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FILIPINA WOMEN’S NET WORK

ANTI-VIOLENCE
RESOURCE GUIDE

FIONA MA

F I E R C E. CO M PA S S I O N AT E. E F F E C T I V E.

INSIDE:

11TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE | 2016

» COMFORT WOMEN JUSTICE COALITION
» CourtWatch: Tordil, Laude, Zamora
L I P I N A W O M E N of
’ S NHuman
E T W O R K Trafficking
| www.filipinawomensnetwork.org
» TheF I Economics

NOTE FROM THE
PRODUCTION
MANAGER

M E S S AG E F R O M T H E E X E C U T I V E P R O D U C E R & C E O
Two countries. Two
candidates for
president. The first
candidate joked about
rape. That he wished he
was able to participate
in the gang rape of a
murdered missionary
and angry because he
should have been first in
raping her because he is
the city’s mayor.
Candidate #1 won the
elections. This country is
now going to have a
leader who admits that
one of his credentials is
being a womaniser.
Presidential candidate #2
consistenly makes
misogynistic comments
about women. He’s
leading his political party
and could potentially also
win the presidency. I
think of the mothers of
these two candidates.
What were they like?

What values did these
two mothers instill in
their sons? What would
they say about their sons’
behaviors toward women
if they were alive today?
As we gather once again
to raise consciousness
about the violence
perpetrated against
women, I reflect on my
favorite monologue, “I
Was There In The Room”
- Eve’s personal story
about the birth of her
granddaughter. I reflect
on my own two sons
whom I have brought to
this world.How have I
raised them? How do
they treat the women in
their lives? I reflect on
the 33 cast and crew
members who responded
to our audition call this
year. What can we of
different economic
sectors, cultural
backgrounds and life

MARILY MONDEJAR
Founder & CEO
Filipina Women’s Network

experiences collectively
do together to fight
misogyny?
Participating in this
benefit performance is
our first step. We thank
our audience tonight for
their presence and their
support.
Join us in our continuing
campaign.

MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTORS
One of V-Day’s core
beliefs is that “Lasting
social and cultural
change is spread by
ordinary people doing
ordinary things”. It is
the dedication, sacrifice,
and commitment of the
volunteer cast and crew
that elevate ordinary
into extraordinary. I
would like to thank the
cast and crew for their
support in carrying on
this tradition, as well as
the Herbst Theatre for
hosting us year after
year. If this is your first
time to experience “The
Vagina Monologues”,
you’re in for a ride. Be
prepared to laugh, cry,
get pissed off, and feel
empowered.
Thank you for sharing
your evening with us
and being a part of
carrying our mission to
stop the cycle of
violence. I hope that
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allowing us to share this
mission with you will
encourage you to do
more ordinary things
that can extraordinarily
transform the lives of
survivors of domestic
violence.
“I have met lifelong friends,mentors, and
my current boss through The Vagina
Monologues. We choose not to cast
professional actresses because behind the
script are real women, with raw stories...
stories of surviving. I volunteer my time
every year because it’s my way of giving
back what this production has given me.”
– Genevieve Jopanda

GENEVIEVE JOPANDA

Chief of Staff to California
Board of Equalization
Chairwoman Fiona Ma

ROSIE JOSUE

Actor and Director

I initially auditioned to
be a cast member
because as a performing
artist, theater is my
passion. Little did I
know that this
production would be
the catalyst of profound
personal transformation
and healing. FWN
couldn’t get rid of me as
a cast member for four
years, and I and my
family continued to
volunteer with the
organization to uplift
women and our Pinay
sisterhood. After a few
years’ hiatus, and

FWN’s production of The
Vagina Monologues are
stories of different forms
of abuse that happen to
women. Our cast acts as
the voice of those who
cannot speak for
themselves or those
who are too afraid to
admit they are in an
abusive situation. I truly
hope that you not only
enjoy the show, but also
become aware of the
injustice that is
happening all over the
world so that we can
educate our young men
that violence is not the
answer to getting what
you want. I volunteer
my time so I can
contribute to creating a
violence-free society for
women and girls.

growing from actress to
director, it’s a privilege
to return to this stage,
now as co-director.
Because eight years ago
“The Vagina
Monologues” saved my
life from an
abusive relationship and
it’s my responsibility to
other women and the
global community, to be
a testament of the
change I want to see in
the world, that together
we can rise above the
noise of fear and step
into the truth of our
own power.
We are telling the
untold stories of pain,
courage, strength,
faith and love that will
leave you laughing,
crying and deeply
inspired. But beyond
the richly colorful and
fiercely honest content,
is a piercing underlining
message that can only
be embodied by the

WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED AGAINST VIOLENCE

TRISHA MARCO

Marketing Manager
Telamon Engineering
Consultants, Inc.

N OT E F R O M T H E
E D I TO R

issue of V-Diaries in
Glady’s honor. To
commemorate her life
as a celebrated
teacher, beloved
mother, cherished
friend.
It is in Glady’s honor
that we rise together
in solidarity as we face
and strip the shame of
ours and others’
suffering, and unravel
to reach a place of
healing.

Last week, just days before
Mother’s Day, a FilipinaAmerican woman was
killed by her ex-husband
outside of a shopping mall
in front of her teenage
RAISSA ALVERO
daughter. Her name was
Fellow
Gladys Tordil.
Filipina Women’s Network
We dedicate this year’s

magic of theater. This
performance itself is the
act of taking agency
over this “complex”,
taboo issue in our
society and culture. It is
“developing the spiritual
muscle to enter and
survive the grief that
violence brings and, in
that dangerous space of
stunned unknowing,
inviting the deeper
wisdom” explains Eve
Ensler, the author of
The Vagina
Monologues. It is the
act of taking control of
the story that the
media, our friends, our
families, history and the
legal, political and
criminal justice systems
has painted around
women and violence,
and painting a new one.
Because the intention
of this show is not
merely to entertain you,
but if it’s true that
“every revolution
started with a thought”,

then my intention is
simply to provoke your
mind. And with that,
may we change the
world.
Learn more about
our campaign to
end violence:
www.filipinawomensnetwork.org
/vday-fwn-against-violence

#FWNAgainstViolence

TA B L E O F CO NTE NTS

The Filipina Women’s Network
is a United States based nonprofit professional organization
for women of Philippine
ancestry with members
worldwide. We promote the
social welfare of Filipina
women and advocate for
Filipina women’s rights. FWN
provides the content; credibility
and community to help women
of Philippine ancestry succeed
in their businesses and careers.
FWN provides knowledge,
products, education, and a
worldwide network for Filipina
women professionals.
Filipina Women’s Network
P. O. Box 192143
San Francisco, CA 94119
filipinawomensnetwork.org
Filipina@ffwn.org
415. 935. 4FWN
@filipinawomen
Facebook.com/
FilipinaWomensNetwork
THE “V” TEAM
DeVoted Publisher: Marily Mondejar
DeLightful Editor: Raissa Alvero
HEART CONTRIBUTORS
2016 TVM Cast,
Genevieve Jopanda, Rosie Josue,
Trisha Marco, Dr. Sheryll Casuga, Judge
Julie Tang, John Vigna, Kevin Lu, SF
Department on the Status of Women
FWN BOARD
Amar Bornkamp
Dr. Bambi Lorica
Elena Mangahas
Maria Beebe Ph.D.
Marily Mondejar
Maria Roseni “Nini” M. Alvero
Col. Shirley Raguindin
Sonia T. Delen
Susie Quesada
Thelma Boac

