressing distess/irritation
Oral: Spoken
Oral tradition/orature: Tradition of spoken
poetry/literature/culture
Bard: oral poet
Lyric poetry: personal/introspective/emotional
poetry (distinguished from dramatic/narrative poetry)

Read/Listen
What are your initial impressions?
Are there any obvious
similarities/differences between this
poem and Genetics?
Are there any difficulties?

Do the following quotations affect your


reading of the poem in any way?

Summary/Review (Poetry
Foundation)
Domestic Violence(2007) weaves
different and competing kinds of
historythe national, the personal, the
domestictogether in poems that also
meditate on the legacy of Irish poetry
itself.

In Bolands own words


Its very hard, even for a contemporary lyric poetry, to escape
history. [] Irish poetry has a bardic history. The Irish bards lay
down in darkness to compose. They wrote poems to their patrons
that ranged from christening odes to the darkest invective. They
were poets who were shaped by an oral culture [] [L]ong after
their language was destroyed, they were remembered and quoted
in Ireland. The drama of all that still backlights Irish poetrythe
painful memory of a poetry whose archive was its audience. There
is a sort of communal aspect to the identity of the Irish poet even
now that has an effect on the contemporary Irish lyric.
***
For a long time, Ive had a sort of dialogue going on in my mind
maybe even a quarrelbetween those elements of poetic
experiment and bardic inheritance.

My poetry begins for me where


certainty ends.

[T]hats what any poet writing about a


particular place wants to do: to
transform it, not just catalogue it.
When I was in a suburb in Dublin, at
the foothills of the Dublin mountains,
surrounded every day by the same
rowan trees and distances, I wanted to
convey not just a place, but the sort of
bodily knowledge I got from place.

I just wanted to find a way of


conveying how things change from the
ordinary to the familiar, from the
familiar to the known, from the known
to the visionary.

Formal/structural features:
Use of punctuation
Verse/stanza structure
(Differences to Genetics?)

What kinds of relationships is the speaker


negotiating in this poem? In what ways
does this follow/differ from Genetics?
Set out response in a grid

Similarities

Differences

Quotations/r So what?
efernece

Form/structur Genetics=
e
villanelle
Inheritance
=
Setting/Irish
landscape/sce
nery

Genetics:
quarry their
image by a
river
Inheritance:
No good
offering the
view might
not even be
theirs.

HW
Compare the
significance of the
past in Inheritance
and one other poem
you have studied.
- Significance means
both importance and
meaning (what does
the past signify?)
- Approx. 500-750 words
- Due this time next
week

Summarize each poem briefly


(mention what each is about, and key
themes/feelings/issues)

Interpret what the past might


mean/how it might be used in the
poem
(e.g. personal history/national history; is
reflection on past used as a way of
pondering the present or projecting into
the future?)

Discuss use of form/structure first, but


link this to the question
(how do form/structure or lack of
form/structure reflect concerns with the
past?)

Analyze and compare 4-6 instances of


interesting/significant language use
(use terminology where possible e.g.
metaphor/simile etc.)

Use historical/cultural context and/or


biographical info. to support your
comments if/where possible
(e.g. history of Ireland in Inheritance)

3.1-3.2) History, by John


Burnside
What is history?
Or: what is the difference between the
past and history?
What would you expect a poem entitled
History to be about, and how might it
connect with the others we have studied?
Is history always about the past? (Think
of common ways in which the word
history is used.)

Read from the beginning of the poem


up to first nakedness on p. 26.
In what sense is the poet engaging
with history?
What is the news he mentions in the
second stanza?
What is the poet negotiating in the
fourth and fifth stanzas? In what sense
is this history?

After 9/11 there was a call for the


writers to make sense of the event.
What do we mean by event in
political/philosophical terms?
What is the inherent difficulty of
putting the event into words?

Does this quote affect your reading?


Our response to the world is
essentially one of wonder, of
confronting the mysterious with a
sense, not of being small, or
insignificant, but of being part of a rich
and complex narrative.
John Burnside

Compare the poem so far with the


others.
What similarities and differences can
we find?

