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Children have a natural curiosity about their peers from other countries.

They generally want to know where they


live, how they dress, what they eat and what their school day may look like. Passport to Play offers your students
an opportunity to engage in a cross-curricular, education standards-aligned program that combines physical
education, health, life skills, language arts, geography and art. It is up to you to decide how to infuse Passport
to Play into your curriculum. The program is well-suited to team teaching but the topics/activities can also be
successfully implemented by individual teachers. It can be a month-long journey or the program can be utilized
over the course of a semester. In that time, your students will virtually visit 11 countries, including; New Zealand,
Colombia, Thailand, USA, Ghana, Australia, Russia, The Netherlands, Mexico, Greece and China.
Passport to Play has been specifically designed to follow the key criteria outlined in the National Association for Sport
and Physical Educations National Standards for Physical Education1. Each game will not only keep students active, but
will also help teach them about other cultures. The program has been designed to appeal to students at every level of
ability and include the entire class in the funeveryone can play!
To ensure that the program works for grades 3-5, we received input and feedback from elementary physical education
teachers. We also had experts at the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) review the
program. We share NASPEs belief that high quality physical education programs should help kids gain a multi-cultural
perspective2, so weve chosen games from all around the globe.
Additionally, educators at The Scripps Research Institute and Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning
(McREL) have conducted an independent review and have aligned the health, physical education, life skills, art,
geography and language arts curriculum to the McREL Compendium of Education Standards3.

Everything you need for your multi-cultural


adventure is provided at www.passport2play.com
Teachers Guide
World Play Map - provides a fun visual and teaching aid.
A Passport to Play - for each student to track their
progress at school and at home.
A Parent Letter from Olympian Julie Foudy - encourages
families to participate in the program with their kids.
Thank you for joining us on a healthy and active educational
world tour that gives your students a Passport to Play!
1) Moving Into the Future: National Standards for Physical Education, 2nd Ed.,
at http://www.aahperd.org/naspe/publications-nationalstandards.html
2) NASPE Guidelines for Quality Physical Education, multiple publications at http://www.aahperd.org/naspe
3) Content Knowledge, 4th Edition at www.mcrel.org/standards%2Dbenchmarks/

Once you identify which games will work best in your


class, you can decide how you want the adventure to
unfold.
You choose the duration of the trip; it could
be a month long or maybe the entire semester.
Some games can be taught in a single class
period; others can be spread out over days or
weeks. You can also teach multiple games
simultaneously to offer variety.
Points or the lengths for games are only
recommendations. Adjust them considering
class size, age and skill level of students and
time available.

Pique interest by hanging the World Play Map


where all the students can see it...like the gym
or cafeteria.
Announce the up and coming multicultural
adventure in physical education class and the
general classroom to get students excited.
Motivate the kids by letting them vote on where
to begin their adventure and how they want it to
continue.
Distribute passports so students and their parents
can keep track of their travels at school and home.

At the start of each class, show students where


you will travel and mark each country that you visit
on the map so they can keep track of where
theyve been.
Recognize student achievements by marking off
where theyve been in their passports as they
participate in each game.

Expand student horizons.


Use the cultural information included with every game
to encourage students and their families to learn
more about the different countries. Getting others
involved is a fun way for kids not only to learn more
about other countries and cultures, but also to get
excited about the new game they will be learning in
physical education class. You can either use the activity
suggestions included or create your own to expand
upon each country and culture its entirely up to you.

Copy the letter from Olympian Julie Foudy and


send it home. If parents know what their kids are
doing at school, they can help supplement with
similar activities at home. This offers parents the
opportunity to give their children healthy snacks
and play the games they learned at school with
them. Doing these things both at home and school
will encourage kids on their multicultural adventure
toward better health and fitness.

Keep kids interested by engaging more than just their bodies.


Children love learning about the way
kids in other countries and cultures
experience life. Thats why this year
- in addition to the games - we have
included compassion, collaboration,
and contribution features designed to
expand students knowledge about the
countries included in the program.

Compassion: Highlights one event or initiative related to each culture


from a caring perspective. Students are encouraged to relate the
information to ways they demonstrate caring.
Collaboration: Focuses on how one culture has collaborated with
others for a common purpose. Children are asked to learn more
about each initiative to expand their understanding of world issues.
Contribution: Provides information on how the culture has
influenced, or given to, other cultures. Students learn about arts,
sports, technology, international cuisine, and more.

In order for kids to stay active and healthy they need to regularly
replace the energy they burn.
The following nutrition tips and ideas can help you get kids involved
in choosing their own balanced meals. Copy this sheet and send it
home to parents to give them new ideas on how to refuel their kids
energy.
GET GOING WITH BREAKFAST. Simple foods like fruit,
low-fat milk and yogurt, whole-grain toast with peanut
butter and oatmeal will help give them the energy
they need to be top performers at school and play.
EAT WHOLE-GRAINS EVERY DAY. Choose from
whole-grain foods such as oatmeal, whole-wheat
bread, brown rice and low-fat popcorn more often.
HELP BUILD BETTER BONES. Calcium-rich foods
such as non-fat milk, yogurt and cheese help build
stronger bones. Serve these and other milk products
several times a day.
ADD GREEN AND ORANGE. Eat a variety of dark
green and orange veggies such as spinach, broccoli,
baby carrots, and sweet potatoes for Vitamin A.
TRY GOING LEAN WITH PROTEIN. Eat lean or
low-fat meat, chicken, turkey and fish. Also, add
more cooked, dried beans and peas to your meals.
Some simple ways to do this are: adding kidney
beans to soup, or adding chick peas, nuts or seeds
to your salads.
GET FOCUSED ON FRUIT. Eat fruit during meals
and at snack time. Fresh, frozen, canned or dried...
it doesnt matter what kind you choose.
REMEMBER: WATER FIRST FOR THIRST. Water is
the best choice for quenching thirst because its
satisfying and has no calories or sugar.