FWN provides Filipina women with opportunities to share practical career and business
experiences. This focus on actual career and business experiences, rather than theory, from
practitioners, corporate managers, entrepreneurs, elected / appointed officials, nonprofit and
community leaders, along with peer networking, are the distinguishing features of FWN meetings.
FWN PROGRAMS:
Annual Filipina Leadership
Global Summit brings together
Filipina women global leaders,
influencers, thinkers and
public figures for discussions,
learning journeys, “kwentuhan
strategies” on how to succeed
as multi-cultural professionals
and private chats to ignite
cooperation through public and
private partnerships.
The high powered gathering
is a vital part of FWN’s Pinay
Power 2020 Mission: A
Filipina leader in every sector
of the economy. It is the
leading forum of its kind in
the Filipina global community
which inspires a renewed
understanding of the Filipino
culture’s emerging influence as
a community.

DISRUPT 2.0: Filipina
Leadership Book Series:
publications to document the
leadership competencies of
Filipina women in leadership
positions in countries
worldwide. The book project
is key to FWN’s strategy in
building its pipeline of qualified
leaders that some will rise to
the ‘president’ position.
www.filipinaleadership.org
Filipina Women Against
Violence: Campaign to raise
funding and awareness of the
high incidence of domestic
violence and human/labor
trafficking in the Filipino
community thru CourtWatch,
The Vagina Monologues
productions in collaboration
with V-Day.
www.filipinawomensnetwork.
org/about-fwn-against-violence

FEMtorMatch™ : FWN strategy
for developing next generation
leaders through local and
global partnerships between
FEMtors™ (female mentors)
and FEMtees™ (female
mentees). FEMtors™ and
FEMtees™ are matched in oneon-one partnerships through
a secure FWN FEMtorMatch™
website. FWN’s Competencies
are the 94 competencies
and 810 skills that enable
professionals to do successful
work in the global workplace.
www.femtormatch.org
Professional Development
Series: Builds on the 12 Basic
Needs; how work/life balance
influence our Web of Work. A
practical foundation for career
pathing and life planning.
www.filipinawomensnetwork.
org/professional-development/

Acknowledgments
SPONSORS • DONORS • TICKET SPONSORS
ABS-CBN / TFC • Amar Bornkamp • ATSSI A Top Notch Security Services, Inc. • Bambi Lorica
• Chevron • Genevieve Jopanda • Heidi Pervin Yamaguchi • Juslyn Manalo • Nancy Wong •
Norma Edar • Nerissa Fernandez • Sonia T. Delen • Trisha Marco • Triya Marco • David
Ceccarelli • Herbst Theatre (Stephanie Smith and Masae Aitoku) • City Box Office (Gus Glimis, Lauren McQuade and Michael Erle) • Ramar Foods • Telamon Engineering Consultants,
Inc. • 03 Restaurant • Kevin Guevarra • AJ’s BBQ and Cafe • Richard Gervais

Honorable Edwin Lee George Gascón
Mayor
District Attorney

© 2016 The V-Diaries is a
publication of the
Filipina Women’s Network.
All rights reserved.

V-DAY FWN
WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED
The Vagina Monologues Playbill 7
Cast & Crew Bios + Photos............ 9, 13, 17
Court Watch ...................................... 11
FWN 11th Year Victories ................ 15
ON THE COVER
Fiona Ma ........................................ 10
V-FEATURES
About V-Day ................................. 14
A Story of Healing ...................... 14
DV Stats on API Community... 16
Economics of Human Trafficking
............................................................ 17
V-DIARIES
Conocimiento..................................6
Beneficiary Spotlight: Comfort Women
Justice Coalition ............................. 12
V-RESOURCES
FWN Community Partners............ 03
FWN Acknowledgments............... 03
V-Resources........................................ 04, 05

SALAMAT,
ADVERTISERS!
ABS-CBN The Filipino Channel...18
A Top Notch Security Services Inc. 5
Bambi Lorica ..................................... 5
Chevron.................... .................... 19
Forest City..................................... 19
FWN Filipina Summit 2016 ...... ..20
Genevieve Jopanda........................ 11
Heidi Pervin Yamaguchi................ 14
Ramar Foods ..................................... 20
Telamon Engineering Consultants, Inc. 13

Connect with us!
» facebook.com/
FilipinaWomensNetwork
» Twitter @filipinawomen
» Instagram @filipinawomen

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T V M 2 0 1 6 | C E L E B R AT I N G 1 1 Y E A R S

#FWNAgainstViolence
#rapeisNOTajoke

S A N F R A N C I S C O B AY A R E A

V- R E S O U RC E S

SAN FRANCISCO

4700 International Blvd.
Oakland, CA 94601
510. 534. 6030
Women and children

Asian Women’s Home

CHILD ABUSE

Concordia County
3000 62nd Ave.
Alameda County Social Oakland, CA 94605
510. 430. 1850
Services
Hotline: 510.259.1800
alamedasocial services.org Horizons Unlimited
440 Potrero Avenue
24-hour confidential
San Francisco, CA 94110
hotline
415. 487. 6717
Child Abuse Prevention www.horizons-sf.org
Violence against girls’
Council
prevention workshops
San Joaquin County
209. 464. 4524
Emergency respite
Institute on Aging
childcare,
3330 Geary Boulevard
court-appointed advocates San Francisco, CA 94118
415. 750. 4180 x100
Child Abuse Training & www.ioaging.org
Technical Assistance
Preventing domestic
(CATTA) Center
violence in late life
707. 992. 0537
www.cattacenter.org
Resources against child
COURT SERVICES /
abuse
LAW ENFORCEMENT
OFFICES
Family & Children

4
ghi

Services
City & County of San
Francisco

Court Info

Family Paths (Formerly
Parental Stress Service)
Alameda County

Alameda County
Superior Court

Hotline: 800. 856. 5553
www.sfhsa.org/174.htm
Child Abuse, respite care,
counseling

Hotline: 800. 829. 3777
familypaths.org
Emergency childcare, 24hour support hotline,
English & Spanish

www.courtinfo.ca.gov/
courts/trial/courtlist.htm
How to contact courts
statewide by county,
searchable by zip code/city
Berkeley Clerk’s Office
www.alameda.courts.ca.
gov
Temporary Restraining
Orders

District Attorney’s Office
Violence
San Mateo County Child Domestic
Advocate
Protective Services
Oakland