Leuchars

St. Andrews

Coastal town in northeast Scotland


Know for railway
which goes to St.
Andrews
RAF base

Famous for its university


(third oldest university in
English-speaking world, after
Oxford and Cambridge;
oldest university in Scotland)
Famous for its gold course
Links: a particular type of
golf-course (dependent on
the type of terrain and soil);
the word derives an old
Scots word meaning rising
ground, ridge.

HW
What is the significance of history in
John Burnsides poem of the same
name?
For next Tuesday

3.3) Sue Boyle, A Leisure Centre


is Also a Temple of Learning
Glossaries
Folders

What is a temple?
A consecrated (made holy) place of worship; sacred
place where religious observances/rituals are carried
out
Also, etymologically, a place cut off
Heterotopia: hetero- (other/different); -topia
(place/space); coined by Michel Foucault
other space: a place that is both everyday and different,
and articulates the ordinary and the extraordinary;
potentially anywhere where one experiences something
different (or authentic?), something on the borders of real
and unreal (like seeing oneself in the mirror)

The leisure a heterotopic space?


What is
seen/understood/disclosed/learned
there?

The honey coloured girl in the womens changing room


is absorbed in making her body more beautiful:
she has flexed and toned every muscle with a morning sw
and showered away the pool chemicals
using an aromatic scrub and a gentle exfoliant.

Lithe as a young leopard, she has perfect bone structure;


her breasts mound as though sculptured from sand by a
her secret cleft is shaved as neatly as a charlatans mous

In dreamy abstractedness she applies cream,


then spray perfumes every part that might be loved.
Her long hands move in rhythm like a weavers at a loom
tipped throat, underchin, the little kisspoints below her e
the nuzzle between her breasts, her willow thighs.

Her head tilted like a listening bird


she brushes her hair so whistle clean it is like a waterfall.
A bee could sip her.
She is summer cream slipped over raspberries
She is so much younger than the rest of us.
She should look around.
We twelve are the chorus:
we know what happens next.

4.1) Essay Feedback


General Feedback:
Overall, good first responses
General grasp of poems sound
Most responses gave roughly equal treatment to both texts
Some good writing
Several attempts to integrate new vocabulary into answers

Common Targets:
Structure of responses: makes sense to tackle form/structure first
(start broad, then zoom-in on language)?
Some responses demonstrated good overall understanding but
tended to re-tell rather than analyze (very little language analysis)
More attention to be given to language at phrase/sentence level
and/or word/phrase level
A little more attention to be given to alternative interpretations

Marking Codes, Feedback, and


Progress Grids
Use sheet with codes/descriptors to
fill out targets: write in green pen
Fill out progress grids: point of these
is to see at a glance any patterns,
and to track progress
For now: Band 5 = A; Band 4 = B;
etc. Will adjust this when we have
more information

Group Analysis of poems


On Friday/Tuesday, one sheet per
group will be taken in and assessed
Posters to be displayed with names
on them (so make them count; no
rubbish!!)
Today:
Annotate/diagram for structure and
language
On language: look for one pattern (e.g.
symbol of x stands for) and one

Group Analysis
Today:
Write up two paragraphs:
Analyze one aspect of form/structure in detail
Analyze language (1-3 quotes, depending on detail) in detail

Use models to guide you


Two versions
Each paragraph to be written on lined paper (I will take
these in and feed back on them)
Each paragraphs to be written on A3 to go next to posters
Everyone should be involved in discussion; share writing out
between everyone
Names on sheets for feedback

On structure
Simon Armitages poem Harmonium is a free verse
meditation on the poets loving yet strained relationship with
his father. The tension between the poets sense of distance
from and closeness to his father is encapsulated at the level
of structure when Armitage writes And he, being him about
his father, and And I, being me about himself. The
grammatical parallelism [same grammatical structure] and
the repetition of words suggests that father and son are, in
some ways, very much alike (just these phrases are alike);
and yet, because these repeated words are separated by two
lines, the reader feels that it may be their similarity possibly
their stubbornness that keeps father and son distant from
each other and prevents them from communicating
effectively. [120 words]

