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Social

Studies
20-1
Long
Range
Plan
Topic/
Unit

Year: Spring 2016


Teacher: Amy Stif

Key Issues

Major Objectives

Nationalis
m

French Revolution
& The Napoleonic
Era
Canadian
Nationalism
Quebecois
Nationalism
American
Revolution &
Nationalism
First Nations &
Metis Nationalism
Inuit Perspectives
Oka Crisis
Kosovo
Tamils in Sri
Lanka
Tibetan
Independence
Northern Ireland
Independence
Jean Vanier

1.1 Appreciate that understandings of


identity, nation and nationalism
continue to evolve
1.2 Appreciate the existence of
alternative views on the meaning of
nation
1.3 Appreciate how the forces of
nationalism have shaped, and continue
to shape, Canada and the world
1.4 Appreciate why peoples seek to
promote their identity through
nationalism
1.5 Explore a range of expressions of
nationalism
1.6 Develop understandings of nation
and nationalism (relationship to land,
geographic, collective, civic, ethnic,
cultural, linguistic, political, spiritual,
patriotic)
1.7 Analyze the relationship between
nation and nation state
1.8 Analyze How the Development of
Nationalism is shaped by historical,
geographic, political, economic and
social factors (French Revolution and
Napoleonic Era, contemporary

Dates:

Materials
&
Resources
Exploring
Nationalism
D2L
Resources
Khan
Academy
Critical
Challenges
(Learn
Alberta)

Strategie
s

Evaluation
Plan

Placemat
4 Corners
Jigsaw
Concept
Mapping
SEE-I
Card sort
Free write
Gallery
Walk
Table top
Twitter
Double
Exposure
Cartoon
Analysis
Post it Poll
Poll
Everywher
e
Human
Graph

Coat of Arms
Activity
Nationalism &
Personal Identity
Research &
Discussion
Roots of
Nationalism
Critical
Challenge
Efects of
Nationalism
Case Study
Competing
Nationalist
Loyalties
Summit

examples)
1.9 Analyze nationalism as an identity,
internalized feeling, and/or collective
consciousness shared by a people
(French Revolution and Napoleonic Era,
Canadian Nationalism, Quebecois
Nationalism, American Nationalism,
First Nations & Metis Nationalism, Inuit
Perspectives)
1.10 Evaluate the importance of
reconciling contending nationalist
loyalties (Canadian nationalism, First
Nations and Metis Nationalism, Inuit
perspectives on nationalism)
1.11 Evaluate the importance of
reconciling nationalism with contending
non-nationalist loyalties (religion,
region, culture, race, ideology, class,
other.)

Ultra
Nationalis
m

World War 1
(Peace
settlements)
The Interwar
period
Russian
Ultranationalism
(Stalin)
Propaganda
Germany after

2.1 Appreciate that nations and states


pursue national interest
2.2 Appreciate that the pursuit of
national interest has positive and
negative consequences
2.3 Appreciate multiple perspectives
related to the pursuit of national
interest
2.4 Explore the relationship between
nationalism and the pursuit of national
interest
2.5 Analyze how the pursuit of national
interest shapes foreign policy (First
world War peace settlements, the
interwar period)
2.6 Explore the relationship between
nationalism and ultra nationalism

Exploring
Nationalism
Khan
Academy

Graffiti
Groups
Memory
Maps

Writing Project

Placemat
4 Corners
Jigsaw
Concept
Mapping
SEE-I
Card sort
Free write
Gallery
Walk
Table top
Twitter
Double
Exposure

Distinguishing
Nationalism and
UltraNationalism
Legitimate
Pursuits of
National Interest
Horrors of UltraNationalism
Critical
Challenge

WW1 (Hitler)
Japan after WW2
(Horihito & Tojo)
League of Nations
Conscription
World War 2
Japanese
internment in
Canada
Peacekeeping

