Diabetes 

 
 
By Daniel Harbourne 
 
 

Type 1 Diabetes 
 
Type 1 diabetes is also known as diabetes mellitus type ​
is a form of 
diabetes mellitus​
 ​
that results from the ​
autoimmune​
 destruction of the 
insulin​
­producing ​
beta cells​
 in the ​
pancreas​
. This basically means that the 
pancreas that regularly makes sure the balance of sugar in the blood is 
correct by breaking it down using the chemical insulin which it creates. It 
acts a type of key to break down the lock of the sugars. However with type 
1 diabetes the fact is that the cells that actually make and provide the 
insulin   
 
Type 1 Diabetes mellitus can also be referred to as insulin­dependent 
diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early onset diabetes . People usually 
develop type 1 diabetes before their 40 years of age, usually in early 
adulthood, or during their adolescent years. 
 
Type 1 diabetes is nowhere near as common as type 2 diabetes . 
Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. 
 
Patients with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin injections for the rest 
of their life. They must also ensure proper blood­glucose levels by carrying 
out regular blood tests and following a special diet. 

 

 

Type 2 Diabetes 
 
Diabetes mellitus type 2​
 (formerly ​
noninsulin­dependent diabetes mellitus 
or ​
adult­onset diabetes​
) is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by 
hyperglycemia ​
(high blood sugar) in the context of ​
insulin resistance ​
and 
relative lack of insulin. This is in contrast to ​
diabetes mellitus type 1 in 
which there is an absolute lack of insulin due to breakdown of islet cells in 
the ​
pancreas .​
The classic symptoms are excess thirst, frequent urination, 
and constant hunger. Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of 
diabetes ​
with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and 
gestational diabetes. Obesity is thought to be the primary cause of type 2 
diabetes in people who are genetically predisposed to the disease 
(although this is not the case in people of East­Asian ancestry). 
 
In this case the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function 
or the cells in the body do not react to insulin. 
 
Some people may be able to control their type 2 diabetes symptoms by 
losing weight , following a healthy diet, doing plenty of exercise, and 
monitoring their blood glucose levels. However type 2 diabetes is typically a 
progressive disease ( it gradually gets worse) and the patient may 
eventually have to take insulin in tablet form. 
 
Overweight and obese people have a much higher risk of developing type 2 
diabetes compared to those with a healthy body weight. People with a lot of 
extra fat are especially at risk. 
 
 

An Introduction 
 
Diabetes or officially Diabetes Mellitus,describe a group of metabolic 
diseases in which the person has high blood glucose ( blood sugar ) either 
because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body’s cells  do 
not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will 
typically experience polyuria (when there is frequent urination ), they can 
become increasingly thirst, and very hungry. 
 
Diabetes is a long­term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. 
It is estimated that approximately over 383 million people suffer from 
diabetes around the world.

 
 

 

Gestational Diabetes 
 
Gestational diabetes​
 (or ​
gestational diabetes mellitus​
, is a condition in 
which women without previously diagnosed ​
diabetes​
 exhibit high blood 
glucose​
(blood sugar) levels during ​
pregnancy ​
(especially during their third 
trimester). Gestational diabetes is caused when ​
insulin receptors ​
do not 
function properly. This is likely due to pregnancy­related factors such as the 
presence of placental lactogen that interferes with susceptible insulin 
receptors. This in turn causes inappropriately elevated blood sugar levels. 
 
During pregnancy, some women have very high blood sugar levels, and 
their bodies are unable to transport all of the glucose into their cells. This 
results in progressively rising levels of glucose in the body. 
 
The majority of gestational diabetes patients can control their diabetes with 
exercise and diet habits. Between 10% and 20% of cases will need to take 
some kind of blood­glucose­controlling medications. Undiagnosed or 
uncontrolled gestational diabetes can raise the risk of complications, before 
and after childbirth. the baby may be be bigger than expected. 
 
 
 
 

Medications 
 
The goal is to keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible to 
delay or prevent complications. Although there are exceptions, generally, 
the goal is to keep your daytime blood sugar levels before meals between 
70 and 130 mg/dL (3.9 to 7.2 mmol/L) and your after meal numbers no 
higher than 180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) two hours after eating. 
To do this, diabetics need to administer insulin injections throughout their 
day. There are different ways of administering insulin to the body. 
 
● Injections 
When people are first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes they must use a fine 
needle and syringe or an insulin pen to inject insulin under your skin. 
Insulin pens look similar to ink pens, and are available in disposable or 
refillable varieties. Needles are available in a variety of sizes. 
Also in order to check how much insulin they need to inject, they must prick 
themselves with a smaller needle to draw blood into strips that can be 
placed in a blood sugar “checker” to determine if the patient has a high, low 
or middle blood sugar. Generally between 4 and 7 is considered average 
blood sugar levels 
Patients check their blood sugar every 2 hours, and unfortunately have to 
do this during the night as well. Also patients can determine how much 
carbohydrate and other minerals and nutrients they need. Looking in a 
positive manner, it allow patients to naturally keep a watchful eye over their 
health and fitness levaels 

 
 
● The Insulin Pump 
This is a machine designed to be filled with insulin. Unlike the constant 
injections of different amounts of insulin, this has a large supply in one 
area. It is generally worn on clothing , and connected to the body through a 
tube and a “site” on the body. A fresh connection must be made every 2 
days and, an injection to connect the

 

tube can be inserted into the arm, stomach, or bum, depending on the 
patient's preference. 
Then when a person checks their blood sugar, they can determine the 
amount of insulin they need, and input the information onto their pumps, 
which will then gradually administer the insulin, through the tube, into the 
body. 
● Artificial Pancreas 
An emerging treatment approach, not yet available, is closed­loop insulin 
delivery, also known as the artificial pancreas. It links a continuous glucose 
monitor to an insulin pump. The device automatically delivers the correct 
amount of insulin when the monitor indicates the need for it. There are a 
number of different versions of the artificial pancreas, and clinical trials 
have had encouraging results. More research needs to be done before a 
fully functional artificial pancreas can receive regulatory approval. 

 
 

Symptoms 
 










Frequent urination 
Excessive thirst 
Increased hunger 
Weight loss 
Tiredness 
Lack of interest and concentration 
A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet 
Blurred vision 
Frequent infections 
Slow­healing wounds 
Vomiting and stomach pain (often mistaken as the flu) 

 
When a person is first diagnosed with diabetes they may be diagnosed with 
these symptoms. Some are common for all 3 types of diabetes, however 
some are limited to being signs that the development of type 2 diabetes 
mellitus is ongoing.

 

The Cure for Diabetes 
In the world today there is no known cure for diabetes type 1, however type 
2 diabetes can be reversed if proper good eating and exercise habits are 
adhered. 
Researchers are beginning to get excited again that a cure or near­cure 
treatment could come as early as within the next decade or two. A ​
diabetes 
vaccine​
 diabetes vaccine is consistently being investigated to provide a 
true biological cure for type 1 diabetes. 
The aim is for a vaccine to be created that stops the immune system from 
attacking the body's insulin­producing beta cells. 
Another cure prospect gaining momentum is ​
islet cell encapsulation​
, with 
stem cells used to create insulin­producing cells that can work without 
immune system interference. 
Research is ongoing to try and find a preventative vaccine or even a cure 
for diabetes mellitus