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FILIPINA LEADERSHIP SUMMIT ISSUE | OCTOBER 2015

F I L I P I N A

L E A D E R S H I P

S U M M I T

I S S U E

O C T O B E R

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12th Filipina
Leadership
Summit:
Legacy 2.0
MOST
INFLUENTIAL
FILIPINA WOMEN
IN THE WORLD

Global100™ Awardees
from Canada, Israel,
Japan, Norway,
Philippines,
Switzerland,
United Kingdom

Col. Shirley Raguindin

Relentless, Resilient, Visionary

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MABUHAY FROM THE CEO

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onsider this: construction, healthcare,
finance, nonprofit, consulting, sports,
entertainment, education, government,
information services, IT, real estate,
manufacturing, transportation, publishing, motion
picture - these are the economic sectors represented
by this year’s Global100™ Awardees.

The 2015 Filipina Leadership Summit is taking us
closer to our Pinay Power 2020: a Filipina woman
leader in every sector of the economy - a global
campaign to gather the Most Influential Filipina
Women in the World where Filipina women thrive.
This is an ambitious working award – each awardee is
asked to ‘pay forward’ by femtoring young Filipinas
helping FWN build the next generation of Filipina
leaders to boost our pipeline of qualified leaders so
more Filipina women will rise to the ‘president’ in the
private and public sectors.

I reflect on the amazing awardees of 2015. I
encourage you to get to know them and each other.
Their stories inspire me. Their struggles tell me that we
share similar barriers wherever we may live in the
world.
The summit is just the beginning. It is a gathering
where Filipina women develop friendships and
deepen relationships. It is a place where we take our
learning into actionable items that we all participate
and grow. It is a time for ourselves, a time with our
fellow sisters
So watch out, we’ll see you next year in the
Philippines.

The Global100 awardees are from Canada, Israel,
Japan, Norway, Philippines, Switzerland, the United
Kingdom and, of course, the United States. The
celebration continues with Learning Journeys to the
campuses of Lawrence Berkeley Lab and the The
Shipyard as we partner with these compananies for
private and public partnerships.

ROSA THE RIVETER: You are the face
of Pinay Power!

At the annual summit, we discuss strategies and
new innovations that are trending so we can take
these learnings to our communities to share. Why do
we need to do this? FWN is committed to advancing MARILY MONDEJAR
our communities so we can be more competivitive CEO and Founder,
Filipina Women’s Network
when we have the latest information.

W I L L KO M M E N F RO M T H E F W N P R E S I D E N T

W

elcome to the 12th Annual Filipina Women’s
Leadership Summit. Filipino History is filled
with brave and fearless Pinay Leaders and we honor
this with our 2015 theme FWN 2.0 Legacy: Mothers &
Daughters, our Next Generation Leaders.
This year is special for FWN as we continue to grow
and mature as a global organization. Your support and
participation is how we have been able to come this far
and we are relying on your partnership for continued
support in this pivotal time. FWN’s mission is to have a
Filipina Leader in every sector across all industries. We
achieve this by lifting each other up. Developing and
Empowering the next generation of Filipina leaders
through Femtorship and Camaraderie is at the center
of FWN’s FEMtorMatch Program and the reason we
published our first Leadership Book in 2014 Disrupt.
Filipina Women: Loud. Proud. Leading without a Doubt.
The FWN Annual Summit gives us a few days to think
about our impact in our organizations and communities
so we can collaborate, inspire and empower the
next generation of Filipina leaders. You will have the

opportunity to engage with your peers and learn from
each other’s experience. We will spend Thursday and
Friday on Learning Journeys and have a chance to see
the impacts of Filipina Leadership in our community
first-hand. We will have panels and workshops designed
to encourage dialogue and discussion surrounding
topics that are relevant for Filipinas in the workplace and
community. On Saturday, we will be at our host hotel the
Marines Memorial Club for more panels and our very own
PINAYTalks.

organization as you develop the next generation of
Filipina Leaders.

Pinay Power!

On Thursday evening, the Salo Salo Soirée will take
place at San Francisco’s City Hall hosted by Mayor Ed Lee
and Hydra Mendoza. We are in search for the Filipina
“Rosa” the Face of the Global Pinay. On Friday, we will
be honoring the Most Influential Filipina Women in the
World Award™ at the Gala Awards Dinner at Marines’
Memorial Club. On Saturday, we close out the conference
with a Kwentuhan Halloween Pajama Party for an
evening of deep connection and soul searching as we
continue to forge the new relationships we have made.
We hope that you return home invigorated with
ideas and concepts that will help you as a leader in your

SUSIE QUESADA

President,
Filipina Women’s Network

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

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EDITORIAL TEAM
MARILY MONDEJAR
Publisher
R A I S S A A LV E R O
Editor
CAROL MENDOZA
ODET FORD
R A I S S A A LV E R O
FWN Fellows
Contributor
FRANKLIN RICARTE
MARIA BEEBE

FWN BOARD
ALICIA FORTALEZA
AMAR BORNKAMP
BAMBI LORICA md
EDCELYN PUJOL
ELENA MANGAHAS
MARIA BEEBE
MARILY MONDEJAR
NINI ALVERO
COL. SHIRLEY RAGUINDIN
SONIA DELEN
SUSIE QUESADA
THELMA BOAC

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Message from the CEO and Founder
2 .
Welcome from the FWN President
2 .
About Filipina Women’s Network 4.
Message from the FWN Chair.. .5
Pinay Global Power 2020 Vision..6
Message from the Selection
Committee Co-Chairs........... .7
Global 100 Keepers of the Flame 8
MessagefromtheSelectionCommittee...8
FWNGlobal100™AwardCategories........10
FWNGlobal100™AwardeeProfiles.........11
DisruptGoesGlobal................................14
LeadershipKeynote:ShirleyRaguindin...15
SummitScheduleataGlance.................16
Theviewsandopinionsofadvertisers
and contributors expressed
inthispublicationdonotnecessarily
state or reflect those of
Filipina Women’s Network.
©2015FilipinaWomen’sNetwork.
All Rights Reserved.
No part of this publication may
be published without the
expressed
written permission of
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the publisher.

The Filipina Women’s Network is
a San Francisco based non-profit
professional organization for
women of Philippine ancestry
with members worldwide. We
promote the social welfare of
Filipina women and advocate for
Filipina women’s rights.
FWN provides the content,
credibility and community to help
women of Philippine ancestry
succeed in their businesses
and careers. FWN provides
knowledge, products, education,
research and a worldwide
network for Filipina women
professionals.
FWN convenes programs and
activities that enhance public
perceptions of Filipina women’s
capacities to lead and to build the
Filipina community’s pipeline of
qualified leaders, to increase the
odds that some Filipina women
will rise to the ‘president’ position
in the private and public sectors
worldwide.
FWN provides Filipina women
with opportunities to share
practical career and business

experiences. This focus on
actual career and business
experiences, rather than theory,
from practitioners, corporate
managers, entrepreneurs, elected
/ appointed officials, nonprofit
and community leaders, along
with peer networking, are the
distinguishing features of FWN
meetings.
OUR MISSION: A FILIPINA
WOMAN LEADER IN EVERY
SECTOR OF THE ECONOMY
Position Filipina women
as economic and social
contributors to the global
economy.


OUR 5 PROGRAM AREAS
1. Branding






Shaping the Filipina Image
Filipina Action Now

2. Social Justice

OUR PRIORITY ISSUES:
Influence Filipina popular
culture.
Eliminate all forms of
discrimination against
Filipina women and girls.
Appoint and elect Filipina
women to positions of
leadership.
Economic independence
in housing, wages and pay
equity for equal work.
Access to public services

in education, immigration,
health care, child care,
senior services, and
transportation.
Reproductive freedom.
Elimination of violence
against women and girls.

Anti-Domestic Violenceand
Anti-Human Trafficking
Awareness Campaigns
Immigrant Rights
The Vagina Monologues
productions
One Billion Rising

3. Coalition Building


Annual Filipina Leadership
Global Summit
100 Most Influential
Filipina Women in the
World Awards™
Pinay Power 2020 Reunion

4. Leadership Development







Filipina Women Who Could
Be President Fellowship
Filipinas in Motion
Boards & Commissions
Appointments
Political Education
Awareness Training and
Voter Registration
FWN Fellows and Interns
FEMtorMatch™
Pinay Speed Femtoring

5. Cultural Awareness


FWN Salo Salo™
Sheroes Monologues
Strategic Alliances
with corporate Filipino
employee affinity groups
in all economic sectors
especially organizations
with global employee
populations.
Filipina Global Leadership
Series
DISRUPT: Proud. Loud.
Leading Without A Doubt
Book Tours
Filipina Global Leadership
Competencies Workshops
JOIN the Filipina
sisterhood!

HOW TO REACH THE FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK: P. O. Box 192143, San Francisco, CA 94119 | Phone: 415. 935. 4FWN
www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org | facebook.com/FilipinaWomensNetwork | Twitter@filipinawomen

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
SUMMIT STEERING
COMMITTEE
Amar Bornkamp
Edcelyn Pujol
Marily Mondejar 
Susie Quesada
Tootsie Lansang
PHILIPPINE CONSULATE
GENERAL
Consul General Henry
Bensurto
Deputy Consul General Jaime
Ramon Ascalon
Consul Reginald S. Bernabe
CITY OF
SAN FRANCISCO
Elsie McAteer
Florence Corteza
Hydra Mendoza

CHARLES SCHWAB
Cathy Campbell
Jed Balce
Leslie Tabor
Tootsie Lansang

VOLUNTEERS
Kristy Drutman
Krystle Canare
Rodelyn Coppock
Zara Chiara Fernandez

FILIPINA SUMMIT
SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS
Krystle Canare
Lani Felicitas
Noelani Sallings
Vina Lustado

TRANSPORTATION
Tower Tours
Janet Roxas

MARINES’ MEMORIAL
CLUB HOTEL
Milen Orendain
Nicky Broderick
The Outstanding Staff of the
Marines’ Memorial Club

Julie Hudson
MUSIC
DJ Mikey
GALA AWARDS
DIY Awards

T H A N K YO U T O O U R
C O M M U N I T Y PA R T N E R S

d

YŌ K O S O F R O M T H E F W N B O A R D C H A I R

T

here are miles traveled
to get to this Filipina
Women’s Network Summit.
Likewise there were many
miles journeyed by Filipino
Americans to get to this
year’s first White House
recognition of Filipino
American History Month.
Hence we double celebrate
because this month will
always honor the history of
perseverance and the
continuing rise to
significance of the Filipino
people in America and, for
FWN, the recognition of
empowered Filipina leaders
in the diaspora.
This year’s timely theme of
Mothers and Daughters
brings to life the cultural gift
of a nurturing instinct that
Filipinas are known to carry
with them in their
professional life. Without
scientific proof, dare I say
that Filipina women are a
natural when it comes to
mentoring. I have seen it
among my family circles as I
have seen it in me while I
perform leadership roles at
work and in the community.
Where did I get that? How
did that benefit me in the
long run?

My own two daughters
who are now in their thirties
have nurturing instincts that
I withdraw benefit from. As
their mother, I now have to
listen and be awed by their
youthful wisdom, their
practical ways and their life
strategies that come with
this day and age. (Or heed
their warning – “What do you
get from Facebook, Nanay?”)
To them I am most grateful.

T H A N K YO U T O O U R
This high-powered
gathering is a vital part of
FWN’s Pinay Power 2020
Mission: A
Filipina leader in every
sector of the economy
powering-up FWN’s pipeline
development of qualified
next generation leaders to
increase the odds that some
will rise to the “president”
position. And who knows? It
just might be your daughter!

SUMMIT SPONSORS

While old traditional
values taught us that our
children’s success is our
success I am also grateful
that my years of affiliation
with FWN had taken me to
the next level – that every
Filipinas’ success is our
collective success.
This is why the Summit
brings together Filipina
women global leaders,
influencers, thinkers and
public figures for discussions,
learning journeys,
“kwentuhan strategies” on
how to succeed as multiELENA MANGAHAS
cultural professionals and
Board Chair,
networking chats to find
Filipina Women’s Network
affinity in public and private
partnerships.

FILIPINO TOWN IN SAN FR ANCISCO

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

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he Filipina Women’s Network’s (FWN)
annual Filipina Leadership Global
Summit brings together Filipina
women global leaders, influencers,
thinkers and public figures for
discussions, learning journeys, “kwentuhan
strategies” on how to succeed as multicultural professionals and private chats to
ignite cooperation through public and private
partnerships. The high powered gathering is a
vital part of FWN’s Pinay Power 2020 Mission:
A Filipina leader in every sector of the
economy. It is the leading forum of its kind in
the Filipina global community which inspires
a renewed understanding of the Filipino
culture’s emerging influence as a community.

local agency representatives, API business
profit/government institutions in Africa,
owners and community leaders at the Mayors’ North America, South America, Asia, Australia,
Salo Salo Soireé and the Global FWN100™
Antarctica, Europe.
Awards and Gala.
The worldwide search is a key to FWN’s
After six years of recognizing the Most
strategy to execute its mission — a Filipina
Influential Filipina Women in the United
woman leader in every sector of the economy
States, we now expand our search worldwide by 2020.
for the 3rd year to find Filipina women doing The economic sectors are:
awesome work in their communities and
• Primary Economic Sector
organizations all over the world. The Global
Industries that produce or extract raw
FWN100 Awards™ recognize women who
materials (Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing,
have risen to the most influential and/or
Farming, Hunting, Mining, Extraction)
highest positions in corporations and non

The summit is FWN’s signature fundraiser
with proceeds funding FWN’s programs that
foster the Filipina women’s socio-economic,
political and educational advancement
in addition to raising awareness of FWN’s
pipeline development of qualified next
generation leaders to increase the odds that
some will rise to the “president” position.
The 2015 Summit’s theme is FWN2.0
Legacy: Mothers & Daughters Together
- Next Generation Leaders. The summit
will convene sessions, Mothers & Daughters
Legacy presentations, and Learning Journeys
to confront issues and barriers that affect the
economic trade and investment opportunities
of Filipina women business owners and the
careers of Filipina professionals in the U.
S. and countries with a high population of
Filipina women.
This year’s Summit includes exclusive
policy briefings and office visits with key
legislators whose policies impact the
Filipino community. Attendees will have
opportunities to network with legislators,
elected and appointed officials, state and
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FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

V E L KO M M E N F RO M T H E S T E E R I N G CO M M I T T E E CO - C H A I R

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because it covers both ends
of the leader spectrum. On
wo years ago, I had the
one end, we will hear and
opportunity to get
learn from Filipina leaders and
involved with FWN by
volunteering to help coordinate pioneers who have overcome
challenges and broken barriers
the Summit hosted by Charles
in the workforce and paved the
Schwab. It was my first time
way for the next generation
working with FWN and I didn’t
leaders. I can’t wait to hear
really know what to expect.
them share their experiences as
Ultimately, that experience
they pass on their legacies. On
opened my eyes to the
the other end of the spectrum,
countless opportunities and
we will hear from emerging
ways to make a difference in
and future leaders who will
Filipina women’s lives and the
continue the pursuit of leveling
Filipino community.
the playing field for women and
relentlessly finding ways to win
This year, I joined the FWN
the gender equality battle.
Board of Directors and was
tasked to co-chair the Summit
I hope you are as thrilled as
Steering Committee. As coI
am
to be a part of this 3-day
chair of the Summit Steering
learning
journey. As you
Committee, I welcome you
participate
in the events that
to the 12th Filipina Women’s
we’ve
put
together
for you,
Leadership Summit. This year’s
ask
yourself
what
brought
you
theme is “FWN 2.0 Legacy:
here
and
what
you
hope
to
take
Mothers & Daughters. Next
away
from
this
experience.
It
Generation Leaders.” I am
is
not
by
chance
that
you
are
very excited about this theme

here. Something within you
brought you here. Maybe just
like for me two years ago, this
experience will open doors
for you to make a difference,
maybe you will find your
purpose, or maybe you will
simply take in the moment
and realize how far we, Filipina
women, have come but how
much work we still have to do.

AMAR BORNKAMP

Co-Chair,
Summit Steering Committee

BARUCKH HABA FROM THE STEERING COMMIT TEE CO-CHAIR

W

elcome to the 2015 Filipina
Leadership Global Summit.
This year, we are back in beautiful San
Francisco. Our theme this year is— FWN2.0:
Legacy. Next Generation Leaders. Mothers &
Daughters. We will be looking at our legacy
and have discussions on how to succeed as
multi-cultural professionals.
The committee and I have planned a
fun-filled three days of trending topics for
discussion and presenting them in innovative
formats. Some of the highlights you should
note in the program include:

National Lab is synonymous with “excellence.”
We will journey over to Lawrence Berkeley Lab,
for a discussion on STEM careers and the latest
in technologies.
• San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee will welcome
Summit attendees at the Salo Salo Soirée at
City Hall. Also, we continue our search for the
Filipina “Rosa the Riveter”, the face of Global
Pinay Power.

leaders at Pinay Speed Femtoring and the
FEMtorMatch program.
• More personal stories and conversations at
Kwentuhan.
Prepare to network with Filipina women
global leaders, influencers, thinkers, public
figures and emerging leaders. Here’s to a great
Summit experience!

• The conversation continues at Charles
Schwab on sessions that include trending
topics such as: Next Generation Leaders,
Legacies, Gender Equality as an Investment
Concept, Corporate Men as Allies, and more.

• A Learning Journey to San Francisco’s
Hunters Point, a model of reinvention. How
public and private partnerships are working
to bring about the transformation of Hunters
Point.

• Have a conversation with successful
entrepreneurs and corporate executives at
perennially favorite panels: Make Me a Filipina
Millionaire and Make Me a Filipina CEO.

• In the world of science, Lawrence Berkeley

• Build the pipeline of next generation Pinay

EDCELYN PUJOL

Co-Chair,
Summit Steering Committee

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

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FILIPINA WOMEN’S
NE T WORK’S GLOBAL100™
KEEPERS OF THE FLAME

AMAR BORNKAMP

BAMBI LORICA, M.D.

EDCELYN PUJOL

ELENA MANGAHAS

GLORIA T. CAOILE

MARIA BEEBE

MARILY MONDEJAR

NINI ALVERO

SHIRLEY S. RAGUINDIN

SONIA DELEN

SUSIE QUESADA

THELMA BOAC

Sustaining the Pinay Power 2020 Vision is
quite daunting. As the excitement dies
down and the reality of executing FWN’s
2020 game plan, many will drop out and
others will pick up the torch. The Keepers
of the Flame are the caretakers to ensure
that the the vision is kept alive.
“Never again forget the contributions of
Filipina women in the building of the
world.”
–Marily Mondejar

BIENVENUE FROM THE SELEC TION COMMIT TEE CHAIR

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ongratulations and
Mabuhay!

I am highly honored to welcome
all of you to this year’s 12th
Filipina Women’s Network
(FWN) Leadership Summit,
honoring Filipina women who
are influencers on the world
stage. This is, indeed, an historic
event celebrating and sharing the
accomplishments of outstanding
women who will carry on the
banner of our vision—building
the next generation of Filipina
leaders by 2020 in both public
and private sectors. These
extraordinary women being
honored this evening will
continue the pathway and will be
the influencers, as they already
are, to attain this goal of the
Filipina Women’s Network.
Eleanor Roosevelt once said,
“You gained strength, courage,
and confidence by every
experience in which you really
stop to look fear in the face. You
must do the thing which you
think you cannot do.” Having had
the deepest honor of conversing
with these inspiring and
empowering women from various
countries and from the United
States, I have seen first-hand their
amazing strength, courage, and
confidence.
These Filipina women continue
to influence their communities—
collectively building positive
images of the Filipina woman
around the world. They include
representatives of the corporate
and business world, government
and policy, legal services, media,
publishing, retail, consulting
services, financial services,
healthcare, military, non-profit

organizations, educational
institutions, artists, entertainment
and film. They are lawyers, judges,
architects, and engineers—all
demonstrating exceptional
courage in leadership.
Visionaries, innovative and
risk takers, these extraordinary
women who have excelled in their
areas of expertise and continue
to influence others with their
leadership skills, their spirit of
humility, their selfless energy
of helping others, their deep
respect for family and humanity,
and, most of all, ever mindful of
women’s rights, in all they are
helping to make a better world.
As Leymah Roberta Gbowee of
Liberia said as she accepted the
Nobel Peace Prize, “You can never
leave footprints that last—if you
are always walking on tiptoe.”
These women of influence we
are honoring tonight will never
walk on tiptoes. They have their
two feet firmly on the ground—
fearless, gentle, compassionate
and disciplined!
My sincerest and heartfelt
congratulations to all of you!

THELMA BOAC

Chair,
FWN Global100® Selection
Committee

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

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FWN Global100™
Award Categories
for a cause through collaborative initiatives
or alliances with nonprofit organizations
on behalf of her own organization;
demonstrates high potential and skill with
B E H I N D T H E S C E N E S L E A D E R S measurable results at a government agency,
or organization in any field. “Buildership”
This award category recognizes Filipina
is about building better organizations,
leading broken organizations to adjust,
women who may not have the big title
repair, and re-align.
or corner office, but is a driving force
behind the success of a social cause or
life issue, a community organization’s
EMERGING LEADERS
project or initiative; or her employer’s
( B E LO W AG E 35)
organizational business unit or
This award category recognizes Filipina
department. Someone who has gone
women below age 35 who are making
beyond the call of duty to devote time,
their mark in a leadership role, are on the
energy, and resources to advocate for
pathway to principalship and building
those who need a voice, or support the
capacity across a system. Emerging
organization she represents or works for.
Leaders have powerful mindsets and
skill sets that drive achievement for their
BUILDERS
organizations.
Builders have demonstrated exceptional
business impact at a large workplace
FOUNDERS & PIONEERS
environment; displaying deep passion
This award honors Filipina women in their
capacities as the chief executive, president,
executive director or founder of a company,
community organization, non-profit, or
business venture that they helped start,
build or significantly grow. This award
category is for the trailblazers who have
marshaled resources and applied innovative
practices, processes and/or technologies in
a new and groundbreaking way to address
a significant business or organizational
opportunity.
This year’s FWN Global100 Awardees
are recognized according to the
following seven categories:

I N N O VAT O R S &
THOUGHT LEADERS
This award recognizes women who have
broken new ground in the marketplace,
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FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

100 Most
Influential
Filipina
Womeninthe
World Award
have delivered new and unique applications
of emerging technology transforming the
way people think, in the fields of sports,
literature, the arts and pop culture, or have
improved the lives of others by helping
develop a product or service in the fields
of science, technology, engineering, arts,
or mathematics. This award category is
also for someone who have either launched
a new enterprise learning function or
completely overhauled an existing
development or community initiative.

