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Teacher Education Program

Daily Lesson Plan


Teacher Candidates Name: Jessalyn Rowlee
Preliminary Information
Lesson 1 of 2.

Date: December 4, 2015

Grade: 8th/9th
Number of Students: 12

Course/Subject: Algebra 1A

Unit/Theme: Proportions - Percent Problems

Period/Time: 4th Period


Estimated Duration: 35 minutes

Where in the unit does this lesson occur?

Structure(s) or grouping for the lesson


(Check any that apply) (Double click box to activate

(Double click box to activate check mark.)

check mark.)

Beginning of the unit


****Middle of the unit****
End of the unit

****Whole class****

Small group
One-to-one
Other: Specify:

For which assignment is this being submitted? Please indicate course name (339 or 407) and
specific assignment title (i.e., Site Lesson 1): TED 339 - Site Lesson 1

What are your goals for student learning, and


why are they appropriate for these students at this time?
Respond to each in the spaces provided.

Big Idea or Concept Being Taught

What is the essential question students will be able to answer after the lesson is complete?

Essential Question: How do we set up proportions to solve percent problems?


Rationale/Context

Why is this lesson at this time; how does it connect to previous or succeeding lessons? OR Why is this an
appropriate topic for an advisory session?

Ratios and Proportions were taught previous to this lesson. Since proportions and percent
problems are so very closely related, this is the perfect time to introduce the percent
problems.

TED Lesson Plan Template Updated 2014-08-13(Churchill) for edTPA

Prior Knowledge and Conceptions

What knowledge and/or skills must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

Students must know the terms and be able to carry out problems using: cross multiplication,
proportions, ratios, solving for a variable.
Student Learning Objective(s)

Identify 1 or 2 student learning objectives. Begin your objectives with: The students will be able to .
Remember: these are NOT activities. Activities are used to assist students with reaching the learning
objectives.

Students will be able to set up various percent problems and solve for the missing variable.
How you will communicate the learning objectives to students?

The essential question will be written on the board so that students know what they will be
learning that day.
Expectations for Student Learning

What are your expectations for student performance in meeting the learning objectives? Specifically, describe
expectations for each of the following types of student performance: exceeds expectations, meets
expectations, and below expectations performance. Please note that this does not address student behavior;
instead, it addresses student performance as they strive to reach learning objective expectations. Include a
rubric with criterion for each: exceeds, meets, and below. REMEMBER: You are measuring the learning
objectives, not student behavior or student participation.

Exceeds expectations: Student shows all work, is able to set up all percent problems and
solves problems without error.
Meets expectations: Student is able to set up most percent problems and solves with few
errors (simple multiplication/division error, missed a negative, etc.)
Below expectations: Student is not able to set up percent problems and therefore cannot
solve them without errors.
Evidence and Assessment of Student Learning

How will you know whether students are making progress toward your learning goal(s), and/or how will you
assess the extent to which they have met your goal(s)? Hint: use academic language such as (but not limited to)
monitor, formative, summative, and observe. Be certain you are accessing the progress of ALL
students. Some formative strategies will not allow for effective concurrent monitoring of every student.

The first form of assessment will be within the first few minutes of the lesson. I will have
students start with a little refresher of proportions by having them solve for a missing
variable. This formative assessment will be observed to be sure that students understand
proportions. I will check with each of the students to be sure they have the correct
answer before we move on.
I will also use observation to be sure students are understanding the lesson throughout the
example problems as formative assessment. This will tell me if students are understanding
the material or if there is something that should be discussed more in depth.
The last form of assessment I will use is also formative. It will be a homework assignment
given to them from the book. This assignment will be turned in the following day to be
graded, but before it is turned in we will go over any questions the students may have
since this was the first day they had learned specifically about percent problems.
Student Feedback

How will you provide students with feedback? Use academic language within your response.

Throughout the lesson I will provide students with feedback by observation of their
responses or work. I will let students know if they are on the right track, if they missed
something simple (like a multiplication error, or flipping is/of), or if they need redirection. I
will guide them to the correct answers and the understanding that they need in order to
successfully solve percent problems.

Standards

List the standards that are most aligned with your learning objectives. Clearly identify if you are using
Wisconsin Academic Standards or CCS.

Common Core State Standards for Mathematics


Ratios and Proportional Relationships - 6.RP
3. Use ratio and reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by
reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, table diagrams, double number line diagrams,
or equations.
c. Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100
times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and a percent.
Academic Language

Identify academic language, particular words/phrases that are essential to understanding the content of this
lesson. In other words, what academic language must students already know to be successful with this lesson?

Ratio, Cross Multiplication, Proportion, Percent (Students should be familiar with this word,
but we will go into more detail in the lesson)

How will you support students to meet your goals?


Respond to each in the spaces provided.

Launch/Hook

How will you get the lesson started? What questions, texts, inquiry, modeling, and/or other techniques will
you use to engage students? REMEMBER: This is the 60 seconds at the start of the lesson that grabs attention
and bridges prior learning with the new content.

