Serena Vargas 

Digestive System Lab Report  
 
This lab report addresses the structure of the mouth and the digestive system. Taste is one of 
the five senses that belong to the gustatory system.  The tongue is covered by thousands of 
papillae. There are around 2,000 and 5,000 taste buds that are located on the front and the 
back of the area of the mouth. Taste buds can also be found on the side of the mouths and the 
backs of the throat. On each papilla, there are hundreds of taste buds located on the inside. 
Since there are such large amounts of papilla and they are decent sized, you are able to see 
them and locate them yourself. 
The human saliva consists of 99.5% water. Only 0.5% of the saliva in the human mouth consists 
of electrolytes. The salivary glands in our body make as much as a quart of saliva each day. 
Saliva helps protect your teeth from and harmful bacteria that may form. Enzymes are found in 
the saliva. The enzymes that are found in saliva are vital components in beginning the process 
of digestion.  Teeth are used for the purpose of breaking down food. While some people may 
assume that teeth are made of bone, they are actually not. Teeth are not even considered 
bones. The things that make up the tooth are enamel, dentine, and the pulp cavity. The normal 
amount of teeth in the human body is 32. The types of teeth consists of 8 incisors, 4 canines, 8 
premolars, and 12 molars. Each type of tooth in the mouth has a different job. The function of 
the stomach is breaking down food and digesting in so that it will extract nutrients from what you 
have previously written.  
 
For the safety in this lab report we used goggles to prevent any chemicals from getting in our 
eyes. We used aprons to prevent the iodine from getting on our clothes. In the lab we attempted 
to see what the effects of salivary amylase on starch. Saliva contains an enzyme known as 
salivary amylase which hydrolyses the starch into maltose. It is only in the small intestine that 
the complete digestion of the starch takes place due to the action of the pancreatic amylase. 
The way that it works is salivary amylase split the starch and the glycogen molecules into what 
are known as disaccharides. Our representation for starch was a cracker. We used the spit that 
we had collected for a whole class period. First, we put the took the edge of the cracker, 
crushed it up and put it at the bottom of the test tube. Once the cracker was placed, we put 30 
drops of saliva into the test tube as well. We let those tubes sit for several days so we could see 
the changes it makes throughout the week.  
 

 
 
Figure 2: In the picture to the left is the set up and process how we tested the effects of salivary 
amylase on starch. It shows the liquids we used, as well as the amount of spit and other things 
we put inside of the test tube.  
 
In this lab report, we basically tested to see if 80% of taste is smell. We used gloves just 
because we were touching objects and we did not want to take any risks in infecting ourselves 
or the other person. The way this lab went was that there were 5 different types of foods. One 
partner fed the food to the other person to see if they could identify what it was. To prevent the 
partner from identifying it even quicker, they placed cotton balls in their noses so they would not 
smell what they were tasting. The person that was eating the food was given 5 seconds to try to 
identify it without smelling it. Once the 5 seconds passed and they could not identify the food, 
the partner then took the cotton balls out to see if they could distinguish what it was. There was 
a chart to with different sections check for if the person was able to identify it or not.  
 
Food 

5 seconds 
placed on 
tongue 

5 sec chew 

5 sec unplug 
nose and chew 

Didn’t ID food 

1. Apple 

✓ 

 

 

 

     2.   Carrot 

✓ 

 

 

 

     3.   Cheese 

 

 

     4.   Banana 

 

 

 

✓ 

     5.   Potato 

 

 

 

✓ 

✓ 

 

 
Figure #3:  Above is a picture of the taste lab data. The apple was identified when it was placed 
on the tongue for 5 seconds. The carrot was also identified when it was placed on the tongue for 
5 seconds. The cheese was not able to identified at all. The banana and potato were also never 
able to be identified.  

 
Mammal teeth have several different jobs, they can can grind, stab, scissor, dig and lift. The 
teeth are the hardest part of the mammal. Each species of mammal has different sizes, shapes 
and different amounts of teeth. Mammals have four different types of teeth, all four with different 
jobs. The four types of teeth are incisors, canines, premolars and molars. The incisors are what 
for nipping, the canines are used for grabbing the prey, the premolars are used for grinding and 
chewing the food, and the molars are used for grinding and shearing the food, For many of the 
mammals, their teeth stop growing and there is a reduction of their blood supply.  

 
Photo Credit to: Logan Boyett 
Figure #4: Above in the picture are four different types of teeth and where they are located at in 
the mouth. 
 
Protein digestion takes place between your mouth and your small intestine. Once a protein has  
been digested it is then broken down into amino acids. Your body regulates protein digestion 
through hormones, it also regulates protein digestion. Protein digestion works by reducing the 
dietary protein to amino acids within your  
gastrointestinal tract. When it comes to gastric juices, pepsin is the most important of the 
enzymes. Pepsin is what begins the digestion of almost all types of the dietary proteins. Gastric 
juices contain a minimal amount of enzymes that split up the fat. That process is not very strong 
because of the fact there is such a low amount of pH of gastric juice.  
 
In this lab, we cut two slices of boiled egg. The two slices of egg had to be translucent in order 
to be used in this lab. Once the slices were cut we put those, as well as 20 drops of pepsin into 
the test tube. Once the pepsin was added, we then put in 10 drops of HCL only into the 
experimental test tube. 20 drops of H20 were added to both the experimental and controlled test 
tubes. Once we completed that part of the lab we moved onto something else. Throughout the 

week we would check on the egg and discover the differences in the test tubes and how the egg 
was no longer there.  

 
Figure #5: Above are the pictures that show after a day has passed how the egg remained in 
the controlled test tube, but nothing remained in the experimental test tube.  
 