Simon Armitages poem Harmonium


is a free verse meditation on the
poets loving yet strained relationship
with his father. The tension between
the poets sense of distance from and
closeness to his father is encapsulated
at the level of structure when
Armitage writes And he, being him
about his father, and And I, being me
about himself. The grammatical
parallelism [same grammatical
structure] and the repetition of words
suggests that father and son are, in
some ways, very much alike (just
these phrases are alike); and yet,
because these repeated words are
separated by two lines, the reader
feels that it may be their similarity
possibly their stubbornness that
keeps father and son distant from
each other and prevents them from
communicating effectively.

Mentions form (free verse:


even if there is not a
set/rigid form, there is still
something to be said)
Brief summary as to what
the poem is about
Structure highlighted
explicitly (structure can be
rhyme scheme, stanza
structure/length, sentence
structure, structural
features such as repetition)
Techniques mentioned
(repetition; parallelism)
Effect of repetition rather
than just meanings of words
considered

Armitages poem explores his relationship with his father and their
inability to communicate their feelings. The harmonium is a symbol of
both their closeness and their distance. Armitage writes that sunlight
had yellowed the fingernails of its [the harmoniums] keys. This image
prefigures a later description of the fathers smokers fingers and dottled
thumbs. By presenting us with an image of the harmoniums fragility
and age, Armitage hints at his concerns over his fathers health and age:
yellowed suggests ill-health, and the description of the fathers hands
suggests a heavy smoker. The fact that one of the harmoniums notes
had lots its tongue anticipates Armitages recognition of his own inability
to communicate with his father: in the final stanza, we are told that the
speaker utters a word / too starved of breath to make itself heard. The
yellowed keys and the silent key are thus part of the same instrument,
just as father and son are intimately connected, the keys stand side by
side just as father and son do in this poem. Nevertheless, one key
remains voiceless, just as Armitage does when he most wishes to speak.
[187 words]

Armitages poem explores his relationship


Summary of main themes/focus
with his father and their inability to
communicate their feelings. The
harmonium is a symbol of both their
Short quotation, integrated
closeness and their distance. Armitage
into sentence
writes that sunlight had yellowed the
fingernails of its [the harmoniums] keys.
This image prefigures a later description of Technical terms (image;
prefigures; links to other
the fathers smokers fingers and dottled
parts of poem; quote
thumbs. By presenting us with an image
explained/interpreted; zoomof the harmoniums fragility and age,
in on single word/phrase
Armitage hints at his concerns over his
(here yellowed) for further
fathers health and age: yellowed
analysis
suggests ill-health, and the description of
the fathers hands suggests a heavy
Second quote analyzed in
smoker. The fact that one of the
some detail and linked to
harmoniums notes had lots its tongue
other part of poem; no wordanticipates Armitages recognition of his
level analysis here, but
own inability to communicate with his
interpretation is focussed yet
father: in the final stanza, we are told that
developed
the speaker utters a word / too starved of
breath to make itself heard. The yellowed
keys and the silent key are thus part of the

4.3-5.2) Armitage: Chainsaw


Versus the Pampas Grass
What strikes you about the title (its
wording/structure)?
This is a narrative poem in free verse
Difference between free verse and
blank verse?

In groups:
1 stanza per group; focus on language
Structure can include repeated words/phrases, but
we are most concerned with language here

Look for images, symbols, similes/metaphors,


personification; clichs
Focus on your stanza, but then look for
patterns worked across the poem
Feedback (today and Tuesday): 3-4 key points
We will do the central, short stanza and the
final stanzas together

What is Chainsaw Versus the


Pampas Grass about?
How many different answers can you
give to this question?

6.1) Compare the ways in which poets present and use


nature in Chainsaw Versus the Pampas Grass by Simon
Armitage (on page 6) and one other poem of your choice.