Child Abuse Hotline
800. 632. 4615 / 650. 595.
7922
www.co.sanmateo.ca.us/
smc/department/hsa/
home

510. 268. 7276
asafeplacedvs.org/
resources.htm

7

Domestic Violence
Response Unit / Elder
Abuse

2400 Moorpark Ave.
San Jose, CA 95128
24-hour hotline:
408.975.2730
www.aaci.org
Asian languages;
emergency food, clothing
& shelter for women and
children, counseling, legal
advocacy

Asian Women’s Shelter
3453 18th St., #19
San Francisco, CA 94110
877. 751. 0880
415. 751. 7110
www.sfaws.org
Various Asian languages;
emergency shelter in
confidential location
Building Futures with
Women And Children /
Sister Me Home
1395 Bancroft Ave.
San Leandro, CA 94577
510. 357. 0205
www.bfwc.org
Spanish; women and
children

Futures Without
Violence

100 Montgomery Street,
San Francisco, CA 94129
415.678.5500 | TTY: 800.
595. 4889
www.
futureswithoutviolence.
org

Gum Moon Women’s
Residence

940 Washington St.
San Francisco,CA 94108
415. 421. 8827
www.gbgm-umc.org/awrc
Transitional housing and
supportive services for
battered single,
low-income, Asian
immigrant women victims
of domestic and sexual
violence

Haven of Peace
Women’s
Emergency Home

San Joaquin County
7070 South Harlan Rd.
French Camp, CA 95231
209. 982. 0390 / 209. 982.
0396
18+ years accepted; 35
space capacity; assist
Community Overcoming women with food,
clothing and counseling
Relationship Abuse

(CORA)

P.O. Box 5090
San Mateo, CA 94402
24-hr Hotline:
800.300.1080
Legal Info Line: 650. 259.
1855
www.corasupport.org
English & Spanish spoken;
emergency shelter,
transitional housing, legal
services

Community Solutions

6980 Chestmut St.
Gilroy, CA 95020
24-hr Crisis Line: 877. 363.
7238
Youth & Family Crisis:
408. 683. 4118
www.communitysolutions.
org

Eden Info & Referral

570 B Street
Hayward, CA 94541
COUNSELING SERVICES
510. 537. 2710
www.edenir.org
ACCESS
Victim Services Division Referral services, daily
24-hr Support Line: 800.
SF District Attorney’s Office updates of shelter
491. 9099
850 Bryant St., Room 320 availability in East Bay
415. 553. 9044
Crisis Support Services Comprehensive advocacy Emergency Shelter
24-hr Line: 800. 309. 2131 and support
Program
1180 B St.
Girls, Inc., Pathways
Hayward, CA 94541
Counseling Center
24-hr hotline:
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Alameda County
Hayward: 510. 786. 1246
SHELTERS
13666 E. 14th St.
Oakland: 510. 534. 6030
San Leandro, CA 94578
Spanish; 90-day stay,
24-Hour Emergency
510. 357. 5515
women and children of
Shelter
WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED AGAINST VIOLE
4
SF Police Department
415. 553. 9225

domestic violence

La Casa de Las Madres

1850 Mission St., #B
San Francisco, CA 94103
24-hour Crisis Lines:
Adult Line: 877. 503. 1850
Teen Line: 877. 923. 0700
www.lacasa.org
Emergency shelter;
Domestic Violence
Response, Safe Havens
Project, Mary Elizabeth
Inn Case Management
Program; Spanish,
Mandarin, Tagalog,
French, Arabic

La Isla Pacifica

Gilroy, CA
24 hour Crisis Line: 408.
683. 4118
Bilingual services,
emergency food, shelter
up to 45 days, drug/
alcohol treatment,
outpatient domestic
violence counseling, legal
assistance

assistance, reeducation
classes for batterers

Mary Elizabeth Inn

1040 Bush St.
San Francisco, CA 94109
415. 673. 6768
www.meinn.org
Transitional housing and
employment assistance

925. 443. 4283 / 888. 216.
4776
www.shepherdsgate.org
Emergency shelter, job
training,
short & long term
programs

Stand Against Domestic
Violence
1410 Danzig Plaza
My Sister’s House
Concord, CA 94520
3053 Freeport Blvd.
888. 215. 5555 / 925. 676.
Sacramento, CA 95818
24-hr multilingual helpline: 2845
www.standagainstdv.org
916. 428. 3271
www.my-sisters-house.org Emergency shelter,
transitional housing,
24-hour help line, safe
Adelante Familia for
haven for Asian / Pacific
Islander women & children Spanish speakers

5jkl

National Domestic
Violence Hotline

1. 800. 799. SAFE (7233)
1. 800. 787. 3224 (TTY)
24-hr access through all 50
states, English & Spanish,
interpreter services in 140
languages, local access to
shelters, information for
immigrants

Next Door Solutions to
Domestic Violence

234 E. Gish Road, Ste. 200
San Jose, CA 95112
24-hr hotline: 408. 279.
2962
www.nextdoor.org
English & Spanish,
comprehensive
emergency assistance
services, shelters in San
Jose & Santa Clara

Tri-Valley Haven

3663 Pacific Ave.
Livermore, CA 94550
800. 884. 8119 / 925. 449.
5845
www.trivalleyhaven.org
Cantonese, German,
French, Spanish, Tagalog,
Hindi; Emergency shelter
for women and children of
DV

Women Escaping
Violence (WEAVE )

1900 K St.
Sacramento, CA 95814
916. 920. 2952 / 916. 448.
2321
www.weaveinc.org
Response team, temporary
housing, crisis counseling,
employment services

W.O.M.A.N. Inc.
North American Islamic 333 Valencia St., Ste. 450
Shelter for the Abused San Francisco, CA 94103
P.O. Box 50515
Palo Alto, CA 94303
888-ASK-NISA / 888. 275.
6472
www.asknisa.org
Support and help to Urdu,
Hindi, Arabic, Farsi, Pushtu
speakers
Safe Alternatives to Violent
Environments (SAVE)
1900 Mowry Ave., Ste. 204
Fremont, CA 94538
24-hr hotline: 510. 794.
6055
www.save-dv.org
Spanish, Hindi, Tamil;
Emergency shelter &
longer term housing,
medical & legal assistance

24-hr Crisis Lines:
877. 384. 3578 / 415. 864.
4722
www.womaninc.org
Bilingual, bicultural services,
counseling, legal referrals,
support groups

YWCA Support Network
for Battered Women
1257 Tasman Dr., Ste. C
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
24-hr Help Line: 800. 572.
2782
www.supportnetwork.org
English & Español; crisis
intervention, counseling,
legal services, emergency
shelter

8

Marin Abused Women’s Saint John’s Shelter for
Services
Women & Children

734 A St., San Rafael, CA
4410 Power Inn Rd.
94901
Sacramento, CA 95826
Women’s English Hotline: 916. 453. 1482
415. 924. 6616
www.stjohnsshelter.org
Women’s Spanish Hotline: Emergency shelter up to
415. 924. 3456
60 days
Men’s Hotline: 415. 924.
1070
Shepherd’s Gate
www.maws.org
1660 Portola Ave.
Emergency shelter, legal
Livermore, CA 94551
NCE FILIPINA WOMEN AGAINST VI