 
The esophagus is known to be straight and it is also known to be nearly 25 centimeters long. 
The function of the esophagus is that it allows there to be a passage for the food to pass 
through. Since the wall of the esophagus is muscular that benefits in the movement of food from 
the pharynx to the stomach. The esophagus is located at the base of the laryngopharynx and 
continues on to the posterior of the thorax. The stomach is shaped like the letter J, which is 
nearly 25­30 centimeters long. The capacity of the stomach is about one liter. The stomach 
receives food from the esophagus and then that mixes with gastric juices. The stomach can be 
divided into several different parts. Those several parts are the cardia, the fundus, the body, and 
pylorus.  

 

 
Photo credits to: Logan Boyett 
Figure #6: Above in the pictures are the different labeled parts of the cat’s stomach.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Another name for the small intestine is the small bowel. The small intestine is connected to the 
stomach and it is what absorbs about 90% of the nutrients from the food that we digest. There 
are three segments that make up the small intestine. The three segments that make up the 
small intestine are the duodenum, jejunum, and the ileum. Once your food has reached the 
small intestine, it is already broken up and made into what is then a liquid. The large intestine is 
also known as the colon or the large bowel. The large intestine is about five feet long and takes 
a wider path through your belly. What is absorbed in the large intestine is water and salts from 
what has already been digested and then it gets rid of any waste products that are left over. 
Once the juices reach your large intestine, majority of the absorption and digestion has already 
taken place in the large intestine.  
 
Experimental Data 
­­­­­­­­­­­ 

Control  Unknown 

Unknow

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

­­­­­­­­­ 

Drops of fluid from 
salivary duct, min ­1 

10 

10 

10 

70 

12 

pH of the stomach 

1.9 

1.8 

Drops of fluid from 
pancreatic duct, min ­1 

77 

30 

9.5 

pH of fluid from a main 
pancreatic duct 

7.2 

10 

7.6 

7.2 

Drops of fluid from 
common bile duct, min ­1 

64 

2.3 

2.4 

2.4 

Motility of stomach, no. of 
contractions/min 

3.6 

15 

3.4 

1.0 

Motility of small intestine, 
no. of contractions/min  

15 

17 

18 

30 

17 

13 

Blood glucose level 

100 

101 

100 

104 

102 

60 

Strength of contraction 

10 

12 

12 

50 

12 

 
Figure 7: In the chart above is information that was retained from a lab that dealt with 5 rats 
being injected with different substances.  
 
 
 
 

 
 
Experimental Data  

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknown 

Unknow

Unknown 

­­­­­­ 

Drops of fluid from salivary duct  

­ 

­ 

↑ 

­ 

­ 

pH of stomach 

­ 

­ 

↓ 

↓ 

↑ 

Drops of fluid from pancreatic duct 

↑ 

↑ 

­ 

­ 

­ 

Drops of fluid from main pancreatic 
duct 

­ 

↑ 

­ 

­ 

­ 

Drops of fluid from common bile 
duct 

↑ 

­ 

­ 

­ 

­ 

Motility of stomach 

­ 

­ 

↑ 

­ 

↓ 

Motility of small intestine 

­ 

­ 

↑ 

­ 

­ 

Blood Glucose Level 

­ 

­ 

­ 

­ 

↓ 

Strength of contraction 

­ 

­ 

↑ 

­ 

↓ 

 
Figure 8: In the graph above is a comparison of the effects of the unknown agents on the 
different functions occurring within the “virtual rat” lab.  
 
Unknown 1  

Unknown 2 

Unknown 3 

Unknown 4 

Unknown 5 

CCK 

Secretin 

ACL 

Gastrin 

GIP 

 
Figure 9: In the chart is above is the 5 unknowns that were involved in the lab and which 
unknown was injected with what substance. 
 

 
Photo Credits to: Logan Boyett 
Figure 10: In the pictures above are labeled photos of the intestines inside the cat.  
 
What starts the chemical digestion of foods are the enzymes that are in the saliva. Amylase is 
what starts the breakdown of what are known as the carbohydrates. When the food arrives at 
the stomach, pepsinogen and hydrochloric acid are secreted by gastric glands. Pepsin assists 
and contributes to the process of the digestion system. Gastrin is the only hormone that is 
indicated to be strongly released due to the neural stimulation. Once it has been secreted into 
the bloodstream, the hormone gastrin travels through the circulation to the and returns to 
stimulate the parietal cells in the stomach that secrete hydrochloric acid. HCl breaks down 
proteins and allows pepsinogen to be converted into its active form. The preliminary digestion of 
proteins begins with pepsin.  The four main GI hormones are gastrin (secreted in response to 
distension of the stomach), secretin (secreted in response to acid), CCK (secreted mainly in 
response to fat), and GIP (secreted in response to fats and carbohydrates). Secretin is the 
second  hormone and it is nature’s antacid. Secretin is released from the S cells when the acidic 
gastric juices and chyme enter the duodenum of the small intestine and lowers the pH to 4.5. 
Secretin travels through the blood to the pancreas to stimulate pancreatic HCO­3. The third 
hormone is CCK. Fat and protein in the small intestine stimulate cells in the duodenum to 
release CCK. The hormone CCK travels through the blood to what is known as the gallbladder, 
it also travels to the pancreas. CCK causes the sphincter of Oddi to relax so that both the 
pancreatic enzymes and bile can flow into the duodenum. GIP is the final hormone and it 

happens to be released from the K cells and is secreted mainly due to fat. GIP decreases 
secretory and motor activity of the stomach. GIP mainly causes insulin to be released from the B 
cells of the pancreas.