ITS A MATTER OF SIZE. Teach your kids how to visualize


appropriate portion sizes. To teach them, relate the correct
portion to things they know like, a small baked potato is as
small as a computer mouse, one cup of fruit is about the
size of a baseball, and one tablespoon of peanut butter
equals two checkers. More examples can be found at
www.kidnetic.com
CHEFS IN THE MAKING. Model balanced food choices by
cooking with children. Check out online cooking web pages
like www.kidnetic.com for fun, kid-friendly recipes, and work
together to help prepare and cook the food.
GROCERY GO-GETTERS. Take your kids to the store with you
and play a game of I see. For example, you might say I see
a soft red vegetable that can be made into ketchup while
you are in the produce section and ask them if they can
find what you are describing and tell you what it is. In this
example, its a tomato. Not only will they learn what different
fruits and vegetables look like, but they can pick their favorite
one to taste. For other fun ways to teach kids about fruits
and vegetables, check out:
www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org.
MAKE SMART CHOICES.
See www.mypyramid.gov/kids/index.html for additional tips,
games and activities.
2009 McDonalds

STICK TO A SCHEDULE. Eat meals and snacks at


regular times and you will have fuel to burn all
day long.
McDonalds works with Produce For Better Health Foundation to educate consumers on the benefits of eating fruits and vegetables. In 2008, McDonalds became a sponsor
of PBHs Campaign for Childrens Health, a program that encourages the nations children to eat more fruits and vegetables for better health. PBHs goal for the Campaign
for Childrens Health is to raise $3 million in funding to be used for programs to provide parental know-how, resources, and motivation that will make increased fruit and
vegetable consumption a reality among our children today.
Learn more > www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org

Preparation
Equipment: One playground ball for
each pair of students.
Set-Up: Choose a location to play;
it should have a large empty wall
and plenty of floor space.

DOWN, DOWN, DOWN


Country New Zealand
Continent Australia

Preparation
Equipment: one tennis ball per pair
of students.
Set-Up: Choose a location to play; it should
have plenty of floor space and room for
pairs of students to spread out.

Contribution
Colombia is famous for its coffee exports. First harvested or
produced there in the early 1800s, most Colombian coffee is
now exported to the rest of the world. This export helps feed
Americans large appetite for coffee. Have students list other
natural resources found in Colombia.
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Colombia is the only South American


country with both a Caribbean and a
Pacific coastline.

When students reach their knees and elbows, have them roll
the ball.
Eliminate the chin position and have students only go as far
as their knees.
Utilize another type of ball (e.g., soft/foam ball) to make it
easier for students to throw/catch.
Compassion
Charitable giving is common in New Zealand. In 2007, over a
million New Zealanders volunteered their time for charitable
causes and over 300 million dollars was donated to charity.
Help your students learn about volunteerism and charitable
giving by organizing a food drive or other effort in your
community.
Collaboration
Scientists in New Zealand and Italy are working together on
Antarctic research in order to study climate change and its
possible effects on the environment. Have your students
research some of the ways climate change might affect the
different types of species in New Zealand.
Contribution
In 1953, New Zealand explorer Sir Edmund Hillary became the
first person to climb to the top of Mount Everest. Invite your
students to describe or draw a picture of some great things
they would like to accomplish during their lifetime.
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In this game, kids try to see how low they can go


The game is played by two children continuously throwing a
tennis ball back and forth until somebody drops the ball.
When the ball is dropped, the child who threw the ball says
Down on one knee, and the child who dropped it has to
continue playing from one knee.
If the same child drops the ball again, the child who threw
the ball says Down on two knees, then Down on one
elbow, and then Down on two elbows, and finally Down
on your chin. This ends the round.
Remember, the child has to stay in the position he or she
is in to catch and throw the ball, and the throw must be
catchable. Encourage students to throw gently to keep the
game going longer.
Try this game with one of these adaptations, depending on
your students ability levels:
In a cooperative match, have both students go to a lower
position when one misses. Have them see how many catches
they can make before they hit the floor!

Collaboration
Colombia works with other countries on Amazon rainforest
conservation. The Amazon Conservation Team works with
Colombias indigenous people and with Brazil, Suriname,
the United States, and several European nations to preserve
rainforest resources. Have students visit the Internet to find
more information on the Amazon rainforest conservation efforts.