Which poems might you consider for


this question, and why?
Discuss & note/brainstorm

For example
Chainsaw Versus the Pampas Grass + History
Because: In Armitages poem, nature is used to
symbolize deep-rooted problems that the speaker
either will not or cannot confront.
In Burnsides poem, nature is used to symbolize a
number of things: human limitation; the extraordinary
nature of the supposedly ordinary; the relationships
of people to the world and one another.
Your reason(s) for making the connection
becomes the thesis (main argument) which you
can state at the beginning of your essay

What am I doing in the


following paragraph?
Simon Armitages poem Chainsaw Versus the Pampas Grass
is, superficially, about the speakers failed attempt to uproot a
patch of pampas grass. Taking a metaphorical sledgehammer
to crack a nut, the speaker attempts to cut down the pampas
grass with a chainsaw. John Burnsides poem History is a
somewhat oblique [indirect; not straightforward]
response to the historic event known as 9/11. In both poems,
nature is used to explore and symbolize a number of issues.
For Armitage, nature symbolizes deep-rooted problems that
the speaker either will not or cannot confront. For Burnside,
nature is used to explore human limitation; the extraordinary
nature of the supposedly ordinary; the relationships of people
to the world and one another.
[116 words]

Simon Armitages poem Chainsaw


Versus the Pampas Grass is,
superficially, about the speakers
failed attempt to uproot a patch of
pampas grass. Taking a metaphorical
sledgehammer to crack a nut, the
speaker attempts to cut down the
pampas grass with a chainsaw. John
Burnsides poem History is a
somewhat oblique [indirect; not
straightforward] response to the
historic event known as 9/11. In both
poems, nature is used to explore and
symbolize a number of issues. For
Armitage, nature symbolizes deeprooted problems that the speaker
either will not or cannot confront. For
Burnside, nature is used to explore
human limitation; the extraordinary
nature of the supposedly ordinary; the
relationships of people to the world
and one another.

Very brief/succinct
summaries of the
basic stories or plots

Re-statement of your
reasons for
linking/comparing/contrasting
the poems: this is your
guiding argument/theme

Compare the ways in which poets present and


use nature in Chainsaw Versus the Pampas
Grass by Simon Armitage (on page 6) and
one other poem of your choice.
In your answer you should consider the
following:
the poets development of themes
the poets use of language and imagery
the use of other poetic techniques.

In your answer you should consider the


following:
the poets development of themes
the poets use of language and imagery
the use of other poetic techniques.
Notice that by writing the intro. paragraph
in the way suggesting, youre already
tackling the first bullet-point

Simon Armitages poem Chainsaw


Versus the Pampas Grass is,
superficially, about the speakers
failed attempt to uproot a patch of
pampas grass. Taking a metaphorical
sledgehammer to crack a nut, the
speaker attempts to cut down the
pampas grass with a chainsaw. John
Burnsides poem History is a
somewhat oblique [indirect; not
straightforward] response to the
historic event known as 9/11. In both
poems, nature is used to explore and
symbolize a number of issues. For
Armitage, nature symbolizes deeprooted problems that the speaker
either will not or cannot confront. For
Burnside, nature is used to explore
human limitation; the extraordinary
nature of the supposedly ordinary; the
relationships of people to the world
and one another.

Very brief/succinct
summaries of the
basic stories or plots

Re-statement of your
reasons for
linking/comparing/contrasting
the poems: this is your
guiding argument/theme

What makes this effective? Can you write an


accompanying paragraph on your other poem? TIP:
nature does not have to be doing the same job in
both poems (Similarly; By contrast)

Armitage personifies both the chainsaw and the pampas


grass, and in doing so he sharply juxtaposes nature
represented by the pampas grass with man-made or
mechanical things represented by Chainsaw (the lack
of a definite article [the] in the title casts Chainsaw as
a character in a battle or contest). Where Chainsaw is
presented as essentially violent and intent on destruction:
it is described as lashing out a quick and violent
action, like that of a fighter, perhaps or just someone
enraged and as having a bloody desire [] for the flesh
of the face. This second description presents Chainsaw
as almost psychopathic in its desire to harm, as the face
is often symbolic of the innermost identity of a person.

Plan your response using the bulletpoints as a guide.