2.7 Analyze Nationalism and UltraNationalism during times of conflict


(Causes of the first and second world
wars, examples of nationalism and
ultra-nationalism for the first and
second world wars, ultra nationalism in
Japan, internments in Canada,
conscription crises)
2.8 Analyze ultra nationalism as a
cause of genocide (The Holocaust,
1932-1933 famine in Ukraine,
contemporary examples)
2.9 Analyze impacts of the pursuit of
national self determination (successor
states; decolonization; Quebecois
nationalism and sovereignty
movement; First Nations, Metis and
Inuit self-government; contemporary
examples)

Cartoon
Analysis
Post it Poll
Poll
Everywher
e
Human
Graph
Graffiti
Groups
Memory
Maps

Charter of
National Duties

Place-mat
4 Corners
Jigsaw
Concept
Mapping
SEE-I

National
Interests &
Internationalism

Genocide Critical
Inquiry Project

Crimes against
Humanity
Self
Determination
Successor States
Internatio
nalism

Economic
Stability
Peace and
Security

3.1 Appreciate that nations and states


engage in regional and global afairs for
a variety of reasons
3.2 Appreciate the impacts of nation
and state involvement in regional and
global afairs on individual and
collective identities

Exploring
Nationalism

Motives for
International

Self
Determination
Humanitarianism
Isolationism
Unilateralism
Bilateralism
Multilateralism
Supranationalism
Foreign Policy
United Nations
NGOs
World Health
Organization
World Trade
Organization
European Union
Climate Change

3.3 Demonstrate a global


consciousness with respect to the
human condition and global afairs
3.4 Analyze the motives of nation and
state involvement or non-involvement
in international afairs (economic
stability, self-determination, peace,
security, humanitarianism)
3.5 Explore understandings of
internationalism
3.6 Analyze how internationalism can
be promoted through foreign policy
(multilateralism, supranationalism,
peace keeping, foreign aid,
international law and agreements)
3.7 Evaluate the extent to which
selected organizations promote
internationalism (United Nations, World
Council of indigenous peoples,
European Union, LOrganisation
international de la Francophonie, Arctic
Council, Contemporary examples)
3.8 Analyze impacts of the pursuit of
internationalism in addressing
contemporary global issues (conflict,
poverty, debt, disease, environment,
human rights)
3.9 Evaluate the extent to which
nationalism must be sacrificed in the
interest of internationalism

Card sort
Free write
Gallery
Walk
Table top
Twitter
Double
Exposure
Cartoon
Analysis
Post it Poll
Poll
Everywher
e
Human
Graph
Graffiti
Groups
Memory
Maps

Involvement
Writing Project

Peace Keeping
Canadian
Nationalis
m

Foreign Aid
Identity
Geography
Pluralism
Multiculturalism
Bilingualism
French Canadian
nationalism
Confederation
Immigration
Ukrainian
Canadians
Land Claims
Symbols & Myths
Louis Lafontaine
& Robert Baldwin
First Nations

4.1 Appreciate historical and


contemporary attempts to develop
national identity
4.2 Appreciate contrasting historical
and contemporary narratives
associated with national identity
4.3 Respect the views of others on
alternative visions of national identity
4.4 Explore multiple perspectives on
national identity in Canada
4.5 Analyze methods used by
individuals, groups and governments in
Canada to promote a national identity
(symbolism, mythology, institutions,
government programs & initiatives)
4.6 Examine historical perspectives of
Canada as a nation (Louis Lafontaine
and Robert Baldwin, the Fathers of
Confederation, First Nations treaties
and the Indian Act, Metis and Inuit selfgovernance, Louis Riel, Sir Cliford
Sifton, Henri Bourassa, FrenchCanadian nationalism, Pierre Trudeau,
National Indian Brotherhood)
4.7 Evaluate the challenges and
opportunities associated with the
promotion of Canadian national unity
(Quebec sovereignty, federalprovincial-territorial relations,
Aboriginal self-determination and land
claims, bilingualism, multiculturalism)
4.8 Evaluate various perspectives of
future visions of Canada (pluralism,

Exploring
Nationalism

Placemat
4 Corners
Jigsaw
Concept
Mapping
SEE-I
Card sort
Free write
Gallery
Walk
Table top
Twitter
Double
Exposure
Cartoon
Analysis
Post it Poll
Poll
Everywher
e
Human
Graph
Graffiti
Groups
Memory
Maps

