You are on page 1of 51

Exploring the Music of Indonesia: A Spiral

Curriculum Approach for Elementary General


Music
Torrey DAngelo
Masters Exit Exam
Spring 2016

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
Overview..3
Rationale. 3
Outline.5
LESSON PLANS
Kindergarten...9
Second Grade....12
Second Grade II....14
First Grade....15
FIFTH GRADE EXTENDED UNIT
Lesson 1.19
Lesson 2.21
Lesson 3.24
Lesson 4.26
Lesson 5.29
RESOURCES, REFERENCES AND POTENTIAL FUNDING PLAN
Resources...32
References..33
Funding..34
APPENDIX.36
Powerpoint from 5th Grade Unit

Exploring the Music of Indonesia: A Spiral Curriculum Approach For


Elementary General Music
Overview: This curriculum intends to incorporate the music and culture of Indonesia into
an elementary (K-5) school music curriculum that is sequential and appropriate for each
grade level leading up the a final fifth grade exploration on authentic Balinese gamelan
instruments featured in a performance that includes a class composition based on the
traditions of Balinese music. This curriculum takes a spiral approach throughout the
grade levels, with skills and repertoire building upon one another.
Rationale This curriculum aims to teach Indonesian (Balinese and Javanese) music and
culture over the course of six years (K-5) in order to fully integrate students into the
culture to the best of my ability. A spiral curriculum approach will be taken to ensure that
students revisit the music of Indonesia year after year. Ideally, I would integrate several
other cultures into my curriculum in the same way. My philosophy on music teaching and
learning is most strongly influenced by the writings and teachings of Zoltan Kodly. As a
proponent of a student-centered, developmentally appropriate Kodly and Orff based
curriculum, I know that teaching Indonesian music will fit perfectly into my other ideas
for an elementary school curriculum. Kodlys thoughts on teaching world music are best
reflected in this quote: "If we want to understand other nations, we first must understand
ourselves. There is no better means for this than folk music. Getting acquainted with the
folk songs of other countries is the best way to get acquainted with other peoples on
this foundation can be built a musical culture which is national but which also opens the
soul to the great works of all peoples (Kodly Institute of the Liszt Fenerc Academy of
Music, 2014)." I hope to incorporate the folk songs and music of other cultures into my
curriculum in the same way that I hope to teach the folk music of the United States, from

the very beginning. As Shehan-Campbell states, almost all elements that general music
teachers hope to teach can be taught through world music as well (Shehan-Campbell,
1992, 31-2). I hope to present all music in a way that is engaging and fun for the students
from the very beginning. Volk describes this method of learning as the Pete Seeger
approach: students sing songs and enjoy music first then learn about the cultural context
(Volk, 21). This approach could also be described as exploratory, or enactive learning,
and is a preferred method of learning in standard Kodly methodology.
As a teacher, I hope to foster creativity in my classroom. Music composition is a
valuable tool for students to learn musical concepts while engaging their own creativity.
Students can create their own world music as well by learning about the characteristics
of the musical cultures they are studying and applying and these aspects towards creating
their own music within that framework. Shehan-Campbell describes this process as, an
instructional aim, where the creative process is a means to the ultimate goal of
understanding the music expressions of the worlds cultures.(Campbell, 2004, 198)
Teaching world music can fit well into the student-centered model of teaching. I strive
for students to be in charge of their music making and learning experiences. I hope to
foster an environment where students make their own musical decisions and feel engaged
and invested in the materials presented to them. Barretts ethnography of Professor Amy
Gwinn-Becker provides a glimpse into a democratic, student-centered classroom that
fosters creativity and collaboration. This great model of a general music classroom is
something that has stuck with me and will influence my decisions as a music educator. I
am inspired by the collaboration of students in learning the music of other cultures and

their eagerness to learn because of the environment which Professor Gwinn-Becker


created for the students.
Music education, and particularly world music education, has the potential to
expand across other disciplines. One can imagine that world music could fit well into
other subjects such as history, literature, and art. This cohesion of subjects can provide
students with a rich cultural context. Beegle contends that teaching world music
promotes, the interdisciplinary theme of global awareness and the cultural skills that
students need in order to navigate the complex life and work environments in the
globally competitive information age might best be addressed through the inclusion of
world music. The inclusion of world music in the general music curriculum can help to
prepare students in practical ways.
My ultimate goal as a music teacher is not only to create students who are capable
musicians, but people who are able to empathize and understand one another. I strongly
believe the best way to do this is to fully immerse students into other cultures as well as
their own. Reimer contends that music and culture are inextricably tied; he argues that
music, defined as the meaningful organization of sounds, is present in each culture, but
that music from around the world is context specific (Reimer, 170). For this reason, I
hope to teach musical concepts through world music, as well as supply students with the
best cultural context I can provide. Reimer describes music as universal to all humans
(170), and teaching the music of many cultures can help lead to this understanding of
humanity, even if not addressed explicitly.
Outline: Indonesian music will be taught at all grade levels Kindergarten through
grade 5 through mini-units (3-4 lessons per year).

Kindergarten: Students will learn the song Tik Tik TIk Bunyi Hujan (The Sound
of Rain), Burung Hantu (the Owl), and Lihat Kebunku (The Garden) all from Mama
Lisas World Website. These are all Indonesian childrens folk songs. The Students will
learn the songs by rote. The students will be introduced to the location of Indonesia, learn
about the many islands, and the climate of Indonesia, and the plants and animals from
Indonesia especially because these are demonstrated in many songs and folk tales.
First Grade: Students will learn about Wayang, or Javanese Shadow Puppets.
This mini-unit could also be integrated with an art class. Shadow puppets can be printed
from a template and laminated to be more durable. The students will keep their shadow
puppets after the unit is over. The students will listen do a guided listening activity to a
recording of Javanese gamelan ensemble playing a piece called The Pouncing Lion.As
the music is playing, the students will listen for musical characteristics. The students will
hold up paper with two different adjectives at the end of their listening that describes the
piece the just heard. Students will be free to use their own words to describe the music as
well. After the guided listening, the students will create a short story to accompany the
music. Students will use their shadow puppets and perform their own short story!
Second Grade: The students will perform on Angklung instruments. The
students will listen and play traditional Angklung music. I will also arrange and have the
students perform popular music that they like on the angklung. Students will also revisit
the folk songs they learned in kindergarten arranged for the angklung. Some students can
sing, while others play along on the angklung.
Third Grade: The students will play the music of the Javanese Gamelan from
Flowing Waters

Fourth Grade: Students will read the book A Club of Small Men: A Childrens
Tale from Bali by Colin McPhee. The students will recreate the story with music played
on Orff instruments.
Fifth Grade (extended unit): The students will learn a folk melody, Topeng
Keras, on classroom Orff instruments. If at all possible, students will have the chance to
work with a culture bearer and play on authentic instruments. Students will read The
Dancing Pig and compose music in small groups in the style of the Balinese gamelan.