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Oba is a traditional Colombian game that challenges kids


stamina and creativity, while also being lots of fun!
The game is played in pairs.
One player throws a rubber playground ball against a wall.
The other player must then catch the ball and handle it in an
interesting way (without dropping it) before throwing the ball
back against the wall. The student cant simply catch it and
return it with a normal throwing motion.
For example, the student might bat the ball against the wall
using his or her forearms; jump before throwing the ball
back; throw it against the wall backhanded; bounce the ball
before throwing it back (one or more times); perform a
hip-hop or other dance move while returning the ball, etc.
The next player then handles the ball in his/her own way.
Rotate opponents throughout the period so everyone gets a
chance to play together.
The activity can be adapted, if necessary, by having students
throw the ball to each other instead of against a wall.

Compassion
The extended family is very important to Colombian culture and
Colombians feel a great responsibility for their families well
being. In fact, it is common for children to live close to their
parents even when they are older. Poll your students to find out
how many members of their extended families live nearby and
how many live in other parts of the country or world.

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Country Colombia
Continent South America

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OBA

New Zealand has no native land


mammals other than bats.

KUNG FU SAYS

Country China
Continent Asia

Preparation
Equipment: None.
Set-Up: Choose a location to play;
it should have plenty of space.

Compassion
The Chinese have a strong sense of responsibility towards their
elders. Talk about some of the ways your students can be helpful to the elders in their neighborhood.
Collaboration
China and the United States are working together to reduce
pollution that may be contributing to climate change. In 2007
China began a program to reduce energy use and pollution.
What steps do your students take to reduce pollution and
energy use?
Contribution
Fireworks were invented by the Chinese in the 12th century.
Today, in the United States, fireworks are a common part of
Independence Day celebrationsa practice since 1777! Have
students write a poem capturing the excitement one feels when
seeing fireworks for the first time.
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The Great Wall of China was originally a series of walls


protecting different Chinese dynasties from each other,
rather than one wall protecting the whole country. Have
students list other notable Wonders of the World.

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Kung Fu means achievement through great effort. Practice


following directions with this Kung Fu version of a popular
childrens game.
Have the students spread out across the floor. The teacher will
then give a command and follow it up by shouting Sifu (See-
Fu; the Mandarin word for teacher.). The students continue to
follow the command until the teacher shouts Sifu again. The
students then must freeze in place.
The teacher gives another command and shouts Sifu to
signal the students to begin.
Any student who moves between Sifus must go to the
sidelines. Those on the sidelines must be silent during the
rest of the game.
Have fun trying to trick students into moving by calling a
command without including Sifu!
Avoid giving directional commands such as kick your right
leg, as youll be facing the students.

Some example commands include:


Stand on one leg and kick
Stand on one leg and hop
Karate chop with alternating arms
Hop in place
The list is endless!

BREAK THE SNAKE


Preparation
Equipment: None.
Set-Up: Choose a large, open location
to play; there should be plenty of
room for movement, with no
obstacles, such as a gym or open
area outdoors. For larger groups
of students, divide the students
into smaller, manageable groups.

Collaboration
Russia and the United States have worked together on
environmental issues for over 30 years. Today, they are working to
protect the polar bear, whose habitat is shrinking as the polar ice
cap melts. Scientists have developed plans to protect the bears
habitat and limit hunting. Have your students locate the Arctic
region on a map or globe.
Contribution
Many of the worlds most famous classical composers were
Russian, including Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky was
born in Russia in 1745. Tchaikovsky is well-known for ballets
including The Nutcracker and Swan Lake, as well as music
such as the 1812 Overture. Share some of Tchaikovskys music
with your students!

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Russia is the largest country in the world. It covers
6.6 million square miles, eleven time zones and two
continentsEurope and Asia.

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This game is similar to follow the leader, but with hands


connected. Just dont let go!
The students stand side-by-side, one after another in a line,
holding each other by the hand to form a snake.
The leader is first in line. She/he starts to move and the
others try to follow, while continuing to hold hands.
Students should not run, but use movements such as
skipping, hopping, or galloping.
The leaders aim is to move so that the others cannot keep
their hands together. When the line (snake) is broken, the
student who leads the broken part goes to the far end of
the line. The snake then reforms and the game resumes.
After two minutes, the leader goes to the end of the line.
The goal is to move up toward the head of the snake as the
game progresses.
When a student falls or calls out a safe word, such as
uncle, all students must freeze in place. After the student
gets up and goes to the end of the line, the teacher says
go and the game resumes.

Compassion
In Russia, Jewish people celebrate the Purim holiday in February
or March. An important part of Purim is giving to charity or friends
and family who are in need. Traditionally, either money or food is
given. Encourage your students to give their time or donations to
help local charities.

Did

Country Russia
Continent Europe and Asia

PILOLO
Country Ghana
Continent Africa
Preparation
Equipment: Small objects to hide
(e.g. coins, colored stones, etc.)
(two per child); Stopwatch; Two
small boxes (optional for team
competition version)
Set-Up: This game works best outside, but could be played in a gym or
even a classroom with modification (e.g., walking instead of running).
Designate start and finish lines.

