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Animal -Based

Experiment at ion:
Two Sides of a Coin

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pref ace
Part 1 - Heads - Animal Research or Animal Tort ure?
Dest roying Animal s f or Human Benef it - Page 5
Human Prot est er Subject ed t o "Animal Test ing" In St ore Window - Page 6
Ment al l y Traumat izing Monkeys f or Minut el y Possibl e Benef it - Page 7
Research on Mice is Point l ess - Page 8
"Tox21" Used t o Repl ace Animal s f or Skin Al l ergy Test ing in EU - Page 9

Part 2 - Tail s - Animal Research - A Gif t t o Advance our


Civil izat ion
Animal s Can Save Human Lives - Page 11
Reasoning For Why We Have No Ot her Choice - Page 12
Taking Care of These Animal s - Page 13
Benef it s To Animal s - Page 14
Benef it s t o Our Economy- Page 15
Final Verdict - Page 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pref ace
Part 1 - Heads - Animal Research or Animal Tort ure?
Dest roying Animal s f or Human Benef it - Page 5
Human Prot est er Subject ed t o "Animal Test ing" In St ore Window - Page 6
Ment al l y Traumat izing Monkeys f or Minut el y Possibl e Benef it - Page 7
Research on Mice is Point l ess - Page 8
"Tox21" Used t o Repl ace Animal s f or Skin Al l ergy Test ing in EU - Page 9

Part 2 - Tail s - Animal Research - A Gif t t o Advance our


Civil izat ion
Animal s Can Save Human Lives - Page 11
Reasoning For Why We Have No Ot her Choice - Page 12
Taking Care of These Animal s - Page 13
Benef it s To Animal s - Page 14
Benef it s t o Our Economy- Page 15
Final Verdict - Page 1

Par t 1 - An im al Resear ch or
An im al Tor t u r e?

HUMANPROTESTERSUBJECTEDTO"ANIMALTESTING"
INSTOREDISPLAYWINDOW
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JUNE6,2016

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By Sajeev Kohli
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OXFORD - Recently, in Oxford, England, a 24-year-old performing artist as w ell as protester w as subjected to ?animal E
tests? in the w indow display of the Lush Store on London?s Regent Street.
s
Jacqueline Traide, student of the Oxford-Brooke University, w as dressed in a unitard, force fed and subjected to
t
needle poking in the w indow display of a store near central England. Her mouth w as clamped shut as another
protester ?performed the necessary procedures? on her. One could easily tell she w as in agonizing pain by w atching p
u
from the other side of the w indow .
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The procedure lasted 10 hours in total, consisting of being given injections, having skin abraded, being smothered n
in lotions and perfumes and having a large strip of her hair shaven off in front of one of the busiest streets in England.w
Thousands of shoppers w atched the artist bleed, cry and scream. They w ere speechless

Somew here else in the w orld, these exact same procedures w ere being carried out on countless animals in research d
labs. At the end of Jacqueline?s protest display, she w as throw n out onto the street into the garbage area,
a
representing a state of having been euthanized but afterw ards she got up and w ent home. An animal subjected to
a
the same procedures w ould have died.
a
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The act w as all part of a collaboration betw een Lush Cosmetics and Humane Society International to encourage
people to end animal testing for cosmetics. In an interview , the Oxford-Brookes University student Jacqueline said, "I w
hope it w ill plant the seed of a new aw areness in people to really start thinking about w hat they go out and buy and i
m
w hat goes into producing it.?

The performer remained mute throughout the w hole procedure. Lush campaign manager Tamsin Omond said,
?Although animal testing for cosmetics w as banned in the EU three years ago, it is still legal in Britain to sell products a
f
animal-tested in other parts of the w orld, including the USA and Canada. In China, such testing is a legal
w
requirement.?
c
Humane Society spokesperson Wendy Higgins mentioned that it w as ?morally unthinkable?that cosmetic companies c
should continue to profit from animal suffering, additionally claiming that there could be ?no justification for
t
subjecting animals to pain for the sake of producing lipstick and eye shadow ?.