Lesson Plan Samples

Introduction: Kindergarten
Song 1: Tik Tik Tik Bunyi Hujan,and Introduction to Indonesia
NAME: Torrey DAngelo
Central Focus: The students will learn an Indonesian folk song for children, Tik Tik Tik Bunyi Hujan and sing with as much pitch and
rhythmic accuracy as possible.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
26A, Stage A, Tools, 2: Label Environmental sounds
26A, Stage D, Processes, 4: Demonstrate basic vocal and/or instrumental production techniques.
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: Sing songs of various cultures in rhythm maintaining a steady tempo.

Specific Objectives:
26A, Stage A, Tools, 2: By the end of the lesson the students will identify rain-like sounds and create their own sounds to correspond to
rain
26A, Stage D, Processes, 4: By the end of the students will sing as accurately as possible with good posture
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: By the end of the lesson the students will sing a childrens folk song from Indonesia keeping a steady beat.

Materials: Rain stick, lyrics to Tik Tik Tik Bunyi Hujan for the teacher, map of the world with Indonesia highlighted
Sequence:
Est.
Time

Procedures

Assessment

The teacher will explain that the students will be exploring a place very far from home with
sound and music today.
The teacher will ask the students to listen carefully and listen to a rain stick
The teacher will ask the students to raise their hands if they think they what the rain stick
sounded like.
The teacher will ask the students to raise their hands if they can come up with a motion
they think can represent the rain.
The teacher will ask the students to create the sound of rain with their voices.

Assessment for understanding


by watching students create
motions for rain and make the
sound with their voices.

The teacher will say Tik Tik Tik to the students and explain that in Indonesia this is one
way people might represent rain with their voices
The teacher will point out Indonesia on a map. The teacher will explain that Indonesia is
9000 miles away. The teacher will ask the students to tug their ear if they know what an
island is. The teacher will explain that Indonesia is made up thousands of islands, and that
people live on 1000 of the islands. The teacher will explain that there is a lot of rain in

Indonesia, and that there are special forests filled with many types of plants and animals
known as rainforests in Indonesia (this can be a cross-curriculum opportunity?). The
teacher will explain that people sing about the rain in Indonesia since it is such an
important part of life there as it allows for their crops to grow, which provide food for the
people.
The teacher will ask the students to be an echo She will speak the first line of Tik Tik Tik
Bunyi Hujan
The teacher will speak the subsequent lines of text and the students will echo
The teacher will speak the first two lines and the students will echo
The teacher will speak the second two lines and the students will echo.
The teacher will sing the whole song and while keeping a steady beat on her knees. She
will ask the students to keep a steady beat with spider fingers (fingers spread as to not
create noise)
The teacher will ask the students to be an echo. The teacher will sing the first phrase with a
steady beat.
The teacher will sing the second phrase and the students will echo while keeping a steady
beat.
The teacher will sing the first and second phrase and the students will echo while keeping a
steady beat.
The teacher will sing the third phrase and the students will echo while keeping a steady
beat.
The teacher will sing the fourth phrase and the students will echo while keeping a steady
beat.
The students will sing the third and fourth line together
The teacher will sing the whole song and the students will echo while keeping a steady
beat.

The teacher will listen to the


students throughout.

Lyrics:
Tik tik tik bunyi hujan/Tik Tik Tik The Sound of the Rain
Children's Song
(Bahasa Indonesia)
Tik Tik Tik bunyi hujan di atas genteng,
Airnya turun tidak terkira
Cobalah tengok, daun dan ranting,
Pohon dan kebun basah semua.

10

Tik Tik Tik, the sound of the rain on the roof


The water pouring down heavily
Take a look, branches and twigs
Trees and gardens, all dripping wet.

This song will be repeated for the students over the course of the year to enforce concepts of steady beat and
environmental sounds. Other Indonesian folk songs, Burung Hantu (the Owl), and Lihat Kebunku (The Garden)
will be taught later on.

11

Potong Padi (Rice Harvesting Song): Second Grade


First introduction to an Indonesian Rice Harvesting Song
NAME: Torrey DAngelo
Central Focus: This lesson will be the students first exposure to the Indonesian Anklung. The students will relate the pitches to the
solfege system they have been learning. The students will learn a traditional Angklung piece, Potong Padi (Rice Harvesting Song).

Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):


27B, Stage A, 1: Connect images and sounds from a work of art to stories about people and everyday life.
26B, Stage D, Skills,1: Sing or play music that has a difficulty level of a on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate timbre, with a steady
tempo, with good breath, bow, mallet, or fingering control, with clear articulation/diction
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: Sing songs of various cultures in rhythm maintaining a steady tempo

Specific Objectives:
27B, Stage A, 1: By the end of the lesson the students will read and understand the text of Potong Padi (Rice Harvesting Song)
26B, Stage D, Skills 1: Students will sing on pitch and in rhythm on Potong Padi and connect it to the solfege system they have been
working on (although this is not the central focus of the lesson).
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: The students will learn and sing the song Potong Padi by the end of the lesson.

Materials: Set of Angklung Do-Do for students to play, copies for the class of the English translation of Potong Podi.
Sequence:
Est.
Time

Procedures

Assessment

The teacher will hand out a translation of the Indonesian rice harvesting song, Potong Podi.
The teacher will ask the students to read the text and raise their hands once they have
finished reading.
The teacher will ask the students what activity the workers do while cutting the rice.
The teacher tell the students they are going to learn to sing the rice harvesting song
The teacher will hand out the text in Bahasa Indonesia for the students to look at.
The teacher will ask the students to echo her. She will recite the first line of the text and
students will echo.
The teacher will repeat this for the first section of the text.