Compassion
Many nations in Africa fell under European colonial rule during the
1800s. Ghana was the first nation in sub-Saharan Africa to win
independence from a colonial power. Today, it is ranked as one
of the most successful African nations in terms of economics,
government stability, and services provided to its people. Ask
students to list as many African countries as they can and then
use a map to find them all.
Collaboration
One of the largest collaborative international organizations in
the world is the United Nations (UN), which is made up of 192
member countries. Ghanaian diplomat Kofi Annan served as
the leader of the UN, a position called the Secretary General,
for ten years. Have students research some of Kofi Annans
accomplishments.
Contribution
Kente is a colorful cloth woven from strips that originated among
the Asante and Ewe peoples of Ghana. Traditionally the cloth was
worn by both men and women for festive occasions. Today it is
used all over the world in items such as bags, ties, and hats. Ask
students to identify other cloths contributed by other cultures.
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Country Thailand
Continent Asia
Preparation
Equipment: A beachball or balloon (the buka)
for each group of students and a tape or a
length of rope to create a line on the ground.
A small playing area is needed for each group
of students.
Set-Up: Form teams of small groups of students.

Compassion
Buddhism is practiced by over 90% of Thailands people.
Buddhists believe that compassion brings happiness.
Encourage your students to share examples of compassion they
have experienced or heard about.
Collaboration
The World Wildlife Fund collaborates with Thai conservationists
to protect Asian elephants. They are working to educate people
about the sale of ivory and to provide veterinary clinics for
injured and sick elephants. Have students draw pictures of other
protected animals from around the world.
Contribution
Thailand is famous for its tasty cuisine. Thai food typically
includes ingredients such as fish sauce, chili peppers, fragrant
rice, and coconut milk. Why not sample some Thai food as a
class or family project?
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This popular Southeast Asian sport is like volleyball meets hacky


sack-style play. Buka is the name of the woven plastic ball thats
used in Thailand.
The goal is to keep the buka from hitting the ground, using
any part of the body except hands and arms. In this version,
the buka can be hit up to five times before going over the net.
A server kicks the buka to the receiving team from behind the
end line. The serve can hit the line as long as it stays
inbounds. The receiving team must return the buka back to
the serving team; play continues back and forth until the buka
hits the ground.
Only the serving team can score. If they fail to score, the other
team serves. When a team allows the buka to hit the ground,
the other team scores a point. 15 points wins a game; two
out of three games wins a set.
No body contact is allowed.

In Ghana, when someone sneezes they


say nkwa which means life.

To keep kids moving, allow play to continue even when the


buka hits the ground. This can be done by permitting players
to pick and kick (pick up the buka and kick it back into
play).

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BUKA BALL

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Pilolo (Pay-loh-loh) means, time to search. This game is a


challenging twist on a timed game of hide and seek.
Select one person to serve as the leader/timekeeper for the
game. The leader hides the objects all around, and then goes
to the finish line. Children line up at the start line and the
leader shouts Pilolo to start the game.
Children race to find the hidden objects and bring them to
the finish line.
The first child to find an object and make it back to the finish
line wins. The leader officially determines the winner in case
of a close call.
Play multiple times, with a different leader each time.
Variations:
Team Competition: Divide the class into two teams. Place
two boxes at the finish line, one designated for each team.
The winner is the team with the most objects in their box
once they have all been found.

Non-competitive: The entire class works together and the


leader (or a teacher) uses a stopwatch to time how long it
takes to get all objects to the finish line. Play multiple times,
trying to get a faster time each round.

The Kingdom of Thailand was known


as Siam until 1939.

BOOMERANG GOLF

Country Australia
Continent Australia

Preparation
Equipment: A foam boomerang or flying
disc for each student.
Set-Up: Prepare a course of 6-8 holes
using cones or chalked lines to mark
each tee and cones or flags to mark
each hole. You can create more or
fewer holes depending on the level of
your students.

Collaboration
Australia is collaborating with the United States NASA
(National Aeronautics and Space Administration) on the
Jason-2 Satellite program. The satellite will allow Australian
scientists to learn more about the climate and ocean
forecasting. Visit NASAs Web site to explore satellite images
of the Earth.
Contribution
Australians have invented many of the things we use in our
daily lives. In addition to the boomerang, invented by Australian
Aborigines thousands of years ago, Australians have given us
the black-box flight recorder, electric drill, latex gloves, box kite,
and much more! Have students draw a picture of an invention
of their own.
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Preparation
Equipment: one basketball and two movable
basketball nets (or improvised equivalents,
such as a raised basket or crate)
Set-Up: Choose a location to play; a basketball
court or small rectangular field is ideal.
Position two basketball nets, each
two-thirds of the way between center and
end lines on opposite ends of the playing
area. Select and arrange two teams of
eight players, four from each team on each side of the playing area. Be sure to
include boys and girls on each team.

Collaboration
The International Court of Justice, the United Nations main
judicial organization, is located in The Hague, the Netherlands.
The court settles disputes among the members of the United
Nations. Students can learn more about the U.N.s efforts at by
visiting the Web site.
Contribution
The Netherlands is famous for its many windmills. Hundreds of
windmills dot the landscape, originally built for purposes such
as grinding grain and moving water. Ask students to describe
how modern windmills are similar to and different from the
Netherlands windmills.