Analyzing a
Canadian
Identity
Historical
Perspectives on
National Identity
Multiple
Perspectives on
National Identity
The future of
Canada Critical
Challenge
Writing Project

treaties and the


Indian Act,
Metis and Inuit
self-governance,

multination model, separatism,


Aboriginal delf-determination, global
leadership, North American integration)
4.9 Develop personal and collective
visions of national identity

Louis Riel,
Sir Cliford Sifton
Henri Bourassa,
Pierre Trudeau
National Indian
Brotherhood

Social Studies
20-1
Unit Plans

Year: Spring 2016


Teacher: Amy Stif

Unit 1: Nationalism
Overview &
Rationale

To what extent should we embrace nationalism?


Students will explore the relationships among identity, nation and nationalism.
Overview

This unit focuses the concept of nationalism. The concept of nationalism is one that
contains many diferent components and means diferent things to diferent people at
diferent times. The in-depth exploration of the terms patriotism, nation, nation-state,
nationalism and identity in this unit will help students to understand how a national or
group identity can bring people together as well as divide them. Students will begin this
unit by exploring their own ideas of what constitutes Canadas national identity and how
that identity came to be through discussion of Vimy Ridge, The Great Depression, WWII,
Peace keeping missions and other contemporary Canadian examples. Students will be
asked to consider what being Canadian means to them personally, as well as consider
what other collective and personal identities within which they may classify themselves,
after exploring all of the diferent factors that contribute to identity such as language,
ethnicity, culture, religion, geography, political affiliation etc. This unit will then explore
how people, especially in a multicultural country like Canada, may have loyalties that
contend with one another and how people seek to amend these competing loyalties.
Furthermore, the class will examine how certain internal factors, such as political ideas
and documents (BNA Act, Constitution Act 1867 & 1982, Canadian charter of Rights etc.)
contribute to the creation of a civic nation. Students will also investigate how historical,
social, economic, geographic and political factors that occur externally can influence ideas
of nationalism (French Revolution, Napoleonic era, Japanese internment, Syrian refugee
crisis etc.) This will lead to an examination of why people wish to promote their identities
through nationalism. A large part of this unit will focus on the French Revolution as well as
Serbian nationalism leading to the outbreak of World War I. To conclude and lead into the
next unit, Ultranationalism, students will take a look at diferent nationalist movements as
well as independence movements in Canada and abroad (French nationalism, Canadian
nationalism, Quebec nationalism, American nationalism, First Nations & Metis nationalism,
Indian independence movement, Kosovo, Tibetan Independence, Scottish Referendum
2014, Catalonia, Basque separatist movement etc.) in order to analyze how nationalism
expresses itself as an identity as well as a collective consciousness which leads people to
come together to reach a collective goal.

Rationale
This unit will allow students to explore their own ideas of nationalism and understand how
diferent ideas of nationalism contribute to the relationships between people nationally
and internationally. In this unit, students familiarize themselves with revolutions,
independence movements and separatist movements, in order to understand that the
development of collective identities can revolutionize the social, economic and political
worlds that people live in. Related issue 1 breaks down the concept of nationalism into
many diferent categories which allows students to determine what linguistic, ethnic,
cultural, religious, geographical and political affiliations they hold personally, and what
efect those affiliations might have on their national identity. This unit is an important
starting point to understanding how personal and collective identities have and will
continue to contribute to significant events and movements throughout the globe.
Key Questions &
Major Objectives

Critical Inquiry Question


To what extent should nation be the foundation of identity?
Key Questions
To what extent are nation and identity related?
- What are some concepts of nation?
- What are some understandings of nation?
- How can nation be understood as a civic concept?
- How do people express their identity through nation?
To what extent should internal and external factors shape nationalism?
- What are some factors that shape nationalism?
- How have people responded to some factors that shape nationalism?
- How have people in Canada responded to some factors that shape nationalism
To what extent should people reconcile their contending nationalist loyalties?

How do nationalist loyalties shape peoples choices?