“NICOLE”
This award honors Filipina women
whose words, actions, and activism,
inspire others to act and revolutionize
society’s way of understanding traditional
beliefs and customs thus leaving behind
a Filipino global imprint. “Nicole,” who
sparked an international dialogue about
women’s rights, national sovereignty,
and international law, as she steadfastly
pursued justice against her rapists, inspires
this category.

POLICYMAKERS & VISIONARIES
This award recognizes Filipina women
leaders who have demonstrated exceptional
business acumen combined with a forwardlooking vision in the development or
influencing of policies, campaigns or laws
that impact business, industry, and society;
leaders who enrich the lives, careers and
businesses of others by sharing the benefits
of their wealth, experience, and knowledge;
actions that significantly change how we
think and live.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Behind the Scenes Leaders

Agnes Bailen

Chief Political Affairs Officer, Chief
of Staff, Association of Congressional
Chiefs of Staff
Manila, Philippines

Filipina Leadership Summit: Global Filipina Women: Power & Influence Global FWN100™2013 Awardees

The 2015
100 Most Influential
Filipina Women in the
World

Atty. Agnes Joyce G. Bailen
earned multiple degrees: B.A. /
M.A. Honors in Political Science,
Bachelor of Law and Bioethics.
Agnes wrote her first book, The
Odyssey of Lorenzo M. Tanada,
which was nominated for Best
Biography by the Manila Critics
Circle in 1998. Her second book,
Supreme Court Rulings on the Civil
Service from 1900-2000. This book
became the centennial gift of the
Supreme Court to the Civil Service
Commission who at that time was
celebrating its Centenary.
Atty. Agnes was appointed as
Court Attorney 4 to the Office of
Justice Artemio V. Panganiban
(who later became Chief Justice).
After working for a year in the High
Court, Atty. Agnes taught at De La
Salle University Manila to teach
dental and medical jurisprudence at
the UP College of Dentistry and the
UP College of Medicine.
After working for four (4) years
in the Supreme Court, Atty. Agnes
went into private practice. But after
a few months, she was appointed
as Chief of Staff in the Office of
Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago.
In 2006, she joined the UP Legal
System under Vice President for
Legal Affairs Atty. Marvic Leonen
who was appointed a justice of

the Supreme Court by President
Benigno S. Aquino III.
In 2007, Atty. Agnes returned
to the legislative branch of
government when she was
appointed as Chief of Staff of the
late Congressman Jose V. Yap of
the second district of Tarlac. In
2010, she became the Chief of
Staff of celebrity politician Lani
Mercado-Revilla, who won as
the Representative of the second
district of Cavite.
Last year, she went back to the
University of the Philippines to take
up a Ph.D. in public administration.
She is now on her second year as a
doctoral student at the UP NCPAG
while serving as Chief of Staff of
Rep. Mercado Revilla.

Angelica
Ligas

Registered Nurse, West Boca
Medical Center, Tenet Healthcare
Lake Worth, Florida, USA
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Inspiring
young minds to the limitless
possibilities that life can offer.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: The impression
that Filipina women are not
qualified to become a leader.
What was your very first paid
job? Caregiver in Canada, 21 years
old, $1000/month.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? A law
11

that requires everyone to donate
at least 10% of their total earnings
with the underprivileged. This
may sound absurd but I resolutely
believe that if this is a mandate, no
one would suffer.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Its people. Filipinos
are known for our hospitality and
cheerfulness and resilience. Despite
the poor economic situations
of most people aggravated by
bombarding natural disasters, you
would see Filipinos smiling and
taking things lightly.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city? I
live in South East Florida and there
is a lot of demand for good nurses.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I come from a
very poor family and strive hard to
reach my goals.
Which living woman do you most
admire? My mother. I grew up
in a family whose means of living
was just enough to live for the day.
This was aggravated when I lost my
father at an early age. I admire my
mom for singlehandedly raising
four children, enduring all the
hardships and tribulations.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? President
Corazon Aquino. I’d like to have a
coffee with her because I want to
express my gratefulness to her for
she uplifted the image and status of
Filipino women. She made people
realize that gender is no longer a
hindrance to whatever you wish to
accomplish.

12

Cheryl
Sevegan

Caregiver, Country Representative
for Israel, European Network of
Filipinos in Diaspora (ENFiD)
Tel Aviv, Israel
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Being invited to
give a lecture to Masters Students
at Tel Aviv University and Bar
Ilan University on International
Migration on behalf of Filipino
Migrants in Israel.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? Labor
Attache Merriam Cuasay
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? The misguided
faith that men are above women.
What was your very first paid
job? Marketing Agent, 11 years old,
1,500 pesos
If you could start over, what
would you do? I’d go back to law
school.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I’d control natural
calamities and destroy all manmade
creation for mass destruction.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
For greener pastures. I believed
that I could be of a bigger help to
my country and fellow countrymen
outside of our homeland.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? It is my home, where
my family resides.

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Tel Aviv, Israel is my second home
because its people welcomed me
warmly which made my life here
easier. I found myself and became
more useful to others.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Close family ties.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? To never be scared of
trying. To not be afraid of exploring
what the bigger world can offer.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Benazir Bhutto
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Being the first
FWN Global100 awardee from
Israel.

Em Angeles

Associate Technical Account
Manager, Yapstone, Inc., Oakland,
California USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be?
This would be it!
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? Ken
Marquis. Believed in me. Mentored
me to become the Executive
Entertainment Producer for
Pistahan.
What was your very first paid
job? Recreation Park Specialist. 16
years-old. $9/hr.
If you had another career, what

would that be? Special Needs
Speech Therapist
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Telekinesis
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Mano or Pagmamano
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I take each day one day at a time.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Work hard in silence and
let your success be your noise.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Mother Teresa
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
If we keep going by this pace,
NOTHING!

Hazel Dolio
Tag-at

Director, Andersen Tax LLC
Alameda, California USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? My charitable
and social justice work for my
hometown in Panaon.
What is the global impact of
your work? My work has been
done through Facebook, which has
enabled many Panaonians living
all over the world to gain access to
timely information about our town,
as well providing them an avenue to
serve, if they so desire.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Being taken
seriously as a trusted tax advisor.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? Our
company’s CEO who epitomizes
hard work and who practices what
he preaches.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? Juggling multiple
commitments (personal and
professional).
If you had another career, what
would that be? Professor
If you could start over, what
would you do? Doing something
related to wellness and health.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Making
everyone walk and bike.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
My family immigrated to the US
when I was thirteen years old.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Being close to nature.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Taking care of our elderly
parents.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Melinda Gates
What do you read? Personal
finance and fiction
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Yoga and lots of walking.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Live simply.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Eleanor
Roosevelt
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Jane Austen
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Learning to make hard decisions
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Influence can
take different forms.

Leonor S.
Vintervoll

Owner/Manager, ASEAN World
Travel, Board Director and
Country Rep, European Network
of Filipino Diaspota (ENFiD),
Founder, Philippine Women’s
Organization Resource Center
Oslo, Norway
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? Being
an entrepreneur has given me
freedom over my own finances and
investments.
What is the global impact of your
work? The lifting of the ban on
deployment of “au pair”/cultural
exchange in Norway and in Europe.
It has given Filipino youth an
opportunity of a lifetime to learn
and know more about their other
culture, foreign language, and at the
same, the chance to earn money!
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I can use
my experience as a woman to try
to make things better, inspire and
encourage women to pursue their
career and think that if “I can do it,
they can do it”. That work can be
fulfilling, rewarding, and fun!
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: To learn a
foreign language fluently is a great
challenge!
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Women’s equality all over the world
.

If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I was given a lifetime opportunity
-a paid assignment in Norway by
the company I worked for in the
Philippines (all expenses paid).
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The Philippines has
around 10 million Overseas Filipino
Workers, which strengthens its
economy!
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I cry easily.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Knowing when to stop and relax.
Work hard but vacation is a must.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? I was very responsible
when I was 20. I took care of my
studies and career! But one should
do things a 20-year old woman
should have been doing, for lost
times and experiences couldn’t be
brought back!
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Unemployment - the Philippines
should have more industries catered
to women, rather than realty
developments which are generally
catered to men.

Leslie Y.
Tabor

Director, Charles Schwab Advisor
Services
Union City, California, USA
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader?

Having the responsibility of
paying it forward. I mentor
many young professionals of
various backgrounds, sharing my
experiences, learnings, and advice,
as well as being a sounding board
for their thoughts and ideas as
they pursue their careers. I also
have the honor of representing
my Filipino heritage. Many of
our cultural values and behaviors
influenced the leader I am today,
which helps to shape the many
discussions I have with mentees,
staff, peers, and other leaders.
Finally, and most importantly, I
have the responsibility of being
a role model to my one-year old
daughter. She is growing in an era
where we are seeing a transition of
wealth to women holding a greater
share of wallet in the economy
(over 50% by 2020), where women
are increasingly becoming the
family breadwinner, and where we
hope to see more female leaders
in positions of greater influence
(i.e. C-suite, STEM, government,
etc). It is my prayer that I may be
a strong example of a leader who
is confident, an influencer, a risk
taker, but also one with humility,
kindness and compassion.
Workplace challenge as a
Filipina woman and why: Very
few Filipina women in senior
leadership positions in my
workplace. I believe some of the
reasons for this may be the cultural
differences in the set of workplace
behaviors that are valued and
viewed as “leadership” behaviors.
For example, from very early
on, we are taught to respect our
elders and not to question their
authority or to keep our heads
down and get our work done or
that we should maintain modesty
in our accomplishments and not
self-promote. In the western
corporate environment, some of the
key leadership behaviors include
questioning/challenging the status
quo and communicating in a way
that influences others and inspires
them to action. For many Asians

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

13

DISRUPT Goes Global

international Book LAUNCH Highlights
BY DR. MARIA BEEBE
A deep examination of how Filipina women
in diaspora thrived in the challenges of living
in the modern multi-cultural global economy,
“DISRUPT” is the definitive book that will
change the public’s perceptions of Filipina
women’s capacities to lead, FWN’s Pinay Power
2020 mission.

COVER STORY

— Susie Quesada, President, Filipina Women’s
Network

Las Vegas, her current home. Her co-host was
Judge Cheryl Moss who wrote about being
the first Filipina judge in a District Court in
Nevada. Gloria also recruited other influentials
to participate in the reading and got them excited
about the evolving FWN again; asked a set of
twins to read the “Letter to a Young Filipina”;
and requested book buyers to buy two and
donate one to a library or to someone who needs
inspiration.
Ruben Nepales, who is acknowledged by
his spouse as the person behind the scenes who
keeps her crazy, wrote about the the DISRUPTing Hollywood on 14 November 2014 as
“probably one of the most fun afternoons I’ve
ever spent with Filipinas. Imagine Filipinas –
loud, proud, achievers and each one a dynamo
in her own way – gathered in the beautiful
home (the former estate of screen legend
Mary Pickford) of the generous couple, Lani
(an accomplished doctor herself) and Edwin
Raquel.” Who is the spouse? None other than
Janet Nepales, aka Santa Juanita Banana, who
wrote about being a journalist as the next best
thing to sainthood.
For the readings in Singapore, Japan, and
Portland where there was only one author in
residence, community members were invited to
read excerpts. Dr. Astrid S. Tuminez, author of
“A Filipina
in a Word, a

Since the launch of DISRUPT. Filipina
Women. Proud. Loud. Leading without a Doubt,
the first ever Filipina Women’s Network (FWN)
leadership book on 5 October 2014 as part of
11th Filipina Leadership Global Summit in
Manila, FWN board members and authors have
led book readings in the various locations in the
US, Singapore, and Japan.
In 2014, book readings were led by Gizelle
Robinson in San Francisco, CA, Gloria Caoile
in Washington, DC, and Rocio Nuyda in
Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA. The 3 November
2014 launch in San Francisco coincided with the
launch of FEMTORmatch. Sponsors included
AT&T, Ramar Foods, and Southwest. The 23
November 2014 launch was arranged at the AFLCIO building in Washington, DC. The readerauthors were treated to a night cap at the W by
Cris Comerford who did not make it to the
reading because she had to prepare
“Filipina women
an early dinner for POTUS. Such
is part of the joy of being “A
are the ultimate
Chef to the Chiefs.” Gloria T.
global disrupters.
Caoile declared “our mantra
is no longer ‘you’ve come
They’re tenacious.
a long way, baby.” “That
They’re firm.
was yesterday. Today we
are loud, proud and we lead
They’re forceful.
without a doubt. Sisters, we
And they don’t give
need to step up, and power
up!” True to her chapter about
up.”
“Stepping Up”, Gloria powered
up again by organizing a book
reading on 12 June 2015 in

Filipina in the World” and Regional Director,
Legal and Corporate Affairs (Southeast Asia),
Microsoft & Adjunct Professor, Lee Kuan Yew
School of Public Policy chaired the event in
Singapore on April 17, 2015. His Excellency
Mr. Antonio A. Morales, Ambassador of the
Philippines to Singapore gave the keynote
speech.
Isabelita Manalastas-Watanabe, author of
“Japan: a Love-Hate Relationship” and President
of Speed Money Transfer requested authors
whose chapters were chosen to be read to send
messages. For example, Sec. Imelda Nicolas,
alo a chapter author, wrote: I hope by reading
my chapter, you will realize that many of us in
government (CONTINUED ON PAGE 48)......

Marily Mondejar

14

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Col. Shirley Raguindin

C an your destiny be e ver pre - de termined ?

“We are all born
with a purpose to
leave a legacy.”

“We are all born with a purpose to leave a legacy and I honor those who
have worked hard and sacrificed everything to allow us to live a better life
for our families, our communities and for generations to come.” Colonel
Shirley S. Raguindin shares her guiding philosophy in 2015. She keynotes
FWN 2.0 Legacy: Next Generation Leaders “Mothers & Daughters,
Mothers & Sons” Together - the theme of the 2015 Filipina Leadership
Global Summit on October 29-31 in San Francisco. Shirley grew up with
humble beginnings in Hawaii’s sugar plantations. An honors student, she
expected to receive a car as a graduation gift, similar to her older brother
when he graduated from high school. Instead her gift was a 24-year old
engineer arriving from the Philippines who was going to be her husband.
Her parents arranged her marriage with the young man’s parents on the day
she was born.
Today, Colonel Raguindin is Chief Diversity Officer for the Air National
Guard (ANG), Chief of Diversity for the National Guard (NGB) and in
her dual role, principal advisor to NGB Chief, General Frank J. Grass and
ANG Director, Lt. General Stanley E. Clarke III. She is responsible for
the strategic direction, implementation and alignment of ANG’s integrated
global diversity and inclusion initiatives to achieve the highest state of

military readiness to over 458,000 soldiers, airmen and civilians.
Colonel Raguindin will speak on Women. Create. Change., her journey
from when her father told her that the military was only for men based
on his generational perspectives; and to discuss resiliency of how to
navigate through one’s career ladder and embrace our tradition and culture
as a strength, and not a weakness. Her father, Isabelo Alonzo Raguindin
is from Ilocos Norte, Philippines, employed by Oahu Sugar Company;
and her mother, Maria Saoit Raguindin, is from Ilocos Sur. Maria was a
traditional picture bride and married Isabelo in Hawaii; and both obtained
their naturalized citizenship a few years later. She has two older brothers,
Grover and Gilbert; and one younger brother, Abraham and two younger
sisters, Elsie and Lisa.
Shirley makes it a priority to always mentor and challenge our emerging
youth to always set for the highest goals in their careers; and to never ever
give up. She mentors members of the USAF Reserve Officer Training
Corps at the University of Hawaii annually; was a former volunteer and
board member of the Pan Pacific American Leaders and Mentors; and
serves as a board member of Filipina Women’s Network since 2008.

Image Captions (L-R): 1. Shirley pictured with her mother, Maria, who flew from Hawaii to attend her promotion ceremony to Colonel at the Pentagon in 2012 2. FWN 2013 - Col Raguindin with all military service
officers from the US Air Force, U.S. Army and U.S. Navy 3. Shirley’s promotion ceremony in 2012 to Colonel with Director of the Air National Guard, Lt Gen Harry Wyatt and CMSgt Alvin Nall as master of ceremonies
at Pentagon Hall of Heroes, 4. Shirley’s son, Jessie at 1.5 years old pictured with Shirley’s mother, Maria.

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

15

COVER STORY

Col. Shirley Raguindin

Summit schedule at a glance
D AY O N E :

D AY T W O :

THURSDAY, OCT 29
Marines
Memorial Club
Hotel

FRIDAY, OCT 30
» Suheil Totah, Executive Vice President,
Lennar Urban

609 Sutter
Street @ Mason
Street
San Francisco,
CA 94102
(except as
noted)

9:00 AM – 9:15 PM
SUMMIT WEAVER 1: DEVELOPING
YOUR CIRCLE OF INFLUENCE
MAXIMIZING YOUR INVESTMENT IN
ATTENDING THE FILIPINA SUMMIT

All sessions and events are open to full
Summit registrants; no additional fees are
required. All others: session-only, eventonly and one-day-only attendance tickets
can be purchased at filipinasummit.org/
register.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER
29th
8:00 AM – 10:45 AM
LEARNING JOURNEY: PUBLIC &
PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: HUNTER’S
POINT
San Francisco is a model for reinvention
- transformation of land use and city
services. We will journey to visit the
locations that are being transformed,
the partnerships that made this
happen, the master planning on joint
development agreements that has the
social considerations of the citizens of
San Francisco - below market housing,
transportation, financing schemes that
help retain families in the city.
Shuttle leaves at 8:00 AM promptly
Dress Code: Business Casual; comfortable
walking shoes; please wear your FWN
name badge

The FWN Board spends a lot of time in
bringing together the women that create
change and disrupt the status quo in
communities and organizations all over
the world. The summit is a once-in-alifetime opportunity for Filipina women
leaders selected for the 2015 Global
FWN100 Awards to be together in one
place. This configuration, this composition
of personalities together in San Francisco,
in the places we’ll be visiting, the events
we’ll be celebrations, will never happen
again.
The FWN Board and the Summit Steering
Committee welcome attendees on how
to maximize investment in the Filipina
Summit = Developing Your Circle of
Influence
We all know that networking is important
and we invest in ourselves so we can
meet those who can belong to our circle
of influence. Travelling to the U. S., to San
Francisco, is about connecting with each
other who are of Philippine ancestry. or
supporting the Philippine economy. To
succeed in today’s world, it’s not only
about what you know, it’s who you know
and have developed relationships with.
This is the secret of professional and
business success.

SCHEDULE

16

Speakers:
» Horst Simon, Deputy Laboratory
Director
» Kathy Yelick, Associate Laboratory
Director, Computing Sciences
» Lawanna Richmond, Staff Advisor
Designate, UC Regents
Special thanks to Elizabeth Bautista, Global
FWN100 ‘15, and her team for making this
Learning Journey possible:
Roy Kaltschmidt, Laboratory
Photographer
Christina Bruther, Protocol Coordinator,
LBNL Directorate, Protocol Office
Evren Sarac Essner
Elizabeth Bautista, Manager, Operations
Technology Group, NERSC
Return to hotel at 2:15 pm
3:30 PM – 5:00 PM
FWN MEMBERS ONLY MEETING
FWN Members: meet fellow members,
learn the history of FWN, how you can
maximize member benefits and volunteer
for committees that will enhance your
professional development.

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
LEARNING JOURNEY #2: LAWRENCE
BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY
1 Cyclotron Road MS 943R256
Berkeley, CA 94720

We will journey to the Lawrence Berkeley

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

The search for the Filipina Rosa as the face
of Global Pinay Power continues. Then, we
salo-salo.
Dress Code: Wear the ‘Rosie the Riveter’
outfit complete with bandanna and you
might just be selected as the icon of
Filipina influence. See photo as the basis
of your outfit. FWN photographer will be
on-site to take your photo! Philippine flag
bandannas will be available for you to use
or purchase.
Keynote Speakers and Remarks:
» Marily Mondejar, FWN Founder & CEO
» Susie Quesada, FWN President
» Opening Remarks by Mayor Ed Lee
Return to hotel at 7:45 pm
9:00 PM – 11:00 PM
AWARDS REHEARSAL FOR 2015
GLOBAL FWN100™ AND FWN BOARD
MEMBERS
Don’t miss this rehearsal. Meet your fellow
awardees. We will review the awards
process so you know what to do during
the Gala Awards Ceremony. Coffee, tea and
matamis will be served.
Dress Code: Pajama, caftan, comfortable
clothing. Please wear your name badge at
all times for entry to all summit educational
sessions and off-ste special events.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30th

Dress Code: Business Casual. Please wear
your FWN name badge
5:00 PM – 5:30 PM
LEARNING JOURNEY TO SAN
FRANCISCO CITY HALL
Shuttle leaves at 5:00 PM promptly

Speakers:
» Tamsen Drew, Senior Project Manager,
Hunters Point Shipyard & Candlestick Point
» Tiffany Bohee, Executive Director, Office
of Community Investment & Infrastructure
» Dr. Veronica Hunnicutt, Member,
Mayor’s Citizens’ Advisory Committee for
Community Development
» Sean Sullivan, Director of Sales, Lennar
Urban

National Laboratory to meet their
executives and a discussion on the lab’s
track record in STEM recruiting a diverse
workforce including minorities especially
Filipina women.