HUMAN TRAFFICKING
California law defines
human trafficking as “all
acts involved in the
recruitment, abduction,
transport, harboring,
transfer, sale or receipt of
persons, within national or
across international
borders, through force,

OLENCE

3
def

B AY A R E A
coercion, fraud or
deception, to place
persons in situations of
slavery or slavery like
conditions, forced labor
or services, such as forced
prostitution or sexual
services, domestic
servitude, bonded
sweatshop labor, or other
debt bondage.”
SERVICE PROVIDERS:

BAYSWAN

P.O. Box 210256
San Francisco, CA 94121
415. 751. 1659
www.bayswan.org

Center for Gender and
Refugee Studies

800
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 252. 3208
www.sf-hrc.org
Jewish Community
Relations Council
121 Steuart St., Ste. 301
San Francisco, CA 94105
415. 957. 1551
www.jcrc.org

Not For Sale
270 Capistrano Rd., Ste.
2
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
650. 560. 9990
www.
notforsalecampaign.org

Project Eden

22646 Second St.
Hayward, CA 94541
510. 247. 8200
Counseling for LGBTQQ
Youth

Sexual Minority
Alliance of Alameda
County Youth Center
1608 Webster St.
Oakland, CA 94612
510. 548. 8283
Support groups for
LGBTQQ youth

SF LGBT Center

1800 Market St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 865. 5555
www.sfcenter.org
Legal referrals,
Temporary Restraining
Order assistance

6
mno

200 McAllister St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 565. 4877
www.egrs.uchastings.
edu

Freedom House SF

A new life for survivors of
human trafficking
650.488.0831
www.freedomhousesf.
org

Lawyers’ Committee
for Civil Rights of the
SF Bay Area

131 Stuart St., Ste 400
San Francisco, CA 94105
415. 543. 9444
www.lccr.com

MISSEY (Motivating,
Inspiring, Supporting
and Service Sexually
Exploited Youth)
Alameda County Family
Justice Center
470 Seventh St.
Oakland, CA 94612
510.267.8840 /
510.290.6450
www.missey.org

Department on the
Status of Women

25 Van Ness Ave., Ste.

427 South Van Ness
San Francisco, CA 94103
24-hr Crisis Line: 415.
333. 4357
www.cuav.org

Lavender Youth
Recreation and
Information Center

127 Collingwood St.
San Francisco, CA 94114
415. 703. 6150
www.lyric.org
Prevention education
through young women’s
health programs, afterschool programs, job
training, and targeted
outreach to queer young
women throughout San
Francisco
234 East Gish Rd., Ste.
200
San Jose, CA 95112
Hotline: 888. 862. 4874
408. 436. 8398 / 408.
436. 8393
www.maitri.org
South Asian Women;
peer support /
counseling for domestic
violence, family law,
immigration domestic
violence issues,
translation,
interpretation,
transitional housing

9

25 Van Ness Ave., Ste.
240
San Francisco, CA 94102
415. 252. 2578
www.sfgov.org/dosw

Human Rights
Commission

Community United
Against Violence
(CUAV)

Maitri Hotline

SHADE Project
Survivors Healing,
Advising and Dedicated
to Empowerment
510.306.5316
shadeproject.org
ADVOCACY
ORGANIZATIONS:

LESBIAN, GAY,
BISEXUAL,
TRANSGENDER,
& QUESTIONING

Pacific Center

2712 Telegraph Ave.
Berkeley, CA 94705
510. 548. 8283
www.pacificcenter.org
Group and individual
counseling, narcotics
anonymous, HIV and
Aids group, social groups

SF Network for
Battered Lesbians/
Bisexuals
415. 281. 0276

LEGAL REFERRALS:
TEMPORARY
RESTRAINING ORDER
ASSISTANCE

j o i n s F I LIPINA W OMEN’S N ETWORK
& THE w o me n o f c o l o r u n i te d
a g a i n s t v i o le n c e IN YOUR DREAM

OF A VIO LE NCE - FREE W ORL D

The Cooperative
Restraining Order
Clinic
San Francisco

415. 252. 2844
Bilingual Service;
Restraining Order
Assistance free of
charge; paperwork
served to batterer at
reduced fee

Legal Aid of Napa
County

Congratulations

trisha and the cast of
the vagina monologues

1001 Second St., Suite
335
Napa, CA 94559
707. 259. 0579
www.legalaidnapa.org
Free legal services to
seniors, immigrants and
low-income residents of
Napa County
YOUTH
ORGANIZATIONS &
RRESOURCES

Huckleberry Youth
Programs
www.
huckleberryyouth.org
415.621.2929

ATSSI offers testing, training, livescan fingerprinting for propriety security officers.
ATSSI is an EOE: Welcome applicants every Wednesday from 1:00 - 3:00 PM
Providing guards to commercial buildings, construction sites,
office buildings, parking garages, private parties, shopping malls.
Norma@attsi-sf.com

24 Hour Teen Hotline
415.621.2929

T V M 2 0 1 6 | C E L E B R AT I N G 1 1 Y E A R S

5

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“I knew my parents were proud of me when
they started telling their friends what I do
(and look for any newspaper clippings)”!
- Nancy Wong

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but all atest fear is t
- Helen bets are off!” o die youngM a r te B
autista
NYU. She showed me
“bell hooks. I met her atfor permission to take
you don’t have to wait
change, start creating it!”
action. If you want to see
-Ali Collins

6

“I fear nothing....
but human trafficking.”
- Rose Stubberfield

“My father ne
work and that ver went to college. All he kn
he let me knowis what he taught us. When ew was back-breaking
I gr
he finally unde
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,

l

The Vagina Monologues

IS A CELEBRATION OF FEMALE SEXUALITY IN ALL ITS COMPLEXITY AND
MYSTERY. BASED ON INTERVIEWS WITH OVER 200 WOMEN ABOUT THEIR
MEMORIES AND EXPERIENCES OF SEXUALITY, THE VAGINA
MONOLOGUES GIVES VOICE TO WOMEN’S DEEPEST FANTASIES AND
FEARS, GUARANTEEING THAT NO ONE WHO READS IT WILL EVER LOOK
AT A WOMAN’S BODY, OR THINK OF SEX, IN QUITE THE SAME WAY AGAIN.
“AT FIRST WOMEN WERE RELUCTANT TO TALK,” ENSLER WRITES. “THEY
WERE A LITTLE SHY. BUT ONCE THEY GOT GOING, YOU COULDN’T STOP
THEM.”
WELCOME