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Korfball is a basketball-like sport invented by a Dutch


schoolteacher in 1902. Korfball differs from many other team
sports in that it is a mixed-gender game. It was developed so
that boys and girls could play together on the same team.
Four players from each team play on each half of the court;
one side in attack mode and the other in defense. Sides
switch after two goals have been scored.
This game is played like basketball but without a backboard.
Dribbling or running with the ball isnt allowed. Players instead
pass the ball to one another.
Defenders try to intercept the attackers passes to go on offense.
No bodily contact allowed.
After a team scores, the other team goes on offense, with a
player tossing the ball to a teammate.

Australia is the only country that is


also a continent.

Compassion
The Dutch culture prides itself on tolerance of other people and
cultures. There is great cultural diversity in the Netherlands. Have
students examine a map of Europe and explain why this may be.

Did

KORFBALL
Country The Netherlands
Continent Europe

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The returning boomerang was invented by Australian Aborigines


over 10,000 years ago. Here is a fun activity that uses this
ancient tool to play a game (golf) that is extremely popular in
Australia.
A foam boomerang puts an unpredictable twist on disc golf.
If you cannot obtain foam boomerangs, you can use foam
discs instead.
Each throw is made from where the boomerang came to rest
after the last toss.
The object is to play the course in the fewest shots.
Play the game in small groups moving from hole to hole to
keep all students engaged.
If students have trouble, use a best ball strategy wherein
each subsequent throw on a given hole is made from the
location of the best previous throw.

Compassion
Australia provides aid to refugees from other countries. The
Australian government helps thousands of people in
relocating to Australia or a new country each year! Since
World War II, over 700,000 people in need (after a war or
natural disaster, for example) have resettled in Australia! Ask
students to think about reasons why people might need help
in moving to a new country (famine, war, a tsunami, etc.).

In a centurys time, the Dutch have gone


from being among the smallest people in
Europe to the tallest in the world.

KIDS DECATHLON
Preparation
Equipment: specific equipment needed is
described with each event below. A
stopwatch and measuring tape are
needed for several events.
Set-up: A large space, such as a football
field, is required to conduct all the
games at once. Set up each event as a
station on the field. You will need some way to mark the fields for each event
(cones, tape, or chalk, depending on whether you are inside or outside), and
a way to record times and distances (clipboard, paper):
To set up racing events: Mark off an area about 50 to 100 feet long (the
width or length of a basketball court), depending on the event. Mark a
starting line and a finish line.
To set up throwing events: Mark off an area at least 50 feet long by 10
feet wide. At one end of the marked-off area, mark a circle about 5 feet
in diameter as the throwing zone. Make sure the throwing zone is
positioned so that kids are throwing away from other events, rather than
towards them.
Introduce events one or two at a time, prior to the day of the Decathlon,
and give students a chance to practice them non-competitively. Video of
Decathlon events can be found on the Internet.

The first modern Olympic Games were held in 1896 in Athens,


Greece. Deca is a Greek word meaning, ten; Athlon means
contest. These games have been adapted from original
Decathlon events.
On the day of the Decathlon, divide students up into roughly
equal teams, and have each team cycle through the stations
until they have completed each of the events.
There are several ways to address winners for the
competition, either through individual overall bests for each
event, within groups, or for group combined scores. Choose
the one that seems best fitted for your group.
100 meter Run (100 feet): Run from the start line to the
finish line while holding a ping-pong ball on a spoon. If the
ball is dropped, the student should pick it up and then keep
going.
Hop, Skip, and Jump (50 feet): Travel from the start line to
the finish line in the following pattern: four hops, four skips,
one jump (repeat)
Shot Put: Throw a volleyball or basketball from inside the
throwing circle, using a traditional shot put motion (ball is
held in the palm of the hand near the neck and pushed
away from the body). Measure using a measuring tape or
mark each throw to determine the farthest throw. If children
are having difficulty throwing in this way, they can use an
alternative throwing technique, such as a chest pass or
two-handed overhead throw.
Standing High Jump: Jump as high as possible from a
standing position, reaching up to touch the highest point on
a wall. Have the children chalk their fingers with colored
chalk before jumping so they will leave a mark on the wall
that can be used to measure and easily be removed.
Alternatively, give children sticky notes to stick to the wall
when they jump.

400 Meter Dribble (100 feet): Dribble a soccer ball from


the start line to the finish line, using only your feet.
110 Meter Hurdle (100 feet): Run from the start line to
the finish line, jumping over five hurdles (made by taping a
cone on each end of a foam tube) evenly spaced along the
way. If a hurdle is knocked over, add one second to the time.
Disc Throw: Throw a foam or plastic disc and measure or
mark each throw to determine the longest.
Bar Hang: Hang from a chin-up bar or monkey bars as long
as you can.
Long Throw: Throw a football and measure or mark each
throw to determine the longest.
500 Meter Track Race (200 feet): Race from the start line
to the finish line.
Compassion
The ancient Greeks believed in a concept called philotimo,
which literally translates as love of honor. Philotimo, one of
the highest of Greek values, required the highest sense of
honor, generosity, dignity, and respect for others, and asked
that one always act in the interest of the good of the
community. Have students identify some values shared in
their own community.
Collaboration
One of the greatest demonstrations of international
collaboration can be seen every two years during the
summer and winter Olympic Games, which originated in
Olympia, Greece almost 3,000 years ago. In 1994, the
Olympics returned to Athens when that city hosted the summer
Olympic Games. Have students create a new 11th decathlon
game which requires teamwork.
Contribution
Democracy, government by the people, is an important political
philosophy around the world. The first known democracy was in
Athens, Greece around 500 BC and spread from there to other
Greek city-states. The word democracy comes from the Greek
words demos, meaning people and kratos, which means
rule. Create a list of democratic rules for your classroom!

u k

Since 1896the beginning of the modern


Olympicsonly Greece and Australia have
participated in every Games.