Before we start anything take out a piece of paper for your notes. You may want a
calculator as well. Earlier this week, you learned how to solve proportions. What can you
tell me about proportions? (Student feedback, they may need to be guided using these
questions as well: what does a proportion look like? how do we solve for the variable in
proportions?)
Today we will be doing the EXACT SAME THING. You already know how to do it, but were
going to add a little bit of a spin with percents to it. Lets do a problem to review from
earlier this week. Take some time to solve this problem:
3/100=21/m
Explore

How will students engage with ideas/texts to develop understandings; what questions will you ask; how will
you promote question generation/discussion; how will you address the academic language demands; detail your
plan.
This section should read like a cookbook. A guest teacher should be able to take this section and
duplicate your entire lesson.

Before we start anything take out a piece of paper for your notes. Earlier this week, you
learned how to solve proportions. What can you tell me about proportions? (Student
feedback, they may need to be guided using these questions as well: what does a
proportion look like? how do we solve for the variable in proportions?)
Today we will be doing the EXACT SAME THING. You already know how to do most of it, but
were going to add a little bit of a spin with percents. Lets do a problem to review from
earlier this week. Take some time to show your work and solve this problem:
3/100=21/m
When you have an answer raise your hand so I can come by and check it.
As students work to solve this problem, I (the teacher) will walk around to check their
answers and help to correct where they may have went wrong, if necessary.
The problem you just solved is exactly what the problems will look like that we will work
to solve today.
What do we know about the word percent? Consider breaking down the word into per and
cent.
(After students respond with their guesses, write these things down on the board for them
to copy: Per-Divide, Cent-100; percent gives you a ratio out of 100)
Now that we know what percent means, we can write it as a ratio. How do we write 83% as
a ratio? [83/100]. How do we write 207% as a ratio? [207/100].
When we set up percent problems using proportions, we use this guideline:
%/100=is/of [Write whats in bold on board.]
Lets do some examples: *More examples could be added as necessary*
What percent of 136 is 51?
Well start with what we know from the problem. Where would we put the 136 and 51 when
we set up this proportion? [Underline of 136, circle is 51.] Where would we put the x in the
equation?
x/100=51/136 Then solve.
What number is 45% of 92?
Lets start by underlining/circling the parts that go together. What clue goes with the
number 92? [Underline of 92.] How about the is? What number goes with that? [The
number we are finding, so is would be replaced with a variable.] What do we do with 45%?
[Write as 45/100 and set equal to the other ratio.]
45/100=x/92 Then solve.
50 is 125% of what number?
Take a minute to try to set up this problem
[After students get a minute to set up this problem, go over the answer on the board.]
125/100=50/x Then solve.
*Extra Examples - if needed* (Write on the board and have students set them up)
What percent of 25 is 17?
What number is 15% of 88?
20 is 12.5% of what number?
Finally, lets take a survey of your favorite kinds of pasta.
Your options are: Spaghetti, Lasagna, Mac & Cheese, Fett. Alfredo, Other
How can we use the survey results to find what percent of the class likes each of the types
of pasta? Lets find the percents for each of the pasta options. What should our percents
add up to? [100%]

Closure

How will you bring closure to the lesson? Do not merely state you would release the students to their next
class.

I would use this ending of the lesson as the closure.


Finally, lets take a survey of your favorite kinds of pasta.
Your options are: Spaghetti, Lasagna, Mac & Cheese, Fett. Alfredo, Other
How can we use the survey results to find what percent of the class likes each of the types
of pasta? Lets find the percents for each of the pasta options. What should our percents
add up to? [100%]
Then I would assign them a homework assignment to be turned in the next day. They would
be free to work together and ask questions if necessary. We would go over a couple
problems they have questions about before it is turned in.
Differentiation/Extension

How will you provide successful access to the key concepts by all students at their ability levels?

From what I have observed, these students are all at about the same level. In order to
successfully gain the key concepts, it may be helpful to allow students to use calculators if
necessary. The calculator will not give them the answer unless they have the proportion set
up correctly, which is really the main concept of this lesson.
What Ifs

Be proactive. Anticipate what might not go as planned with the lesson; what will you do about it?

What if
students are not understanding the material or dont understand the proportion using
percents? At this point I will go over the main idea with them again [%/100=is/of] and go
through more examples. It may also be helpful to go back to the example of the very first
proportion solved (intro/hook) and remind them that they are simply solving the same
kinds of proportions that they have been solving all week.
students are understanding the material and do not need all the examples I have
prepared? I would not skip the problems, but I would have the students work individually
on the problems rather than doing each one as a class. Then make sure students have
gotten the correct answers or know where they may have went wrong.
Resources and Materials

Identify all resources and materials used for this lesson.

Teacher
Whiteboard
Whiteboard Markers
Student
Paper
Something to write with
Calculator
Book for homework assignment