Next lesson we will write up our
responses under timed conditions as
a classroom mock.
You will be allowed to use your
anthologies and any notes for this
first time piece.

Which poems might you link


Chainsaw Versus the Pampas Grass
to, and why?

Task
Compare the ways in which poets
present and use nature in
Chainsaw Versus the Pampas
Grass by Simon Armitage (on
page 6) and one other poem of
your choice.
In your answer you should
consider the following:
the poets development of
themes
the poets use of language and
imagery
the use of other poetic
techniques.

Lesson 6.2

Tips
Establish the link in the first
paragraph; explain what
nature does in each poem
(remember, nature does not
need to be doing the same
work in both texts
contrast/difference give you
more to write about).
After intro., start with
form/structure.
Then work through linguistic
techniques/themes.
Use the bullets as a guide.

7.1) Essay Feedback


Fill out targets and progress grids
Marks are on the front of the
assessment grid, targets on the back

7.1) Essay Feedback


Remember: assume approximately
a two-grade difference between A
Level and GCSE (so A* GCSE work
would be C+ at A Level).
Remember, too, that this is the first
extended piece youve tried under
timed conditions for several months.

Grade Boundaries

A: 25 +
B: 22-24
C: 19-21
D:15-18
E: 10-14

Modal mark this time was 15

Illocutionary force: the actual


effects of an utterance, regardless of
its intended meaning
Polysyndetic: syndetic sentences
are those whose clauses are
connected by conjunctions;
polysyndetic = many conjunctions
Asyndetic: asyndetic sentences are
those in which clauses are not joined
by conjunctions

Look at the marking criteria for Level


5.
Individually, read the A-grade
response (28 marks).
Annotate as you notice the writer
hitting the marking criteria. These
are broad, so make a brief note as to
what it is that the writer is doing.
Be ready to discuss and feed back.

Repeat for the Level 4 (C-ish)


response.
Annotate for the Level 4 marking
criteria, and also make comparisons
with what the Level 5 piece.

Now use green pen to


revise/rewrite/extend a paragraph
from your essay, using either one of
the exemplar pieces as a model.

Markers Feedback
28: A response

20 marks: C(-ish)
response
This essay has a controlled argument and
is placed in Level 4, with 20 out of 30
marks. It works efficiently through a range
of points, although it doesnt quite get to
the heart of the auntie-niece relationship;
because expression is clear and a range of
technical points is used the essay can
sometimes appear to be saying more than
it actually is. We are told, for example that
the structure positions the reader within
aunties perspective (but it is not quite
clear why exactly this is an effect of
structure) and occasionally points are
dubious the lack of caesuras
encourages the idea of helplessness and
the and sentence structure gets shorter
neither of these points is accurate.

A-grade response

Notice that a misunderstanding (the


comment about Eine Kleine
Nachtmusik) is still given credit
because it seems reasonable and is
well-supported.
Compare that acceptance with the
comment on the Level 4 (C-ish)
response

Level 4
This essay has a controlled argument and is placed in
Level 4, with 20 out of 30 marks. It works efficiently
through a range of points, although it doesnt quite get
to the heart of the auntie-niece relationship; because
expression is clear and a range of technical points is
used the essay can sometimes appear to be saying more
than it actually is. We are told, for example that the
structure positions the reader within aunties perspective
(but it is not quite clear why exactly this is an effect of
structure) and occasionally points are dubious the lack
of caesuras encourages the idea of helplessness and
the and sentence structure gets shorter neither of
these points is accurate.

A-grade response

7.2) Response to feedback: 10 minutes

Using the exemplars from last lesson,


revise/rewrite/extend one part of your essay.
Write in green pen.
Use the targets as a guide:
E.g. do you need to rewrite for accuracy/clarity?
E.g. do you need to rewrite to extend
analysis/interpetation?

If you dont have your essay with you, write a


new paragraph, using the exemplars as a
guide. Answer on the same poems.

1853262404

0141188413

7.2) On Her Blindness, by


Adam Thorpe
What is this poem about?
Look at the opening couplet and the
final couplet: what are the major
concerns/themes?

How would you describe the overall


verse structure of the poem?
What might its significance be?