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Country Greece
Continent Europe

Tlachtli (tlach tlee) was created 3,500 years ago by one of


Mexicos earliest cultures, the Olmecs. Their name means
rubber people in Aztec. This could be because they used
rubber for so many things, including the first rubber ball,
which was used in this game.

OLD SCHOOL HOOPS

Country USA
Continent North America

Preparation
Equipment: A basketball court, with
baskets lowered to a height ap
propriate for your students if
possible, and a basketball for each
group of two teams.
Set-Up: Teach the rules and allow
practice of the skills involved such
as dribbling or passing.

Basketball was invented by a physical education teacher in


1891. Since then, the rules of basketball have evolved. This
version puts a new spin on a few of the original rules.

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The world has Mexico to thank for the gift of


chocolate. The Olmecs were the first to discover
the process of extracting the dark rich substance
from cacao beans.

Compassion
In 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross. The
organization has provided humanitarian aid, natural disaster
relief, and more, for over 125 years! Contact your local Red
Cross for literature about Red Cross programs, including blood
drives, that students can share with their parents.
Collaboration
The International Space Station is maintained in space through
the collaboration of the United States and 15 other nations,
including Germany, Canada, France, Japan, Italy, and
Russia. Visit NASAs Web site to see a calendar of planned
space events!
Contribution
Basketball was invented in 1891 by physical education
instructor James Naismith, as a way to keep his students
busy during cold Massachusetts winters. Womens basketball
followed quickly in 1892. Have students identify other sports
that originated in the United States.

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When a player catches the ball, he or she cant run, but


must pass or shoot it from the spot where it was caught.
After catching the ball, it may be hard for some students
to stop in place. Students may take one shuffle step when
catching and throwing the ball.
If one team commits three fouls in a row, the other team
gets two points and a foul shot. A foul is any contact that is
against the rules. For example, players should not hold or
push another player, whether unintentionally or purposefully.
A ball out of bounds can be freely thrown or dribbled in by
the last person who touched it.
Two points are awarded for each basket.

Contribution
Of the many contributions Mexico has made to the world, one
of the tastiest is their cuisine, or food. Ingredients such as corn,
beans, and chili peppers are popular throughout most of the
country. Dishes including those ingredients, such as tacos,
tamales, and burritos, are popular throughout the world, especially
in the United States, where Mexican food ranks among the three
most popular foreign cuisines. Share some samples of common
Mexican ingredients for your students to taste.

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How to Play
Form two teams with six children per team and assign each
team a goal in which to score. Play the game in two
15-minute halves.
As a warm-up and to determine which team gets the ball
first, have each team attempt to keep the ball from touching
the ground as long as possible without using their hands. The
team that keeps the ball in the air the longest gets the ball
first. Play begins in the middle of the field.
Teams pass the ball without using their hands, and attempt
to get the ball into the goal on their side of the field.
Points are awarded to the opposing team for disallowed
body contact, touching the ball with hands, or if a team lets
the ball touch the ground. If any of these happen, the other
team gets one point and possession of the ball.
If a team successfully gets the ball into the goal, they win.
If neither team gets the ball into the goal by the end of the
second half, the team with the most points wins.

Collaboration
In 1994, Mexico entered into an agreement known as NAFTA, or
the North American Free Trade Agreement, with the United States
and Canada. This agreement was designed to allow Mexico,
Canada, and the U.S. to trade goods across each others borders
without heavy taxes. NAFTA marked an historic level of economic
cooperation for Mexico and the other countries in North America.
Create a list of materials or products which may have come from
Mexico.

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Preparation
Equipment: Volleyball; 2 medium height
garbage cans for goals
Set-Up: Mark off a field half the size of
a basketball court; place a goal on
each end of the field.

Compassion
Ecotourism, tourism to areas with a goal of learning about the
natural resources thereand preserving themis a quickly
growing type of travel. The term ecotourism was originally
coined in Mexico, where ecotourism is very popular. Have
students research an ecotourism destination and create a
brochure that highlights the benefits of this type of travel.

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TLACHTLI

Country Mexico
Continent North America

Q is the only letter in the alphabet that


is not in the name of any state in the
United States.

Preparation
Equipment: A foam boomerang or flying disc
for each student.
Set-Up: Prepare a course of two to four
holes using cones or chalked lines to
mark each tee and a large mat or circle
to mark each hole. You can create more
or fewer holes

K2 KUNG FU SAYS
Country China
Continent Asia
Preparation
Equipment: None.
Set-Up: Choose a location to play;
it should have plenty of space.

Kung Fu means achievement through great effort. Practice


following directions with this Kung Fu version of Simon Says.
Have the students spread out across the floor. The teacher
will then give a command and follow it up by shouting Sifu
(See-Fu; the Mandarin word for teacher.). The students
continue to follow the command until the teacher shouts
Sifu again. The students then must freeze in place.
The teacher gives another command and shouts Sifu to
signal the students to begin.
Any student who moves between Sifus must go to the
sidelines. Those on the sidelines must sit quietly during the
rest of the game.
Have fun trying to trick students in to moving by calling a
commandbut not shouting Sifu!
Avoid giving directional commands such as kick your right
leg, as youll be facing the students.