Marily Mondejar,
Executive Producer
VAGINA WARRIORS
SPOTLIGHT

Adam Keigwin,
Blesilda Ocampo,
Clara Tempongko,
Giovannie Pico,
Imelda Oppenheim,
Julie D. Soo, Rodel
Rodis, Rudy Asercion,
Tess Crescini
INTRODUCTION

Ali Collins, Camellia
Santos, Dyanna
Quizon, Hala Hijazi,
Heidi Yamaguchi,
Helen Marte Bautista,
Julie Abrams, Marian
Catedral-King,
Rosario CajucomBradbury, Rose
Stubberfield
INTRO – HAIR

Julie Abrams
HAIR

Ali Collins
WEAR AND SAY

Amar Bornkamp, Ava
Ragasa, Azja Ragasa,
Camille Dixon, Cecile
Ascalon, Jenna
Rapues, Juslyn
Manalo, Rocio Nuyda,
Sheryll Casuga,
Tahitia Dean
INTRO – THE FLOOD

SAY IT (FOR THE COMFORT
WOMEN)

Marian CatedralKing, Rose
Stubberfield & All
Cast

EXTRO– SAN FRANCISCO
COMFORT WOMEN
MEMORIAL UPDATE

Fiona Ma

INTRO – BECAUSE HE LIKED
TO LOOK AT IT

Myrna Tang Yao
BECAUSE HE LIKED
TO LOOK AT IT

Rocio Nuyda

MY REVOLUTION BEGINS IN
THE BODY

EXTRO - ECONOMICS OF
HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Marily Mondejar

MY SHORT SKIRT

Rosario CajucomBradbury

Dyanna Quizon

THE VAGINA WORKSHOP

THE LITTLE COOCHI
SNORCHER THAT COULD

Heidi Yamaguchi

Rosaura Sandoval

Supervisor Jane Kim

INTRO – THE LITTLE COOCHI
SNORCHER THAT COULD

INTRO – SAY IT (FOR THE
COMFORT WOMEN)

INTRO – I WAS THERE
IN THE ROOM

LULLABY –
ILI-ILI, TULOG ANAY*

Ali Collins

Ava Ragasa, Azja
Ragasa, Jenna
Rapues, Camellia
Santos

OUTRAGEOUS VAGINA FACT
(VIBRATOR)

Nancy Wong

CAMELLIA SANTOS

Preschool Teacher

CAMILLE DIXON

CECILE ASCALON

Former Chairwoman of
the City of Vallejo Youth
Activities Commission

Executive Director
Pilipino Senior Resource
Center

HALA HIJAZI

HEIDI PERVIN
YAMAGUCHI

Sheryll Casuga,
Tahitia Dean & All
Cast

FILIPINO LULLABY –
SA UGOY NY DUYAN**

Rosaura Sandoval

AZJA RAGASA

Student
Academy of Art
University, San Francisco

THE WOMAN WHO LOVED
TO MAKE VAGINAS HAPPY

MY VAGINA WAS MY VILLAGE

THE FLOOD

Sonia Delen

Rose Stubberfield

INTRO – MY VAGINA WAS MY
VILLAGE

Hala Hijazi

VAGINA HAPPY FACT

INTRO – THE WOMAN
WHO LOVED TO MAKE
VAGINAS HAPPY

Ali Collins, Camellia
Santos, Heidi
Yamaguchi, Helen
Marte Bautista,
Myrna Tang Yao

Camille Dixon

Amar Bornkamp,
Cecile Ascalon,
Nancy Wong

RECLAIMING CUNT

MY ANGRY VAGINA

Julie Abrams, Juslyn
Manalo

AVA RAGASA

Student
Mercy High School

Camille Dixon

I WAS THERE
IN THE ROOM

Camellia Santos

AMAR BORNKAMP

Senior Team Manager
Charles Schwab

INTRO – RECLAIMING CUNT

Rosario CajucomBradbury

Dyanna Quizon, Heidi
Yamaguchi

ALI COLLINS

San F rancisco Public
School Advocate and
Blogger

Tahitia Dean

NOT-SO-HAPPY FACT

Azja Ragasa

Who’s
Who in
the Cast
& Crew

DYANNA QUIZON,
ESQ.

Legislative Aide to San
Francisco Supervisor
Katy Tang

HELEN MARTE
BAUTISTA

Former Commissioner
San Francisco Public
Library Commission

FIONA MA

Chairwoman, California
State Board of
Equalization

JENNA RAPUES

Assistance Provider
UCSF Center of
Excellence for
Transgender Health

Board Member, Emerge
California; Founder,
Professionals VIP
Network

JUSLYN MANALO

Community
Engagement Associate
Forest City Enterprises

Retired
Chevron

JULIE ABRAMS

Founder & CEO Bay
Area Women Leader’s
Network & Bay Area
Women’s Philanthropy

SPEAK OUT

HANDPRINTS PLEDGE
(MEN AGAINST VIOLENCE)
WITH THE V-MEN:

San Francisco District
Attorney George
Gascon, Former City
College Board
President Rodel Rodis

MARIAN
CATEDRAL KING

Policy, Government
& Public Affairs Rep,
Chevron

MYRNA TANG YAO

Founder & CEO
Richwell Trading Corp.,
Philippines

NANCY WONG

Diverse Segments
Marketing Manager
Wells Fargo

ROCIO NUYDA

Owner
Grace Events

CURTAIN CALL

Cast & Crew
BREAK THE CHAIN
*Text:“Ili-Ili,NowGoToSleep”(Cebuano).
P. Magdamo, Arranger
**Text:“FromtheCradle”(Tagalog),LucioSan
Pedro,Composer;LeviCelerio(Lyrics)

ROSARIO
CAJUCOMBRADBURY

Former Managing
Director & CEO of SGS in
the Philippines & Guam

ROSAURA
SANDOVAL

Entrepreneur and
Photographer

ROSE
STUBBERFIELD

Portfolio Manager;
Board Member,
Stubberfield Foundation

DR. SHERYLL
CASUGA

Sports Psychologist and
Clinical Psychologist

Women of Color United Against Violence Cast & Crew

SONIA DELEN

Senior Vice President
Merrill L ynch, Banc of
America Leasing

TAHITIA DEAN

Educator

Playwright

Co-Director

Founder
V-DAY

Chief of Staff to California
Board of Equalization
Chairwoman Fiona Ma

Co-Director

Executive Producer

Actor and
Director

Vice Chair & Commissioner
Commission on Community
Investment and Infrastructure

EVE
ENSLER

ROSIE
JOSUE

GENEVIEVE JOPANDA

MARILY MONDEJAR

ALI M. COLLINS is a San
Francisco-based public
school advocate who
has worked in the field
of education equity for
almost 20 years. She is
an independent agent
of change and active
blogger on SF Public School
Mom (http://sfpsmom.
com/) where she writes
about education policy,
parenting, and race. She
is an active school and
district volunteer who
regularly advocates for
underrepresented families
at her daughters’ school
and throughout the district.
AMAR BORNKAMP is
Senior Team Manager
in Operations Control
at Charles Schwab.
She manages teams in
Orlando, Phoenix, and
India, providing oversight
and controls over firm
applications/systems in
order to prevent employee
fraud, protect clients
and firm assets. As cochairperson of the Asian
Pacific Islander Network at
Schwab, she puts together
career development events
that focus on leadership
and overcoming cultural
barriers.
ANASTAZJA RAGASA