12

The teacher will recite the first four lines of the text and the students will repeat after her.
The teacher will recite the 5th line of the text and students will repeat
The teacher will do this for the second stanza of text.
The teacher will repeat the second stanza and the students will repeat.
The teacher will say all of the text and students will repeat.
The teacher will sing the whole song for the students.
The teacher will sing the first line of the text and students will echo.
The teacher will repeat the same process for learning the text with singing for the students.
The students will sing the whole song.
Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons: In subsequent lessons the students would repeat playing and singing Potong
Padi. The students would also learn more familiar songs such as Do a Deer and eventually play a transcription of a pop song.

13

Introduction to Angklung: Second Grade


Potong Podi on the Anklung
NAME: Torrey DAngelo
Central Focus: The students will learn an Indonesian rice harvesting song on the angklung
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
27B, Stage A, 1: Connect images and sounds from a work of art to stories about people and everyday life.
26B, Stage D, Skills,1: Sing or play music that has a difficulty level of a on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate timbre, with a steady
tempo, with good breath, bow, mallet, or fingering control, with clear articulation/diction
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: Sing songs of various cultures in rhythm maintaining a steady tempo

Specific Objectives:
27B, Stage A, 1: By the end of the lesson the students will read and understand the text of Potong Padi (Rice Harvesting Song)
26B, Stage D, Skills 1: Students will sing on pitch and in rhythm on Potong Padi and connect it to the solfege system they have been
working on (although this is not the central focus of the lesson).
26B, Stage A, Skills, 1: The students will learn and sing the song Potong Padi by the end of the lesson.

Materials: Set of Indonesian angklung for the students, score of Potong Padi for the teacher, paper with solfege syllables written
Sequence:
Est.
Time

Procedures

Assessment

The teacher will explain to the students that they are going to play on very special
instruments. (If a set of angklung is not available the students could learn the song of
handbells or boomwhackers, but I abosolutely prefer and hope to purchase a set of
angklung).
The teacher will pass out the angklung to every student (taking turns if only one set is
available) and allow them to explore while sitting on the floor on a carpeted area very
carefully. The teacher will ask the students how they have created sounds with the
instruments.
Once the students have had a chance to explore the sounds they can make on the Anklung,
the teacher will then show the students the proper technique for holding the angklung.
The teacher will place 8 sheets of paper on the floor in order: Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do.
The teacher will sing Do for the students. The students will be asked to place the
angklung in order to practice their pitch matching and solfege understanding.

This is to assess if the students


know and understand the
relationship between solfege
syllables and pitch

The students will (take turns) and be assigned to a different solfege syllable.
The teacher will ask for Do Mi and So to play together

14

The teacher will ask for Re Fa La to play together


The teacher will ask for Fa La Do to play together
The teacher will ask for Re So Ti to play together
The students will be handed a score of Potong Padi with the solfege written in.
The students will all sing Potong Padi together as a reminder
The students will all sing Potong Padi under-tempo and students will play when their
solfege syllable is present for the harmony. The teacher will cue the Angklung players and
cut them off when necessary.

This song will be repeated later on for the students. They will eventually move on to play Do a deer and then an arrangement of a pop
song that the students are familiar with such as The Lion Sleeps Tonight

15

Shadow Puppets: First Grade


Shadow Puppets and Active Listening
NAME: Torrey DAngelo
Central Focus: The purpose of this lesson is for students to listen to authentic Javanese music, identify musical characteristics, and
create a story based on what they hear.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):

Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):

Materials
Shadow puppet, curtain, flashlight, computer with speakers for showing videos and listening to music, paper handouts of adjectives for
students
Sequence:
Est.
Procedures
Assessment:
Time
The students will listen to the Javanese Gamelan Ensemble play Pelog Barang-Singa
Holding up the paper is an
Nebah, The Pouncing Lion. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3HwqqiVxbE) While
assessment to see if they
the music is playing, students will be handed out sheets of paper with two options on either understand what they are
side. At the end of the song, the students will be asked to close their eyes and hold up
hearing
whatever word they heard that describes the music
The teacher will then explain that this piece is played by a gamelan orchestra. The teacher
will show a section of the video that shows all the instruments and play the song again for
the students.
The teacher will ask the students which animal they best think fits the song, a Lion, a cat, a
bird, or a fish.
The teacher will ask the students why they think this reminds them of whatever animal they
picked.

This is assessment of
understanding the musical
affect.

The teacher will explain that sometimes music is used to accompany Wayang, or shadow
puppet performances.
The teacher will show this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T66XVf6t4r8 to
demonstrate what someone moving shadow puppets looks like. I am choosing not to show
shadow puppets from the audiences perspective because I want the kids to experience this
for the first time.
The students will be given a lion shadow puppet from this link:
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Lion-Black-White-OutlineShadow-PuppetTemplate-773093
The teacher will ask what the shadow puppet lion might look like when moving slow, then
fast.
The teacher will let students choose from a variety of other shadow puppets.

16

The teacher will ask the students to break into groups of 3 where they create a story about a
lion and two other characters the accompany the music.
Each group will perform their short story for the class along with the music.

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons: In subsequent lessons the students could repeat their shows for one another or
their families through a performance or through video recording.

Handouts will say:


SLOW/FAST
EXCITING/BORING
CALM/FRIGHTENING
HAPPY/SAD
On either side of the paper. The students will use these to describe the music they are hearing.