IMPORTANT: Please wear you FWN name
badge in order to board shuttle. Your
name badge color will identify you as a
Full-Access Summit Pass Holder.
7:00 - 7:30 PM
SALO-SALO SOIRÉE: THE SEARCH
FOR FILIPINA ROSA AS THE FACE OF
GLOBAL PINAY POWER
@ San Francisco City Hall

7:30 AM – 8:15 PM
LEARNING JOURNEY TO CHARLES
SCHWAB
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Board Lyft rides in front of the Marines’
Memorial Club to take you to Charles
Schwab.
Shuttle leaves at 7:30 AM promptly.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

SCHEDULES, SPEAKERS AND PROGRAMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
UPDATED CONFERENCE SCHEDULES WILL BE AVAILABLE DURING
THE SUMMIT AT THE REGISTRATION DESK.

8:30 AM – 8:45 PM
SUMMIT WEAVER 2: OUR JOURNEY SO
FAR...
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Keynote Speaker: Col. Shirley
Raguindin, USAF, Chief NGB Diversity,
National Guard Bureau
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
KEYNOTE CONVERSATION: FWN2.0
LEGACY: NEXT GENERATION
LEADERS. MOTHERS & DAUGHTERS
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Welcome Remarks by Leona Tang, EVP of
Internal Audit, Charles Schwab
Filipina.Women.Create.Change.
Filipina Women Coming Together at the
Summit To Create Change.
The opening session of the Filipina
Summit will feature Filipina women from
different backgrounds and economic
sectors. The Conversation will begin
with a moderator’s overview of what
legacy means, how Filipina women
create change, the roles they play in the
workplace, and how coming together as a
community we can create a global imprint.
Speakers:
» Aimee Alado, Attorney-At-Law,
Chairman, European Network of Filipino
Diaspora, United Kingdom (Government)
» Catherine Salceda Ileto, Senior Director
of Marketing and Public Relations,
Sutherland Global Services, Makati City,
Philippines (Outsourcing)
» Elizabeth Bautista, Operations
Technology Group Lead, Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory, California,
USA (Technology)
» Hedy Marie Leuterio Thomas, PE.,
President, Leuterio Thomas Architects and
Engineers, Maryland, USA (Architecture)
» Hon. Lorna Schofield, United States
District Judge, Southern District of New
York, New York, USA (Law)
» Luisa Blue, Chief Executive Officer, SEIU

521, California, USA (Labor)
» Melissa Orquiza, Musician, Composer,
Walt Disney Studios, California, USA
(Music)
» Nerissa Fernandez, Global Corporate
Affairs & PR, ABS-CBN International
(Telivision)
» Pet Hartman, Senior Vice President,
Global Services Operations, Arch Insurance
Group., North Carolina, USA (Insurance)
» Ramona S. Diaz, Director, CineDiaz,
Maryland, USA (Film)
» Susan Bautista Afan, Chief Marketing
Officer, ABS CBN Lingkod Kapamilya
Foundation, Makati City, Philippines
(Talent Search and Foundation)
» Stephanie Lomibao, Senior VicePresident, Philanthropy Manager, Bank of
America (Philanthropy)
» Tess Martillano-Manjares, Enterprise
Services & Chief Information Risk Officer
(CIRO) for Latin America and Caribbean,
BNY Mellon, New York, USA (Cybersecurity)
»Trina Villanueva, Director, Community
Outreach/Foundation Officer Corporate
Social Responsibility, MUFG Union Bank,
N.A., California, USA. (Social Responsibility)
Moderator:
Sonia Lugmao Aranza, President, Aranza
Cross-Cultural Strategies; CEO, Global
Leadership Development, Virginia, USA.
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
#1 CONCURRENT SESSION: PERSONAL
LEGACY: MY PORTFOLIO
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

ON PRINT
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Location Photo shoot - a professional
photographer will be on-site to take your
headshots
Bring 2 outfits - business and business
casual
1) Professional headshot for your career
portfolio
2) Action shot
3) Social Media: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
#3 CONCURRENT SESSION- CULTURAL
LEGACY: GENDER EQUALITY AS AN
INVESTMENT AND RETIREMENT
CONCEPT
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Join the conversation on leveraging
investing as a powerful means to
advance gender equality and women’s
empowerment in the workplace and
beyond.
Do we have a “Pobrecita mentality”? What is
the Filipina culture in investments, savings,
managing money? Why are we willing
to send $$$ to our relatives in our home
country but not enabling them to save?
With pay inequity, how financially ready
are we for retirement? What are our culture
patterns?

Speakers:
» Edcelyn Pujol, CFP, Investment Advisor,
Frontier Wealth Strategies
» Crystal Dykstra, Financial Consultant,
Charles Schwab
Do you have a job or do you have a career? » Leslie Tabor, Director, Product
Management/Marketing, Charles Schwab
You have a job if you’re “doing” and you
don’t feel like you’re achieving. You have
11:00 - 11:20 AM
a career if what you do creates a path of
where you want to be at a particular time NETWORKING BREAK & AUTHOR BOOK
SIGNINGS 1
frame.
This is where I begin - developing my
legacy by creating my My Personal
Portfolio, the foundation for my
professional career.

Attendees will learn the nine components
of creating My Personal Portfolio.
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
#2 CONCURRENT SESSION:
PROFESSIONAL LEGACY: YOUR IMAGE

@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Network with peers, new friends, old
friends.
FWN Members and Global FWN100

Awardees who have authored books will be
available for book signing. Books available
for purchase on-site.
Moderator: Maria Beebe
Founding Partner, Global Networks
11:20 AM - 12:30 PM
SMART.YOUNG.UNINTIMIDATED.NEXT
GENERATION LEADERS. YES. WE. ARE. 
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

A provocative discussion from our
emerging leaders on Topics Du Jour for
Next Generation Filipinas. Technology Lives:
Smart Phone.Twitter.Facebook.Instagram.
LinkedIn.
What issues are important to young Pinays?
What would the world look like when
Millenials take over the world?
Speakers:
» Belle Zatlin, Masters in Social Work,
Fordham University
» Patricia Quema La Chica, Policy Analyst,
Office of the Governor, Hawaii, USA
» Kharissa Leah Fernando, Support
Manager, Peek, California, USA
» Juslyn Cabrera Manalo, Community
Engagement Associate, Forest City
Enterprises, California USA
» Raissa Alvero, FWN Fellow 2015-2016
Moderator:
Francine Maigue, District Director,
California State Assembly
12:30 - 1:00 PM
LUNCH AND AUTHOR BOOK SIGNINGS 2
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Network with peers, new friends, old
friends.
FWN Members and Global FWN100
Awardees who have authored books will be
available for book signing. Books available
for purchase on-site.
Moderator: Maria Beebe
Founding Partner, Global Networks
1:00 - 2:15 PM
THE ECONOMY TODAY: SHARING

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

17

SCHEDULE

Dress Code: Business Casual; comfortable
walking shoes; please wear your FWN
name badge.

D AY T H R E E :

SATURDAY, OCT 31st
ECONOMY VS. ON-DEMAND ECONOMY.
THIS.IS.THE.FUTURE.
@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Get.In.The.Program.
The “sharing economy” describes a
type of business built on the sharing of
resources – allowing customers to access
goods when needed. Think AirBnb or
Zipcar. While sharing goods has always
been a common practice among friends,
family and neighbors, in recent years,
the concept of sharing has moved from
a community practice into a profitable
business model.
The On-Demand Economy
D A Y isTrevolutionizHREE:
ing commercial behavior in cities around
the world, ushering in a paradigm shift
similar to what was seen with the advent
of the internet in the late 1990s. Think
on-demand apps such as Uber, LinkedIn
or TaskRabbit.

» Greg Cosko, President and CEO, Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Company
» Michael Haydel, Senior Vice-President,
Operational Services, Charles Schwab
» Eric McDonnell, Chief Operating
Officer, Executive Vice-President, United
Way of the Bay Area
» Steven Hartman, President and CEO,
Stonewood Insurance Management
Company, Raleigh, NC
Return to hotel at 3:15 pm

Are our Filipina women entrepreneurs
business disrupters or sustainers?
Our millionaires will engage in a bold
conversation on becoming millionaires,
how they did it, sustain it and own their
success without the guilt yet sharing
their prosperity with those who need it.
Attendees will leave the session feeling
proud of our Filipina sisters who took
action on their ideas.

6:00 PM
REGISTRATION: VIP RECEPTION &
GLOBAL100™ AWARDS GALA
@ 10th floor Foyer, Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter St. San Francisco, CA 94102

SATURDAY, OCT
7:30 PM- 31st
12:00 AM

On-Demand Economy is defined as the
economic activity created by technology
companies that fulfill consumer demand
via the immediate provisioning of goods
and services. Supply is driven via an efficient, intuitive digital mesh layered on
top of existing infrastructure networks.
Speakers:
» Paolo Parigi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor,
Institute for Research in the Social
Sciences, Stanford University
» Molly Turner, Global Head of Civic
Partnerships, Airbnb
2:15 PM- 3:15 PM
CORPORATE MEN AS ALLIES. SHARING
THE POWER IN THE WORKPLACE

SCHEDULE

@ Charles Schwab
211 Main St, San Francisco, CA 94105

Conversation with our allies. Sex
discrimination in hiring, promotion, and
job assignments is difficult to overcome.
Gender biases are activated in all of us
automatically. As soon as evaluators
know the sex of a person, it can lead to
unintentional and implicit discrimination.
The corporate men who are leading
gender equality in the workplace share
their perspectives and tips on how
Filipina women can be more pro-active in
managing their careers to achieve equal
status in the workplace.
Speakers:
18

signature FWN women entrepreneurship
thought leadership session focused on the
business side of the quintessential Pinay.
Filipina Millionaires who have shared
their stories in previous sessions include
Loida Nicolas Lewis, Angelica Berrie, Maria
Banatao, Sherri Burke, Zeny Cunanan, and
Lita Abele, Nimfa Gamez, Cora Alisuag. Dr.
Tess Mauricio, and others in finance, real
estate, healthcare, personal services and
manufacturing.

GLOBAL100™ AWARDS CEREMONY
AND GALA DINNER

Please join the Filipina Women’s Network
in honoring the FWN Global 100: The 100
Most Influential Filipina Women in the
World.
MPORTANT: Please bring your dinner
tickets. Meal tickets will be collected by
Marines’ Memorial Club staff.
Dress Code:
Filipiniana / Formal / Barong / Black Tie

Speakers:
» Emma Marcha Imperial, President,
Imperial Homes Corporation,
Muntinlupa, Philippines
» Fe O. Punzalan, Vice-President, Punzalan
Management, Inc.
» Myrna Tang Yao, President & CEO,
Richwell Trading Corporation and
Richprime Global Inc., Philippines
» Micaela van Zwoll, Principal at Micaela
Contemporary Projects

SATURDAY, OCTOBER
31st

Moderator:
Susie Quesada, President, Ramar Foods
International

9:30 AM- 10:30 PM
SUMMIT WEAVER #3: OUR JOURNEY
ALMOST ENDS

10:25 AM - 11:35 AM
RUN FILIPINA RUN: FILIPINAS FOR
POLITICAL EQUITY

Crystal Lounge - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Heritage Room 10F- Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Speakers:
» Marily Mondejar, CEO & Founder,
Filipina Women’s Network
» Susie Quesada, President, Filipina
Women’s Network

Filipina women in public office is dismal.
What can we do? How do we educate and
encourage women to run for public office?
How do we build our talent pipeline? Can
we make this a global campaign?

9:30 AM- 10:30 PM
MAKE ME A FILIPINA MILLIONAIRE:
REINVENTION. DISRUPTION. LEGACY.
BRAND.

Meet the Filipina women who have run
for office, as well as those who support
or train women to run for office, and get
all the information you need to decide
whether you want to run.

Crystal Ballroom - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

The “Make Me a Filipina Millionaire” is a
FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

Speakers:
» Agnes Bailen, Board of Trustees,
» April Veneracion Ang

» Aurora Austriaco
» Genevieve Jopanda
» Hydra Mendoza
» Noelani Sallings
» Thelma Boac, Board of Trustees,
Berryessa Unified School District
» Luisa Blue, CEO, SEIU Local 521
» Thelma Boac, Board of Trustees,
Berryessa Unified School District
Moderator:
Gloria T. Caiole, National Political
Director, APALA
12:00 PM-1:00 PM
MAKE ME A FILIPINA CEO: WOMEN
AT THE TOP: ARE WE ACHIEVING
GENDER EQUALITY AND PAY
EQUITY?
Crystal Ballroom - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

The message of Lean In for Filipina
women-on-the-rise. Implications
for Filipina Women of the World.
Competitiveness and growth in the
workplace. Joining the conversation,
sharing “Lean In Moments”, connecting
with other Filipina women across the
globe. Is Lean In the answer to Filipina
Global100™ Power?
An informal Kwentuhan (story telling)
session (a la “The View”) among kindred
spirits of how being bi-cultural is both a
challenge and an advantage in the global
workplace.
Speakers:
» Jennifer Cabalquinto, Chief Financial
Officer, Golden State Warriors
» Pet Hartman, Senior Vice President,
Global Services Operations, Arch
insurance Group
» Tess C. Martillano-Manjares, Enterprise
Services & Chief Information Risk Officer
(CIRO) for Latin America and Caribbean,
BNY Mellon, New York
1:00 PM - 1:45 PM
GETTING PUBLISHED IN FWN’S NEXT
BOOK - WRITING YOUR MEMOIR
Crystal Lounge - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

We invite those who are interested in
writing a chapter for an FWN follow-on
book to DISRUPT. Filipina Women. Loud.
Proud. Leading without a Doubt to

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

participate in the Writing Your Memoir
workshop. At the end of the workshop,
you should have a 250-word abstract. A
memoir is a story from your life; it is not
your autobiography which is the story of
a life. A memoir is just a slice of your life.
For the purpose of the follow-on book,
your memoir is about your own trajectory
to becoming what you are now – a global
Filipina demonstrating leadership.
Chair: Maria Beebe, Founding Partner,
Global Networks
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
FEMTOR MATCH: PINAY SPEED
FEMTORING WITH GLOBAL FWN100™
AWARDEES
Crystal Ballroom - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

FWN Board Members will facilitate this
awesome and popular panel - one of the
highlights of the Summit - femtoring next
generation leaders.
After the Pinay Speed Femtoring,
FEMtorMatch gurus, will walk you through
the FEMtorMatch website so you can sign
up as a FEMtee and be matched with a
FEMtor to continue an official femtoring
partnership to guide your professional
career.
FWN’s 6th year of building the pipeline
next generation of Pinay leaders. Pinay
Speed Femtoring is a learning event at
which femtees / protégés can ask the
Global FWN100™ Awardees (AKA Femtors)
the “everything-you’ve-always-wantedto-know-but-didn’t-know-whom-toask” questions. Femtees will have the
opportunity to interact with Femtors
during the course of the session by
moving to different topic tables every 15
minutes.
Advance sign-up is required for Femtees
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
CLOSING REMARKS: GO, FILIPINA
WOMEN OF THE DIASPORA- CHANGE
THE WORLD, WE ARE HALF THE SKY
Crystal Ballroom - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

If we’re half the sky, how do we change the
world as Filipina women?

Short, powerful stories about our personal
or professional lives.
Speakers:
» Ace Itchon, President, Aspen Philippines
Incorporated, Taguig City, Philippines
» Aimee Alado, Attorney-At-Law,
Chairman, European Network of Filipino
Diaspora, UK
» Agnes Bailen, Chief Political Affairs
Officer, Association of Congressional Chiefs
of Staff, Quezon City, Philippines
» Angelica Ligas, Registered Nurse, Tenet
Healthcare, Florida, USA
» Annabelle Misa Hefti, Samhang Pilipina
Bern, Switzerland
» Glenda Tibe Bonifacio, Gender, Migration
and Citizenship Scholar and Associate
Professor at University of Lethbridge
» Irene Kaneko, Publisher, Jeepney Press,
Chairperson, UTAWIT
» Nimfa Gamez, President & CEO,
Caring Hearts Foundation, Mission-Hope
Developmental Services, Hand in Hand for
Progress LLC., California
» Maria Santos Greaves, President &
Owner of Surrey Hearing Care, Inc.» Susan
Bautista Afan, Chief Marketing Officer, ABS
CBN Lingkod Kapamilya Foundation
» Tiffany Bohee, Executive Director,
Office of Community Investment and
Infrastructure
» Vina Lustado, Founder & Owner, Sol
Haus Design
Moderators:
» Marily Mondejar, CEO & Founder, Filipina
Women’s Network
7:00 PM - 10:30 PM
HALLOWEEN SPEED KWENTUHAN:
MOTHERS, DAUGHTERS & SONS
SHAPING THE FILIPINA POP
CULTURE IMAGE? (FILM SCREENING
& PAJAMA PARTY!)
Crystal Ballroom - Marines Memorial Club
609 Sutter Street @ Mason Street

Getting personal with U.S. and Global100
awardees as they share their deepest
secrets in small table settings over
tsokolate and matamis.
What is the Filipina Pop Culture Image?
We will begin with the film screening
of the award winning documentary,
“Miss Representation” by Jennifer Siebel
Newsom. Fascinating Speed Kwentuhan
topics on advertising, marketing, media
and image management.

FEMtorMatch™ is the Filipina
Women’s Network’s strategy for
developing the next generation
of Filipina leaders through local
and global partnerships between
female mentors, FEMtors™, and
female mentees, FEMtees™.
FEMtorMatch™ provides structured one-on-one mentoring that
harnesses the power of the Internet
to broaden and deepen the reach of
traditional mentoring. Thus, both
FEMtors™ and FEMtees™ can reside
anywhere in the world.

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

19

in the workplace, these cultural
differences are difficult to navigate
and the lack of role models in
senior leadership roles adds to the
challenge.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
I began my career at Charles
Schwab & Co. Inc. in 1999 as the
Administrative Assistant to Ray
DiSanza, then VP in Operations
(currently SVP in Operations). I
was given the opportunities to work
on various projects and contribute
my skills across many efforts.
He also gave me the autonomy
create processes that would add
value to the management of his
organization. Ray recognized my
skills and the potential I had in
the company. After four years as
his assistant, he helped me see my
potential and presented the tough
question on choosing my career
path…project manager or people
leader. He helped me navigate
through this fork in my career
path and continues to do so to this
day. Ray has been an invaluable
mentor, friend and father-figure to
me. He is someone whose opinion
is important to me and to whom I
owe a debt of gratitude for shaping
me into the leader I am today.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
most significant barrier to female
leadership is our hesitancy in taking
risks, particularly in our career
paths. Women traditionally feel
the need to tick every box before
considering ourselves qualified
or ‘ready’ for the next phase in
our careers. Our aversion to risk
can prevent us from a growth
opportunity that may lead to a
promotion or simply acquiring new
skills and/or experiences.
If you had another career, what
would that be? A radio personality
or ESPN/FOX sports broadcaster.
If you could start over, what
would you do? My dad passed
away in 2002. I would have met my
husband earlier and started our
20

family in time for my dad to be a
part of their lives.

Lisa Suguitan
Melnick

Professor, College of San Mateo
Moss Beach, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? One
of my projects, in its eighth year, is
the yoga/qi gong course I developed
and teach in the Kinesiology
Division at College of San Mateo.
It deserves notice for the way it
has transformed and improved
the wellness of not only hundreds
of students, but of faculty and
staff alike. I am proud to be part
of assisting campus community
in improving their health and
well-being, thereby elevating the
workplace environment.
What is the global impact of your
work? As an educator, I facilitate
people’s process in achieving their
personal goals.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Knowing
that I am a valuable role model.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Representation
commensurate with the populations
we serve.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Oscar Peñaranda—one of my first
university professors. He taught
Filipino-American literature.
He opened a whole new world,
provided a space in which to

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

express and exchange ideas. Thirtyfive years later, our paths crossed
again when I participated in his
travel program to the Philippines,
called the Al Robles Express.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
colonized lens with which we may
view ourselves contributes to our
not feeling worthy of leadership
positions and thus, not receiving
respect in like terms.
What was your very first paid
job? Waitress. 16 years old; $1.65/
hour
If you had another career, what
would that be? Perhaps something
in the spiritual/healing realm, but
still an educator.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Render people able
to speak only the truth.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Nature, lots of nature. Moss Beach,
California.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Humble generosity.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I can’t dance.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Gemma Nemenzo
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? Self-care means taking care
of physical, spiritual (mind),
emotional bodies. Staying active
and being a student of something at
all times.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Make choices and do
actions that benefit yourself and
others. In other words, create
broad benefit.
Which historical figure would
you like to have coffee with? Leny
Strobel
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women? A
sense of longevity/continuity in the
workplace.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I have

emerged as a powerful, mindful
conduit in all the communities I am
part of: the communities of higher
education, teaching, learning,
healing, parenting, life partnering.