What choices have people made to affirm nationalist loyalties?
How can nationalist loyalties create conflict?
How have people reconciled contending nationalist loyalties?

To what extent should people reconcile their contending nationalist loyalties and nonnationalist loyalties?
- What are non-nationalist loyalties?
- How can nationalist loyalties compete?
- How have people reconciled contending nationalist and non-nationalist loyalties?
Resources &
Materials

GLOs & SLOs

Exploring Nationalism
D2L resources
Khan Academy
Critical Challenges (Learn Alberta)

GLO 1
To what extent should nation be the foundation of identity?
Students will explore the relationships among identity, nation and nationalism
SLOs
1.1 Appreciate that understandings of identity, nation and nationalism continue to evolve
1.2 Appreciate the existence of alternative views on the meaning of nation
1.3 Appreciate how the forces of nationalism have shaped, and continue to shape, Canada and the world
1.4 Appreciate why peoples seek to promote their identity through nationalism
1.5 Explore a range of expressions of nationalism
1.6 Develop understandings of nation and nationalism (relationship to land, geographic, collective, civic,
ethnic, cultural, linguistic, political, spiritual, patriotic)
1.7 Analyze the relationship between nation and nation state
1.8 Analyze How the Development of Nationalism is shaped by historical, geographic, political, economic
and social factors (French Revolution and Napoleonic Era, contemporary examples)
1.9 Analyze nationalism as an identity, internalized feeling, and/or collective consciousness shared by a

people (French Revolution and Napoleonic Era, Canadian Nationalism, Quebecois Nationalism, American
Nationalism, First Nations & Metis Nationalism, Inuit Perspectives)
1.10 Evaluate the importance of reconciling contending nationalist loyalties (Canadian nationalism, First
Nations and Metis Nationalism, Inuit perspectives on nationalism)
1.11 Evaluate the importance of reconciling nationalism with contending non-nationalist loyalties (religion,
region, culture, race, ideology, class, other.)

Assessments &
Evaluations

Formative
Nationalism and personal identity
Competing Nationalist loyalties
Roots of Nationalism
Efects of Nationalism
Summative
10% Coat of Arms Activity
10% Contending Loyalties Assignment
10% Speech Assignment
20% French Revolution Editorial
25% Position Paper Assignment
25% Unit Exam

Social Studies 20-1


Unit 1: Nationalism
Dates: February 3Lesson
GLOs & SLOs
Number,
Date & Title
February 1: NID
February 2: GLO: 1
Chapter 1:

Key

Learning
Activities

Nation,
Nationalism,

SEE-I
Jigsaw

Instructional
Strategy

Assessment

Formative
critical

Classroom
Management

Nation and
Identity

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.3,
1.6

February 3:
Chapter 2:
Shaping
Nationalism

GLO: 1

February 4:
Chapter 3:
Competing
Nationalist
Loyalties

GLO: 1

February 5:
Roots of
Nationalism

GLO: 1

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.3,
1.5, 1.6

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2,
1.3,1.5, 1.6,
1.7, 1.8, 1.9,
1.10, 1.11

SLOs:
1.4, 1.9,
1.10, 1.11

Patriotism,
Vimy Ridge,
Great
Depression,
WWII etc.
Language,
ethnicity,
culture,
religion,
geography,
political
affiliation
Quebec,
Aboriginal
issues, OKA
crisis

Internal &
External
Factors
(historical,
social,
economic,
geographic
and political
factors)

inquiry

Coat of Arms
Activity

Critical
Inquiry

Summative
Rubric
grading
15%

Competing
Nationalist
Loyalties
Critical
Inquiry

Formative
Critical
inquiry

Lecture,
Notes

Formative
Exit Slip

February 8:
Enlightenme
nt

GLO: 1

February 9:
American
Revolution

GLO: 1

February
10:
French
Revolution

GLO: 1

February
11:

Teachers Convention

February
12:
February
15:
February
16:
French
Revolution &

Teachers Convention

SLOs:
1.1, 1.3, 1.4,
1.6, 1.7, 1.8

Enlightment
thinkers (John
Locke, Stuart
Mill etc.)