17

Fifth Grade Extended Unit Plan

18

Extended Fifth Grade Unit: Introduction to the Balinese Gamelan


Lesson # 1

of

Central Focus (a statement or phrase that captures or summarizes the overarching learning outcomes associated with content standards
and learning objectives. It may not be as broad or comprehensive as a big idea or essential question used in a longer unit of instruction,
but it should represent a focus that connects to performing arts concepts.)
By the end of this lesson sequence, students will be able to compose music to accompany a scene from a Balinese folktale, The Dancing
Pig. Students will express their understanding of characteristics that are idiomatic of Balinese gamelan music through incorporating one
or more of these elements into their compositions. Learning to compose within this genre will be supported by learning about the role
of instruments in the gamelan orchestra, learning to play an arrangement of Topeng Keras(a folk melody) arranged for Orff instruments,
discussing cultural context and history, and by listening to examples of performances on the Balinese gamelan.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
26A, Stage B, 3: Identify classroom instrument sounds
26A, Stage B, 4: Identify instruments visually
27B, Stage E: 3: Compare the ways different cultures, times, or places use materials to produce works of art (e.g., musical
instruments, masks, puppets, pottery, textiles).
Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):
By the end of the lesson the students will be able to recognize the sounds and roles of the various Orff instruments transferred
into Indonesian pelog tuning. The students will also be able to recognize traditional gamelan instruments at sight. Students will
also begin to understand ways in which the Balinese gamelan is unique to Indonesian culture.
Materials: Computer, dongle to connect to projector, speakers to connect to headphones outlet, powerpoint presentation about
Indonesia, pencils and clipboards for students to lean on

Est.
Time
20 mins

Sequence:
Procedures (make specific notes for where academic language demands will be
highlighted in the sequence) !Academic language is emphasized in bold font.
Movement Activity
The teacher will greet the students as they walk into the classroom and ask them
to take a seat in a circle on the carpet.
The teacher will join the students in the circle. The teacher will say: boys and
girls, we are going to play a game called statues.
The teacher will ask the students for an example of a statue.
The teacher will say: When the music is playing, explore by moving. I will give
you hints on ways you can explore the space. When the music stops, look to the
projector and freeze in the position on the board. The teacher will start and pause
a recording of gamelan music intermittently. In between the pauses, the teacher
will ask the students to explore the room in various ways.
o The teacher will ask the students to move freely, move like they are
carrying something heavy, bouncing an object, tiptoeing, and stamping
like elephants.

Assessment (include both


formal and informal; identify
formal assessments with an
asterisk turn these in with
your materials).

The final slide will indicate for students to move back to sitting in a circle by the

19

time the music ends.


.

15 mins

Presentation
The teacher will turn on the projector and display the powerpoint.
o Along with the powerpoint, the teacher will ask the students: Where is
Indonesia? The teacher will show the students a map of the Eastern
hemisphere and ask for them to try to find it. The teacher will then show
the students the same map with Indonesia highlighted.
o The teacher will ask the students to find Bali on a map of Indonesia.
o The teacher will ask the students what they think of when they hear the
word orchestra. She will explain that the word gamelan translates to
the word orchestra. The teacher will show the students a picture of a
traditional European or American symphony orchestra and a picture of
the gamelan ensemble.
o The teacher will play a recording of the Balinese gamelan embedded
within the powerpoint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2AkVegZ5tk
(also included in instructional materials)
o The teacher will show the students the different instruments of the
gamelan (gangsa ugal, pemade, jublag, and gong)and play an example
of the most uniquely different from the barred instruments, the jublag,
embedded in powerpoint
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NXForWVo30 (also included in
instructional materials). The teacher will explain that all of these are
played with one mallet called the pangul.
The teacher will ask the students, Raise your hand if you think we can play the
gamelan in our classroom? The teacher will explain that Carl Orff, who invented
the barred instruments heard the gamelan and was inspired to create childrens
instruments he could bring back to Europe and use for teaching music.

Informal assessment-teacher
will see how the students
respond when given a visual
image of the Eastern
hemisphere and if they recall
knowledge from previous
years.

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons (if this is not the last in the sequence):
In subsequent lessons, the students will have the opportunity to explore the instruments in the new Pelog tuning, learn a traditional piece
from Bali, read a folktale from Bali, and ultimately express their knowledge about Balinese music and culture in a group composition
project.

20

Fifth Grade Extened Unit: Exploring the Gamelan


Lesson # 2

of

Central Focus (a statement or phrase that captures or summarizes the overarching learning outcomes associated with content standards
and learning objectives. It may not be as broad or comprehensive as a big idea or essential question used in a longer unit of instruction,
but it should represent a focus that connects to performing arts concepts.)
By the end of this lesson sequence, students will be able to compose music to accompany a scene from a Balinese folktale, The Dancing
Pig. Students will express their understanding of characteristics that are idiomatic of Balinese gamelan music through incorporating one
or more of these elements into their compositions. Learning to compose within this genre will be supported by learning about the role
of instruments in the gamelan orchestra, learning to play an arrangement of Topeng Keras(a folk melody) arranged for Orff instruments,
discussing cultural context and history, and by listening to examples of performances on the Balinese gamelan.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
26A, Stage B, 4: Identify instruments visually
26A, Stage B, 7: Sing and play accurately simple pitch notation using a symbol system (e.g., icons, syllables, numbers, letters.)
26B, Stage C, 1: Sing on pitch or play on classroom instruments songs of various cultures in rhythm, with appropriate timbre
and maintaining a steady tempo.
Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to identify and appropriately label instruments of the Balinese gamelan and their Orff
instrument counterparts. They will also learn a traditional Indonesian song using numeral notation.

Materials
Computer, dongle to connect to projector with headphones outlet to connect to speakers, link to youtube video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2AkVegZ5tk, soprano xylophones, alto xylophones, bass xylophone, mallets, and gong, labels
for the barred instruments named Gangsa Ugal, Gangsa Pemade, Jublag, and Gong, whiteboard with Pelog scale written on
it, poster for Topeng Keras.

Est.
Time
10
minutes

Sequence:
Procedures (make specific notes for where academic language demands will be
highlighted in the sequence). !Academic language is emphasized in bold font.
Review and Discussion:
The teacher will greet the students at the door and instruct them to find a seat on
the blue carpet facing the screen.
The teacher will play a video clip
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2AkVegZ5tk) of a Balinese gamelan
performance to refresh the students memories. The teacher will say: watch and
listen, tell me what you remember from last week, and new things you notice.
The teacher will ask: Raise your hand if you can tell me the name of all of these
instruments.
The teacher will ask: Raise your hand if you can tell me what the word gamelan
means.
The teacher will say: Do all of these instruments look the same to you? the
teacher will ask What are the names and roles of some of the instruments that we

Assessment (include both


formal and informal; identify
formal assessments with an
asterisk turn these in with
your materials).

Informal assessment: retention


of information presented
during previous class.