Enjambment
Look at instances of enjambment,
particularly across stanzas.
What is the effect of this technique?
Consider the words/phrases the
enjambments draw attention to
How might you link these words/phrases
to the overarching themes/concerns?

Focalization
Writing from a particular characters
perspective without changing the
narrative voice/POV.
For example (third-person; focalized
through protagonist):
As the sun came up, she watched the
horizon and wondered about her friends
and family: so far away. Did they miss
her? What were they doing? Did they
have families?

Register/Diction
How would you describe the
register/diction of this poem?
What is the significance of this?
What do make of the use of reported
and direct speech, and focalization?

8-10 key quotes (allowing for twice


round classroom)
Identify quote
Identify technique
Why is it significant?
How does it link to the main themes
of the poem?

7.3) Essay Planning


Consider the ways in which the poets
present relationships in On Her Blindness
and one other poem you have studied.
In your answer you should consider the
following:
the poets development of themes
the poets use of language and imagery
the use of other poetic techniques.

Find a connection between On Her Blindness


and all the other poems. Make a note of them; you
will choose the best one later.

On Her Blindness

Genetics
Inheritance
Chainsaw Versus the
Pampas Grass
History
To My Nine-Year-Old
Self
A Leisure Centre Is Also
A Temple of Learning
The Furthest Distances
Ive Travelled

Plan and write your introduction,


using the exemplar pieces as a
guide.

Autumn 2

1.1) Alan Jenkins, Effects


(p. 92), and Tishani Doshi,
The Deliverer (p. 43)

Alan Jenkins
Jenkins has said he was once told,
Your subject is loss. Stay with that.
In earlier works the loss was focused
on love; later work has included
many elegies for friends and his
parents.

1. What story is being told?


2. What state is the mother in? When is this made plain? Why
does the narrator delay this revelation?
3. How many sentences make up this poem?
4. How does the poems syntax and single stanza structure help
to convey the narrators reaction to his mothers death?
5. Chart the patterns of rhyme in the poem. How do they
change during the course of the poem? How might this
reflect the central relationship between mother and son?
6. Discuss the importance of hands as an image in the poem.
7. What clues does the poem give us as to the narrators family
life and background? What is his attitude towards this past?

Doshi, The Deliverer


What does the title suggest? (What
possible meanings does deliverer
have?)

Tishani Doshi
Poet, writer and dancer;
born in the city formerly known as Madras (now
Chennai), India, to Welsh and Gujarati parents;
earned a BA from Queens College in North Carolina
and an MA from the Writing Seminars department
at Johns Hopkins University (both USA);
worked in the fashion-magazine industry in London,
before returning to India;
unexpected meeting with one of Indian dances
leading choreographers, Chandralekha, led Doshi to
a career in dance.

1. What story is being told?


2. What is the narrators relationship to the story
that she is telling?
3. What is the significance of the locations?
4. What is the significance of the use of short
sequences?
5. What do you notice about the verb choices used
in relation to girl babies and their mothers?
6. Think again about the title: what is its
significance?

HW
Revise new poems (Jenkins, Effects; Doshi, The
Deliverer; Feaver, The Gun; Barber,
Material), and read ahead for study of the
following: OBrien, Fantasia on a Theme by James
Wright (p. 130); Fanthorpe, A Minor Role (p.57)
Read Heart of Darkness, which we will start
Friday, following timed poetry practice in class on
Thursday. The question will name one of the new
poems, and ask you to compare it to another of
the new poems. The focus will be on settings.

Vicki Feaver, The Gun


(p. 62)
Look at the opening stanza: what
changes do you expect the narrator
to mention? How might a gun change
a house?

1. What do you think the narrator means when she


says, A gun brings a house alive? What evidence
does the poem present to support this idea? Does
the poem convince you this is the case?
2. Look closely at the line breaks in the poem. What do
you notice about them? How do you think they
connect to the poems subject matter?
3. Divide into four groups and pick one of the longer
stanzas to analyse. Look at the predominant sounds
in each stanza, including examples of alliteration,
assonance and rhyme/half rhyme. Discuss as a class
how these contribute to the poems overall impact.