HUMANPROTESTERSUBJECTEDTO"ANIMALTESTING"
INSTOREDISPLAYWINDOW

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(
m
By Sajeev Kohli
f
OXFORD - Recently, in Oxford, England, a 24-year-old performing artist as w ell as protester w as subjected to ?animal E
tests? in the w indow display of the Lush Store on London?s Regent Street.
s
Jacqueline Traide, student of the Oxford-Brooke University, w as dressed in a unitard, force fed and subjected to
t
needle poking in the w indow display of a store near central England. Her mouth w as clamped shut as another
protester ?performed the necessary procedures? on her. One could easily tell she w as in agonizing pain by w atching p
u
from the other side of the w indow .
c
The procedure lasted 10 hours in total, consisting of being given injections, having skin abraded, being smothered n
in lotions and perfumes and having a large strip of her hair shaven off in front of one of the busiest streets in England.w
Thousands of shoppers w atched the artist bleed, cry and scream. They w ere speechless

Somew here else in the w orld, these exact same procedures w ere being carried out on countless animals in research d
labs. At the end of Jacqueline?s protest display, she w as throw n out onto the street into the garbage area,
a
representing a state of having been euthanized but afterw ards she got up and w ent home. An animal subjected to
a
the same procedures w ould have died.
a
w
The act w as all part of a collaboration betw een Lush Cosmetics and Humane Society International to encourage
people to end animal testing for cosmetics. In an interview , the Oxford-Brookes University student Jacqueline said, "I w
hope it w ill plant the seed of a new aw areness in people to really start thinking about w hat they go out and buy and i
m
w hat goes into producing it.?

The performer remained mute throughout the w hole procedure. Lush campaign manager Tamsin Omond said,
?Although animal testing for cosmetics w as banned in the EU three years ago, it is still legal in Britain to sell products a
f
animal-tested in other parts of the w orld, including the USA and Canada. In China, such testing is a legal
w
requirement.?
c
Humane Society spokesperson Wendy Higgins mentioned that it w as ?morally unthinkable?that cosmetic companies c
should continue to profit from animal suffering, additionally claiming that there could be ?no justification for
t
subjecting animals to pain for the sake of producing lipstick and eye shadow ?.

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RESEARCHONMICEISPOINTLESS
UNITED STATES - People have developed countless cures
for countless cancers, a vaccine for AIDS, a cure for
paralysis and a remediative therapy for M S...except they' ve
all been aimed at mice

There is a large uncertainty regarding applicability to


humans in several rodent studies. The immune systems of
humans and mice are poles apart. A human tumour takes
years to develop w hereas a tumour in a mouse can just be
directly injected. Also, most mice tested in biomedical
studies are inbred and thus their genetics are no w here
near representative of the human species.

Recently, w hen interview ed about the development of


therapeutics for cancer and other presently incurable
diseases, Dr. Lois Parker, senior pharmacist at the
M assachusetts General Hospital, said, "great new s if you' re
a mouse! " She additionally claimed that success in rodent
studies is nothing to get excited about and that there is a
large time gap betw een the lab and the clinic.

WECURED
CANCER50
YEARSAGO...
INMICE

In fact, out of 250 compounds tested for safety in lab


experiments, only one gets approved by the US Food and
Drug Administration. To get from the lab to the clinic
usually takes 10-15 years.. Betw een these years, thousands
of mice die or are killed during experimental procedures.

Despite the large differences betw een humans and


rodents, lab researchers continue to experiment thousands
of compounds on mice , finding new "cures" for currently
incurable diseases every day.
Witten By Sajeev Kohli

RESEARCHONMICEISPOINTLESS

In fact, out of 250 compounds tested for safety in lab


experiments, only one gets approved by the US Food and
Drug Administration. To get from the lab to the clinic
usually takes 10-15 years.. Betw een these years, thousands
of mice die or are killed during experimental procedures.

Witten By Sajeev Kohli

Par t 2 - An im al Resear ch - A Gif t


To Advan ce ou r Civilizat ion

A
R
C
S
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L

A
R
C
S
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L

PROTOCOLSENSUREPROPER
TREATMENTOFANIMALS
Done By Kyungbin Son

THESTORYOFBLUEGENE
Although there are alternatives to animal
testing, most computer simulated testing is
flaw ed and unreliable. The human body is
much too complex for our current
technology to simulate as for there are too
many functions and conditions w e must
factor in.