21

5
minutes

10
minutes

learned about last week.


The teacher will point out the gangsa ugal, the leader of the orchestra, if the
students do not point this out.
The teacher will ask about how the instruments sound. She will say: Do you
think the pemade will be a higher or lower pitched instrument than the leader of
the orchestra, the gangsa ugal.
The teacher will point out the jublag. The teacher will ask: Does anyone
remember anything about the jublag? The teacher will lead the students to
remember that the jublag are very similar, but slightly differ, like a brother or
sister. The teacher will ask them if the instrument is pitched lower or higher than
the others because of its size.
The teacher will point out the gong. The teacher will ask the students, do you
know the name of this instrument? The teacher will also ask the students, what
do you remember about the gong?

Naming the Instruments of the Gamelan Activity:


After the discussion of the instruments is over, the teacher will say: I have an
activity for us to do. Last week we decided that we could play the gamelan in our
classroom using instruments in our classroom. I have labels for each of you.
Please carefully label which Indonesian instrument you think our classroom
instruments are meant to represent.
Students will walk around the classroom and identify the instruments with labels
provided by the teacher.
The teacher will look at the way the students labeled the instruments.
The teacher will ask the students questions about the instruments and why they are
set up the way they are. The teacher will ask: where should the leader of the
orchestra be placed, in the front or the back of the orchestra?
The teacher will ask students to collect the papers and bring them to the front of
the classroom.

Informal assessment:
assessment of student
knowledge of role of each
instrument and their physical
placement within the gamelan
orchestra.

Free and Guided Exploration:


The teacher will use a list created earlier in the year by the mentor teacher to
determine the order in which students get to choose instruments. This is
determined by order of birthdays, and students get to choose in that order.
Eventually, over the course of the year, the students will get the opportunity to
choose first.
The teacher will say: Once you get to your instrument, please take of your D and
G bars, or donuts and grapes. Students will explore freely once they get to their
chosen instrument.
After several minutes of free exploration, the teacher will cut the students off and
tell them to put the mallets down.
The teacher will ask the students questions about the setup of their orchestra. The
teacher will ask the students: What did you notice about our instruments?
The teacher will ask: How many total number of bars do you have on your
instrument. This should be a different number for each instrument in the gamelan
orchestra.
The teacher will ask: How many different notes do you have on your
instruments.
The teacher will say, We learned about another scale that has five notes, raise
your hand if you can remind me of the name of that scale? The students will
mention the pentatonic scale, which they have already learned about.
The teacher will say: This scale in Indonesia is known as the pelog scale. In
Indonesia they do not call these notes A, B, C, E and F, they call them Ning,
Nong, Neng, Nung, and Nang.
The teacher will have the students sing up and down the scale.

22

15
minutes

Learning Topeng Keras:


The teacher will sing the first line of Topeng Keras, a folk song from Indonesia.
The teacher will say: we are learning a traditional piece from Indonesia called
Topeng Keras, which means dance.
The students will echo the teacher.
The teacher will say: listen to my voice and tell me if my voice moves up or
down to the E.
The teacher will ask the students to find those notes on the instrument and play
and sing.
The teacher have the students echo sing A E F until they can all sing, play, start
and stop together.
o If the students are having trouble, she will have the students separating
singing and playing first, then have the students sing and play.
The teacher will have the students echo sing F A B C t until they can all sing,
play, start, and stop together.
o If the students are having trouble, she will have the students separating
singing and playing first, then have the students sing and play.
The teacher will sing the last phrase E B C A B E, to the students and have them
play and sing while echoing her.
o If they students are having trouble with this section she will ask them to
play this by themselves a few times until they can play it confidently and
fluidly. They will also rehearse slowly since this is the most challenging
part of the piece because of all the leaps that occur between pitches.

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons (if this is not the last in the sequence):
This lesson went well. The students were excited to express their understanding of the Indonesian instruments by labeling the
instruments found in the classroom. They also did a nice job learning Topeng Keras. In subsequent lessons, students will refine Topeng
Keras, improvise, and complete a short individual composition. The lesson sequence will culminate in a small group project where
students compose music to accompany a scene from the folk tale, The Dancing Pig. They will incorporate elements of the Balinese
gamelan which we have been studying in class.

23

Extended Fifth Grade Unit: Rehearsing Topeng Keras and Improvising


Using the Pelog Scale
Lesson # 3 of

Central Focus (a statement or phrase that captures or summarizes the overarching learning outcomes associated with content standards
and learning objectives. It may not be as broad or comprehensive as a big idea or essential question used in a longer unit of instruction,
but it should represent a focus that connects to performing arts concepts.)
By the end of this lesson sequence, students will be able to compose music to accompany a scene from a Balinese folktale, The Dancing
Pig. Students will express their understanding of characteristics that are idiomatic of Balinese gamelan music through incorporating one
or more of these elements into their compositions. Learning to compose within this genre will be supported by learning about the role
of instruments in the gamelan orchestra, learning to play an arrangement of Topeng Keras (a folk melody) arranged for Orff
instruments, discussing cultural context and history, and by listening to examples of performances on the Balinese gamelan.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
26B, Stage C, 1: Sing on pitch or play on classroom instruments songs of various cultures in rhythm, with appropriate timbre
and maintaining a steady tempo.
26B, Stage B, 3: create short vocal or instrumental melodic and rhythmic phrases within specified guidelines.
Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):
By the end of the lesson, the students will have learned to play Topeng Keras, and Indonesian folk melody while maintaining a
steady tempo and with correct rhythm. The students will also have improvised for 8 beats using the pelog tuning on barred
instruments.
Materials:
Barred instruments ( soprano xylophones, bass xylophones, alto xylophones, hard mallets) board with Topeng Keras poster for
students to reference

Est.
Time
5
minutes

Sequence:
Procedures (make specific notes for where academic language demands will be
highlighted in the sequence). !Academic language is emphasized in bold font.
Introduction and Review:
The teacher will greet the students at the door and usher them to take a seat on the
cushions near the bay window at the back of the classroom.
The teacher will ask: Do you have any questions from our class last time?
o The teacher will answer any questions from the last class.
The teacher will refresh the students memories of the last class and of their
individual exploration by asking the following questions:
o How many notes are in a pelog scale?
o What are the names of the instruments that we played
o Which notes have we been taking off of the instruments to create the
pelog scale.
After the students name all of the instruments, the teacher will go down a list

Assessment (include both


formal and informal; identify
formal assessments with an
asterisk turn these in with
your materials).
Informal assessment: retention
of information learned in last
class.