Ros Barber, Material


What does the title suggest?
What are the differences between
material, materialism, and
materialistic?

Ros Barber was born in 1964 (in


America, to British parents), but grew
up in England (Essex as a child;
moved to Brighton aged 18).
If she is drawing on experience in
this poem, then it is not the
experience of such a distant past:
late 1960s, into the 1970s.

1. What story is being told?


2. What is the symbolic importance of
hankies?
3. What is the significance of material?
4. Discuss the narrators attitude towards
motherhood? Discuss with reference to
quotations, and consider the ambivalence
of the narrators attitude.
5. What is the rhyme scheme, and what is its
significance?

Task
Write about the ways in
which the poets present and
use setting in Ros Barbers
Material (p.10) and any of
the poems in the righthand, white-filled box.
In your answer you should
consider the following:
the poets development of
themes
the poets use of language
and imagery
the use of other poetic
techniques.

Lesson 6.2

Tips
Establish the link in the first paragraph;
explain what nature does in each poem
(remember, nature does not need to be
doing the same work in both texts
contrast/difference give you more to write
about).
After intro., start with form/structure.
Then work through linguistic
techniques/themes.
Use the bullets as a guide.

Alan Jenkins, Effects


Tishani Doshi, The
Deliverer
Viki Feaver, The Gun

Vocabulary
James Wright (1927-1980): American poet whose poetry
dealt with disenfranchisement (powerlessness, especially
legal/political), the outsider, emotional suffering
West Moor and Palmersville: colliery (coal mining) villages
near Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Hedleys Coming Home: Painting of miners by Ralph
Hedley (1848-1913), an artist best known for his paintings
portraying scenes of everyday life in the North East of
England.
noyade: (French) destruction or execution by drowning,
especially as practiced at Nantes, France, in 179394, during
the Reign of Terror after the French Revolution of 1789

Sean OBrien
Poet and academic
Born (1952) in
London, but grew up
in Hull and now lives
in Newcastle (both
north-east England;
both
mining/industrial
towns)

James Wright

Ralph Hedleys
Coming Home

1. What story is being told?


2. Look at the use of levels in the poem: what is the
symbolic significance of the miners being
underground?
3. (A)How does OBrien use sound and rhythm to
present the miners? (B) What is the narrators
attitude towards the miners?
4. What do you notice about the structure of the
poem? How does it relate to/reflect the subject
matter?
5. Does the poem believe that the miners history is
done?

U.A. Fanthorpe, A Minor Role


(p.57)
1. What story is being told?
2. What is the significance of the metaphor of the stage?
3. How is the metaphor of the stage brought back
towards the end, and what is the significance of this?
4. Look at all the references to speech, talk, or the use
of direct speech: what do these moments suggest in
relation to the central theme of illness/death?
5. Consider the use of tense or verb forms: what do
these tell us about the narrators attitude towards
illness/death?
6. Given you answers to the previous questions, what do
you think the significance of the last line might be?

6.3) Seamus Heaney, Out of


the Bag
Group analysis
Feedback next lesson
Each group will be given a second
poem to compare Heaneys with;
links must be made in the feedback
Annotations in anthologies
Links/comparisons in notebooks

Patience Agbabi, Eat Me


(p.3)
Read this and Please Hold
For Wednesday, read The Fox in the
National Museum of Wales.

Discuss the following questions; as you go, try


to make connections with Please Hold and any
other poems youve studied

What is the poem about?


How many voices are there in the poem? What is
the significance of this?
How is the womans body described and how
does the description of the womans body
change?
What is the relationship between the body and
power in this poem?
Is the poem about gender relations only?
Are there any formal aspects of the poem that
strike you as significant?

Please Hold
What is the poem about?
What is the significance of the poets use of
repetition?
What is the (ironic?) significance of the
refrain this is the future?
Why do you think the last three lines are set
aside and how do they differ from the rest of
the poem?
What strikes you as significant about the
language (is it typically poetic?)?