Maria Cecilia
“Cecile” Gregorio
Ascalon

Family Support Services Program
Manager
Millbrae, California, USA
Cecile studied at the University
of the Philippines in Diliman from
Kindergarten until College. She
finished her degree in Bachelor of
Arts in Communications major
in Journalism at the UP College
of Mass communication. She
completed Professional Diploma
in Family Ministries, Psychology
and Counseling ) and Certificate
of Clinical Apprenticeship in
Pastoral Care and Counseling (
An advanced supervision program
for graduates of the Professional
Diploma Program) at the Ateneo
de Manila University Center for
Family Ministries (CEFAM).
Cecile worked in AVON and
CALTEX (Chevron) when she
was in the Philippines. In 2008,
she decided to become a Family
Counselor.
Cecile believes that we can
only truly discover ourselves in
relationship with others. She helps
families who are experiencing
different crises in their lives. She
assists in the healing of family
relations and support them in their

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

struggle in dealing with the stresses
of modern life. She advocates for
the Domestic Violence survivors by
providing them with unconditional
support. She encourages them
to improve their self-esteem and
provide them with options and
resources (shelters, therapy, support
groups, legal services. She also sees
the importance of educating the
communities in understanding
what is domestic violence.
As a Triple P (Positing Parenting
Program) Accredited Practitioner/
Trainer, she creates training
programs and workshops to educate
parents on how to have more
positive relationships with their
children.
Starting November 16, 2015,
Cecile will be the Executive
Director of the Pilipino Seniors
Center in San Francisco. She plans
to create an environment where the
Filipino seniors would benefit from
a wide range of health, education,
recreation, and wellness programs.
She hopes to raise and enhance
their sense of dignity and self-worth
by inspiring and enabling them
to be independent and be more
involved in community activities.
She also wants to uplift their lives
by improving the services and
information on aging. The Center
will also be an emotional support
system that will help reduce
depression and loneliness.
Cecile has been married to a
Philippine Consulate General in
San Francisco Deputy Consul
General Jaime Ramon T. Ascalon
for 19 years. She understands the
pressure of her husband’s work and
the need to complement his role
and lighten his workload to make
his work easier. They are proud
parents to two very intelligent and
extra- ordinary sons : Jaime Martin,
18 years old and Andre Luis, 12
years old.
Cecile always has very special
kind of connection with her sons.
She allows them to feel, learn and
decide about themselves – the
world and what to do in the future

to survive or thrive. She teaches
them about the importance of
social and life skills – respect,
concern for others, problem
solving, and cooperation; as well as
the skills to contribute to the home,
school and larger community.
Cecile’s dream is to have her own
foundation. She aspires to build
Family Centers in the Philippines,
most especially in the barangays,
and also for Overseas Filipinos.
She plans to set up scholarship
programs for people who would
like to learn about psychology,
counseling , parenting, and seniors
program.
According to her, “ It is not
always easy living a normal life, but
to do things to make a difference in
the lives of people is worth living
for. “

Susan
Bautista-Afan

Chief Fundraising Officer,
ABS CBN Lingkod Kapamilya
Foundation, Inc.
Metro Manila, Philippines
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
Becoming the number one Regional
Manager of the World for Robert
Half International in 2015 and
taking a team of 22 other top sales
awardees with me. That experience
made me relish the meaning of true

Teamwork! Robert Half is a$4.2
B Public Company with 11,000
+ employees in 400+ locations
worldwide.
What is the global impact of your
work? I am very fortunate to have
the opportunity at this point in
my career to be in the forefront of
public service in the Philippines.
My engagement in ABS CBN
Lingkod Kapamilya Foundation
allows me to use my talent, time
and skill to unite Filipinos around
the world– young and old, from
various disciplines, to be part of
projects that have significant impact
in the lives of Filipinos. Being
a bridge between those who are
willing to give back and share a part
of themselves and those that are in
dire need help, is a great honor and
responsibility. Today, it’s about my
ability to help unite Filipinos from
around the world and give back to
various projects and advocacies that
involve improving the lives of our
less fortunate countrymen through
the power of media.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? There
is nothing more satisfying than
being able to inspire and influence
fellow Filipinas to become leaders
themselves. There is immeasurable
joy and fulfillment when you are
able to bring out the best in other
people and be an instrument in
making them realize their own
aspirations and dreams. Our
country is going through major
changes---politically, socially and
economically. Filipinas too are all
over the world with an ability to
bloom wherever they’re planted.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Rita Steel, my boss at Robert Half.
She’s an epitome of expertise and
compassion; an outstanding leader
who has vision, and understanding
for how to achieve it. She’s a real
leader by example.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave? I
actually came back after 30 years!
And it is so great to be back.

Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: In no time
in the history of the Philippines
have we seen women play a greater
role in society and in various
industries than in the last 30 years.
It is during this period when the
country produced its first and
second women Presidents and,
who knows, in less than a year it
might just have its third. We have
seen the emergence of Filipinas
excelling in the fields of business,
medicine, fashion, music and art
with some carving a name for
themselves in the global arena. It
is also during this time when we
have witnessed the growth in the
number of Filipinas who pursued
degrees and careers and bravely
competed in the male dominated
workforce. I was one of them. In
pursuit of the American Dream, I
packed my bags, booked a plane
bound for California and never
looked back. In America I built a
successful career in recruitment
that span more than 3 decades. I
came back to the Philippines in
2014 thinking that I will spend a
relaxing retirement while doing
part time volunteer work. Instead,
I found myself in the middle of
multi- million fundraising action
at the helm of the country’s most
trusted foundation. It has become
a full time job and in addition, is a
public service radio program which
I co-anchor on Sundays. Today,
my work is no longer about hiring
people, but about serving people.
In midst of a very different field,
I sometimes struggle adjusting to
local work practices that are totally
in contrast to what I have been
used to. But it is exactly what drives
me to go on because I know that I
can institute positive changes and
make a difference. My involvement
with ABS CBN Lingkod Kapamilya
Foundation made me realize that
like myself, there are many others
who are willing to share their time
and talent for the betterment of
others given the information and
chance. So I take this opportunity

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Builders
to call on Filipinas all over the
world who have grown in wisdom
through their overseas experiences,
to consider leading movements and
projects that may bring impactful
and significant changes back home.
Or for others to come home and
join us in the battlefield as we
strive to improve efficiency and
practices so that we can create
an environment that will breed a
new generation of Filipina leaders
who can propel our country to
progress and abundance. I thank
the Filipina Women Network for
the recognition and a platform
to share my story. I am humbled
to be in the company of women
with stellar achievements and
accomplishments in their chosen
fields. Your organization inspired
me to continue to be relevant,
productive and driven as I pursue
my new career dedicated to serving
the disadvantaged Filipinos.

Aimee Alado

Attorney-at-Law, Chairman,
European Network of Filipino
Diaspora (ENFiD, ENFiD UK)
London, United Kingdom
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Fellowship on
Intellectual Property Law - The first
22

Filipino (and second in the world)
to be a recipient of Intellectual
Property (IP) Fellowship under
the auspices of Japan Patent Office
(JPO) and World Intellectual
Property Office (WIPO). I’d also
say being Elected Chairman for
ENFID-UK and Legal Counsel for
ENFID (Europe). The European
Network of Filipino Diaspora
(ENFiD) is an active international
networking association that seeks
to cultivate a sense of shared
nationhood and cooperation among
Overseas Filipinos in Europe.
What is the global impact of your
work? The Government Legal
Department is the “government’s
principal legal advisers. Its core
purpose is to help the government
to govern well, within the rule
of law.” GLD plays a key role in
providing legal service (advisory
and litigation) to majority of central
government departments and the
Parliament in drafting primary and
secondary legislation. This service
is quite important as it impacts
upon the (local) community as a
whole; the European Union (EU)
vis-a-vis UK’s obligations; and the
world with the ever-increasing
major role and responsibility that
Great Britain plays in the world
stage. I started as a legal counsel for
Europe and UK for ENFID until I
initially got elected as Vice-Chair
and ultimately as a Chairman
for ENFID-UK. I believe that
ENFID is an organization where
the potential, thus the impact is
just enormous. The impact can be
wide-ranging and all encompassing.
I would refer to it as a “Trailblazer!
Changemaker! Revolutioniser!”
And to better illustrate the last
noun “Revolutioniser”, I will requote the phrase of Bill Drayton,
Ashoka Founder and CEO, in
parallelism to ENFID vis-à-vis
to the other FilComs ahead of it:
“ENFID-ers are not content just
to give a fish, or teach how to fish.
They will not rest until they have
revolutionized the fishing industry.”
What’s the best part of being

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

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a Filipina woman leader? The
best part of being a Filipina
woman leader is the ability and
opportunity to inspire the group
that you lead coming from
different backgrounds to achieve
a common goal. The challenge
and the life transformation is
not only for others but also a
personal transformation for me. I
always draw inspiration from the
word synergy, one of my many
favourites, whereby the interaction,
cooperation amongst the members
of my group has always a combined
effect greater than the sum of our
separate effects.
Workplace challenge as a
Filipina woman and why: Being
a member of an ethnic minority is
not supposed to be a challenge in
a city like London. That’s because
London is one of the most multiracial city on this planet but I think
the challenge depends on your

ethnicity and the profession where
you operate. Filipinos I would say is
one of the “unrecognized” ethnicity
in the UK. Also, in the legal
profession, there are not so many
women judges especially women
with other ethnicity. Since the
creation of the Supreme Court of
the United Kingdom in 2009, there
is only one white lady justice out of
the twenty justices.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I currently live in London, the
greatest city on this planet! It is a
city where you fall in love the more
you get to know it. I am just so
amazed and always thrilled with
what the city can offer 24/7. The
whole city is a living and breathing
museum, full of history, culture,
ancient and new all co-exist
harmoniously. They say, if you get
tired of life, you get tired of London
but for me, I will never get tired of

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

life and hence will never get tired of
London.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Margaret
Thatcher! Nicknamed the “Iron
Lady” due to her uncompromising
politics and leadership style. She
was Britain’s first female prime
minister and the longest-serving of
the 20th century and is currently
the only woman to have held the
office. She was one of the dominant
political figures of 20th century
Britain, and Thatcherism continues
to have a huge influence to this day.
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Someone has said that “the best
way to predict the future is to
create it”. And already, with the
way things are, we are creating
a future generation that is a lot
more competitive; a world that is
a lot more complex but with big
challenges comes tremendous
opportunities. I think the challenge
really is how to equip this next
generation of Filipina women to
deal with these grand challenges
and problems and come out as the
most successful leaders from the lot
instead of just being followers.

Anny
Misa Hefti

Retired Psychologist, Swiss
Country Representative, European
Network of Filipinos in Diaspora
(ENFiD), Ruederswil, Switzerland
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential

action that makes you very
proud from your body of work,
what would that be? In terms of
community accomplishments, I am
glad to have been in the position
to start and sustain a few women’s
groups and organizations in
Switzerland and in Europe.
What is the global impact of
your work? Networking is a
keyword in globalization. Forming
organizations and connecting
with others complements the
globalization process. In my own
humble way, I have contributed to
this development.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader? That
built-in confidence and resilience
we learned from home.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Not specifically
as a Filipina woman but rather a
challenge to being a woman of color
the challenge to rise above gender,
race and social class barriers.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Sociologist Anni Lanz. Ann
mentored me in community social
activism. She always acknowledged
my efforts and cheered my small
successes. She even said, “I also
learn from you.”
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? Women are not
aware of the internalized oppression
they carry which hinders them
from assertion. They stay within the
comfort of “being nice and be liked”
and thus are prone to exploitation.
To be an effective female leader,
women have to be healed from
generations of internalized
oppression of patriarchy and in
the case of women from the South,
the oppression of a poverty-laden
environment.
What was your very first paid
job? Psychology College Instructor,
21 years old; P360 per month.
If you had another career, what
would that be? A florist. Having
lived most of my life now amidst
nature, meadows and flower
decorated chalets, I have discovered

the beauty of flower arrangement.
This profession would be both work
and a hobby. Every creation would
be different and a real joy!
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
A law that would eradicate the
concept of irregular migration.
In today’s global interdependent
world, the existing immigration
and naturalization laws of many
countries are still too restrictive.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
To take up graduate studies. Travel
presented new experiences and
possibilities, if not opportunities.
Marriage was one of them.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The people. Any
widely-traveled foreign visitor
will say that the Filipinos are most
friendly and hospitable - anywhere
and to anyone.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in Ruederswil, a farming
village in rural Switzerland. Aside
from the picturesque rolling green
hills, Ruederswil has carved a name
in Swiss history. A local farmer
named Niklaus Leuenberger led the
Peasant’s Uprising in 1653.
ONE (only) Filipino custom or
tradition you would like to pass
on to others: Our tradition of town
fiestas should be experienced by
our children and the children after
them.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: As Filipinos back
home say, “Secret.”
Which living woman do you most
admire? Angela Merkel
What do you read? German
newspapers and magazines on the
train.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Self-care means being good to
oneself - physically and mentally.
I have always taken a holistic
approach to life. I believe in taking
care of myself first, so I can be
better at taking care of others.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year

old self? “Live life to the brim,
you are young but once.” - Omar
Khayam
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Creating sustainable changes changes that alleviate poverty,
changes to patriarchal patterns,
changes to gender roles and models.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: The Filipina
has come a long way over the past
four centuries. She has not arrived
yet. I would like to pass on the torch
of optimism to the next generation.
Much has been achieved, continue
to uphold and celebrate all the
goodness there is in being a Filipina
woman.

Aurora
Austriaco

President & Owner,
Austriaco & Associates, LTD.
Chicago, Illinois, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Serving as the first
Asian President of the Chicago Bar
Association, the largest and oldest
(140 years old) metropolitan bar
association with over 22,000 lawyer
members in the country would be
up there. Being President of this
prestigious organization is a highly
coveted and competitive process
which has been dominated mostly
by mainstream lawyers. Having
served as CBA President gave me

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the opportunity to shape/define and
write policies and issues affecting
the legal profession; to represent
its 22,000 member lawyers and be
their voice on matters that affect
the profession and protection of the
public.
What is the global impact of your
work? As the first Asian President
of a major metropolitan bar, I
was able to represent the CBA in
many national and international
conferences and enter into many
International Twinning agreements
with Barcelona Bar, Frankfurt Bar,
Montreal Bar. This position has
given global visibility to the fact
that Filipinas have what it takes to
run a mainstream organization.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader?
Commitment, passion and people
listen.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why?
Peter Birnbaum influenced my
professional career the most. Peter
is the President and CEO of ATGF
and he took me under his wing at
the age of 18. He made me realize
that one can impact and help more
lives especially the underserved
with a law degree.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? Lack of
full access to the Old White Boy’s
Network.
What was your very first paid
job? I was 18 and just came to the
US. I worked at Woolworth for 3
hours as a Teller.
If you could start over, what
would you do? Apply all that I have
learned sooner rather than later.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Equality
for women on all levels.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Pass the super
powers to my daughters so they can
have the same opportunities as I
have.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I left to join and be reunited with
my family. My parents left for the
24

US when I was eight years old. My
siblings and I re-joined my parents
when I was eighteen.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Its beauty, culture and
beautiful people.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in Park Ridge and it’s a closeknit community with the best
school system. It’s a hidden gem of
a neighborhood.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Having a party with family
and friends not just on holidays but
as often as permitted.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I’m a very
competitive tennis player and I
have a standing tennis match every
Sunday morning.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Hillary Clinton
What do you read? Mostly oldfashioned newspapers and journals.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Take more risks and
constantly improve yourself.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Abraham
Lincoln
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Maya Angelou
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Getting to the C-suites of Fortune
500 companies. Filipinas need to
break out of the mold that they
don’t want to ruffle anybody else’s
feathers by asking. On the contrary,
we need to ASK more to be
considered for higher positions.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: To be an
impactful member of FWN who
can be the bridge between the baby
boomers, the Generation Xers and
the Millenials.

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

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Carina
Ruiz-Singh

Partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP
Menlo Park, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
Building a $30M practice within the
largest professional services firm in
the world.
What is the global impact of your
work? Have enabled the growth
of international treasury practices
within Deloitte.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Being in a
position to inspire others to achieve
great things.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: It’s tough to fight
off natural tendencies to simply do
the work and wait for recognition.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? First
partner who hired me into Deloitte.
He took a chance on me and it paid
off!
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? Feeling like we
have to act differently in order to
do well.
What was your very first paid
job? Teacher for PROSEC. I was
paid about PHP200 an hour.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Crossborder rules.
If you had super powers, what

would you do? Heal.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
For better job opportunities.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The people.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What
city? The Bay Area is great for
innovation.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Bayanihan
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I used to be a
singer for a rock band
Which living woman do you most
admire? Angela Merkel
What do you read? Fiction/Sci-Fi
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Spending quality time with family.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Don’t be afraid to take
risks!
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Socrates
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Hillary Clinton
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Lack of courage to be who they are.

Ileto

Catherine

Senior Director for Marketing and
Public Relations for Asia Pacific,
Sutherland Global Services
Metro Manila, Philippines

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? If I would only pick
one- that would be my contribution
in selling the Philippines as the
preferred investment destination
in the world during my work as
Executive Director for Marketing
and External Relations of the
Business Processing Association of
the Philippines (BPAP). During my
work at BPAP in 2007-2008, I was
the one who provided leadership in
ensuring the amendment of Article
130 of the Philippine Labor Code,
prohibiting women from working
at night. It has been a rewarding
experience to see fruits of my hard
work. Now, we can see so many
Filipina women empowered and
even given global leadership roles
within the Philippine IT Business
Process Management industry.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I think
the best part of being a Filipina
women leader is being able to
understand and adopt Filipino core
values instead of the broad foreign
concepts in Management. Values
like Bayanihan, Malasakit and
Diskarte. These are unique Filipino
core values that I personally live
and breathe. These values do not
have an English translation. These
form part of the Filipino culture.
Bayanihan is making sure we act
as part of a bigger purpose- being
part of a bigger community.
Malasakit is empathy and having
the Entrepreneurial Spirit to ensure
we go above and beyond what is
required from us. Diskarte is our
creativity and passion for excellence
and resourcefulness making us
world class.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Perhaps one
challenge is the lack of a public
policy in the Philippines that
requires work environments to
have women-friendly facilities- a
day care for example within the

office- or a nursing room. These
are found in some companies. But
it would be good to have these as
requirement in all corporate offices
and establishments so women who
need to work can balance their
needs as a mother.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
most significant barrier to female
leadership is perhaps cultural
in some geographies. In the
Philippines, we have been led
by two female Presidents, and
we have a very strong roster of
Filipina leaders in the Senate and
Congress as well as in the business
community. We have women media
personalities and female athletes.
I do not see this as an issue in the
Philippines, but in some countries
where women are not expected to
hold responsible positions – this is
a fact of life. On a personal note- I
am grateful to have been given all
the opportunities to lead even at a
young age.
If you had another career, what
would that be? If I had another
career, I would be a Policymakersomeone in either Congress
or Senate specializing in bills
and policies that empower the
marginalized and protect women
and children.
If you could start over, what
would you do? If I had the luxury
of going back in time, I would
pursue Law and specialize in
aligning various stakeholders to
create public policies.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? If I
could run the entire world, I would
enact a law that required all private
and public organizations to hire
50% women in leadership positions
to provide equal opportunities in
the workplace.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The best thing about
the Philippines is its PEOPLE. We
are resilient and always genuinely
positive. We take pride in being a
Filipino and we are hard workers

who always go out of our way to
help others.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I would say you
will never guess that I am actually
a homebody. I love staying home
and I like quiet weekends. I can be
left alone the whole day with just a
book or my usual playlist.
Which living woman do you most
admire? I admire the leadership
of my mentor in the PH IT BPM
industry- Beth Lui. She taught me
how to LEAD, MOTIVATE and
INSPIRE people.
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
I would say our Generation Yparticularly the young women in
the Philippines today are influenced
by too much foreign concepts- that
they miss out on the core Filipino
values and tradition that will make
them great leaders in the future.
Values like persistence instead of
instant gratification. The value
of being simple-minded instead
of the consumer-mentality that
is imminent among the youth
nowadays. All these make it
challenging for the next generation
of Filipina leaders to live with
integrity.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: If I would
share a legacy, it would be my own
stories as a Filipina Leader. My
legacy puts forth ideas about how
we can influence public policy
and impact communities with our
persistence inspiring leadership
from the grassroots where it
matters.

Cathy Valle
Campbell

Managing Director, Diversity &
Inclusion
Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.
San Bruno, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be? I
re-invented the foundation of the
Employee Resource Group program
at Schwab and guided the Women’s
Interactive Network at Schwab
to transition from a social focus
to a focus on investor education
through a Financial Life Planning
for Women program, which
has enabled Schwab to deepen
relationships with and better serve
women investors. The initiative
was recently recognized as a Model
Gender Equality Best Practice by
the San Francisco Commission on
the Status of Women for its positive
impact.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader?
Leading through strengths and
having parents who instilled in
me the values of perseverance and
responsibility, which has guided
me throughout my personal and
professional life.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Jane Robertson influenced my
professional career in the Diversity
& Inclusion field to always focus
on results and impact and to
always align strategy with business

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priorities.
What was your very first paid
job? I was 16 and worked as a high
school intern for a foreign currency
exchange company through Diane
Feinstein’s San Francisco Mayor’s
summer youth program. I was paid
about $6.00 per hour, which went a
lot further back then!
If you had another career, what
would that be? Learn the art of
photography
If you could start over, what
would you do? Recognize and
pause more frequently for moments
of celebration with family, friends,
and colleagues.
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Workplace equality worldwide
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Build infrastructure
to help families/communities
benefit from economic
sustainability.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
San Bruno is a mid-sized
community with easy access to
all the benefits of California’s
landscape and multi-cultural
communities -Pacific coast,
redwood forests, Lake Tahoe, etc.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: The Tagalog language for
the next generation.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I am Filipino
What do you read? LinkedIn
articles, HBR Magazine, fiction,
non-fiction, and anything my kids
want me to read.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I love cat naps and walks on the
beach. There’s something about the
ocean that’s very zen.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Lean in.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Eleanor
Roosevelt
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Oprah
26

What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Leaning in earlier in their careers.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Continue to
mentor future women leaders.

Elizabeth J.
Bautista

Operations Technology Group
Leader, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory
Daly City, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? I continue to
create opportunities for women to
consider a career in the Computing
Sciences area.
What is the global impact of your
work? By creating opportunities
for women in Computing Sciences,
I give them a tangible inroad into
this area. They can experience the
work they can potentially take part
in and demonstrate the impact of
what they do to further scientific
research.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I’d like to
provide insight and opportunities
to young women.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: My industry
is still very male-oriented and as
a woman in a technical area, my
co-workers and even management

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team, assume that I do not
understand the technical aspects
of our work. I am more known for
my soft skills and not my technical
skills. The challenge for me is to
continue reminding management,
that I cannot do my job well
if I did NOT have a technical
understanding.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
William Harris was a former
supervisor who hired me at the Lab.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? That women
are known for their soft skills
and not technical skills. There is
an assumption that if a question
requires a technical answer, a
woman is unlikely to solve it.
What was you very first paid job?
I was a lumpia wrapper in a factory
and was paid .25 per dozen.
If you could start over, what
would you do? I would seek the
type of opportunities that would
have taken me further down this
road than where I am today.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Equal
opportunities for all.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I would heal the
sick.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
My family left to find better career
opportunities.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The food
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
The multitude of cultural activities
in San Francisco.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: To work hard and do what
it takes.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Gemma Narisma
What do you read? Science fiction
and adventure.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Allowing myself to get enough sleep
and have fun.

What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? “Although the world is
full of suffering, it is also full of
overcoming it.” - Helen Keller
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Dr. Phyllis Schneck, Deputy
Under Secretary for Cybersecurity
and Communications for the
National Protection and Programs
Directorate (NPPD) at the
Department of Homeland Security.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I hope that my
leadership is demonstrated by the
moments that were shared with the
people who took risks and grew
with me through the decisions we
made together, the actions we have
taken and the mistakes we had to
overcome.