American
Revolution

Khan
Academy
video & Table
Twitter

Formative
Exit Slip

French
Revolution

Khan
Academy

Formative

Khan
Academy

Formative

SLOs:
1.1, 1.3, 1.4,
1.6, 1.7, 1.8

SLOs:
1.1, 1.3, 1.4,
1.6, 1.7, 1.8

Family Day
GLO: 1
SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.3,

French
Revolution

Napoleonic
era

1.4, 1.6, 1.7,


1.8

February
17:
French
Revolution &
Napoleonic
era

GLO: 1

February
18:
French
Revolution &
Napoleonic
era

GLO: 1

February
19:
Serbian
Nationalism
February
22:
February
23:
World War I

French
Revolution

Editorial
Assignment

Summative
Rubric
Grading 20%

French
Revolution

Editorial
Assignment

Summative
Rubric
Grading 20%

German &
Italian
unification
Congress of
Vienna etc.

Speech
Assignment

Summative
Rubric
Grading
15%

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.3,
1.4, 1.6, 1.7,
1.8

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.3,
1.4, 1.6, 1.7,
1.8

NID
GLO: 1
SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.5,
1.6, 1.7, 1.8,
1.9

February
24:
Contemporar
y Movements

GLO: 1

February
25:
Efects of
Nationalism

GLO: 1

February
26:
February
29:

SLOs:
1.1, 1.2, 1.5,
1.6, 1.7, 1.8,
1.9

Scottish
Referendum
2014,
Catalonia,
Basque
separatist
movement,
Aruba, Easter
Island,
Alaska,
Kurds, isis
etc.

SLOs:
1.3, 1.5, 1.8

GLO: 1
SLOs:
ALL

Social Studies
20-1
Unit Plans

Year: Spring 2016


Teacher: Amy Stif

Unit 2: Ultranationalism

Speech
Assignment

Summative
Rubric
Grading
15%

Efects of
Nationalism
critical
inquiry
project

Formative
Critical
inquiry

Unit Exam

Summative
MC/ Short
answer 25%

Overview
Students will assess impacts of nationalism, Ultranationalism and the pursuit of national
interest.
Rationale
Key Questions &
Major Objectives

To what extent should national interest be pursued?


To what extent do national interest and foreign policy shape each other?
- How are nationalism and national interest related?
- How has national interest shaped foreign policy?
- How has foreign policy shaped national interest?
To what extent can nationalism lead to Ultranationalism?
- What is Ultranationalism?
- How does Ultranationalism develop?
- How have people responded to Ultranationalism?
To what extent can the pursuit of Ultranationalism lead to crimes against humanity?
- What are crimes against humanity?
- How has Ultranationalism caused crimes against humanity?
- What are some contemporary consequences of Ultranationalism?
To what extent should national self-determination be pursued?
- What is national self-determination?
- What are some efects of pursuing national self-determination?
- What are some efects on Canada of pursuing self-determination?
- What are some unintended consequences of the pursuit of national self
determination?

Resources &
Materials
GLOs & SLOs

GLO 2
To what extent should national interest be pursued?
Students will assess impacts of nationalism, Ultranationalism and the pursuit of national
interest.
SLOs

2.1 Appreciate that nations and states pursue national interest


2.2 Appreciate that the pursuit of national interest has positive and negative consequences
2.3 Appreciate multiple perspectives related to the pursuit of national interest
2.4 Explore the relationship between nationalism and the pursuit of national interest
2.5 Analyze how the pursuit of national interest shapes foreign policy (First world War peace settlements,
the interwar period)
2.6 Explore the relationship between nationalism and ultra nationalism
2.7 Analyze Nationalism and Ultra-Nationalism during times of conflict (Causes of the first and second world
wars, examples of nationalism and ultra-nationalism for the first and second world wars, ultra nationalism in
Japan, internments in Canada, conscription crises)
2.8 Analyze ultra nationalism as a cause of genocide (The Holocaust, 1932-1933 famine in Ukraine,
contemporary examples)
2.9 Analyze impacts of the pursuit of national self determination (successor states; decolonization;
Quebecois nationalism and sovereignty movement; First Nations, Metis and Inuit self-government;
contemporary examples)

Assessments &
Evaluations

Social Studies
20-1
Unit Plans

Year: Spring 2016


Teacher: Amy Stif

Unit 3: Internationalism
Overview
Students will assess impacts of the pursuit of internationalism in contemporary global
afairs.