Stage Coordinator

JOHNNY T. VELOSO

Pianist

MELINDA MORSE

Stage Tech

JOY LAM

Editor

RAISSA ALVERO

Fellow
Filipina Women’s Network

graduatedfromMercyHighSchool
SanFrancisco.Shehasattended
CityCollegeofSanFranciscoasan
EthnicStudiesstudentandAcademy
ofArtUniversityasaMultimedia
Communicationsstudent.Attheage
of15,Anastazjawasawardedwith
aninternshipinMayorEdLee’sOffice
andreceivedthe“IAmTheFuture”
Scholarship.
AVA ROSE RAGASA is
a 14-year-old freshman
honor student at Mercy
High School. Ava was
chosen for Mercy’s Women
in the Performing Arts
program and recently
performed in “Celebrating
Women on Broadway.”
She is a soprano and sings
in the Mercy choir Dolce.
Ava and her family are
very active in the FilipinoAmerican Community.
CAMELLIA SANTOS

Production Manager

Production Assistant

Marketing Manager
Telamon Engineering
Consultants, Inc.

Student,
San Francisco State

TRISHA MARCO

TRIYA MARCO

made her a cting debut at
the Chabot Little Theater.
She joined Americorps
NCCC assisting non-profit
organizations across the
U.S. She returned to the Bay
Area to pursue behavioral

science and earned her BA
in Child Development from
Mills College. Camellia is in
the business of expanding
minds and hearts both as
a preschool teacher and
an Arbonne Independent
Consultant. Everyday she
practices how to be a
wonderful human being
and aims to what she calls
“earning your Savasana.”
CAMILLE DIXON makes
her theatrical debut in
V-Day FWN’s production of
The Vagina Monologues.
A Bay Area native with a
multi-ethnic background,
she likes meditating on
the beach, advocates for
individuals that come
from disadvantaged
backgrounds while staying
involved in public interest
work. She was Chairwoman
of the City of Vallejo Youth
Activities Commission
and volunteered for
Prisoner Legal Services
in San Francisco. Camille
has worked in various
government positions
for over 10 years and has
served as a staff member
under two elected officials.
She has earned degrees in:
Paralegal Studies, Political
Science, Law, and Tax Law.
CECILE GREGORIOASCALON is the Executive

Director of Pilipino
Senior Resource Center.
She received her BA in
Communications and
Journalism from University
of the Philippines, Post
Baccalaureate Studies
in Counseling at Ateneo
de Manila University,
Successful Aging Mini
Fellowship Program
at Stanford School of
Medicine and is an
accredited provider of
the Triple P – Positive
Parenting Program. Cecile
has received various awards
including the 100 Most
Influential Filipina Women
in the World (Global
FWN100™). Married to
Philippine Deputy Consul
General Jaime T. Ascalon,
they have two very smart
sons – Jaime and Andre.
DYANNA QUIZON

attended Holy Name
and Lowell High School,
received her B.A. Sociology
at UC Davis and her J.D.
at UC Berkeley. Dyanna

9

is Legislative Aide to San
Francisco Supervisor Katy
Tang. Previously, she served
as a legal intern with the
Department of Justice’s
Civil Rights Division;
Judicial Administration
Fellow with the California
Administrative Office of
the Courts; assistant to
the Asian Pacific Islander
Legislative Caucus;
and policy analyst with
Mayor Ed Lee’s Office.
She loves cheering the
Niners, Giants, Warriors
and Sharks; training for
body building (bikini
division) competitions; and
exploring the City by the
Bay.

of Public Health degree
from SF State University.
Jenna is a capacity-building
assistance provider with the
UCSF Center of Excellence
for Transgender Health.
She provides technical
assistance and capacitybuilding to communitybased organizations
nationally in improving
health disparities and
outcomes for trans and
gender non-binary people.
Jenna has published
journal articles highlighting
the impact of HIV and
health disparities among
San Francisco’s transgender
communities.

HALA K. HIJAZI is a

is an experienced CEO
and sought-after speaker
in entrepreneurship and
women’s leadership. A
dedicated philanthropist
and activist, she serves
as advisor and board
member to tech start-ups
and social sector boards
focused on women and
children, Latinos, economic
development and the
arts. Julie is the Founder
and CEO of the Bay Area
Women Leader’s Network
and the Bay Area Women’s
Philanthropy Network. She
also serves as Chair of the
Cypress String Quartet,
Co-Chair of Vital Voices
Bay Area Council, and
Board Director of Women’s
Funding Network.

distinguished business and
political leader in the public
and private sectors. Hala’s
public service include:
Board Director, Emerge
California; President
Obama’s/ DNC’s National
Finance Committee, cofounder of DNC’s GEN 44
program; CA Democratic
State Delegate (D-11);
Political Partner at the
Truman Project; founder,
Professionals VIP Network
(4500 members); launched
the William J. Clinton
Foundation’s Millennium
Network raising over $1.5
Million Dollars; honored as
a Rising Star by the League
of Women Voters.
HEIDI (PERVIN)
YAMAGUCHI As a life long

advocate for women’s
rights, a mother, a wife, I am
proud to be a part of The
Vagina Monologues. My
mother ended the cycle of
multi-generational violence
in our family by leaving her
husband in 1945. I thank
my mother, Pauline Audrey
Elizabeth (1923-2004), for
the values of independence
and self awareness that she
bestowed upon me and
my sister, Lisa. She gave
us three rules to love by:
never stay with someone
who is (1) possessive, (2)
not generous, and (3) never
stay with someone who
strikes out in violence. I
thank her for her wisdom.
JENNA RAPUES is
a Filipina-American
transgender woman. She
was born in the Philippines,
grew up in San Francisco
and received her Master

JULIE CASTRO ABRAMS

MARIAN CATEDRAL-KING

is the Policy, Government
and Public Affairs (PGPA)
Representative for Chevron
Northern California and
Pacific Northwest where
she provides public affairs
and communications
support including
government relations,
community engagement
and social investment.
Marian was Manager of
the PGPA team in Chevron
Philippines (Caltex)
before she moved to the
United States. Marian was
recognized one of the Most
Influential Filipina Women
in the United States by the
Filipina Women’s Network.
She was past President
of Chevron’s Filipino
Employees Network and
mentors young Filipino
Americans in the Bay Area.