The Canadian Federation of Human


Societies, also developed guidelines and
rules for the animal used for experiments
and to also oversee the assessment of the
A year ago, scientist Henry M arkram set out
use of animals in universities and
laboratories. Before these guidelines w ere to simulate the brain of a rat. October 8,
2015, M arkram published a paper going in
established, there w as only a one page
guide. How ever, after these in depth rules depth on the progress and his vision of the
project. In order to simulate a rat brain,
w ere developed, it is proven that the
M arkram and 80 other researchers required
number of animals has decreased w hile the the use of "Blue Gene," the w orlds fastest
volume of research has increased.
supercomputer. Even w ith Blue Gene, they
w ere not able to fully replicate the rat brain.
Although, it show ed similarities in the
mental make-up, it lacked the structure of
nerves seen in a real rat brain.
M arkram w as only able to simulate half of a
rats brain w ith Blue Gene. Now imagine the
amount of computational pow er that w ould
take to simulate all the functions and
conditions w ithin a human body. This poses
a huge computational problem for
supercomputers. A rat' s brain runs a billion
CLICK calculations every 25 microseconds, w hereas
HERE a human brain runs one billion times as
many.

ANIMALRESEARCHBENEFITS
ANIMALSTOO

According the California Biomedical Research


Association, the methods that have been
developed to prevent diseases in humans have
also helped countless animals. It has been
proven that more than 80 vaccines and
medicines developed for humans are also
helping animals too. Animal research has helped
to create many vaccines for animals to fight off
diseases such as rabies and distempers, and has
also helped w ith infectious hepitius virus and
assisted the development of treatment for heart
w orms .

Until w e improve our understanding of the


human body, and advance our technology
the truth is that w e simply have the
know ledge and resources to create an
accurate computer simulation.

We can't r eplace an im als


w it h com pu t er s...yet

C
O
T

C
O
T

ENDANGERED
SPECIES
Done by Kyungbin Son

Animal research has also helped endangered species. Through


animal research, treatment for animal has also been developed.
Treatments such as vaccines for rabies and feline leukemia virus.
Therefore, through treatment for animals has also helped
preserve endangered species. The ability to help breed species,
treat illnesses and eliminate parasitism helped improve survival
and health for many species that are in danger. For example,
animal research helped preserve nearly extinct species such as
the California candor and the tamarins of Brazil because of the
new reproductive techniques due to research

EVERYDAYPETS
Animal research has also impacted animals that are
everyday pets of humans. Feline Leukemia is a long term
contagious viral infection that is spread through cats.
However, thanks to animal research, a vaccine for it is now
made. Also, organ transplant techniques for dogs are now
advanced through antirejection drugs. These are only some
of the many benefits these animals had through
researching and experimenting. These animals now can be
treated and be prevented of diseases and viruses because
of animal research.

""ANIMAL
RESEARCH
HASALSO
GREATLY
EXTENDED
AND
IMPROVED
LIVESOF
MANY
COMPANION
ANIMALS''
Don e By
Kyu n gbin Son

Don e By
Kyu n gbin Son

FINALVERDICT
By M ich ael Li , Sajeev Koh li an d Kyu n gbin Son

We can all agree that experimenting on animals is not the most humane
way to advance our society's knowledge , but one can disagree that it is
necessary. Millions of people would be dead from diabetes, Hepatitis C,
HIV/AIDS, Epilepsy, and other diseases if not for animal testing, but how
many more rats and chimps were killed to develop these drugs? Families
were restored, because of some of these breakthroughs, but at the cost of
baby chimps torn from their mothers. Some may argue that it is for the good
of mankind and will save lives, but others will protest that it's a type of
murder and that we have no right to experiment on the animals. Whether
animal testing is good or bad, that is a matter of opinion. It is a question with
two viable answers, revolving around two perspectives, encompassing two
completely justifiable vantage points. Such is the nature of this issue, an
issue centered around two sides of a coin.