24

10-15
minutes

Rehearsing Topeng Keras


The teacher will say: We are going to continue learning our piece, Topeng Keras,
raise your hand if you can remind me what that means?
The teacher will ask the students, You learned about the Wayang,. Raise your
hand if you can tell me about Wayang? The teacher will explain that sometimes
in Indonesia the gamelan is used to accompany the shadow puppet theatre, and a
piece like Topeng Keras might be played.
The teacher will begin rehearsing by having the students play the first half of the
song until they are able to sing and play by having the students echo her.
o In order to aid students in play this piece, the teacher will slow the tempo
down as needed, have students play on their own, and ask students for
suggestions on how they can best play the piece.
The teacher will have the students rehearse the second half of the song by echoing
her until they are able to sing and play confidently and fluidly.
o As needed, the teacher will slow the tempo down have students practice
on their own, and ask students for suggestions on how they can best play
the piece.
o The teacher may have the students practice moving from single notes
repeatedly until they are able to do this.
o The teacher may have the students take apart the singing and the playing.
The teacher will rehearse the students from the very beginning.
o The teacher will have the students start from various places, have them
play in various tempi, and break apart singing and playing to aid the
students in learning the piece.
The teacher will tell the players on the Jublag to play every other note starting
from the beginning. The rhythm with be tah rest tah restetc.

15
minutes

created earlier in the year by the mentor teacher, which uses student birthdates to
determine the order in which they choose instruments.
After the students decide on instruments, the teacher will make sure that the
students have the instruments in the proper tuning and allow them to explore for a
few minutes.

Informal assessment: retention


of information from classes in
previous years

After the students have learned the piece the teacher will have the students put
down their mallets.

Discussion and Improvisation


The teacher will ask the students, how are these instruments different or similar
to the way we usually play the barred instruments, and write student responses on
the board.
The teacher will allow the students to improvise on their instruments for a few
minutes using the pelog scale. Because they have already learned one traditional
piece, they will hopefully have an idea for the feel of Balinese music.
The teacher will count for 8 beats and have all of the students improvise for eight
beats.
The teacher will ask the students to improvise for eight beats row by row. The
back row will play for eight beats first, then the middle, then the front. This is to
acclimate the students to playing in smaller groups and to hearing themselves
improvise.
If comfortable, the teacher will then pick volunteers to play an 8 beat long
improvisation.

25

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons (if this is not the last in the sequence):
In subsequent lessons I will ask the students for a more clear definition of improvisation and composition. Students will then partake in
individual composition and finally a small group composition.

26

Extended Fifth Grade Unit: The Dancing Pig and Beginning


Composition
Lesson # 4 of

Central Focus (a statement or phrase that captures or summarizes the overarching learning outcomes associated with content standards
and learning objectives. It may not be as broad or comprehensive as a big idea or essential question used in a longer unit of instruction,
but it should represent a focus that connects to performing arts concepts.)
By the end of this lesson sequence, students will be able to compose music to accompany a scene from a Balinese folktale, The Dancing
Pig. Students will express their understanding of characteristics that are idiomatic of Balinese gamelan music through incorporating one
or more of these elements into their compositions. Learning to compose within this genre will be supported by learning about the role
of instruments in the gamelan orchestra, learning to play an arrangement of Topeng Keras (a folk melody) arranged for Orff
instruments, discussing cultural context and history, and by listening to examples of performances on the Balinese gamelan.

Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):


25B, Stage B, 3: Investigate story, feelings, or expressive ideas shared in the work of two different art forms.
26B, Stage E, 3: Create or arrange short songs or instrumental pieces within specified guidelines.
Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):
By the end of the lesson, students will have composed a short composition reflecting a single word. They will also begin a longer
small-group composition reflecting a scene from the Indonesian folk tale, The Dancing Pig.
Materials: Gongs, Bass xylophone, alto xylophones, soprano xylophones (enough for each student to be on one instrument), hard
mallets, copy of The Dancing Pig by Judy Sierra, student worksheets, pencils, clipboards for leaning on.

Est.
Time

Sequence:
Procedures (make specific notes for where academic language demands will be
highlighted in the sequence). !Academic language is emphasized in bold font.

15 -20
minutes

Introduction and the Dancing Pig:


The teacher will greet the students at the door and ask them to take a seat on the
cushions in the back of the classroom.
The teacher will allow the students to play the gong lightly because they have not
had the opportunity to play this instrument of the gamelan yet.
The teacher will introduce, The Dancing Pig, to the students. The teacher will ask:
what do you notice about the title page?
o The students will notice the instruments on the title page.
As the teacher reads the story to the kids she will engage them in the story by
reading the story in voices to demonstrate the characters and their sounds.

10
minutes

Introducing Composition:
The teacher will say, last time you did a really great job with your improvisations,
raise your hand if you can tell me what improvisation means?
Raise your hand if you can tell me what composition is?
The teacher will say: I have created mini gamelan orchestras around the room for
us to use for composition. Raise your hand if you can remind me of one of our

Assessment (include both


formal and informal; identify
formal assessments with an
asterisk turn these in with
your materials).

Informal assessment:
assessment of student
comprehension of the words
improvisation and
composition, how they relate,

27

10
minutes

instruments in the gamelan orchestra.


The teacher will use a list created earlier in the year by the mentor teacher, which
uses the students birthday to determine the order in which they choose
instruments.
The teacher will break the students into their groups, allow them to choose their
instrument, and then allow them to explore for a few minutes.
The teacher will engage the students in a composition warm up. The teacher will
tell the students that she has the word running in mind and wrote a very short
composition to represent this word. The teacher will explain that the music she
wrote is only four beats long. The teacher will show the students the notation she
used to write this composition. She will explain that this is only one way of
notating music, and that they can write down their compositions however they
would like.
The teacher will say: we are going to do a short composition exercise. I have the
word dancing in mind, please write a composition for the word dancing and we
will share after a few minutes.
The teacher will say, everyone is going to practice at the same time, I will play
my drum for four beats.
The teacher will say, raise your hand if you would like to share your
composition.

and how they differ.

