The Effects of Bisphenol S on the Behavior

Patterns of Drosophila melanogaster with
FMR1 Gene Insertions
Arooba Lodhi
Niles North High School

Graphs and Results

Data Analysis

Control Groups

● Control 1 Average Behavior Patterns- ranking of 1 signifying that locomotion, clumping, reaction to
light, and reaction to additional food source patterns remained consistent and normal
● Control 2 Average Behavior Patterns- ranking of 1 signifying that over 80% of fruit flies displayed
normal locomotion, clumping, reaction to light, and reaction to additional food source patterns
● Both groups established a baseline for normal behavior patterns for the three week testing period

No BPS Groups
● No BPS 3 Average Behavior Patterns- ranking of 1 for normal locomotion and clumping patterns for
the first week and normal locomotion, clumping, and reaction to light patterns for the second week
● No BPS 3 Average Behavior Patterns- week three shifted behavior by slighting increasing rankings
between 1 and 2 for locomotion, clumping, and reaction to additional food source
● No BPS 4 Average Behavior Patterns- displayed similar patterns to group 3 with a ranking of 1 for
locomotion and clumping patterns for week one
● No BPS 4 Average Behavior Patterns- displayed slightly intensified behavior with rankings between
1 and 2 for all behavior categories in weeks two and three

BPS Groups
● BPS Group 5 Average Behavior Patterns- ranking of 1.6 for week one, to a ranking of 2 for week
two, and a ranking of 2.7 for week 3 signifying a large shift from the normal movement patterns
● BPS Group 5 Average Behavior Patterns- rankings averaged above 2 for clumping patterns and
reaction to light; rankings were significantly higher for all categories that No BPS groups
● BPS Group 6 Average Behavior Patterns- rankings for locomotion and clumping progressed from
normal patterns of 1 to rankings above 2; reaction to light and additional food source remained
higher than No BPS group rankings

Experimental Error
Food Consumption Rates
● No definite way of accounting for the amount of media (or BPS) each
individual specimen consumed during the three week testing period
● Consuming more or less BPS- alter the behavior patterns of the specimen
either by intensifying particular symptoms or reducing others
● Tubes were monitored to make sure the same amount of specimen
remained in each group

Death and Reproduction of Specimen
● No definite way to keep track of the dead and the newborn so all the
specimen in one tube were grouped together
● Tubes may have held more or less specimen due to random deaths and
faster reproductive capabilities- created a larger or smaller sample size
● Fruit flies altered to not reproduce could be observed to create more stable
sample groups

Transference of Specimen
● Fruit flies were placed in a more fresh environment at the end of each
week allowing the older media and/or BPS to not affect behavior as
intensely as at the start of the weekly trial
● each tube should be given a fresh media and/or BPS source daily

Experimenter’s Bias
● Experimenter already had an idea of what the expected data should look
like so rankings based on those expectations were given
● 2-3 people were given the key and asked to rank behavior on different days