Giving
Australians invented many of the things we use every day!
The boomerang was invented by native Australians, called
Aborigines, thousands of years ago. In modern times,
Australians invented the electric drill, latex gloves that
doctors use, and the box kite! Have students draw a picture
of an invention of their own.

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The returning boomerang was invented by Australian


Aborigines over 10,000 years ago. Here is a fun activity that
uses this ancient tool to play a game (golf) that is very popular
in Australia.
A foam boomerang puts an unpredictable twist on disc golf.
If you cannot obtain a foam boomerang, you can use a foam
disc instead.
Each throw is made from where the boomerang came to rest
after the last toss.
The object is to play the course in the fewest shots.
Play the game in small groups moving from hole to hole to
keep all students engaged.
If students have trouble, use a best ball strategy wherein
each subsequent throw on a given hole is made from the
location of the best previous throw.
For youngest children, consider using a ball and having
them roll it toward the target.

Teamwork
Australia and NASA worked together on the Jason-2 Satellite
program. The satellite orbits Earth and helps scientists learn
about weather and the ocean! Help students use the Internet
to visit NASAs Web site and explore satellite images of the
Earth.

Did

Country Australia
Continent Australia

Caring
Australia provides helps many people from other countries.
Their government helps thousands of people move to Australia
or a new country each year! Many people who lost their homes
after a war, flood, or earthquake, have found a new home in
Australia! Ask students to think about reasons why people
might need help in moving to a new country (famine, war, a
tsunami, etc.).

Australia is the only country that is


also a continent.

Some example commands include:



Touch your nose.

Hop up and down.

Karate chop with one arm.
Add more challenging moves like standing on one leg or
lifting one leg and one arm as the game goes on.
Caring
The Chinese believe they should take care of their elderstheir
parents and grandparents. Talk about some of the ways your
students can be helpful to the elders they know.
Teamwork
China and the United States are working together to help the
environment. In 2007 China began a program to use less
energy and make less pollution. What can your students do to
use less energy and make less pollution?
Giving
Fireworks were invented by the Chinese hundreds of years
ago. In the United States, fireworks have been a part of July
4th celebrations since 1777! Have students write a poem or
draw a picture capturing the excitement one feels when seeing
fireworks for the first time.

u k

The Great Wall of China was originally a series of walls


protecting different Chinese dynasties from each other,
rather than one wall protecting the whole country. Have
students list other notable Wonders of the World.

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K2 BOOMERANG GOLF

Country Greece
Continent Europe
Preparation
Equipment: specific equipment needed is
described with each event below. A
stopwatch and measuring tape are needed
for several events.
Set-up: A large space, such as a football field,
is required to conduct all the games at once.
Set up each event as a station on the field.
You will need some way to mark the fields for each event (cones, tape, or chalk,
depending on whether you are inside or outside), and a way to record times and
distances (clipboard, paper):
To set up racing events: Mark off an area about 50 to 100 feet long (the
width or length of a basketball court), depending on the event. Mark a
starting line and a finish line.
To set up throwing events: Mark off an area at least 50 feet long by 10 feet
wide. At one end of the marked-off area, mark a circle about 5 feet in
diameter as the throwing zone. Make sure the throwing zone is positioned
so that kids are throwing away from other events, rather than towards them.
Introduce events one or two at a time, prior to the day of the Decathlon,
and give students a chance to practice them non-competitively. Video of
Decathlon events can be found on the Internet.

The first modern Olympic Games were held in 1896 in Athens,


Greece. Deca is a Greek word meaning, ten; Athlon means
contest. These games have been adapted from original
Decathlon events.
On the day of the Decathlon, divide students up into roughly
equal teams, and have each team cycle through the stations
until they have completed each of the events.
There are several ways to address winners for the
competition, either through individual overall bests for each
event, within groups, or for group combined scores. Choose
the one that seems best fitted for your group.
100 meter Run (100 feet): Run from the start line to the
finish line while holding a ping-pong ball on a spoon. If the
ball is dropped, the student should pick it up and then keep
going.
Hop, Skip, and Jump (50 feet): Travel from the start line to
the finish line in the following pattern: four hops, four skips,
one jump (repeat)
Shot Put: Throw a volleyball or basketball from inside the
throwing circle, using a traditional shot put motion (ball is
held in the palm of the hand near the neck and pushed
away from the body). Measure using a measuring tape or
mark each throw to determine the farthest throw. If children
are having difficulty throwing in this way, they can use an
alternative throwing technique, such as a chest pass or
two-handed overhead throw.

