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HIS135 / HIS 135 / CheckPoint: Nixon’s Politics

HIS135 / HIS 135 / CheckPoint: Nixon’s Politics

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Published by Number1Tutor
CheckPoint: Nixon’s Politics
 Due Date: Day 4 [Individual] forum
 Submit a 150- to 200-word response comparing Nixon’s policies of engagement with foreign policy strategies used during the Cold War.
CheckPoint: Nixon’s Politics
 Due Date: Day 4 [Individual] forum
 Submit a 150- to 200-word response comparing Nixon’s policies of engagement with foreign policy strategies used during the Cold War.

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Published by: Number1Tutor on May 15, 2010
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President Nixon on the War in Vietnam

In the past, American leaders had promised that defeating Communism would win the war. Foreign policy was often based around threats of invasion, violent containment, and the use of a nuclear bomb. The American public was familiar with these strategies, as they had been broadcast over American television, radio, and appeared in newspapers and magazines. Many people believed that America was responsible for destroying Communism before it could spread into Europe. President Nixon would rather simply end the war in Vietnam than win it. As winning the war would cost America billions of dollars and thousands of soldiers' lives, Nixon simply wanted the war to end honorably and peacefully. To move peace talks along, Nixon withdrew American soldiers forces from Vietnam. Secretly, though, Nixon ordered raids of North Vietnamese bases near Cambodia. American people protested and, to show its disapproval, Congress repealed the Tonkin Gulf Resolution. In the next stage, the Nixon Doctrine relieved the U.S. military by shifting some military obligations to their allies. Nixon initiated the détente policy in order to contain Soviet power. The arms race had set the Soviet economy back significantly. Nixon, aided by Kissinger, played the “China Card” for leverage on the Soviets, when Nixon then opened China to diplomatic relations with the West.

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