Compare the ways in


which the writers of your
two chosen texts present
characters of different
backgrounds.

Compare the ways in


which the writers of your
two chosen texts present
the idea that colonisation
results in greed.

In your answer you must


consider the following:
- the writers methods
- links between the texts
- the relevance of
contextual factors.

In your answer you must


consider the following:
- the writers methods
- links between the texts
- the relevance of
contextual factors.

Ciaran Carson, The War


Correspondent
What does the title suggest?
What is strange about the term war
correspondent when applied to
Gallipoli (1915-16) and Balaklava
(1854)?

Benares: holy site on the banks of the Ganges in


India
Boulogne: Port town in northern France
Gallipoli: Allied campaign to defeat Ottoman Empire
during WWI (1915-16). Allies defeated by Ottoman
Empire; more than 100,000 dead.
Charge of the Light Brigade: 25 October, 1854
(part of the Battle of Balaklava, Crimean War). British
troops attempt to storm a Russian artillery battery.
The battery was very well defended, and the British
troops suffered heavy casualties (more than 200
troops killed or wounded; 60 taken prisoner).

Carson is from Belfast (N. Ireland),


and was born in 1948.
Is there any significance between his
background and the subject of the
poems?

1. What do the poems have in


common?
2. What separates them?
3. Consider the ways in which they
appeal to the senses: find quotes,
and ask why this sensory
overload?
4. 3-4 big ideas/issues the poet raises
5. Shift in perspective/voice/tone?
6. Links to other poems?

Write about the significance of


journeys in the texts you have
studied.

Ian Duig, The Lammas


Hireling
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

What story is being told? (4 groups; what happens in each


stanza?)
What kind of story is being told (genre/tradition)?
What questions does the elusive nature of the poem
encourage us to ask?
How is the reader positioned in relation to the speaker?
2 key quotes from each stanza.
Links to other poems?
Read the Duffy poem Map Woman for Thursday. We
will have to work on the basis that it has been read; it
is too long to read and study in 1 lesson.

Lammas the festival of loafmass, 1


August traditionally a time for hiring help
with the harvest
a cow with leather horns Irish riddle
meaning hare
muckle dialect word meaning much
elf-shot cursed
casting ball the process of making shot
for a shotgun. Gamekeepers often made
their own.

The Map-Woman
Read and make notes on the
summary...

This narrative poem tells the story of a


woman (never named) who feels the weight of
her past on and in herself at all times.
This is a poem that seems to take it as a basic
truism that we embody our histories we now
are embodiments of the sum totals of our
pasts.
Much of the poem is concerned with mapping
the womans past to the body (e.g. Stanzas 12); this is symbolized by mapping the town
itself over the womans body.

The grown woman seems never to be comfortable in


her own skin their are several references to speaking
in foreign languages, as if the woman is a stranger to
herself.
Eventually, the woman returns to her home town, and
now the mapping of the town transfers from the
symbolic mapping over the body, to the town itself.
However, the town that has remained so alive in
memory is now the same as it was only superficially,
and the woman finds herself lost once again (or still?).
In a strange final stanza, the woman sheds her
second skin and drives away from the town.

Biographical note:
Duffy was born in Glasgow in 1955,
and grew up in Staffordshire.
She was encouraged to write from an
early age (10) by one of her
teachers, who was an inspiration to
her.

Look for brief quotations exemplifying the


following, and consider their significance:
1. the past figured/symbolized as the story/narrative/history
of who we are or become (stanzas 1,3,4);
2. references to time, and the suggestion that it only moves
in one direction (times arrow) (stanzas 6-9);
3. the idea that the past may be what makes us who we are,
but we can never relive/retrieve it (11-12);
4. the sense that the woman feels like a stranger to herself
(8,10);
5. Failed attempts to bury/smother/stifle the past (stanzas 1,
7, 10.
. What do you make of the resolution in the final
stanza? Is this really as resolution?

There are a number of examples of


enjambment across stanzas: what do
you make of this?
There is no set rhyme scheme, but
rhyme is used both end rhyme and
internal rhyme.
Find examples of both, and consider
their significance.