MYRNA TANG YAO worked
( CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 )

FIONA MA
Game changer
B Y G E N E V I E V E J O PA N D A

From the moment she burst
onto the San Francisco
political scene as the Sunset ’s
representative on the Board of
Supervisors, Fiona Ma has been
a passionate and outspoken
leader on domestic violence.
And throughout a political
career that includes serving on
the Board of Supervisors, three
terms in the Assembly—where
she was, at one point, Speaker
Pro Tempore, second only to
the Speaker in the Assembly ’s
leadership—and now as
Chairwoman of the State Board
of Equalization, Fiona Ma has
never ceased waging a fearless
fight to keep domestic violence
at the front and center of
California’s public concern.
Over the course of an
unusually productive time
in the Legislature (Ma had
more than 60 bills signed
into law by Governors Arnold
Schwarzenegger and Jerry
Brown, a track record of
accomplishment few legislators
of that era were able to boast
of), Ma introduced no fewer
than six major bills related to
domestic violence, including
her nationally watched efforts
to reform the criminal justice
system so that victims of abuse
can finally have a fair day in
court.
It ’s that last issue that has
emerged as something of a
signature policy achievement for
Fiona Ma.
For the past twenty years, the
prevailing wisdom in political
circles is that elected officials
couldn’t be perceived as being
10

Fiona Ma keynotes the Victim Rights Week Rally at the State Capitol in Sacramento

“soft on crime” even in a city whose politics
are as progressive as San Francisco. Until
very recently, that conventional wisdom went
virtually unchallenged by almost every elected
official in California—except for Fiona Ma.
She was one of the first major state officials
to publicly question whether a one-size-fitsall approach to justice was, in fact, treating
survivors of abuse justly.
Her landmark efforts on behalf of incarcerated
abuse victims made one of the first major
victories of the criminal justice reform
movement—and it has made a tremendous
difference in the lives of the women who have
taken advantage of Ms. Ma’s legislation.

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

It ’s hard to overstate how important this law
is for the women who found themselves in
an abusive environment; whose physical and
mental anguish drove her (or him) to the point
of reacting violently, and who then found
themselves in prison. For decades, this horrific
cycle played itself out across California, aided
by a culture of silence and a criminal justice
system that simply didn’t factor in what years
of abuse can do to a person mentally.
In those days, Battered Wife Syndrome was
not treated as the serious mental condition
we now understand it to be, but rather more
like a desperate ploy by defense attorneys.
Our criminal justice system, and the society it
underpinned, simply did not take into account

WWW.FILIPINAWOMENSNET WORK.ORG

the isolation, abandonment
and dependency that enables
abusers to keep abusing their
victims.

using that statewide position to
stay engaged in the policy process
advocating for the victims of
domestic violence.

But today, we know what
abuse can do to someone
mentally. We hear horror
stories from those earlier
years of women who, in a
moment of desperation, shot
their husbands—and then got
sent to prison for life. It ’s
hard not to weep for these
women; for the circumstances
that led them to prison. But
it ’s another thing entirely for
a politician to stand up and
champion them.

One such victim—a name all too
familiar to Bay Area residents—
is a name that Fiona Ma first
heard alongside the rest of San
Francisco in the summer of 2000.
Claire Joyce Tempongko was
brutally stabbed to death by a
former partner of hers, witnessed
by her son and daughter. The
system failed Claire Joyce
Tempongko and her children. She
didn’t stay silent—she called the
police a number of times. She
filed restraining orders and did
everything she could to separate
herself from her abuser. But it
wasn’t enough.

Yet that ’s exactly what Fiona
Ma did. She wrote the law
that removed a major hurdle
for women whose rehearing
petitions had been denied due
to lack of expert testimony
that might otherwise
mitigated a conviction. She
wrote the law that mandates
parole boards take into
account the abuse that women
suffered before they were
convicted of their crimes. She
gave these women a voice. For
many of them, this was the
first time anyone had stood up
to fight for them.
AB 593 and AB 1593 are
the capstones to six years
in the Assembly that saw
Fiona Ma wage a number of
crucial fights. She also wrote
legislation raising awareness
of intimate partner violence
between teenagers, and issue
that is too often overlooked in
the media. She also authored
legislation easing the process
for obtaining a temporary
restraining order, and secured
funding for emergency
shelters throughout California
that were operating under
enormous strain due to the
Great Recession.
Term limits forced her from
the Assembly in 2012, but
she returned to public life
in 2014, winning a seat on
the nation’s only elected tax
board, the State Board of
Equalization. Earlier this year,
she was elected Chairwoman
by her colleagues, and she is

A criminal justice system that
didn’t take domestic violence
seriously enough never connected
the dots that Claire Joyce
Tempongko’s partner was a serial
abuser, and that his abuse was
escalating. And it continued to
escalate, right up until the day
that he stabbed her to death and
fled to Mexico.
Tempongko’s death shocked the
community, and brought issues of
domestic violence—particularly
against women of color—to the
forefront. Fiona Ma has helped
keep it there, working with
Filipina Women’s Network and
other groups to keep the memory
of Claire Joyce Tempongko alive,
as an example to remind each of
us that the cycle of abuse can
be broken—but only if we speak
out when we suspect abuse is
happening, and are committed to
bringing abusers to justice.

t
r
u
o
C
h
c
t
a
W
Beloved Filipina-American high
school teacher killed by estranged
ex-husband
In March 2016, Filipina-American
high school chemistry teacher Gladys
Tordil testified in front of a Prince
George’s County Judge against her
estranged husband, Eulalio Tordil. In
her testimony she described specific
incidents of physical altercations that
left her face bruised with her glasses
broken. She also expressed death
threats that Eulalio had made towards
her and her two teenage daughters.
Gladys was granted a protective
order against Eulalio and he was later
put on administrative leave from his
job at Homeland Security’s Federal
Protective Service. Two months later,

Gladys was shot and killed by Eulalio
at Westfield Montgomery Mall,
Maryland in front of her teenage
daughter just days before Mother’s
Day. Tordil continued his rampage and
shot five more people, two of them
fatally, before being apprehended by
Montgomery County Police.
Justice for Jennifer
Jennifer Laude was murdered by
19-year old Private First Class Joseph
Scott Pemberton of the U.S. Marines
while he was stationed in Subic
Bay, Philippines. Jennifer, a Filipina
transgender woman, was drowned
and asphyxiated by Pemberton.
The Olongapo Regional Trial Court
found Pemberton guilty of homicide,
a lesser charge than murder, and
sentenced him to 6 to 12 years in
Philippine jail.
San Francisco Public Defender Marla
Zamora
Former San Francisco Public Defender
Maria Zamora was murdered in her
Portero Hill home on May 6, 2016.
Police have arrested her nephew,
20 year-old Angelo Zamora, in
connection to her stabbing murder.

(Claire Joyce Tempongko’s killer
was eventually brought to justice
after the reward for his capture
was increased thanks in part to
the efforts of Fiona Ma).
Fortunately, with thoughtful
and visionary elected officials
like Chairwoman Ma leading the
charge, we can truly envision the
day when domestic violence is a
thing of the past.