Grace Trinidad
Vergara

Field Director, Service Employees
International Union (SEIU)
Henderson, Nevada, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
Helped organize union members to
lobby for political action during the
2015 legislative sessions to protect
middle-class families in Nevada.
What is the global impact of
your work? I bring awareness to
the injustice that is created by the
large divide between the middle
and upper classes. My work enables

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

workers to collectively bargain with
their employers to ensure that they
are treated fairly in the workplace.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I am able
to help people.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Always having
to prove myself and constantly
needing to make sure I’m taken
seriously at my local.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career?
Why? Andrea Carney, my union
shop steward. She would always
educate me about union work and
encouraged me to participate in my
union by volunteering to organize
non-union workers.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? From my
experience, the fact that I am a
woman of color, in my opinion,
is the most significant barrier to
female leadership.
What was your very first paid
job? I was a sales lady at SM
Department Store in Makati,
Philippines. I was 19 years old.
If you had another career, what
would that be? A Lawyer
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? I would
distribute the wealth in the world
more evenly.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I would have the
power to teleport so I could visit my
dad in the Philippines more often.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I’m always with my son, Nathaniel.
I live in Henderson, Nevada.
ONE (only) Filipino custom or
tradition you would like to pass
on to others: Filipino food.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Elizabeth Warren
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I try to watch what I eat and stay
active. I think it’s important to be
healthy.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Abraham
Lincoln

Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My passion for
social and economic justice.

Imelda
‘Emmie’
Collado Ortega
Anderson

Founder, CEO, Pinoy Power Media
Aiea, Hawai’i, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? I am proud of
fulfilling my mission to Enrich,
Enlighten, Educate, Entertain and
Empower Others, especially our
kababayan.
What is the global impact of
your work? To Empower All that
Connects with our Global Reach on
pinoypowermedia.com.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? The best
part of being a Filipina Leader is to
proudly rise above all
difficulties, challenges, and
discrimination that sets us back.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Filipina women
are viewed as lacking knowledge
and experience because of our
tendency to belittle our abilities.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career: My
Social Studies teacher, Ms. Harriet
Minami who always encouraged me
to express my inner thoughts and
be heard so I could represent others

who are not capable or confident
enough to express themselves.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? The barrier of
women competing in a workplace
dominated by powerful men. In my
media business, I really had to go
out of my way to prove my ability in
a male-dominated industry.
What was your very first paid
job? My first paid job as a seasonal
pineapple picker for Castle &
Cooke Fields, Lanai City, Hawaii. I
was 15 years old. I was paid $1.25
per hour.
If you could start over, what
would you do? I would go to
medical school and become a
doctor.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Equality
and non-discrimination.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I would cure all
diseases and promote world peace.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I left the Philippines to fulfill my
American Dream: to obtain quality
education, to own a nice home,
to prepare and secure my future,
and to share my blessings and
abundance with others.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Our unique culture
and national pride.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in Aiea, Hawaii. It is God’s
Paradise. Everything beautiful is
found in Hawaii.
ONE (only) Filipino custom or
tradition you would like to pass
on to others: Utang Na Loob.
What do you read? I read my
scriptures, my bible and inspiring
stories of hope and courage.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I take time to meditate, medicate,
search, ponder and pray.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Mother
Teresa or Nelson Mandela.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she

be? Maya Angelou, Oprah Winfrey
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The ability to compete and excel in
global representation.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My desire
as a Filipina to empower others
by encouraging other Filipinas
to proudly stand firm on causes
that will allow us to continue our
onward progression.

Jennifer
Cabalquinto

Chief Financial Officer, Golden
State Warriors
Oakland, California, USA
Jennifer Cabalquinto is the
Chief Financial Officer of the
Golden State Warriors. In this role,
she oversees all day-to-day and
long-term financial planning and
accounting for the organization.
She is also responsible for the
planning and leadership of IT,
facilities and business analytics
departments.
Jennifer Cabalquinto has over 20
years finance leadership experience
in a variety of start- up, turnaround,
stable and high growth business
environments. Most recently,
Jennifer served as Vice President
and Chief Financial Officer for

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27

Universal Studios Hollywood. In
this role, she was responsible for
supporting NBC Universal’s theme
park and Citywalk operations in
Los Angeles, California.
Jennifer joined NBC Universal as
part of the Telemundo acquisition.
At the time of the acquisition, she
served as Vice President and Chief
Financial Officer for the Telemundo
Station Group in Miami, Florida.
With the integration of Telemundo,
Jennifer was relocated in August
2002 to Los Angeles to serve as Vice
President Finance for NBCU’s Los
Angeles television stations – KNBC,
KVEA and KWHY.
Before joining Telemundo,
Jennifer worked for Ernst and
Young, Royal Carribean Cruise
Lines and Future Tech International
in auditing, financial planning and
reporting and Controllership roles.
Jennifer serves on the Boards of the
Boys and Girls Club of Oakland
and Alameda County Community
Food Bank. She is also the Audit
Committee Chair for Leadership
Education for Asian Pacifics
(LEAP).
Jennifer earned a Bachelors
degree in Accounting from
SUNY, Binghamton’s School of
Management. She and her husband,
Howard Joyce, reside in Oakland
with their son Jack.

Katerina
Villanueva

Community Outreach and
Foundation Officer, MUFG Union
Bank
28

Oakland, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? As a board member
of Filipino Advocates for Justice,
I’m proud that I have helped the
organization grow and helped them
accomplish their mission of serving
the Filipino community specifically,
our youth, recent immigrants and
low-wage workers for the past 12
years.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Hopefully
to be seen as a role model.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: I always get
mistaken for being a lot younger
than I really am. So many times I
feel I have to prove myself to my
colleagues because they don’t realize
how long I have been doing this
work and the different experiences I
have had in my career.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? Vida
Benavides. Over 20 years ago
before I began graduate school,
I was an intern for Vida at the
Democratic National Committee
in Washington DC. It was great to
see a Pinay in a leadership position.
Her work ensured that the party
better understood the Asian Pacific
American community and the
diverse issues we face. Her work
also ensured that there were more
APAs appointed to key positions
during the Clinton Administration.
Vida included me in a lot of policy
discussions that summer and since
then, Vida has remained a close
friend and mentor and I always
check in with her as I make major
decisions in my career.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? I think women
feel an extra burden of balancing
their family and career. Sometimes
we make decisions that are the best
for our family and that may mean
not being able to advance to senior

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leadership positions.
What was your very first paid
job? Accounts Payable Assistant; 16
years old; $4.25/hour
If you could start over, what
would you do? Find time to travel
more.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? The
ability for women to take a year
paid sabbatical to do whatever they
wanted.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? The ability to stop
time.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave? I
left with my parents in the early 80s
because of economic and political
instability and to find a better life in
the US.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Family
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in Oakland and it has a lot of
“hidden gems.”
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Bringing pasalubong for
family and friends from trips.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I like watching
reality TV shows especially the ones
that have singing and dancing.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Michelle Obama
What do you read? For fun, I love
People Magazine but for work, any
policy and philanthropy-related
journals.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Because I’m juggling work and little
kids, sometimes I just need to take
a few hours for myself to do things
like get a mani/pedi.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Don’t be so afraid of
making mistakes.
Which historical figure would
you like to have coffee with? Pope
Francis
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women? I

think as with other generations, the
next generation of Filipina women
will take care of a lot of people
including their parents, partners
and children while juggling their
own personal goals and aspirations.
They need to have a solid group of
friends, mentors and colleagues to
support them and help them pursue
their dreams.

Leticia
“Letty” Quizon

President, The Marketing Edge,
Inc.
San Jose, California, USA
Letty Quizon has 20 years
of experience in marketing,
advertising, PR, and community
engagement. As Creative Director
and Head of the New Business
Team of the global ad agency,
McCann-Erickson in Manila and
Hong Kong, she created awardwinning campaigns for Fortune
500 companies. As President and
CEO of her own ad agency and
production house, LeadCom Asia,
she won the international media
accounts of PEPSI and SEIKO for
which she consistently garnered
Creative Guild awards. She later
partnered with the multinational
agency of Ogilvy and Mather
and her agency became O &
M Philippines. She was chosen
one of the Top Ten Women in
Advertising in Asia for her creative
work and her lifelong dedication
to mentoring young women in
marketing and advertising.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

She established her own PR
and marketing agency, The
Marketing Edge Inc. based in
Silicon Valley CA with a special
focus on ethnic marketing,
specialty markets, and community
outreach and engagement. She
develops, implements, and
evaluates community outreach
programs for various ethnic
markets as well as niche markets
involving women, children,
millennials, and professional
groups. Letty is a sought-after
strategic adviser for several
community organizations and is
a frequent speaker and consultant
on multicultural marketing and
nonprofit development work.
When not engaging or advocating
for the Filipino community, she
continues to pursue her dream of
establishing a Philippine Heritage
and Leadership Institute that aims
to mentor and train future Filipino
American leaders.
Born and raised in Manila,
Philippines, Letty has a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Mass
Communications from the
University of the Philippines.
She holds certificates in project
management and nonprofit
leadership from Stanford University
and is working towards her Trans
Global Executive MBA degree at
Saint Mary’s College of California
(Class of 2016). She leads many
community projects as the
Board Chair of the UP Alumni
Association of SF, as a Committee
Lead for the annual Kalayaan
Independence Day event and the
Asian Art Museum’s Philippine
History Month celebration, among
others.

Pet Hartman

SVP, Global Services Operations,
Arch Insurance Group, Inc.
Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
Being recognized as one of the few
female/Asian leaders in a maledominated industry. With this came
the opportunity to create global
operations that effectively support
our company while creating
hundreds of jobs in the Philippines.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? There
is a special lady who I considered
to also be my mentor that I worked
for several years ago. She had
gone through the same challenges
faced by a minority woman in the
corporate world and became one
the respected senior executive in
the insurance industry. I always
remember her one piece of advice:
“Do not be afraid to be heard,
assert yourself and utilize your own
potential.”
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I’ve been fascinated with western
culture while I was growing up. I
think living in the USA gave me
the freedom of choice and equality
that I think growing up was not an
easy option, especially for women
and for an achiever like me, in the
Philippines.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The people.

What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I practically live in 2 regions, the
NY/NJ northeast area and Raleigh,
North Carolina in the south. Both
cities offer cultural and ethnic
diversity.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Family as the center of the
social culture.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Condoleezza Rice
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? Self-care for me today means
scheduling some time for me,
for my husband, for little things
that lights up my life without
negotiating with myself on how to
keep those internal commitments. I
always try to remember the advice
from our family doctor where he
always ends his prescription with
“Try to do something nice for
yourself everyday, even for just 30
minutes...”
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Do not work too hard to
be like someone else to feel that you
‘belong.’ Work harder to find your
true self and that will lead you to
your dreams.
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The continuing quest for equality
in the workplace, not just in title/
position but also in compensation.
I’d also say the continuing challenge
of balancing career and parenthood.
In most cases, the period that
women become parents or decide
to start a family coincides with the
point where they are faced with
challenging opportunities at work.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I rose through
the ranks in the corporate world
thru hard work, perseverance,
motivation, determination and
having the self-confidence that I
can be successful by being who I am
and where I came from. I am proud
of my heritage and have been very

fortunate to be a part of a global
company where senior management
respect, provide opportunities, and
empower women. I am proud to be
the only senior executive Filipino/
Asian women in our organization.
For what I have achieved and will
continue to achieve, I am very
privileged to be a member of
FWN and be a supporter of the
mentorship program. I want to be
able to inspire others to realize that
you are the best person to discover
who you are and what you are
capable of achieving.

Salve Vargas
Edelman

Founder, President, Rising Asian
Pacific Americans Coalition for
Diversity (RAPACD)
Las Vegas, Nevada, California
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
After 17 years of relentless pursuit,
I finally realized my dream and
established the first-ever Rising
Asian Pacific Americans Coalition
for Diversity (RAPACD) Cultural
Center, inside the historic Lorenzi
Park, Las Vegas, Nevada!
What is the global impact of
your work? I was able to mobilize
the Asian Pacific Islander, Native
Hawaiian communities in Southern
Nevada! We started with 13
countries when I launched my Isla
Vegas, the Ninth Island Television
Show. A cultural variety show, a

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new genre in television! RAPACD
currently represents 38 countries
now.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader? I
am proud and honored to be
able to share my God-given
talents wholeheartedly and
unconditionally; empowering our
youth of today to become great
leaders of tomorrow; celebrating
and embracing our cultural
diversity!
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: We constantly
have to prove ourselves as emerging
leaders! And that’s okay! I don’t
mind letting my clients know that
as a Filipina, I have personal and
business integrity! I deliver what I
promise!
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? Personally, I
didn’t have any! As a Community
and Business Leader, I’ve always
been a pioneer, independent, brave,
courageous, God-confident, and
risk taker! For other Filipina leaders
I know, they need to let go of egos,
power-hungry and hidden agendas,
and self-centeredness! It’s not about
them, it’s about our community and
the people we serve! For others,
they need to develop their selfworth and value as a Filipina leader.
What was your very first paid
job? Executive Secretary, Sulo
Restaurant, Makati. I was 18 years
old and paid P250.00 a month.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Television, movie,
Broadway and recording producer.
If you could start over, what
would you do? Pursue my singing
career, record my 10 original songs
as a recording artist, international
performing artist and produce
my own TV shows, concerts and
movies! I’d have my own television
network like Oprah Winfrey!
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? World
Peace! A non-violent world! Teach
everyone how to fish!
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Heal the world, the
30

sick and the dying! Have enough
food for everyone! Give jobs
to everyone! Engage! Educate!
Empower! Inspire!
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
My sister migrated to USA in the
60s and petitioned my Mama in the
70s. I was supposed to migrate in
1976 but I chose to travel first in
Asia and Europe from 1975 to 1980
as an International Performing
Artist, Leader Singer, Crooner’ and
sang in various languages. Finally, I
was asked to migrate in 1980 to take
care of my Mama, who became ill at
that time. She lived with me until
she passed away in 1991.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas the Entertainment Capital of the
World! It’s my kind of city - it’s
24/7! I’m spoiled here: no state tax,
no corporate tax, no valet fee, no
hotel parking fee!
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Our Bayanihan customs
and traditions.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I am an
International Performing Artist,
Versatile Singer, Patriotic Singer
who loves to ballroom dance.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Oprah Winfrey
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? I love to do my back-to-back
workout: Body Pump and Zumba!
Self-care means taking care of
yourself in mind, body, spirit, heart,
and soul and that includes positive
thinking, positive affirmations,
positive mental attitude and a
positive outlook on life.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Pursue your dreams,
never give up on your dreams;
never forget where you came from;
remember your family values; make
the right choices; don’t be afraid
to make mistakes; go where no
Filipina has gone before; have an
unwavering faith in God; when you

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

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work in silence God will reward
you in the open!
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Dr. Jose
Rizal, our national hero.
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The loss of family values, identity
denial and the inability to speak
their native language

Sonia Aranza

President/CEO, Aranza Cross
Cultural Strategies/Global
Leadership Development
Alexandria, Virginia, USA

If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? I created my own
luck and built a consulting practice
that impacts the lives of people
around the world. I believe in
transformational leadership and I
began with transforming myself. I
confronted my fears and believed I
could help others to do the same.
What is the global impact of
your work? I have the privilege
of working with global companies
who allow me to help transform
their leaders. In doing so, I impact
the personal evolution of thousands
of individuals who in turn impact
the lives of their employees, families

and communities around the world.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Mental
toughness and agility. I am deeply
aware that I come from a line of
people who persevere.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: It rarely happens
today but early in my business,
people judged my brown package
and doubted my ability. Today
when I speak, leaders listen.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
There are so many who positively
influenced me along the way. I
would say that it was my willingness
to observe numerous individuals
and my discipline to learn from
their experience that helped me the
most.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
creative balance required to have a
successful career and a successful
family life.
What was your very first paid
job? I made leis at the old
Honolulu airport as a 15 year old so
I could save money for my first car.
I think I got paid $2.15 per hour!
If you had another career, what
would that be? Professor
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Selflove: everyone would learn how to
love themselves.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I would make every
individual realize that the magic
they’re looking for is inside of them.
All the answers come from within.
You possess everything you need.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
My family immigrated to the
United States in 1969 for a better
future.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? People, sights and
food.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What
city? Intellectual stimulation and
abundant opportunities in the
metro Washington, DC area.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Respect for elders.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I had small parts
on the original Hawaii Five-O
Which living woman do you most
admire? Hillary Clinton
What do you read? Numerous
global articles, newspapers and
anthologies of short stories
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Meditation, quiet walks, prayer,
massages. Self-care is self-love.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Carpe diem! Seize the
day! No hesitation. No fear. You
have everything you need! Kaya
mo!
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? The Dalai
Lama
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Aung San Suu Kyi
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Lack of self-awareness. Looking
on the outside instead of the inside.
Self-knowledge. Everything starts
within.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I am an
immigrant Filipina who arrived
in the United States at the age of 8
and barely spoke English. Today, I
speak to leaders around the world.
I would like my humble journey to
inspire others to create their own
luck, discover work that they love
and make a positive difference in
the world. Life is brief. Make it
count.

Stephanie
Lomibao

Senior Vice President, Philanthropy
Manager, Bank of America
Los Angeles, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very
proud from your body of work,
what would that be? I helped
to illuminate Bank of America’s
philanthropic investments in
hunger relief, military support,
diversity and inclusion - especially
for the intellectually disabled through cause-related promotions
and bank-owned channels as part of
the integrated enterprise team.
What is the global impact of
your work? Many of my platforms
engage employees across our global
footprint - specifically hunger
relief with key partners like Global
Foodbanking Network and World
Food Program - and the bank’s
partnership with Special Olympics,
Inc. I also previously managed
the Bank of America Charitable
Foundation’s disaster relief portfolio
where I worked on the bank’s
rebuilding support in Haiti, Japan,
Horn of Africa, and the Philippines,
to name a few.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Challenging the
status quo in Corporate America
- looking different from the
stereotypical executive.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Dannielle Campos, current
manager at Bank of America who

helped recognize and amplify my
strength-based leadership and
challenge myself to get to the next
level in my career.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? Remembering
to “Lean In” and embrace our
differences while still exhibiting
executive presence.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Talk Show Host
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? AntiPoverty Policies
If you had super powers,
what would you do? Power of
Persuasion
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I’m first generation FilipinoAmerican. My Parents immigrated
from the Philippines- dad as a
college student and mom with her
family since my grandfather served
in WWII.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Proximity to family - Los Angeles.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Sheryl Sandberg, author
of “Lean In” and Chief Operating
Officer for Facebook
What do you read? Twitter Feeds
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Making sure being a mommy is my
first priority.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Be open to opportunities
that expand your horizon and
give you the opportunity to grow
professionally.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Gandhi
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Lack of leadership pipeline.

Tess
MartillanoManjares

MD, Information Risk Management
& Chief Information Risk Officer
(CIRO) for Latin America & the
Caribbean, BNY Mellon
New York, New York, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? I have
ventured in a career path that is less
traveled by women. Being a woman
and a minority, I wanted a career
where I can make a difference in
terms of diversity, growth, and
empowerment. Not only did I want
to introduce the power of having
a woman in a team, but I also
wanted to make people aware of
the capabilities and competencies
of a Filipina and Asian woman in
the business world, specifically
in Information Technology and
Cybersecurity. According to
Huffington Post, women made up
26% of the computing workforce,
down from 35% in 1990s. Humbly,
I want to help to change these
numbers even in small ways.
I have been motivating and
encouraging Filipina and Asian
women to pursue careers in the
areas of information technology
and cyber security through my
public speaking engagements.
Throughout my career and in my
limited capacity, I am proud to say
that I have hired talented women

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and some of them happened to be
Filipinas. I have been mentoring
Filipinos, other women of different
backgrounds and ethnicities; I
am happy to say that there are a
number of them now in senior
leadership roles and very happy and
doing great in what they do.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader? As a
woman, we tend to bring a skill set
that benefits different aspects of
teamwork; empathy, flexibility, and
collaboration. As a Filipina woman
leader, I think we contribute to
“social sensitivity” and collective
intelligence by bringing varying
perspectives and opinions. We,
Filipinas, are very thorough
in planning and thinking….
sometimes to a fault.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Being a female
in a male-dominated career area
is already a challenge on its own.
But one experience stood out in my
mind: being the only woman in a
meeting with 25 European men to
discuss information technology and
information security and I manage
to stand my ground. I am very
lucky to have bosses/managers and
CIOs who have encouraged me to
speak my mind and be assertive.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Besides my parents, my husband is
the one who has greatly influenced
me to pursue the professional career
I am in now. I was graduated with
a degree in Accounting and had
worked as a Corporate Accountant.
Some people say that behind man’s
success is a woman…well, it is the
opposite in my case, behind my
success as a woman is my husband!
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
most significant barrier to
female leadership is my own self,
knowing that I have to transcend
preconceived notions about women
being “weak” in technology. I know
that being a leader takes a lot of
time to focus, do hard work, self32

sacrifice and a great deal of support
from your family. But, ultimately, it
is I who makes the choice.
If you had super powers,
what would you do? Stop the
wars; promote peace, love, and
friendship, regardless, race, sex,
gender, income, religion, and
history.
What’s the best thing about
the Philippines? The Filipino
hospitality, which I still have in
me; our Filipino family values plus
respect for the elders and authority
are the best things about the
Philippines
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city? I
live in New York City, the financial
capital of the world. I love the
energy of this city and if you work
hard, opportunities are plenty. And
it is true, if you can make it here,
you can make it anywhere in the
world. I love New York!
ONE (only) Filipino custom
or tradition you would like
to pass on to others: Ang
hindi marunong lumingon sa
kanyang pinanggalingan ay
hindi makakarating sa kanyang
paroroonan.