Group Composition:
The teacher will ask the students to put their instruments and mallets down. The
teacher will say: Each one of your groups is going to compose a different scene
to accompany the dancing pig. You may not tell the other groups what your
scenes are. Your groups will be working together to compose a piece of music
together. After your compositions are done, you will share with your classmates.
Your compositions will be 16 beats long, will follow your assigned scene, and
must use some of the characteristics of Indonesian music that we have discussed.
The teacher will walk around the classroom and help students with their
compositions until class is over.

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons (if this is not the last in the sequence):
In subsequent lessons, students will share their compositions to accompany The Dancing Pig.

28

Extended Fifth Grade Unit: Sharing Compositions to Accompany


The Dancing Pig
Lesson #

5 of

Central Focus (a statement or phrase that captures or summarizes the overarching learning outcomes associated with content standards
and learning objectives. It may not be as broad or comprehensive as a big idea or essential question used in a longer unit of instruction,
but it should represent a focus that connects to performing arts concepts.)
By the end of this lesson sequence, students will be able to compose music to accompany a scene from a Balinese folktale, The Dancing
Pig. Students will express their understanding of characteristics that are idiomatic of Balinese gamelan music through incorporating one
or more of these elements into their compositions. Learning to compose within this genre will be supported by learning about the role
of instruments in the gamelan orchestra, learning to play an arrangement of Topeng Keras(a folk melody) arranged for Orff instruments,
discussing cultural context and history, and by listening to examples of performances on the Balinese gamelan.
Illinois State Content Standards (large goals):
25B, Stage B, 3: Investigate story, feelings, or expressive ideas shared in the work of two different art forms.
26B, Stage E, 3: Create or arrange short songs or instrumental pieces within specified guidelines.
27A, Stage B, 1: Identify and demonstrate the qualities of good audience behaviors.
27A, Stage B, 2: Share comments in a positive manner about a performance and/or an art work
27B, Stage E: 3: Compare the ways different cultures, times, or places use materials to produce works of art (e.g., musical
instruments, masks, puppets, pottery, textiles).
Specific Objectives (align with Standards from above; each objectives should be written such that they could finish the phrase by the
end of this lesson unit, students will be able to ):
By the end of this lesson, students will have composed a short group composition utilizing elements of Balinese gamelan music.
Additionally, students will listen to their peers performances, and give positive comments about their performances as well while
demonstrating respectful audience member behavior.

Materials: Alto xylophones, soprano xylophones, bass xylophones, gongs, mallets, computer, dongle, projector screen, projector,
worksheets for students, pencils, clipboards to lean on

Est.
Time
5
minutes

Sequence:
Procedures (make specific notes for where academic language demands will be
highlighted in the sequence). !Academic language is emphasized in bold font.
Introduction and Rules for Composition:
The teacher will greet the students at the door and ask them to take a seat at the
cushions.
The teacher will ask the students: how can we work together to compose?
The teacher will allow students to share responses and the teacher will write these
on the board.
The teacher will say: we will each be playing on the same instruments, in the
same group, for the same scene.

Assessment (include both


formal and informal; identify
formal assessments with an
asterisk turn these in with
your materials).

29

15-20
minutes
minutes

5-10
minutes

The teacher will say, Raise your hand and remind me of some of the rules for our
compositions?
The teacher will hand out each students papers to them.
The teacher will walk around the classroom and make sure that all of the
instruments are set into the correct tuning.

Group Composition:
The teacher will tell the students to put their mallets down and that they have ten
minutes to compose and talk with their group members.
The teacher will start a timer for 10 minutes using the website e.ggtimer.com.
The teacher will walk around and help students with their compositions and assign
a leader to help the group start the composition when it is time to perform.
After ten minutes, the teacher will cut the students off. The teacher will say: We
are going to share our compositions. Raise your hand if you can tell me some rules
for being a good audience member
Group 1 will share their composition
The teacher will ask the class for positive comments about Group 1s composition
and guess which scene the
Group 2 will share their composition
The teacher will ask the class for positive comments about Group 2s composition
and guess which scene the
Group 3 will share their composition.
The teacher will ask the class for positive comments about Group 3s composition
and guess which scene the
Post-test:
Students will take the post-test*. The teacher will read the test along with the
students and remind them they are not to share answers with one another.
There is a section for self-reflection on the post-test that students will fill out as
well.

*Formal assessment: post-test


to assess student growth,
knowledge of Indonesian
culture, and opportunity to
self-reflect.
Informal assessment-the self
reflection portion of the posttest will be used to informally
evaluate student understanding
of the compositional elements
of Balinese gamelan music
and how these were utilized in
small group composition.

Reflection of Teaching and thoughts for next lessons (if this is not the last in the sequence):
If possible, students could benefit from the guidance of a culture bearer and playing on authentic instruments. This will be made
possible by working with the community and contacting locations which house Balinese gamelans such as churches or universities.

30

Resources, References, and Potential Funding


Plan

31

Resources
Holtfreter, L., & Widaryanto, F.X. (1996). Flowing Waters: Building A Musical Bridge
Between Your Orff-Schulwerk Ensemble and the Javanese Gamelan. Danbury,
CT: World Music Press.
This DVD and accompanying book provides resources for teachers to adapt the Javanese
gamelan onto standard classroom Orff instruments. The book provides a few lesson
plans and how to prepare the instruments.
Lion: Black & White Outline/Shadow Puppet Template. Teachers Pay Teachers.
Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Lion-Black-White-OutlineShadowPuppet-Template-773093
The resources is a template for a shadow puppet that one could use to create a Wayang
theatre.
Mama Lisa's World of Children and International Culture. (2014). Burung Hantu Indonesia. Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=610&c=73
Mama Lisa's World of Children and International Culture. (2014). Lihat Kebunku Indonesia. Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=594&c=73
Mama Lisa's World of Children and International Culture. (2014). Tik tik tik bunyi hujan
- Indonesia. Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=605&c=73
Theses three songs from Mama Lisas World of Children and International Culture
provide the lyrics to traditional songs and videos of culture-bearers sharing the song. The
songs are uploaded to the site from people of that culture and sometimes will have
accompanying sheet music, but often do not.
McPhee, C., & Tyrie, T. (2002). A club of small men. Hong Kong: Periplus.
This is a childrens book written by Colin McPhee, a composer and ethnomusicologist
about the Balinese Gamelan. Students could easily compose music to go along with the
text of this book.
Meuter, A. (2014). The Balinese Gamelan Orchestra Club. Smithsonian Folkways.
Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/docs/lesson_plans/FLP10047_indonesia_ba
li_gamelan.pdf