Standing High Jump: Jump as high as possible from a


standing position, reaching up to touch the highest point on
a wall. Have the children chalk their fingers with colored
chalk before jumping so they will leave a mark on the wall
that can be used to measure and easily be removed.
Alternatively, give children sticky notes to stick to the wall
when they jump.
400 Meter Dribble (100 feet): Dribble a soccer ball from
the start line to the finish line, using only your feet.
110 Meter Hurdle (100 feet): Run from the start line to
the finish line, jumping over five hurdles (made by taping a
cone on each end of a foam tube) evenly spaced along the
way. If a hurdle is knocked over, add one second to the time.
Disc Throw: Throw a foam or plastic disc and measure or
mark each throw to determine the longest.
Bar Hang: Hang from a chin-up bar or monkey bars as long
as you can.
Long Throw: Throw a football and measure or mark each
throw to determine the longest.
500 Meter Track Race (200 feet): Race from the start
line to the finish line.
Caring
The ancient Greeks believed in a concept called philotimo,
which means love of honor. Having Philotimo means being
kind, generous, and respectful of everyone and always trying
to help your community. Have students discuss how neighbors
can show that they care about each other and the community
in which they live.
Teamwork
One of the greatest examples of teamwork can be seen every
two years during the summer and winter Olympic Games,
which started in Greece almost 3,000 years ago. In 1994, the
Olympics were held in Greece, the place where they started so
long ago. Have students create an new 11th decathlon game
which requires teamwork.
Giving
Democracy, people having a say in how their government works,
is very important. Like the Olympics, modern democracy started
in Greece and spread around the world. The word democracy
comes from the Greek words demos, meaning people and
kratos, which means rule. Create a list of rules for your
classroom and vote on them!

u k

Since 1896the beginning of the modern


Olympicsonly Greece and Australia have
participated in every Games.

now

yo
Did

K2 KIDS DECATHLON

Country Mexico
Continent North America
Preparation
Equipment: Beach ball; two large card
board boxes for goals
Set-Up: Mark off a field approximately
6 feet by 6 feet, and place a goal on
each end of the field.

Tlachtli (tlach tlee) was created 3,500 years ago by one of


Mexicos earliest cultures, the Olmecs. Their name means
rubber people in Aztec. This could be because they used
rubber for so many things, including the first rubber ball,
which was used in this game.

Teamwork
In 1994, Mexico, the United States, and Canada agreed to trade
goods without paying extra money. This agreement is called NAFTA,
or the North American Free Trade Agreement. It has helped to give
people jobs. Create a list of materials or products which might
come from Mexico.
Giving
Mexico has shared delicious food with the rest of the world. Corn,
beans, and chili peppers are found in dishes such as tacos,
tamales, and burritos. These foods are popular throughout the
world, especially in the United States, where Mexican food is very
popular. Share some samples of common Mexican ingredients for
your students to taste.

yo

u k

The world has Mexico to thank for the gift of


chocolate. The Olmecs were the first to discover
the process of extracting the dark rich substance
from cacao beans.

now

How to Play
Form two teams with six children per team and assign each
team a goal in which to score. Play the game in two
15-minute halves.
As a warm-up and to determine which team gets the ball
first, have each team attempt to keep the ball from touching
the ground as long as possible without using their hands.
The team that keeps the ball in the air the longest gets the
ball first. Play begins in the middle of the field.
Teams pass the ball without using their hands, and attempt
to get the ball into the goal on their side of the field.
Points are awarded to the opposing team for disallowed
body contact, touching the ball with hands, or if a team lets
the ball touch the ground. If any of these happen, the other
team gets one point and possession of the ball.
If a team successfully gets the ball into the goal, they win.
If neither team gets the ball into the goal by the end of the
second half, the team with the most points wins.

Caring
Ecotourism is a type of travel where people visit beautiful, natural
places and try to learn about the places while also helping
keep them natural and beautiful. Mexico, one of the places
where ecotourism started, has many popular sites like this. Have
students research an ecotourism destination and create a poster
showing why it would be popular.

Did

K-2 TLACHTLI

Hi, Im Julie FoudyLike all parents, I do my best to pass on the lessons Ive learned to my child. While its true that the importance of teamwork and
motivation are priorities in my home, Ive learned something even more valuable that I keep coming back to time and again. Id like to
share that with you in hopes that it can make as much of a difference for your family as it has for mine.
Looking back on being a part of two World Cup champion and Olympic Gold Medal teams, Im always struck by the fact that the key
to those victories was ultimately balance. And Im not talking just about the balance of skills and abilities of our team. Ultimately,
we won those championships because of the balance - of mind, body and spirit - that each member brought to the team. Without a
strong mental game, our physical conditioning couldnt have come in to play. Our individual abilities just wouldnt have been enough
without the strong passion and sense of spirit we all brought to the game. Just as they make for championship teams, compassion,
collaboration, and a spirit of contribution make for happy and healthy kids.
The Passport to Play program your kids are participating in at school is designed to
do just that. But we need your help because, ultimately, the lessons it teaches have
to be reinforced at home to be successful.
So, what can you do? For one, try to emphasize the importance of a balanced diet
high in fruits and vegetables. You can also encourage your children to turn off the
TV or computer and turn on to playing sports or pursuing other activities with the
emphasis on being ACTIVE. Ask them about the Passport to Play program. Have them
show you how to play some of the games. In the end, Im betting youll have just as
much fun as they do!
Great kids, dedicated teachers and a well thought out curriculum form the
foundation of a winning team. We only need one more piece of the puzzle to bring
home the championship.
Wont you join us?
Sincerely,

Julie Foudy