Tiffany Bohee

Executive Director, San Francisco
Office of Community Investment
and Infrastructure
San Francisco, California, USA
What is the global impact of your
work?
Developing sustainable
communities including housing

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anchored by innovation clusters
that export knowledge and services
is a model for other cities.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why?
Amy Neches with TMG Partners,
a San Francisco bay area fullservice real estate and management
company, has over 30 years of real
estate and finance experience.
Amy was an early mentor who
showed great dedication to her
work, demanded the same caliber
of excellence from her colleagues,
and had a strong commitment
to helping others reach their
professional goals.
What was you very first job?
Intern
Most difficult workplace
challenge as a Filipina woman
and why:
Prior perceptions or stereotypes
can blur vision and lead to
misunderstandings and conflict, but
I’ve found that listening to better
understand the underlying interests
as well as adopting a problem
solving approach has been useful to
carve a path forward.
What was the turning point in
your professional life?
Accepting Mayor Ed Lee’s
appointment in 2011 as San
Francisco’s redevelopment director,
despite the tenuous status of
redevelopment in California, has
been the most challenging and
rewarding professional experience
to date. My charge has been
to demonstrate that economic
development and community
revitalization are synergistic, and
that the bonds of community are
essential to the dignity of people
with an emphasis on accountability
and transparency for taxpayers and
community stakeholders.
ONE (only) Filipino custom or
tradition you would like to pass
on to others:
Bayanihan or the spirit of helping
one another
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you:
As a child, I wanted to be an ice

skating doctor.

Francine
Maigue

District Director, California State
Assembly
Chula Vista, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Anything I’ve
done that has helped empower and
highlight our Filipino community
and the lives I’ve touched through
teaching…that’s what I’m most
proud of. When people say, “Wow!
That’s awesome. I didn’t know that
about the Filipino community,”
and when my students’ faces light
up because they’ve reached a
goal then go on to help someone
else accomplish theirs…that’s
priceless for me. To have any kind
of influence is to have a power
that holds the most precious of
responsibilities. Awards fade, but
a helping hand, kind words, and
mentorship. They last forever.
What is the global impact of
your work? I feel blessed to have
had opportunities and roles that
have brought me all over the
world, most often using different
art forms as means of diplomacy.
Whether inspiring female
empowerment during concerts in
Japanese stadiums, giving master
classes at the University of the
Philippines to students who use
dance as a living prayer, writing
to engage, educate, and empower

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Emerging Leaders
marginalized communities locally
and overseas, choreographing
theatrical productions that illustrate
issues that need to be addressed in
communities that need to be better
understood.
Workplace challenge as a
Filipina woman and why:
Naturally, even (and especially)
in leadership positions, I aim to
be a most humble, helpful team
player. Sometimes that kindness,
though intended to a make for
a harmonious, understanding
workplace, can be misread or taken
advantage of. While, as Filipina
women, we are taught to give
respect, be as accommodating as
possible, and put others first, we
also have to know our own value—
our time, our talent, our ideas—and
we need to make sure hospitality
doesn’t compromise equity in
workload, in accountability, in
compensation, in respect. Equity is
everything.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? We tend
to internalize and apologize for
less than favorable situations and
outcomes--a knee jerk reaction,
even when we didn’t contribute (at
least solely) to failure. We shouldn’t
automatically say sorry when
we aren’t sure if we did anything
wrong. Sometimes, we need to
take pause and first pinpoint the
crux. We also shouldn’t dim our
shine to make others feel more
comfortable in times of success.
I value humility, but our success
should be seen and used as tools
of inspiration not inadvertent
weapons of intimidation. We work
so hard. Why shouldn’t we celebrate
when things go well? We should be
the first to celebrate, especially each
other.
What was your very first paid
job? Performer; 10 years old;
$40/minute...yes, per minute--I
opened conventions for IBM, said
the Pledge of Allegiance, and held
Leslie Uggams’s hand as she sang
the National Anthem--still probably

the best paying gig of my career-My next job came a year later. I
was hired as a Dance Educator &
Choreographer, making $20/hour
teaching...not bad for an 11 yearold.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: Though I’m
known to be a meticulous planner
with a penchant for calculated
risk and deep analysis, I love
spontaneous adventures. Drop
me in unfamiliar surroundings,
around new people, languages, and
customs...and I am completely at
peace and at home. I truly embrace
the thrill of learning to connect
with and understand people from
scratch. C’mon—let’s go right now!
*grabs passport*
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
We must all be willing to wholly,
humbly say, “There is enough room
at the top for all of us,” then we
need to give each other a boost and
make sure everyone gets up there.
Right now, everyone keeps saying
that we need to “lean in,” but I don’t
want our Filipina sisters to just feel
comfortable sitting at the table. I
want them at the head of it!
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I am currently
working to establish Filipina
Friday in my hometown. While the
Filipino community in San Diego
is great about collaboration and is
quite powerful, we don’t often have
conversations specifically about
our experiences as Filipinas—our
achievements, our challenges, our
ambitions. It’s been a challenge
to produce only because these
incredible Filipinas are also some
of the busiest, most in-demand
women in our community! We are
working hard to make this happen
together, Filipina leaders of all ages,
representing a bevy of different
organizations and industries. We
had hoped to have everything
ready in time for Filipino American
History Month (October), but we
recognize our scope for the project

is big and worth more prep time.
Look out for us in March during
Women’s History Month. Filipina
Friday will be an annual event that
will include theatrical presentations
of chapters of FWN’s DISRUPT,
inspiring speakers, engaging
roundtables, and more! Stay tuned!
#filipinafriday

Juslyn
Cabrera Manalo

Community Engagement Associate,
Forest City
Daly City, California USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very
proud from your body of work,
what would that be? One of the
professional accomplishments that
makes me very proud of the work
I do today is giving back to SoMa
neighborhood where my mother
first set foot in the United States as
a young immigrant woman.
What is the global impact of
your work? It reaches beyond
the United States because I have
had the opportunity to speak in
the Philippines about community
development in San Francisco and
the Filipino community. There is
a quote that I feel strongly reflects
my belief in social equity: “Injustice
anywhere is a threat to justice
everywhere. We are caught in an
inescapable network of mutuality,
tied in a single garment of destiny.
Whatever affects one directly,
affects all indirectly.” Martin Luther

King, Jr.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? The best
part of being a Filipina woman
leader is sharing our natural
warmth armed with our tenacious
warrior spirit.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why?
Dr. Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales has
helped influence my professional
career by invoking that you can
ignite positive change across
sectors, whether it is in the
nonprofit, educational, corporate
and public domain.
What was your very first paid
job? My very first job was at bank
teller at Homes Savings of America
and I was paid $7.21 an hour
If you had another career, what
would that be? Interior Designer
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Daly City has one of the best
Filipino barbecue spots in the
nation- FilAm Barbecue!
ONE (only) Filipino custom or
tradition you would like to pass
on to others: Warm Hospitality
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I was a
cheerleader in Junior High and
High School.
Which living woman do you
most admire? My mother, Josefina
Cabrera Manalo
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? One piece of advice I
would give my 20 year old self is to
take more risks and do not be afraid
to go out of my comfort zone.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Maya
Angelou
If you could have dinner with
an amazing woman - who would
she be? India Arie, she has such
beautiful, inspirational messages of
truth, spirit and resilience.
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The next biggest challenge that
faces the next generation of Filipina
women is continuing to defy

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stereotypes especially with social
media as one of the places these
images/misrepresentations are
perpetuated.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My legacy is
to link the younger generation of
Filipina women in the bay area to
rise to their utmost potential.

Kharissa
Fernando

Support Manager, Peek
San Francisco, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Being Editor-inChief of the EXPO Magazine for
the past 3 years
What is the global impact of your
work? With my work at Peek, we
are powering the world’s tours &
activities, and helping people spend
money on experiences, not things.
Research shows that experiences,
and not material things, make
you happy. Being able to play a
driving force in this change through
technology is incredible and lifechanging.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? With my
work with Pistahan, the satisfaction
I receive from helping bring the
Filipino community together to
celebrate our heritage.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? Al
Perez, the President of the Filipino
34

American Arts Exposition. He first
connected me with Pistahan Parade
and Festival, and placed me into the
editor role.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? The
gender divide: unequal pay and
opportunities for men and women.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Back-up dancer for
Beyoncé.
If you could start over, what
would you do? Study abroad in
college for a year
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Widespread quality of and equal
opportunity in education
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Instantly learn any
language or skill
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? How friendly and
welcoming the people are
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
San Francisco, where we’re always
living on the cusp of the next great
idea
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Karaoke
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I love board
games and I’m a 2x board game
champion at work!
Which living woman do you most
admire? Sheryl Sandberg
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Take advantage of every
opportunity
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Leonardo
da Vinci
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? J.K. Rowling
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
A challenge that actually faces all
women — managing a work-life
balance that works for them and
their family.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina

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Women’s Network: Advocating
for more Filipina women in
technology and helping create those
opportunities.

Michelle
Florendo

Founder and Principal, What If You
Could, LLC
Oakland, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? The
professional accomplishment I am
most proud of is choosing to leave
a comfortable, somewhat fulfilling
job in order to build a company
that would enable me to create
the life I wanted and have even
more of an impact on the world.
After spending years working
in the corporate world in both
management consulting and brand
management, I saw a lot of peers
stuck in soul-sucking jobs and
golden handcuffs. As someone who
understood the frustration of highachieving professionals, I decided
to dedicate myself to improving
the lives of others and founded my
own career consulting firm, What
If You Could, LLC. Today, What
If You Could serves a number of
ambitious mid-career professionals
who are interested in maximizing
their professional contribution
by aligning their work with their
passions.
What is the global impact of
your work? In 2014, I had the

pleasure of leading career planning
workshops in Paris, France and
Amsterdam, Netherlands for an
organization that provides career
support to millennial women. At
first, I was unsure about whether
the concepts I teach would be
applicable in other countries, but
I found that the women there
struggled with many of the same
issues women in the U.S. struggle
with in their careers. It was a
fantastic experience to be able to
share the tools my American clients
have used to craft fulfilling careers
with women internationally.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Being able
to be a part of this fabulous group
of Filipina women leaders that is
FWN. I still remember the very first
FWN Summit I attended: it felt like
I was at a family party with kind,
laughing, women who felt as close
as aunties and cousins, yet every
woman present had impressive
professional accomplishments.
Never before had my familial and
professional worlds collided, but
in FWN, I enjoyed a happy mix of
both.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: To be honest,
the biggest challenge I face as a
Filipina woman in the workplace
is my height. I’ve found that when
I’m doing a speaking gig for a large
audience, I need a stage, stadium
seating, or very high (yet stylish)
heels. Rest assured, though, even if
the people in the back can’t see me,
they WILL hear my message. I’ve
been told I have a loud voice that
belies my size.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why?
Julius Paras has had an enduring
influence on my professional career.
He introduced me to the concept
of Industrial Engineering as the
“engineering of efficiency,” and
thus triggered my fascination with
optimization. It’s been a pleasure
to watch how Julius has crafted a
career in which he amplifies people
and organizations so that they can

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

scale their impact. He has inspired
me to find a way to use my unique
background to also amplify the
impact, success, and happiness of
the clients I serve.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? I think
the most significant barrier to
female leadership is this silly
notion of “women who have it
all.” The problem I have with that
phrase is that so many women
stress themselves out trying to live
up to someone else’s definition of
“it.” I’ve had clients who burned
themselves out trying to satisfy
this expectation that success
means you must maintain a highpowered, well-paying job, show
your dedication to your kids by
cooking dinner every night and
handcrafting birthday party favors
worthy of Pinterest, and somehow
still find time for extended family,
friends, and self-care. Not that
there’s anything wrong with that
picture if you can do it.
The point is, I’d like to see more
women take time to define for
themselves what having “it” all
means for them, so that they can
spend more of their time thriving
in their own definition of success
instead of striving for someone
else’s. That’s part of why I do the
work that I do, empowering clients
to make good career decisions
according to their own terms.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact?
I would ensure that every girl
and woman had access to proper
sexual education, affordable
contraception, and safe abortions,
if necessary. I believe every girl and
woman should have the ability to
control her body and her future.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: Way back in
the day, I was once on my school’s
wrestling team, and had to wrestle
boys because there were no other
girls in my weight class.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Serena Williams. I admire

her determination, strength,
enduring excellence, femininity,
and grace.
What is one piece of advice
that you would give to your
20-year old self? Funny thing, I
gave a whole talk on this topic to
UC Berkeley’s Partners for PreProfessional Pilipinos (P4). I had
three pieces of advice: 1) Take
time to figure out what are your
passions, strengths, and values.
2) Make time for the things and
people you love. 3) The decisions
you make now do not determine
the rest of your life (so don’t stress
out too much about them).

Noelani
Sallings

Trustee and Director
Santa Clara Unified School
District and San Jose Jazz
Santa Clara, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? As
the first Filipina elected official,
I am proud of the work I did to
get elected and the work that I do
on a daily basis to make sure the
students are represented.
What is the global impact of
your work? When I think of the
possible impact that my work will
have globally....I still don’t know.
With 15,298 students in my school
district, my policies will affect each
of them and where they end up.
We could be educating the next

president, the next curer of cancer
or the engineer that creates the
flying car.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Being
Filipina!
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? I can’t
name just one but I can narrow
it down to two amazing women,
Judge Erica Yew and Meri Maben.
These women have been rock solid
mentors for me throughout my
professional career, sharing pitfalls
and successes so that I can learn
from them. I would not be where I
am today without their advice and
support.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? I don’t see
barriers, I see walls to climb over.
What was your very first paid
job? Martial Arts Instructor, I was
13!
If you had another career, what
would that be? Secretary of
Education
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Mandatory siestas, everyone would
be well rested and more pleasant.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The flourishing art
and music community
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? I love Santa
Clara, it is a big city with a little
town feel.
One Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Sitting around the table
and wrapping lumpia
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I am a
second degree black belt
How do you take care of
yourself? What does self-care
mean to you? I work out out as
much as I can! Whether it is taking
a walk around the neighborhood
with my boyfriend or doing
full-on cardio, exercise keeps me
grounded.
Which historical figure would
you like to have coffee with? Rosa
Parks

Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Being the first
Filipina elected to the Santa Clara
Unified School District Board of
Education.

Trish Quema
La Chica
Policy Analyst, Office of the
Governor, State of Hawai’i
Honolulu, Hawai’I, USA

If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? I was
able to collaborate with various
Filipino organizations in the SF Bay
Area to attain certification for the
City and County of San Francisco
to provide language access services
in Tagalog, as it became the 3rd
most spoken language in the city
after Chinese and English. On April
2, 2014, I stood next to Mayor Ed
Lee, with Board of Supervisors
President David Chiu, Supervisors
John Avalos and Jane Kim and local
community partners to announce
the new Tagalog certification at the
Bayanihan Community Center.
What is the global impact of
your work? As a public health
advocate, I am involved in a lot
of initiatives that aim to improve
health outcomes for the Asian and
Pacific Islander population. Here in
the US, my work has had an impact
across the nation, particularly
in the development of Tagalog
translated materials that are used
by the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention as well as the

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Founders & Pioneers
Department of Health and Human
Services.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I love
being the only Filipina in the
Governor’s Office that actually grew
up in the Philippines. I like being
able to talk about home and the
unique experiences I have had that
helped to shape my career.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why?
Roxanna Bautista was my
supervisor at the Asian & Pacific
Islander American Health Forum.
She introduced me to the world of
public health, and what it means to
improve health outcomes not just
for the individual, but for the entire
community. Through her, I learned
the value of creating meaningful
relationships, and how to lead by
example. She is an amazing mentor
who has always looked out for me.
I would not have made it this far in
my career without her.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? There are
actually a lot of women leaders in
the health care field, and many of
them are vocal about issues that
affect the Filipino community. I
think that there is always a need
for Filipina women to run for
public office, particularly those who
wish to implement innovative and
progressive legislation.
What was your very first paid
job?
I started as a researcher for the
ABS-CBN News and Current
Affairs show, The Correspondents.
I was 20 years old and my starting
salary was Php15,000.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Remove
tax laws that favor the wealthy.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Power mimicry, for
sure.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave? I
became an immigrant through my
Mom, who helped petition for my
residency. It was only in 2014 that I
36

became a US Citizen.
What’s the best thing about where
you live now? What city? I live in
Honolulu and the best thing about
Hawai’i is that it reminds me so
much of the Philippines!
Which living woman do you most
admire?
Aung San Suu Kyi - I was fortunate
to meet her in person in San
Francisco.
What do you read? A lot of
nonfiction - memoirs, tech books,
and social commentary books.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? How people treat others is a
reflection of how they feel about
themselves, right?
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with?
It would have been pretty awesome
to sit with Rosa Parks.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: I would
love to help motivate others to
get into policy and advocacy,
particularly on issues that affect
ethnic and racial minorities.

Ace T. Itchon

President & CEO, Aspen
Philippines
Manila, Philippines

If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? Bringing Aspen
to the Philippines thereby creating
jobs and professional development
for more Filipinos.
What is the global impact of your

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work? Providing greater access to
quality but affordable medicine.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Former superior from previous
company, Mr. Brian Nichols, who
believed in my ideas and supported
me all the way up to being
transferred to Aspen.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? From a
previous Asia-Pac role in a previous
company: Being heard in an allmale boardroom meeting. Hence, I
would always volunteer to take the
minutes of the meeting in order to
have a chance to clarify, interject,
give my opinion and challenge
others’ ideas.
What was your very first paid
job? Medical Representative.
Twenty years old. US $167.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Teacher
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? A law
enforcing a target percentage of
women leaders in organizations so
we could fully tap into the potential
of women in leading change.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Kapwa tao
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I was Mutya
ng Malolos circa 1981. Was Ms.
Alaska Milk circa 1979.
What do you read? Leadership
and management books. Culinary
books.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Eating fish and vegetables, climbing
stairs, running on the treadmill
and biking. I need to be healthy
to attend to my personal and
professional responsibilities.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Don’t smoke.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Tandang
Sora
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Hillary Clinton

What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Generational attitude towards work.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: You do not
need a silver spoon to get to the top.

Hedy Leuterio
Thomas

President/CEO, Leuterio Thomas,
LLC
Fort Washington, Maryland, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes
you very proud from your body
of work, what would that be?
Running a successful Architectural
and Engineering business was not
in my career plan. I was employed
as a Structural Engineer with a large
multinational Architectural and
Engineering office, designing high
profile structures, which meant
long dedicated hours. My husband
and I had then 2 small children
and with a live-in nanny to help. It
was agonizing for me as a mother
to leave them, essentially with a
surrogate mother. I was unhappy
with that arrangement. That is when
I decided to leave a well-paying
corporate position to starting a
business from our basement and
be at home with our children. If
asked, “Would I do it any different
looking back? My answer is a solid
no. I would have not discovered
my talent as a business woman,
tenacious in contract negotiation,
and managing talented staff.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Gaining respect
especially on the construction site
when many believe the louder you
shout, the more important you are!
I remember I was on-site where
we were adding heavy equipment
on the roof of an existing large
bus repair facility. Our job was to
provide additional strength to the
steel beams. We were proposing
carbon fiber reinforcement but the
subcontractor did not understand
it and was protesting loudly.
I sketched out the structural
properties of his solution and
showed why it would fail, then
explained calmly why he needed
to follow my design. All went
quiet, and then he meekly said he
understood!
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? As
Filipinos, parents are the first that
provided guidance and influence in
pursuing a professional career; from
selecting a college degree program
to managing our workload. For me
that is my Father, Mariano Leuterio.
He was a Civil Engineer with an
unsurpassed work ethics. As I
pursued Structural Engineering
and worked with mentors,
Andy Sauvage, my first boss was
inspirational, and believed in my
abilities.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? As a female
engineer in a male-dominated
profession, it is speaking up for
yourself. Much has been written
about how women need to stand
up and demand their rights as we
are in the majority. Mika Brzezinski
wrote a great book, “Knowing your
Value” that helped me understand
the barriers to women getting what
they deserve in terms of respect,
earning power and corporate
positions. We need to understand
we are powerful and should be
proud of it. For me, the confidence
to speak up for myself had been my
greatest challenge.
If you could run the world, what

one law would you enact? A
world without borders and that
people are free to move around and
find opportunities. As long as an
individual is willing to work hard
and pay its dues, who is to stop
anyone from migrating anywhere
around the Globe? The current
exodus of people looking for safer
place to live should be welcomed
with open arms from every country
in the world. I am open for one
world, one race, which I truly
believe eventually will take place.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The progress and
metamorphosis is an eye-opener.
For the first time, I am hearing
more of expats wanting to go
back and live there, versus people
wanting to leave the Philippines for
a better life somewhere else. On
my recent trips to the Philippines,
I realize that the center of the
world is shifting towards the Pacific
Region and the Philippines will be
at the heart of it. The skills sets are
there, working with the National
Museum and the National Center
for Historic Preservation, there
are many talented people, welleducated, who can show that the
Philippines has emerged as one of
Asia’s Tiger.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city? I
live in Fort Washington, Maryland
about 15 miles outside Washington,
DC. It has a significant Filipino
community, one of the largest in the
MD-VA-DC area. Of course that
comes with its perks. We have about
3 Filipino restaurants within 5
miles from each one plus a Filipino
grocery store a few miles from
where I live. My Children grew up
with Filipino “sicheria” and dishes
as well. With both now in college,
if I am sending a care package,
Filipino treats is on top of the list.
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I am in love with
the Scottish Highlands and Jamie!
I so want to go and visit one day.
He is the character from the novel
I am reading “Outlander” by Diana

Gabaldon.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Hedy
Lamarr. While a great and beautiful
actress, what people may not realize
was that Lamarr developed a keen
interest in applied science, and
bored by her acting career, utilized
this knowledge as an inventor.
At the commencement of World
War II, keen to aid the Allied war
effort, she identified jamming of
Allied radio communications by
the Axis as a particular problem,
and with composer George Antheil,
developed spread spectrum and
frequency hopping technology to
defeat it. Though the US Navy did
not adopt the technology until the
1960s, the principles of her work
are now incorporated into modern
Wi-Fi, CDMA and Bluetooth
technology, and this work led to her
being inducted into the National
Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014”
(Wikipedia). Beautiful and smart!
On a side note, I was named after
her.