32

This is a lesson plan that accompanies the book, A Club of Small Men, by Colin McPhee.
This lesson is tailored towards third to fifth graders and Students will have the
opportunity to play the gangsa, xylophone, drum, and gong to an arrangement of Balinese
gamelan.
Sierra, J., & Sweetwater, J. (1999). The dancing pig. San Diego: Harcourt Brace.
This book is an illustrated folk tale from Indonesia, very similar to Hansel and Gretel.
This could also be used for a class composition project where students could recreate a
scene in the story. This also has the potential to include artists, actors, or dancers.
YouTube,(2014). Javanese Gamelan Ensemble - Pelog Barang - Singa Nebah (The
Pouncing Lion). Retrieved 13 November 2014, from
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3HwqqiVxbE
This is a video of a Javanese Gamelan Ensemble playing a piece called the Poucing Lion.
This will be used to accompany a Wayang theatre creation by the students.
Youtube. (2013). Gamelan Bali (Balinese Gamelan) - Saraswati. Retrieved June 01,
2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2AkVegZ5tk
This is a video of a Balinese gamelan ensemble played by children.
References:
Barrett, J. (2009). "To think in the perspective of each child"-A student centered music
teacher's beliefs and perspectives. Presentation, American Education Research
Association San Diego, California.
Beegle, A. C. (2013). Preparing Students for the 21st Century Through the Study of
World Music. General Music Today, dx.doi: 1048371313507277.
Campbell, P. S. (1992). Cultural consciousness in teaching general music. Music
Educators Journal, 78(9), 30-36.
Campbell, P. S. (2004). Teaching music globally (pp. 191-247). New York: Oxford
University Press.
Kodly Institute of the Liszt Fenerc Academy of Music,. (2014). Kodly Concept.
Retrieved 26 November 2014, from
http://kodaly.hu/zoltan_kodaly/kodaly_concept
Reimer, B. (2002). World musics and music education: Facing the issues. Rowman &
Littlefield Education.

33

Volk, T. M. (2002). Multiculturalism: Dynamic creativity for music education. World


musics and music education: Facing the issues, 15-29.

Funding Plan:
Donors Choose Application:
My students are elementary school students from kindergarten through 5th grade who
are learning about music from all around the world. My students are passionate and love
learning about the authentic music practices of other cultures.
My Project involves students learning the folk music of Java on the Indonesian Anklung.
Students will learn a traditional Rice Harvesting song. This project is integrated into the
rest of the school curriculum where students will learn about many the culture, climate,
and people of Indonesia
My students need a set of Indonesian angklung. The Instruments have a single pitch and
are similar to handbells or boomwhackers. However, the combination of the bamboo
instruments creates a beautiful, rich, sound that one cannot experience through
boomwhackers or handbells. I need 200 dollars for 3 sets of angklung and shipping.
Target Field Trip:
(This application is currently closed so I will follow the Donors Choose Format) This
application is for a 700 dollar grant for a field trip.
My students are hardworking elementary students in the fifth grade who have been
studying the music of Indonesia since they were in kindergarten. Because my students
have been learning to play the traditional music of Bali on regular classroom Orff
instruments for the past 5 years, the students need a chance to experience the music of
Bali on an authentic Balinese gamelan.
My project is to allow the students to experience the beautiful sounds of the Balinese
gamelan and learn with culture bearers. The Gamelan Dharma Swara is an ensemble of
gamelan players and teachers who can come to us (or us to them) with a set of Balinese
gamelan for students to play on! 5 gamelan players and teachers will work with my
students for 60 minutes. The group can also teach a 60 minute dance class as well.
My students need a grant in order to work with culture bearers and on authentic
instruments. This will provide rich cultural context to their understanding of Indonesian
music. This experience will act as the culmination of a six year study of Indonesian
music!

34

Appedix

35

Balinese Gamelan

Where is Indonesia?

Where is Indonesia?

Map of Indonesia

About Indonesia

Made of 17,000 islands
between the Pacific and Indian
Oceans

Is part of the Pacific Ring of
Fire and has many volcanoes

Climate is tropical-hot and
wet.

250 million people live there

People in Indonesia speak
Bahasa Indonesia, English,
Dutch, and other local
languages

About Bali

Island

Home to about 3
million people

Many beautiful
beaches-because
of this the main
industry is
tourism.

About the Balinese Gamelan



Gamelan is the Indonesian word for
orchestra.

What do you think of when you hear the
word orchestra?

About the Balinese Gamelan

About the Balinese Gamelan

What Does the Balinese Gamelan


Sound Like?

How is the Balinese Gamelan Made?


Made out of local
materials-bronze,
bamboo, wood,
and iron.

A gong-smith is
someone who
creates a gamelan
and is trained to
control the spirits
that live in the
instruments. One
gong-smith
creates all the
instruments for a
gamelan.

What are the Instruments?


Gangsa Ugal-its role is the leader of the gamelan. The player
on the Gangsa Ugal can control how fast or slow, and loud or
soft the music is.

What are the Instruments?


Pemade-it plays the same part as the Gangsa Ugal, but
plays higher notes. The instrument is a bit smaller than
the Gangsa Ugal.

What are the Instruments?


Jublag- The Jublag are like two sisters or
brothers. They are very similar. They have the
same number of keys and are played the same
way, but they sound slightly different from one
another. They always play together, and their
slightly different sounds create a shimmer.

What are the Instruments?



Gong- plays less
than the other
instruments because
its sound lasts
longer. It is also
loud, so it is said to
awaken the spirits
of the ancestors of
the players in the
gamelan so they can
listen.

How Do We Respect the Gamelan?



Take off shoes before playing

Offer flowers or fruit at a performance

Never step over the instruments, always walk
around them.