Rationale
Key Questions &
Major Objectives

To what extent should internationalism be pursued?


To what extent does involvement in international afairs benefit nations and states?
- What are some common motives of nations and states?
- How do the motives of nations and states shape their responses to the world?
- What are some understandings of internationalism?
- How does internationalism benefit nations and states?
To what extent can foreign policy promote internationalism?
- How do countries set foreign policy?
- How can states promote internationalism through foreign policy?
- How does Canadian foreign policy try to balance national interest and
internationalism?
To what extent do eforts to promote internationalism through world organizations afect

nationalism?
- How have changing world conditions promoted the need for internationalism?
- How have the United Nations changing international responses afected
nationalism?
- How do the responses of various international organizations afect nationalism?
To what extent can internationalism efectively address contemporary global issues?
- What are some contemporary global issues?
- How has internationalism been used to address contemporary global issues?
- Is internationalism always the most efective way of addressing contemporary global
issues?
Resources &
Materials
GLOs & SLOs

GLO 3
To what extent should internationalism be pursued?
Students will assess impacts of the pursuit of internationalism in contemporary global
afairs.
SLOs
3.1 Appreciate that nations and states engage in regional and global afairs for a variety of reasons
3.2 Appreciate the impacts of nation and state involvement in regional and global afairs on individual and
collective identities
3.3 Demonstrate a global consciousness with respect to the human condition and global afairs
3.4 Analyze the motives of nation and state involvement or non-involvement in international afairs
(economic stability, self-determination, peace, security, humanitarianism)
3.5 Explore understandings of internationalism
3.6 Analyze how internationalism can be promoted through foreign policy (multilateralism,
supranationalism, peace keeping, foreign aid, international law and agreements)
3.7 Evaluate the extent to which selected organizations promote internationalism (United Nations, World

Council of indigenous peoples, European Union, LOrganisation international de la Francophonie, Arctic


Council, Contemporary examples)
3.8 Analyze impacts of the pursuit of internationalism in addressing contemporary global issues (conflict,
poverty, debt, disease, environment, human rights)
3.9 Evaluate the extent to which nationalism must be sacrificed in the interest of internationalism

Assessments &
Evaluations

Social Studies
20-1
Unit Plans

Year: Spring 2016


Teacher: Amy Stif

Unit 4: Canadian Nationalism


Overview
Students will assess strategies for negotiating the complexities of nationalism within the
Canadian context.
Rationale
Key Questions &
Major Objectives

To what extent should individuals and groups in Canada embrace a national


identity?
To what extent have visions of Canadian identity evolved?
- What is Canada?

How and why did early visions of Canada emerge?


To what extent did various early visions of Canada meet peoples needs?
How is the evolution of various visions of Canada reflected in the country today?

To what extent have attempts to promote national identity been successful?


- How have symbols and myths been used to promote national identity?
- How have institutions been used to promote national identity in Canada?
- How can government programs and initiatives be used to promote a national
identity?
- How can individuals promote a national identity?
To what extent should Canadian national unity be promoted?
- What is national unity?
- How does the nature of Canada afect national unity?
- How has the changing face of Canada afected national unity?
To what extent should I embrace a national identity?
- What are some possible visions of nation?
- What are some possible visions of Canada?
- What is your vision of national identity?
Resources &
Materials
GLOs & SLOs

GLO 4
To what extent should individuals and groups in Canada embrace a national
identity?
Students will assess strategies for negotiating the complexities of nationalism within the
Canadian context.
SLOs