Irene
Sun-Kaneko

Publisher, Jeepney Press/Chairman
UTAWIT and AsiaVox, Ltd.
Tokyo, Japan
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? Being
able to pool together volunteers &
Filipino groups all over Japan to
work together towards a unified

vision for making a responsible
Filipino society in Japan.
What is the global impact of your
work? UTAWIT’s impact extends
beyond Japan. Also conceived as
a charity, UTAWIT has annually
donated its proceeds to the less
privileged in the Philippines.
UTAWIT has also helped support
victims of several typhoons
although they are not the official
beneficiaries of UTAWIT. In
recent years, the funds raised by
UTAWIT benefits the less fortunate
children of Gawad Kalinga – Sibol,
Child and Youth Development, by
funding their education.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Working in a
Japanese company is quite challenge
being a Filipina or a foreigner in the
country. Speaking their language
and adopting their work habits has
to be learned to gain their respect.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
My mentor, friend, Mr. Naoya
Horiike. He is a very busy man
himself with multi-businesses but
you won’t see him in a panic mode
attack. He is so cool, focused and
does things one at a time. He has
a positive attitude, dedication and
commitment.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? You cannot
win the respect of the people
immediately. You still have to
prove the successful staging of your
events.
What was your very first paid
job? Secretary. 22 years old.
PHP1,500/month
If you had another career, what
would that be? Linguist.
If you could start over, what
would you do? I would come to
the U.S. instead of Japan because it
would have been much easier as I
speak English already.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Respect
different religions.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I’d remove hatred

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from people’s hearts.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I went to Japan to study for 2 years
until I got a job and had a family.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Warm smiles, best
beaches, good food, historical
places.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Tokyo is an upbeat city that never
sleeps. Everything is on the go
which matches my personality.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: I was once an
aerobics instructor.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Oprah Winfrey
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I eat well and go to gym for hot
yoga. If I am healthy, I can think
well on the job and I can serve
better.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Irene, always stay focused
and take responsibility of all your
actions.What do you think is the
biggest challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women? How
to empower them with leadership
and greatness.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Jeepney
Press- a Japan-wide bi-monthly
publication with a circulation
of 30,000 whose goals are to
share knowledge and resources,
strengthen existing relations
and forge new ones with various
Filipino communities all around
Japan and organize communitybased cultural program and
collaborative projects. UTAWIT- a
singing competition to encourage,
endorse and develop Filipino
talents while promoting Filipino
music in Japan 11 years ago has
now grown to be a national singing
competition for both Filipinos and
Japanese all over Japan. It is by far
the only Filipino-organized event
in Japan that covers a nationwide
scope.
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Juanita Nimfa
Y. Gamez

President & CEO, Caring Hearts
Foundation, Inc. & Mission-Hope
Developmental Services, Inc.
San Ramon, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? Being
able to start my companies, being
able to provide jobs for hundreds of
people, and being able to advocate
and make some difference in the
lives of the intellectual disabled in
our community.
What is the global impact of your
work? Because of my success, I
set an example to women all over
the world, that a simple housewife
with many kids could make it in
the business. My income allows
me to help provide micro-financing
and other forms of assistance like
medical, educational, burial, dental,
etc. to the underprivileged in the
Philippines.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? To be
able to be the voice to millions of
other women who do not have the
same chance as I do in influencing
society, impacting legislation, etc.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: To be not
listened to or taken seriously, or to
always have to fight my way and be
more emphatic compared to men
who may just speak and people

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will immediately pay attention
especially in technical and legal
aspects. Other challenges include
when others think you know less
because you are a Filipina with
a thick Filipino accent, or being
perceived as too sweet or softspoken.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
The friend who told me to “walk
in there like I own the place” to
my initial shyness when I first
came to the US. This boosted my
confidence tremendously in dealing
with other business people.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? Having to
choose your priorities and doing
a balancing act between business
and family especially for a Filipino
family where guilt tripping always
plays a role. Often women worry
about failing in their business or
failing their family.
What was your very first paid
job? I was in my early 40s when I
first came to the U.S. and held my
first full-time job.
If you could start over, what
would you do? I would have still
put up my businesses, because by
doing so, I was able to multiply
myself to touch more lives as much
as possible. In creating financial
wealth, I am able to help the needy
and be the voice for others in
influencing society.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? To
stamp out violence against people
with differing beliefs.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Eradicate poverty.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
Financial difficulty to reunite with
my parents and siblings who were
already living in the U.S.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? Its people, its natural
beauty and the food.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
The weather, the cleanliness and
beautiful houses

The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I can dance.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Charo Santos-Concio for
her sweet, unassuming countenance
despite her position. She doesn’t
have to be loud or be a show-off to
prove her status and intelligence.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I dance, walk, exercise, eat right, do
my own nails and always try to be
kind and sweet to everyone around
me, so they’ll love to have me
around, especially my grandkids.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? To enjoy life, especially
sports and friends, both men and
women.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Margaret
Thatcher
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The challenge of having a loving
family and keeping a healthy career.

Maria Nieves
Santos-Greaves

President, Surrey Hearing Care
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? The fact that we at
Surrey Hearing Care have provided
complimentary hearing screenings
for more than a thousand people
from all over the world.
What is the global impact of

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

your work? A number of our
patients have returned or have
been visiting their home countries,
and/or roaming the world. I
believe we have made a number
of conversations around the world
more audible and clearer. I am
sure some decisions were made
out of those conversations. I find
it professionally satisfying that in
this regard I am making a global
imprint.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader? Our
values as Filipinas mean we are
considerate, sensitive and decisive.
We have that feminine intuitive
sense that makes us leaders who
know how to approach, talk, treat
and consider others whatever their
gender, age or background. That is
impeccable and effective leadership.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: As a Filipina,
sometimes there is the misleading
perception that you cannot say
“No.” I can, know when, and have
said “No” when called for.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
I would say the person who
influenced me in my career was
my former boss in a hearing clinic
before I started my own. I did not
like the way he was treating his
clients. For him, it was all about
money. So that was why I decided
to open my own clinics.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? In Canada, there
are barriers to employment to
overcome if you are an immigrant
regardless of your qualifications,
more so if you are a woman and
speak English different from a
Canadian accent. Without the
opportunity to start, how can one
be a leader?
What was your very first paid
job? An Audiometrist in my early
20s right after college.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Social Worker
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Hearing volumes of headphones or

earphones should be manufactured
set to a maximum level that will
still protect hearing. A recent
World Health Organization report
indicates the world will see a spike
in hearing loss across generations
because of harmful headphone
decibels.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I would restore the
hearing of all those who have some
level of impairment. If everyone
can hear each other, then one would
know when to talk, or keep quiet,
when to listen, and when not to.
No more mystery.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I was married to a Canadian and I
wanted to be with my Canadianborn son.
What’s the best thing about
the Philippines? Our Bayanihan
Spirit – service to others & unified
community action.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Our Christmas traditions:
Noche Buena, parol, belen and
lively fun huge family reunions with
tons of food and gifts.
Which living woman do you
most admire? I try to emulate my
mother whose lifelong dedication
to her family remains to this day.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Save, save, save. No
matter what happens, when it
comes to finances, you are building
financial security if you save
regularly, no matter how small.
Which historical figure would
you like to have coffee with?
The mother of Jose Rizal, Teodora
Alonso. How did she raise such
a brilliant and honorable man? I
have a son myself.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Imelda Marcos – what makes
her good-spirited in spite of how
the world keeps poking fun at her?
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My continued
hard work in providing quality
hearing care and practical

education to people from all over
the world. Where I live and work,
Greater Vancouver BC, Canada,
we have a very multicultural
demographic.

Corporation and Richprime Global
Inc., the exclusive distributor of
Barbie Dolls, Hotwheels, Fisher
Price, Mattel Games, V-Tech
Learning Computer and many
other well-known toy brands, infant
and juvenile, shoes and apparel.
She is a recipient of many local
and international awards including
International Entrepreneur Award
by the Global Summit of Women
in 2006, the Gold Prize Award
for Women’s World Excellence
Award held in Beijing, Ernst
& Young Entrepreneur Award
and International Women’s
Entrepreneurial Challenge Awardee
in 2013 held in Lima, Peru. She
was also granted the Presidential
Merit Award by the President of
the Republic of the Philippines
for her success in the field of
entrepreneurship.

Myrna T. Yao

President & CEO, Richwell
Trading Corporation | Richprime
Global Inc.
Quezon City, Philippines
Myrna Yao is a graduate of
Business Administration in the
University of the East. She finished
her Master’s Degree in Business
Administration in the same
university. She is a proud mother of
4 daughters and grandmother of 9
grandchildren.
A staunch advocate of women’s
economic empowerment, Ms.
Myrna T. Yao served as Chairperson
of the Philippine Commission
on Women from 2004 to 2010.
She is the Founding Chairperson
of the Philippine Federation of
Local Councils of Women and
Filipino-Chinese Federation of
Business Women and Professional
Women of the Philippines, and
the Chairman Emeritus of Pearl S.
Buck, Philippines.
A well-known and successful
businesswoman, she is the President
& CEO of Richwell Trading

Tessa
Yutadco

Founder & CEO, My Prime
San Diego, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? I am proud to have
taken Pili oil, an ingredient from
the Philippines that was unknown
in the global skincare market, and
used it in innovative skin care
formulas in a way that has brought
more awareness in the U.S. and
elsewhere to the amazing resources
in the Philippines.
What is the global impact of
your work? Prior to the launch

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of My Prime skincare, Pili oil was
relatively unknown in the U.S.
skincare market. By including
Pili oil in My Prime products and
investing in the promotion of Pili
oil in the U.S., I ensured that Pili oil
and the Philippines had a place, no
matter how modest, in the emerging
use of botanical oils in skincare
products that has since swept the
beauty industry in the U.S. and
internationally.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I have
a very special opportunity to talk
meaningfully about the Philippines
and everything I love and appreciate
about my country and its people.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Overcoming
the stereotype of being subservient
and less qualified. On one occasion,
I was negotiating a contract and
the other party seemed surprised
that I was a skilled negotiator and
that I insisted on terms that were
significant to my business.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Claudette Wilson. Claudette was
a wife, mother and the founding
partner of a successful law firm
in San Diego that I worked at as
an associate attorney. She showed
me that you can be successful,
universally respected and a
formidable opponent while still
maintaining your identity, priorities
and qualities as a woman.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? That
having a communication style that
is respectful, poised and nonconfrontational can be mistaken for
weakness.
What was your very first paid
job? I was a counter person and
barista for a newly-opened bakery
and cafe in San Francisco’s financial
district called “Specialty’s.” It was
March 1988 and I was 17 years old.
Specialty’s has since grown to over
40 cafes in three states.
If you had another career,
what would that be? A wellness
40

consultant.
If you could start over, what
would you do? I would have started
My Prime earlier in my life.
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
I would enact a law requiring
countries with adequate resources
to accept and welcome refugees
who are desperately trying to escape
oppression, violence and poverty
from their home countries.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
For economic and educational
opportunities available in the
United States.
What’s the best thing about where
you live now? What city? I live in
San Diego now. I love its climate
and the plenty of opportunities it
offers to spend time outdoors.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Respect for and valuing our
elders.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: Some of the
things I bake are actually edible.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? I run, I practice yoga, I have
my morning coffee unhurriedly,
I connect with family and friends
regularly and I pray. To me, self-care
is consciously doing something,
no matter how simple or short,
that puts you in a place of peace,
compassion and gratitude.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Choose kindness over
being right.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Justice Sonia Sotomayor
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
Striking a fulfilling balance between
actively pursuing a robust and
dynamic career with maintaining
our culture’s value of prioritizing
and caring for our families.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My legacy
to FWN is my firm devotion to

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supporting and promoting Filipino
women so that they advance and
thrive in their chosen professions.

Emma
Imperial

President & CEO, Imperial Homes
Corporation
Muntinlupa, Philippines
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very
proud from your body of work,
what would that be? Being
globally recognized in September
2013 when I was invited by IFC/
World Bank to talk and present
my transformational business
model to the world to help climate
change and alleviate poverty. The
Philippines’ first Solar Powered
Low Cost Housing Communities
equipped with solar system
solutions. When I started my
real estate business, my aim was
to provide quality yet affordable
homes to my countrymen. I
am now providing homes and
communities with good quality and
of global standard. These homes
will give savings and added value on
investment.
What is the global impact of
your work? When I launched my
solar powered housing project, I
encouraged other developers to
adopt this type of development
which will help address climate
change and the 3 million mass
housing backlog of the country,
if adopted will also result in the

elimination of 1,882,000 tons
of carbon dioxide and savings
of US$2.768 billion in fossil
consumption per year.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Filipina
leaders are talented, ambitious,
hard-working and have always been
highly respected and admired in the
society.
Workplace challenge as a
Filipina woman and why: After
college, I joined an International
Heavy Equipment Corporation.
It is indeed a world where men
ruled and as a Sales Executive,
cloud of doubts and contentions
surrounded me. However, with my
character, knowledge, skills and
resourcefulness, I was able to make
it on top of the game as I became
the company’s top seller and dealer
of heavy equipments. To this day,
there are few women developers
and the industry is still dominated
by men. Basically that is the reason
why I am too eager and motivated
to prove that we too can excel and
shine on this industry… Men can
build homes but women can create
homes.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? To be
honest, I was inspired by Henry Sy
of Shoemart. Thirty years my senior
at that time, he shared the secret
of his success which I followed all
my life. But it is the constituents
of my public servant husband
that influenced me most to create
and establish this business. I look
straight into the eyes of these people
and saw their great desire in having
a property and a home of their own.
With that, I turned my life from
being a simple wife and mother to
becoming a home provider and a
community developer who aims to
help people in fulfilling one of their
dreams.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? One barrier
I encounter always in terms of
women leadership is the society’s
perception of women. Almost

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Innovators & Thought
Leaders
everywhere, particularly in the
corporate field, when a man is
assertive, we view that person
as strong but when a woman
is assertive, we find that lady
imperious and stubborn. So while
it is true that society recognizes
the strength of women’s power
and capabilities, they still do not
accept the reality. Most women do
not welcome the thought that they
can rise equal to men, if not above
them.
What was your very first paid
job? I juggled work and studies
during College years. While
studying, I also worked as an
Investment Analyst in Ayala
Investment and Development
Corporation. My initial salary
was Php 1,000/monthly which at
that time was already sufficient
to support my studies and other
needs.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? Wider
attention to Women’s Rights
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave? I
have no intention of leaving my
country and my dreams for my
country.
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The diversity in the
way of life. You can live in a big city
and eat imported cheese or you can
go to the mountains and live on
plain rice. Humble, polite, honest
and genuine. These are the people
you will meet if you ever come
off the tourist trail here. These are
the people you will meet high up
tending to crumbling rice terraces
in the north. These are the people
you will meet fishing out from a
row of stilt houses in the south.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Muntinlupa City can match your
travel desires. It can meet your
gauge for a place to see, live or
invest in.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: One quality of Filipinos
that we have is Malasakit. Malasakit

is more than just care, it is a sincere
concern for others wherein you will
give and do everything to help and
reach out to the people in need.
It is an overflowing generosity of
oneself in helping others.
The ONE thing that we would
not guess about you: Despite my
serious and strict persona, I’m a
funny person who loves to crack
jokes all the time. I am a light
person to be with.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Melchora
“Tandang Sora” Aquino
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
The way I see things, women
nowadays are more empowered.
They are rising to the top and are
more inclined to establish their
rights. The challenge, however,
may be that they are losing their
values and identity. They might be
too empowered to care… they may
be too strong to have a character.

Glenda Tibe
Bonifacio

Associate Professor, University of
Lethbridge
Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? My book on Pinay
on the Prairies: Filipino Women
and Transnational Identities (UBC
Press 2013)
What is the global impact of

your work? This book outlines
the history of Filipino migration
to Canada and the factors that
shape contemporary global labor
diaspora. It is the first published
work discussing the lived realities
of Filipina migrant workers and
immigrants in the prairie provinces
in Canada; the first to include the
contribution of Filipino women in
their communities as volunteers,
leaders, and agents of change. The
book uses “Pinay peminism” as
a theoretical frame of analyzing
the transnational lives of Filipino
women in Canada.
What’s the best part of being
a Filipina woman leader? The
respect and recognition of being
Filipino.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Social constructs
of a Filipino woman in a foreign
country. The assumption that all
Filipino women work in only one
occupation.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
Professor Emiritus Josefa Saniel,
Asian Center, University of the
Philippines Diliman. She influenced
my career path as a graduate
student in the Philippines.
What is the most significant barrier
to female leadership from your
experience? Leaders are made; thus
barriers do not exist as they form
leaders through such experiences.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Human rights
lawyer
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Universal human rights
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Eradicate prejudice
and discrimination
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
For an international scholarship
What’s the best thing about
the Philippines? Culture and
collectivism
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?

Filipino women are independent,
kind-hearted, and passionate about
the issues they embrace. They can
surpass any challenge that befalls
them.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: Continue to
be role models in your respective
professions and communities. It is
only in doing that we can inspire
others to be the Filipina we all
aspire to be anywhere in the world.

Melissa
Orquiza

Composer, Musician, Walt Disney
Studios
Los Angeles, California
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? I’ve received a song
writing credit in McFarland, USA
by Walt Disney Studios starring
Kevin Costner. I was fortunate to
be part of a film celebrating the
immigrant dream. The director is
Niki Caro, from Latin American
heritage, raised in New Zealand.
As a Filipino raised in the US, I’ve
felt very fortunate to have used my
musical abilities in a meaningful
story.
What is the global impact of your
work? My biggest sustainable
contribution is being a voice of
change. Major orchestras and the
intellectual community need to
see that the staid, composer of

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41

Western classical music should
be questioned. The Philippines is
a cultural melting pot, melodies
steeped with conflict, dreams, love,
and the unquestionable pursuit of
something bigger. The world needs
to include the Filipino community
in their portrayal of a musical
Asian, Spanish, or Pacific Islander
musical mythology.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: There are almost
no Filipina women working in film
music.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why?
My professors helped shape my
inspired worldview of music and
my previous bosses helped shape
my reality of music.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership from
your experience? The status quo
dictates that female leaders are rare
and rarely succeed in Hollywood.
What was your very first paid
job? Intern, Fox Music Publishing,
$8.00 an hour in 1997.
If you could start over,
what would you do? I’d be
an entrepreneur combining
neuroscience and technology to
integrate compassion in everyday
life.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? A
liberal immigration policy
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
Opportunity, Los Angeles.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Family values
What do you read? Everything.
Wall Street Journal, CNN, The
Atlantic, etc.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
I enjoy facemasks and solitude.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Don’t worry. Everything
will come out alright. Believe in
yourself and believe in others. If
someone else succeeds, it does not
mean you will not. Believe in those
around you. They mean well for
42

you, too.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Henry
Kissinger or Madeleine Albright
What do you think is the biggest
challenge that faces the next
generation of Filipina women?
They need to overcome stereotypes.
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: The status quo
needs to be questioned. Don’t be
shy and speak up.

Ramona
S. Diaz

Filmmaker, CineDiaz
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? As an independent
filmmaker, I’m an entrepreneur.
Every film is a start-up. Every time
I finish a film, it’s a public offering.
I can say that every public offering
is an accomplishment of which I’m
proud.
What is the global impact of
your work? I make films about
the Filipino experience for a
global audience. We are often
represented as minor characters,
even in our own narratives. We
seldom see ourselves represented
on the screen in a lead role. I hope
to be impactful by changing those
expectations and bringing our
experiences to a global, mainstream

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

audience.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Upending
expectations and stereotypes.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Being a woman
in the film industry is challenging
enough. Being a woman of color
in the film industry is a double
whammy. Every day is about
making myself visible and heard.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? I pick
one group of people - my mentors
and teachers at Stanford where I
went to grad school. They helped
me discover my voice and validated
it. They emphasized that content
is just as important as craft, if not
more so.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership
from your experience? We tend
to willingly give our power away
too easily because we’re afraid to be
called the “b word”. I think once
I realized that leadership was not
necessarily a popularity contest,
it was liberating. I’m not saying
it gave me license to act badly, it
just helped me walk away from
the dissent and stand my ground
gracefully.
What was your very first paid
job? I was a Writer’s Assistant on
the 80’s television series Remington
Steele starring Pierce Brosnan and
Stephanie Zimbalist produced by
MTM Productions in Los Angeles.
I was in my early twenties and was
paid $250 a week, gross.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Museum Curator
If you could run the world,
what one law would you enact?
Universal health care and equal pay
for women.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Write entire
narratives in my head and beam
it onto a hard drive in perfect
publishable Pulitzer prize-winning
form.
If you no longer live in the
Philippines, why did you leave?
I left for undergrad and returned
to the Philippines for a few years

in the late eighties. I returned for
graduate school, married and had a
child in America. Children ground
you in ways literal and spiritual.
What’s the best thing about
the Philippines? Friends with
whom you’re not always starting
explanations with “in the
Philippines…”
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: I’m shy.
Which living woman do you most
admire? Too many to name just
one. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi or
Maya Lin are two who come to
mind.
What do you read? All sorts fiction, non-fiction, short stories,
essays.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Speak up. Your voice is
meant to be heard.
Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Maria
Montessori and Sylvia Plath
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Marina Abramovic or Hillary
Clinton
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My biggest
legacy is my films, which I hope
speaks for themselves.

