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Lesson Plan for Third Observation: Little Red Riding Hood and Pretty Salma

Name: Kate FitzGerald


Date and time of the lesson: March 24, 2016
School: PS 130
Grade: 3rd
Cooperating teacher: Alina Diaconu
Room number: 302
Content area: English Language Arts

Central Focus/Essential Question (Standard 3.3)


How are the folktales Little Red Riding Hood and Pretty Salma similar and different from one
another (compare setting, characters and events)?
Goal of Lesson
In this lesson, students will learn how to compare and contrast two folktales from different
cultures. They will compare the setting, the characters and the events of the story using evidence
from the text.
Common Core Standards (Standard 2.1, 2.8)
RL.3.1. Ask and answer question to demonstrate understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
RL.3.2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures;
determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is
conveyed through key details in the text.
RL.3.3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or
feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events).
Prior Knowledge/ Key Misconceptions
Students will already have read the traditional version of Little Red Riding
Hood in class the day before (they will therefore be familiar with the
characters, events and settings, and these will be listed on chart paper
from the day before).
Some students may get confused about where similarities and
differences go in the diagrams, so I will ask as much as is necessary
which column I should record information in.

Materials & Resources (Standard 3.1)


* Pretty Salma: A Little Red Riding Hood Story from Africa, by Niki Daly.
* Little Red Riding Hood (Jerry Pinkney) - This traditional version may be used for reference
purposes.
* Chart Paper (for listing student ideas and modeling purposes.
* Map of Africa from a World Atlas.
* Graphic organizers for group student work comparing the ends of both
versions of Little Red Riding Hood.

Lesson Development (Standard 3.1, 3.3) This should be the main section of your
lesson plan.

Introduction to the Lesson (10 minutes):


Students will begin seated in the meeting area, close to the whiteboard/front
of the room. I will introduce students to the lesson in the following manner. I
will tell the students, Yesterday, we read the traditional version of the folktale
Little Red Riding Hood. We learned that the earliest versions of the tale came
from different countries in Europe (France and Italy, for example).
We took some notes about the characters, setting, and events of the story. I
will then pick a student to read our notes aloud to the class to remind them of
the story (the basic who, what, when, where, why of the story).
Now that we have refreshed our memories about the story, we are going to
read Pretty Salma: A Little Red Riding Hood Story from Africa, and we are going to
compare the two tales to see what is similar and what is different in the two
stories. We can compare the setting, the characters, and the events of the
story. We will use a Venn-Diagram to do this, listing the similarities between
the two folktales in the center, and the differences on either side.
Im going to stop at specific places in the story and ask you to think carefully
about any similarities and differences you see between the two stories.
Sometimes you will think on your own, writing down your ideas on post-it
notes, and sometimes it will be a turn-and-talk with your partner. Anyone not
able to focus with his or her partner will have to do the thinking on his or her
own. Then I will ask a few pairs to share with the group.
Ready?! Lets put our compare and contrast thinking caps on. I know you are
all very smart, but I want to see how well you pay attention to the story. Lets
see if you can find all the differences and similarities that I found. Who knows?
Maybe you can even find more than I did! And if you ever forget the question
we are trying to answer for this lesson, its right here above the VennDiagram (I will pick a student to read it aloud).
Reading of the Folktale (25 minutes):
Stopping point 1 (page 7): Turn and Talk to your partner about any
similarities or differences you notice between the two versions of the tale.
One of you can write down the similarities on a post-it and one can write the
differences (these are to help you remember when you share). Remember to
think carefully about characters, events, and setting. (In case students get
stuck, questions I can ask include, Who does the main character live with? What is the
main characters name? What does she look like/how does she dress? Who sends her out of the
house? Where do they send her? What is the purpose of her trip? What advice do they give
her?) Have students share responses and record on Venn-Diagram with
student initials next to contributions.

Stopping point 2 (page 9): Ask students, I see Pretty Salma doing something on her
way to the market that Little Red Riding Hood didnt do? Do you know what it is? (singing).
Ask, Who can remind me of the purpose of her trip/why her granny sent her out? Record
student responses.

Stopping Point 3 (page 11) : Turn and talk to your partner to discuss, Who does Pretty
Salma meet? What does he do for her? When students give their response, I will ask them if
their description of who she meets and what happens is similar or different to the other version of
the story, and why. Potential prompts: Think about what are wolf and dogs suggestions to main
character? How do the two villains act in comparison to one another? Record student
responses.
BRIEF Stopping Point 4 (page 13): Briefly ask, What else is Mr. Dog trying to get Pretty
Salma do? Does the wolf in the other story do anything like this? Record student responses.
BRIEF topping Point 5 (page 15): Briefly ask, What is the third thing Mr. Dog is trying to
get Pretty Salma to do? Does the wolf do anything like this? Record student responses.
Stopping Point 6 (page 16): Ask, How does Mr. Dog get rid of Pretty Salma? What
about in Red Riding Hood? What is the wolfs tactic/how does he trick Red Riding Hood?
Record student responses.
Stopping Point 7 (page 18): Ask, Does Pretty Salma know that her grandmother might be
in danger because of Mr. Dog? What about in Red Riding Hood? Record student responses.
Stopping Point 8 (page 22): Turn and Talk to your partner to discuss what is similar and
what is different about Mr. Dog meeting Granny, and the wolf meeting the grandmother in Little
Red Riding Hood? One person should record a similarity and one person a difference, and then
you will post them on the board when you are ready. Remember to think about what happens?
What kinds of things do the villains say? (After students have posted, read several comments and
record student responses (try to consolidate them as students post them up.).
Wrapping Up of Read Aloud: Tell students, Wow. You came up with so many similarities
and differences between the two stories. Great job. Youre doing such a good job that I think you
can do this same thing with a partner using the ends of both stories.
Each pair of two will get a copy of both ends of the story. You are allowed to read with your
partner and discuss similarities and differences together, but you must complete your own VennDiagram. You can also write on the handouts if you need to (circle and underline things). I will
then select a student to repeat the directions to make sure that everyone understands the activity. I
will say that my challenge to them is to find as many similarities and differences as possible (at
least one or two of each). I will tell them they have 15 minutes.
Group work with graphic organizers (Venn-Diagrams) and photocopies of ends
of both versions of Red Riding Hood (15 minutes): Students will be evaluated on the
completion of individual Venn-Diagrams comparing the endings of both versions of Little Red
Riding Hood. Students will work in pairs reading the ends of both stories and discussing. Based
on time constraints, if students can come up with at least one similarity between the ends of the
two stories and one difference, that will be sufficient. However, I will encourage them to list as
many as they can!

Assessment: Students will be evaluated on the completion of individual Venn-Diagrams


comparing the endings of both versions of Little Red Riding Hood. Students will work in pairs
reading the ends of both stories and discussing. Based on time constraints, if students can come up
with at least one similarity between the ends of the two stories and one difference, that will be
sufficient. However, I will encourage them to list as many as they can!