Daily Calendar - February


Sund
ay

Mond
ay
1 NID

Tuesday
2

Wednes
day
3

Thursday

Friday

5 Flex /

Saturd
ay
6

Friday
School
4.1 Appreciate historical and contemporary attempts to develop national identity
4.2 Appreciate contrasting historical and contemporary narratives associated with national identity
4.3 Respect the views of others on alternative visions of national identity
4.4 Explore multiple perspectives on national identity in Canada
9
10
11
Teachers
12 groups
13
4.5 Analyze
methods
used
by individuals,
and governments in Canada to promote a national identity
Convention
Teachers
(symbolism,
mythology,
institutions,
government
programs
& initiatives) Saturday
Tuesday Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
4.6 Examine historical perspectives Conventi
of Canada as a nation (Louis Lafontaine and Robert Baldwin, the Fathers
on and the Indian Act, Metis and Inuit self-governance, Louis Riel, Sir
of Confederation, First Nations treaties
1 French
2
French
Revolution
3 Modified Day
4 10:00
Job Fair
5 National Indian Brotherhood)
Cliford Sifton, Henri Bourassa, French-Canadian
nationalism,
Pierre
Trudeau,
Revolution
Sourcethe
Analysis
16:00 Program
Unitwith
Exam
4.7 Evaluate
challenges and opportunities
associated
the promotion of Canadian national unity
Source (Quebec sovereignty, federal-provincial-territorial
Planning French
relations, Aboriginal self-determination and land claims,
16
Plains
17 Non
18 Western
19
Flex / 20
Analysis
Revolution
bilingualism,
multiculturalism)
of
nationalist
alienation &
Friday
4.8 Evaluate
perspectives ofSchool
future visions of Canada (pluralism, multination model, separatism,
Abraham,
loyaltiesvariousnational
Aboriginal
delf-determination,
global
leadership,
North American integration)
Quebec
critical
energy
Position
4.9
Develop
personal
and
collective
visions
of
national
identity
8 Myths, challenge,
9
10
11
Flex / Friday 12
nationalism
program,
paper

7
8
Daily
Calendar
- March
Sunda Monday
y
14

15
Family
Day

7
Assessments
&
timeline,
types of
Canadian
institution
Aboriginal
non
timeline
Evaluations
s,

equalization
School
payments,
nationalist
political
(Immigrati timeline
loyalties
representatio
on policy,
n
CPR, Red
Contending
River
loyalties
Rebellion,
(conflict &
Indian Act,
how to
AFN, Land
reconcileclaims)
reasonable
13
14 Report 15 19:00
16 11:30 CBE
Awards
17 Last Day of 18 Spring
19 Spring
Cards
IB Meeting
Unit exam accommodati
Classes
Break
Break
on &
Parent Teacher
mutliculturali
Interviews
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday
Friday
sm)
1 Flex / Friday
21
22 NID 23
24 Pink
25 French
26 Flex / 27
School
position
Shirt Day
Revolution
Friday
20
21 Spring paper
22 Spring Break
23 Spring Break School
24 Spring
25 Spring
26 Spring
Enlightmen
Spring
Break
Break
Break
Break
t&
French
Break
Good
Friday
American
Revolutio
Revolution
n

Daily Calendar - April

28
27
Spring
Break

29
28
Spring
French
Break
Revoluti
on

29 Classes
Resume

30Ultra nationalism

31

Saturday
2

10

11 Term 4

12

13

7 Grad Parent

8 Flex / Friday

Evening

School
Term 3 Ends

14

15 Flex / Friday

Begins

16

School

17

18

19

20

21

22 NID

23

24

25 NID

26

27

28

29 Flex

30

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Daily Calendar - May


Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

2 IB Exams

3 18:30 School

Start

Council Meeting

10

6 Flex / Friday

School

11

12

13 Flex / Friday

14

School

15

16

17

18

19

20 Grad 2016

21

NID

22

23 Victoria Day

24

No School

29

30

25 19:00 Music
Awards

31

Daily Calendar - June

26

27 Flex / Friday
School

28

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday
1

Thursday
2 19:00 Spring

Friday
3 Full Flex Day

Saturday
4

8 18:30 Night

10

11

Awards

of the Chiefs

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29 Report

30 Summer

Cards
Appeals
Yearbook

Break Starts