Vina Lustado

Founder/Owner, SolHaus Design
Ojai, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

would that be? First, receiving
an international fellowship from
American Council on Germany.
Building and designing my own
Tiny House for $40,000.
What is the global impact of your
work? I have been very fortunate
to have my Tiny House featured in
countless publications all over the
world (ie: television, magazines,
and architecture books). The appeal
of the tiny house movement is
definitely gaining traction. As a
result, I have helped people from
Korea, Australia, US and Europe
to design and build their own
tiny house. I receive notes from
strangers, almost daily, how my
house have inspired them to live
smaller, live intentionally, and
with more meaning in their lives.
Beyond the practical benefits, living
smaller has makes a big difference
in minimizing environmental
impact and providing a model for
alternative housing developments.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? I think
women have a biological need to
nurture and empower others. As
a minority woman in a typically
male dominated field, I’m proud
to represent a woman from the
Philippines, and hopefully inspire
other Filipinas to become leaders
as well.
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Arne
Steffen is an architect with whom
I worked in 2002 to research
sustainable and affordable housing
for the international fellowship by
American Council on Germany.
During that time, I lived in
Germany for three months, living
like a local and learning to speak
German to gather data for the
research. My eyes were wide open
to a different way of living. Not only
did I learn about architecture, I also
learned that sustainability must
be a way of life, rather than a byproduct of marketing strategies. It
was an eye-opening experience that
would greatly influence my views
of architecture as a profession- that

good design should be socially and
environmentally responsible.
What was your very first paid
job? Baskin Robbins ice cream
store at 13 year old, minimum wage
at maybe $5/hr.
If you had another career, what
would that be? I think my other
career would be related to travel
and helping others experience
other cultures. The time I spent in
Europe, at hostels and B&B’s really
opened my eyes. It allowed me
to see how we are all connected,
and how we can all benefit from
learning from other cultures. I have
often thought about designing or
owning a small hotel and becoming
a host for international travelers.
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? One of
the major challenges with the tiny
house movement is the minimum
size for a legal full time residence
(usually 400-500sf). I would change
building and zoning codes to allow
for small dwellings (200sf or less)
as permanent legal dwellings. I
would also remove/minimize the
restrictions for greywater usage,
and legalize composting toilets.
We need to take immediate action
to mitigate the water crisis in
California.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? I believe my
superpower is the ability to connect
with people, especially those from
totally different backgrounds.
To enable this in others can
have meaningful benefits. With
my superpower, I would create
alternative housing developments,
such as tiny house communities, to
inspire connection with others in
the community, to promote shared
resources and shared economy.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in a small town in Ojai,
California, just 2 hours north of Los
Angeles. All my life, after years of
moving and traveling, I searched
for a place to call home. With
unconventional values, I didn’t
quite fit into most places… until I

discovered Ojai with its magical,
beautiful landscape. The small town
embraces differences in people,
and encourages art, spirituality and
innovation.
Which living woman do you most
admire? I most admire all women
who live under extreme oppression,
such as women in Afghanistan.
What do you read? Cradle to
Cradle by William McDonough
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Being out in nature is my favorite
way of taking care of myself. It
nourishes my soul. Backpacking,
biking, rock climbing, or hiking.
Another important practice is yoga.
It helps balance my mind and my
body.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Stay authentic to who
you are. Listen to that inner voice
coming from your heart. At first,
you may not be clear on who that
person is, but if you listen carefully,
it will become clearer and clearer.
Embrace change and vulnerability,
it will empower you to do great
things.
If you could have dinner with
an amazing woman - who would
she be? Rose Mercurio – CEO of
Patagonia
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: My legacy
would be to create a model for
affordable and sustainable housing
in the Philippines. My vision is to
use prefabricated modular building
components. This would minimize
construction cost and reduce
construction time.

April
Veneracion Ang

Legislative Aide
Supervisor Jane Kim, Board of
Supervisors City and County of San
Francisco
Oakland, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or
influential action that makes you
very proud from your body of
work, what would that be? I am
proud to work as a social change
leader with Supervisor Jane Kim
of San Francisco’s Sixth District.
I have worked in the South of
Market and District Six for over
10 years. The South of Market is a
dynamic, changing neighborhood
that has also been the home to San
Francisco’s Filipino community
since the 1950s. I am excited
to work on solutions to ensure
new development is equitable
and inclusive of SoMa’s historic
populations who often times are
vulnerable and left out of the
benefits of new development. Some
pivotal wins include preserving
300 rental controlled units that
were slated for demolition, the
creation of a $30 million South of
Market Community Stabilization
Fund and negotiating a 40%
affordable housing commitment
from the San Francisco Giant’s
waterfront development-- the
highest commitment to date in San
Francisco.
What is the global impact of your
work? I help foster dialogue among

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43

Policymakers & Visionaries
people with different interests to
come up with mutually beneficially
solutions. This is important as we
continue to see division rather
than unity to solve problems. It
is through this dialogue that we
develop the best solutions.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? Being
a woman leader gives me the
opportunity to connect with other
successful and brilliant women
young and old. It is through these
relationships, many of them present
here today, that I continue to be
motivated to pursue social change
work.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: Balancing work
and family. This isn’t necessarily a
challenge faced solely by Filipina
women. Our perspective as
women is important at the highest
levels of leadership, where often
the demands on our time are
the greatest. I know for me, my
participation as a woman leader is
not possible without the support of
both my work and home families.
I am lucky enough to work in an
amazing all-female office where
my boss understands this balance
and where my colleagues support
one another to be our best selves
at work and with our families. At
home, my husband and my parents
provide our family with the stability
and care to allow me to thrive and
be my best at the workplace.
ONE person who influenced your
professional career? Why? My
first job right out of college was as a
Fellow at the Greenlining Institute.
This is where I first learned about
strategy, coalition building and
building power in the fight for
racial and economic justice. John
Gamboa was the Executive Director
of the Greenlining Institute and my
first supervisor. He was demanding
and pushed me to reach beyond
what I thought was possible.
We often had meetings with
legislators, bank CEOs and high
level executives. I remember even
meeting with Alan Greenspan, the
44

Chairman of the Federal Reserve
at the time. John Gamboa taught
me that my voice and perspective
was just as important as anyone
else sitting at the table, even Alan
Greenspan. This was amazing
experience and knowledge for
me as a young person. John also
believed in people of color forming
coalitions and supporting each
other. He started the Greenlining
Multi-ethnic Leadership Academy.
To this day, the people that I met at
the Greenlining Institute continue
to be my best friends, confidants
and professional support network.
Supervisor Kim, whom I work
for and Trina Villanueva, another
awardee tonight are both alumnae
of the program.
What was your very first paid
job? Processing pictures at a family
friend’s 1-hour photo business. I
was 12 or 13 years old. I was paid
enough to afford me a sense of
freedom at that young age. I could
buy an ice cream scoop or lip gloss
from the drug store without having
to ask my parents.
Which living woman do you most
admire? My mom. Growing up
my mom used to subscribe to a
magazine called Working Woman.
She taught me to work hard and
value work outside of the home.
What do you read? I gobble up
all the local news and blogs. My
husband makes fun of me because
I sometimes don’t know what’s
going on nationally. I am currently
reading Thich Nhat Han, Creating
a Home Meditation Practice and
Gordon Chin’s book Building
Community, Chinatown Style, A
Half Century of Leadership in San
Francisco Chinatown.
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to
you? Starting a yoga practice,
monthly massages, creating clear
boundaries-- something I am
constantly working on.
What is one piece of advice that
you would give to your 20-year
old self? Consider working for the
City and County of San Francisco.

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

Which historical figure would you
like to have coffee with? Grace
Lee Boggs, an Asian American
activist that recently passed away on
October 5th.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Stella Abrera recently promoted
first Filipina principal dancer for
American Ballet Theatre.

Lorna
G. Schofield

United States District Judge for the
Southern District of New York
New York, New York, USA
Lorna G. Schofield was
confirmed by a unanimous U.S.
Senate vote as a United States
District Judge for the Southern
District of New York on December
13, 2012. She is the first FilipinoAmerican to serve as an Article III
federal judge.
Previously, Judge Schofield
was a litigation partner at the
international law firm of Debevoise
& Plimpton LLP from 1991 to
2011. Judge Schofield’s practice
focused on litigation in complex
commercial matters usually on
behalf of large multinational
corporations. Her practice
included the defense of companies
and individuals in regulatory and
white collar criminal investigations.
She also conducted internal

and independent investigations
on behalf of companies, their
Boards of Directors and Audit
Committees. On the civil side,
she represented clients in private
disputes, including class actions,
corporate bankruptcies, business
fraud, professional liability and
commercial disputes.
Judge Schofield is an experienced
trial attorney, building on the trial
experience she gained as a federal
prosecutor. Her trials include the
successful defense of celebrity Rosie
O’Donnell at trial in a $100 million
lawsuit brought by the former
publishers of Rosie magazine and a
class action jury trial for one of the
Big Four accounting firms in which
the jury returned a favorable verdict
after only thirty minutes.
Judge Schofield was an associate
at Cleary Gottlieb Steen &
Hamilton LLP from 1981 to 1984,
where she worked on the Philippine
debt restructuring. From 1984
to 1988, Judge Schofield served
as an Assistant US Attorney in
the Criminal Division of the US
Attorney’s Office for the Southern
District of New York.
She is a former chair of the
American Bar Association Section
of Litigation, an organization in
which she held many leadership
positions over twenty years. Judge
Schofield has written and spoken
frequently about trial tactics and
women in the legal profession.
Judge Schofield received her B.A.
magna cum laude from Indiana
University and her J.D. from New
York University, where she was an
editor of the New York University
Law Review.

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

Keeper of the Flame

Luisa
Vicerra-Blue

Chief Elected Officer, Service
Employees International Union
Local 521
Service Employees International
Union Local 521
Hayward, California, USA
If there is one professional
accomplishment and/or influential
action that makes you very proud
from your body of work, what
would that be? In the early years
of my Union activism, before there
was a name for AIDS and before
the AIDS virus was discovered,
I provided leadership to medical
staff at San Francisco General
Hospital about education on the
deadly disease. I educated hospital
workers, including physicians, on
what was currently known about
the disease, plus the appropriate
precautions hospital staff needed
to take to prevent infection.
I also pointed out that these
patients needed to be treated with
compassion and provided quality
healthcare like all patients and their
families deserved. There was a lot
of homophobia among healthcare
professionals, physicians, nurses,
etc., who at the time, were refusing
to provide care and discriminated
against patients who were gay. The
second body of work I am most
proud of is the years that I spent
in the U.S. organizing workers
into the Union for a collective
voice at work, dignity and respect
for the work they do everyday,

having a decent wage in order to
raise their families and a safe and
respectful working environment.
I organized homecare workers,
some of the lowest paid workers
in the U.S., nurses and other
healthcare workers, government
employees and other workers. I
lead the organizing of San Francisco
International Airport screeners
(pre-9/11) which was the largest
group of Asian Pacific Islander
workers ever organized. As Chief
Elected Officer of SEIU Local 521, I
spearheaded API civic engagement
projects in the Vietnamese and
Hmong communities.
What is the global impact of your
work? The global impact of my
work directly impacts workers that
do not have a voice at work, do not
have respect and dignity for the
work they do and impacts wages,
benefits and working conditions.
Over 50% of workers in this
country make less than $15/hour,
have no benefits, even paid sick
days. 20% of U.S. children live in
poverty. As the richest country in
the world, this is not right. Multinational corporations that make
billions of dollars off the backs of
workers have gone unchecked and
have made it worse for working
families in third world countries.
Uniting workers throughout the
world builds power for families
and raises their voices to fight for
justice.
What’s the best part of being a
Filipina woman leader? The best
part for me is being part of the
rich union history of Filipinos in
the U.S. and being one of the few
Filipina labor leaders in the U.S.
that can lead and make change.
Workplace challenge as a Filipina
woman and why: The challenge
continues to be discrimination
ONE person who influenced
your professional career? Why? I
would have to say Pat Jackson, who
was the Executive Secretary of my
first Union, SEIU Local 400.
What is the most significant
barrier to female leadership

fromyour experience? The most
significant barrier to female
leadership is being given the
opportunity to lead.
What was your very first paid
job? I was 16 yrs. old and worked
part time as a waitress, made a little
over $5/hr.
If you had another career, what
would that be? Travel agent
If you could run the world, what
one law would you enact? A law
that all workers would have the
right to form a union; all workers
would make a living wage with
benefits so they can raise their
families and retire in dignity.
If you had super powers, what
would you do? Fly so I could visit
countries when I want and it would
be so cheap!
What’s the best thing about the
Philippines? The resilience of the
people in the face of challenges.
What’s the best thing about
where you live now? What city?
I live in Hayward, California and
the best thing is that it is a diverse
working class city.
ONE Filipino custom or tradition
you would like to pass on to
others: Respect of your elders
The ONE thing that we would not
guess about you: That I could have
been a tagger
Which living woman do you most
admire? Myrtle Witbooi, a leader
of Domestic Workers in South
Africa & internationally
How do you take care of yourself?
What does self-care mean to you?
Take time to smell the flowers.
Self-care to me means taking time
to unwind and not think about the
next thing you have to do for work.
If you could have dinner with an
amazing woman - who would she
be? Dolores Huerta
Your LEGACY for the Filipina
Women’s Network: The work
that I have done in the Union
Movement.

Amar
Bornkamp

Senior Team Manager, Operations
Control, Charles Schwab
Union City, California, USA
Amar Bornkamp is a Senior
Team Manager in Operations
Control at Charles Schwab. Amar
has been with Schwab for a total
of 21 ½ years, and in her tenure
has led teams in Corporate
Actions, Cash Control, and Access
& Entitlements. She currently
manages a team in Orlando,
Phoenix, and India, that manages
oversight and controls over firm
applications/systems in order to
prevent employee fraud and protect
clients and firm assets. She majored
in Business Administration and has
over 30 years of experience in the
financial industry.
She is passionate about
developing others to their full
potential and helping them
advance in their careers. As a cochairperson of the Asian Pacific
Islander Network at Schwab
(APINS), she coordinates and puts
together career development events
that focus on how to overcome
issues and challenges AsianAmericans and Pacific Islanders
face in the work force. In putting
together these events she’s worked
with other companies and Asian
non-profit organizations like
Ascend and FWN.

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

45

Legacy 2.0 Mothers & Daughters
She also serves on the School
Board of St. Bede Catholic School
in Hayward and is the chairperson
of their Enrollment Committee. As
a member of the St. Bede parish
she has been teaching catechism
for almost 15 years. She teaches
3rd and 4th grade parishioners
who are preparing to do their First
Reconciliation and receive their
First Communion. As a catechist,
she’s not only giving back to the
church and community, but also
living out her childhood dream of
being a teacher.
Amar has two sons, and when
she’s not spending time with her
husband and two boys, she enjoys
spending time with her extended
family, reading, watching movies,
and planning events and parties.
She’s also a big sports fan and a big
fan of the SF Giants, SF 49ers, and
Golden State Warriors.

Global FWN100™ 2009 Awardee and FWN Board
Member Nini Alvero and her daughter, Raissa Alvero

DISRUPT BOOK
READING
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Maria Roseni
“Nini” M. Alvero

Raissa Alvero

FWN Board Member, Commercial
Counselor of the Philippine
Embassy’s Commercial Section
(Philippine Trade and Investment
Center)
Quezon City, Philippines
Maria Roseni “Nini” M. Alvero is
the current Commercial Counselor
of the Philippine Embassy’s
Commercial Section (Philippine
Trade and Investment Center).
She has more than thirty years of
government service experience,
serving in various capacities at the
Department of Trade and Industry
in the fields of economic research;
industry and trade policy; export
marketing and investment promotion; and the bilateral and multilateral government-to-government
relations.
She is a seasoned diplomat with
former foreign stints in France,
Canada, China and the US (Los
Angeles, San Francisco, and a second term in Washington, DC).
As a Foreign Trade and
Investment Officer, she has established a track record in establishing fruitful connections among
business individuals and companies
between her foreign post of assignment and the home country.

Global FWN100™ 2015 Awardee Emmie Ortega
Anderson and her daughter Jaymie Anderson Tyau

46

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

Filipina Women’s Network Fellow
2015-2016
Communications Director,
Douglas Udell Gallery
Visual Artist Advocate and
Consultant
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Raissa Alvero is delighted to be
the new Filipina Women’s Network
Fellow (2015-2016) and Editor of
the ePahayagan. With a special
interest in communications and
project management, she looks
forward to harnessing and developing her professional skills amidst
a community of supportive and
inclusive Filipina women.
Raissa is a visual arts industry
professional based in Montreal,
Canada. She moved to Vancouver
from the San Francisco Bay Area
in 2006 to attend the University
of British Columbia where she received a BA in Art History. In 2012,
she served as the Associate Director
of the Douglas Udell Gallery
Vancouver. Following the October
2014 closure of the Vancouver
gallery, she became the Director of
Communications for Douglas Udell
Gallery Edmonton. In addition to
her work in the gallery capacity, she
is also an independent Visual Artist
Advocate and Consultant.

Singapore
Organizer: Dr Astrid S. Tuminez,
Regional Director, Legal and
Corporate Affairs (Southeast
Asia), Microsoft; Adjunct
Professor, Lee Kuan Yew School
of Public Policy
His Excellency Mr Antonio A.
Morales, Ambassador of the
Philippines to Singapore
LKY School’s Gender and Policy
student group
Rockefeller Foundation
Tokyo, Japan
Organizer: Isabelita ManalastasWatanabe, President, Speed
Money Transfer Japan
Embassy of the Republic of the
Philippines in Tokyo
Dr. Fumio Watanabe
Maria Teresa “Marty” M. Timbol
Jeepney Press
Daloy Kayumanggi
The Book Readers
• Dr. Maria Rosario PiqueroBallescas
• Minister and Consul General
Maria Jocelyn R. Tirol-Ignacio
• Third Secretary and Consul
Parwana Paikan
• Dr. Maria Carmelita Zulueta
Kasuya
• Ms. Leith Casel-Schuetz
• Ms. Anita Aquino Sasaki
• Ms. Rowena Gunabe
• Ms. Milena Inocencio-Domingo
• Ms. Josefa Aranjuez Nistal
• Ms. Olga Gorevaya
• Ms. Joanna Joy O. Torreda
Portland, OR
Organizer: Dolly Pangan-Specht
Columbia Distributing
Tambayan
Global Networks – for book
donations given to the readers
Janet LaBar, Doll Pangan-Specht,
and Cynthia Reidy – for book
donations given to 3 young
Pinays
Center for Women and
Leadership, Portland State
University
Department of Anthropology,
Portland State University
Office of Global Diversity
& Inclusion, Portland State
University
The Books Readers
• Dolly Pangan Specht 

• LaVerne B. Brown
• Welo Rivera Cao
• Rae Santos
• Sunny Petit
• Shannon Aniciete
• Nim Xuto
• Malia Gayomali, Elissa Santos,
and Maili Smith

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

DISRUPT-ing Hollywood
Oganizers: Rocio Nuyda, Edwin
and Lani Raquel, Benel Se-Liban,
Jannelle So-Perkins, and Cora
Aragon-Soriano
Filipino American Symphony
Orchestra
GOLD SPONSORS
Island Pacific
Vasquez & Company, LLP
Refresh LA
www.refreshla.com
DONORS
State Farm
Ludivina Lelim
Trinity Foliente
Cora Aragon Soriano
Print Hub USA
Leelin Café and Bakery
IN-KIND DONORS
Feed2Succeed <www.
feed2succeed.com>
White Flower Designs
Holy Spirit Retreat Center
PartyWorks Etc.
Squid Design Copy & Print
VOLUNTEERS
Charina Carrera
Isabella Carrera
Josie Castro
Lutzie Francisco
Rick Gavino
JP Liban
Joy Marino
Mark Pijuan
Elaine Quadra
Erlinda Granada-Sabah
PANEL PARTICIPANTS AT ILA
WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE IN ASILOMAR
AND FILAM BOOK FEST IN SAN
FRANCISCO
Dr Juliet Gabiola
Dr Penelope V. Flores
Dr Maria A. Beebe
LAS VEGAS
Organizers: Gloria Caoile and
Judge Cheryl Moss
Readers: Rozita Lee, Amie
Belmonte, Nadia Jurani, and Luz
Micabalo
MINI-BOOK reading in San Diego
Organizers: Francine Maigue and
Kristine Custodio
Book Reading – Washington, D.C.
Organizers: Philippine
Commercial Counselor Nini
Alvero
Dr. Bambi Lorica, FWN100™ ‘07
Carmen Stull, FWN100™ 09
Philippine Embassy
US Philippine Society

in
an,

N

Luz

ego
and

D.C.

7

DISRUPT Goes Global
international Book LAUNCH Highlights
Continued from Page 14

are truly “public servants”, serving
the people in every way we can, to
the best of our ability. Mabuhay
ang ating Inang Bayan! Mabuhay
ang mga Pilipina nasaan man sila
sa mundo! Banker and author Nina
Aguas sent this message “Living is a
team sport and I believe one cannot
live and journey through life alone.”
Dolly Pangan-Specht (2009
FWN100 US) and Maria Beebe
(2011 FWN100 US and 2013
FWN100 Global, board member,
and book co-editor) organized a
book reading on 5 October 2015
in collaboration with Portland
State University’s Office of Global
Diversity and Inclusion, Department
of Anthropology, and Center for
Women and Leadership. The Asian
Pacific American network of Oregon
(APANO) and the Council of Filipino American Associations (CFAA)
also participated. Global Networks,
Dolly Pangan-Specht, Janet Labar,
and Cynthia Reidy donated books
as gifts to the readers. Tambayan
and Columbia Distributing provided
food and drinks. The event followed
the example of Singapore and Japan
of inviting community members to
act as readers and following the example of Las Vegas, to invite young
Pinays.
The book was also discussed at a
panel on Women and Leadership, an
International Leadership Association
affinity group in Asilomar on 9 May
2015 and at the PAWA FilAm Book
Fest in San Francisco on 3 October
2015. The panelists -- Penelope V.
Flores, Juliet Gabiola, and Maria
Beebe who wrote chapters for the
book discussed the stories behind
their chapters.
In his review of the book,
Portland State University emeritus
professor Leonard Cain averred
that “Filipina women are offering
the world a way to excel, with the
potential of promoting peace and

prosperity for all humankind.” As
the first FWN book on leadership,
plans are underway to do a DISRUPT 2.0 and a book focusing on
leadership across generations.

pioneering
success

About Dr. Maria Beebe

At AT&T, we’re proud of the groundbreaking women who help
shape our company today and continue to lead us into tomorrow.
We salute the Filipina Women’s Network for
its outstanding leadership development
programs for women throughout the world.

Dr. Maria Beebe is an applied
socio-linguist who specializes in
critical discourse analysis, women’s
leadership, and information communication technologies (ICT) for
development.

© 2015 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved.

Order DISRUPT on Amazon.com

L E G AC Y 2 . 0 : M OT H E R S & DAU G H T E R S N E X T G E N E R AT I O N L E A D E R S

47

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FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

www.FilipinaWomensNetwork.org

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