T V M 2 0 1 6 | C E L E B R AT I N G 1 1 Y E A R S

11

BENEFICIARY
SPOTLIGHT:
COMFORT
WOMEN
JUSTICE
COALITION
The “Comfort Women” Justice Coalition
(CWJC) is composed of over a dozen groups
of human rights advocates, lawyers, teachers,
and veterans—and includes organizations
from the Korean, Chinese, African-American,
Filipino, Japanese, white, peace, church, labor,
and other communities. Beginning in
September 2015, CWJC launched an initiative
to create a memorial commemorating the
suffering and courage of the women the
Japanese government and military sexually
enslaved during WWII. The memorial has
received overwhelming support and
endorsements from the Pan-Asian
community in the US and internationally,
including twenty progressive organizations
from Japan. Supervisors Eric Mar and Jane
Kim have led the effort, which has also
received strong support from the Mayor of
San Francisco, the Honorable Edwin Lee and
First Lady Anita Lee; and all eleven San
Francisco supervisors, the two
Assemblymembers from San Francisco, David
Chiu and Phil Ting, and State Senator Mark
Leno.
The effort to install such a memorial is
premised on the human rights of women and
men to be free from sexual exploitation,
trafficking and abuse: a fundamental right
that was severely and shamefully violated
during WWII. The Japanese government,
through its Imperial Army, sexually enslaved
between two- and four-hundred thousand
women and girls in what euphemistically
12

came to be called “Comfort Stations.” There,
women from 11 Asian countries—with the
majority from China, Korea and the Philippines-were forced to endure brutal sexual violence and
mass rape. Between 75 to 80% of them died as a
result. Most of the women and girls were
murdered, and some committed suicide—in
what became the largest and most infamous
crime of government-sponsored sexual
trafficking in modern history. In 2007, the US
Congress unanimously passed Resolution 121,
affirming that shameful history and called for an
acknowledgment and apology from the
Japanese government—and urging educators to
teach about it in our schools.
CWJC is currently actively engaged in supporting
the California Department of Education’s plan to
adopt the subject of “Comfort Women” in its
curriculum framework for 10th graders
beginning in spring 2017. In September 2015,
CWJC succeeded in urging the San Francisco
Board of Education to incorporate the subject of
“Comfort Women” into its curriculum on sex
trafficking. Our members continue to work with
the SFUSD Department of Curriculum to
implement that resolution.
CWJC has also conducted forums in San
Francisco for human rights workers from Japan
to speak out against the oppression of minorities
in Japan: Korean-Japanese and Filipino-Japanese
who suffer from harassment and threats without
government protection from the self- appointed
right-wing nationalistic Japanese groups.

WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED AGAINST VIOLENCE

CWJC is very grateful to Filipina Women’s
Network (FWN) for this generous gift allowing us
to benefit from the May 13, 2016 performance of
“The Vagina Monologues.” We wish you much
success and pledge our solidarity with our
Filipina sisters to help end violence against
women. We urge all women:

To Remember
History To Avoid
Repeating it.
LEARN MORE ABOUT
COMFORT WOMEN
JUSTICE COALITION (CWJC)
www.remembercomfortwomen.org

www.facebook.com/
comfortwomenjusticecoalition
https://www.facebook.com/groups/
RememberComfortWomen/

WHO’S WHO IN THE CAST AND CREW
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 )

dry goods to her position in the upper
echelon of Philippine business as an
exclusive distributor and licensing
agent of Mattel toys and leading brands
of toys, shoes and baby products. A
staunch advocate of women’s economic
empowerment, Myrna is founding
chair of the Philippine Federation
of Local Councils of Women and
founding president of the FilipinoChinese Federation of Business and
Professional Women of the Philippines.
She has held leadership positions in
the ASEAN Confederation of Women’s
Organizations, the International Alliance
of Women, the Philippine Movement
for Good Governance, and Women for
Women Foundation.

ROSAURA SANDOVAL is an
entrepreneur, mother of two small
children, wife, youngest of 6 children
from immigrant parents, Stanfordeducated light-catcher and storyteller. Her Arbonne and Photography
businesses and family keep her busy but
she still finds time to workout 6 days a
week, sing Karaoke whenever possible
and be the first and the last person on
the dance floor. Her super power is
helping people get healthy on the inside
out, realize how beautiful they are and
know they are worth it.

Fitzsimmons, and sons: David, Justin, and
Matthew.

recently had its world premiere at
American Repertory Theater where
she will also debut and perform In
the Body of the World, based on her
memoir in Spring of 2016, directed
by Diane Paulus. Her newest short
play Avocado opened to rave reviews
this summer at the West Yorkshire
Playhouse and at the Latitude festival
in the UK. She has written numerous
articles for The Guardian, Time
Magazine, Washington Post and the
International Herald Tribune. She
was named one of Newsweek’s “150
Women Who Changed the World” and
The Guardian’s “100 Most Influential
Women.”

TAHITIA DEAN is a New York transplant
and U.C. Berkeley graduate. At Berkeley,
Tahitia served as an editor for the History
Department Journal Clios’s Scroll as well
as Co-Chair of the Latino Pre-Law Society.
She has been teaching for the past few
years, having taught law courses and
related theories in a law academy in a
public high school in Richmond, California
for two years. She is currently pursuing
a Master’s Degree in Applied Intelligence
and preparing to take the law school
entrance exam. This is her second time
ROSE STUBBERFIELD is a portfolio
manager in Danville, California. She sits performing in V-Day FWN’s production of
on the board of the Stubberfield Family Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues.
Foundation and is a member of the
GENEVIEVE JOPANDA is Chief of Staff
NAACP, the National Council of Negro
to Fiona Ma, CPA- Chairwoman of the State
EVE ENSLER is the Tony Award
Women, and the Junior League of the
Board of Equalization serving upwards of
winning playwright, activist and
East Bay. She mentors at TransAccess,
10 Million constituents over 23 counties
author of the theatrical phenomenon,
NANCY WONG is the Diverse
a non-profit organization supporting
across California. She has held leadership
The Vagina Monologues, which has
Segments Marketing Manager at Wells
disabled women and girls. Rose has a
development and business operations
been published in 48 languages and
Fargo’s Community Banking Division.
passion for giving back to programs that performed in over 140 countries.
management positions with San Francisco
She is responsible for conducting
alleviate problems concerning girls and Eve’s plays include Necessary Targets,
Chronicle, Hertz Corporation, Zipcar,
complex marketing studies to project
women. Originally from New Orleans/
Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce, District
The Treatment, The Good Body, and
future marketing needs of diverse
Nawlins, Rose is a sustaining donor/
Emotional Creature. Her books include Liaison to former California Assembly
communities within Community Bank’s
supporter to Ruby’s Place, a non-profit Insecure At Last: A Political Memoir;
Speaker pro Tempore Fiona Ma, and San
Pacific and Mid-West region. She leads
rescuing domestic violence victims in
Francisco Hep B Free Campaign.
the New York Times best seller I Am
implementation of marketing programs, Hayward, California.
Genevieve is State Chair for the Filipino
An Emotional Creature, and her latest
provides support to business lines in
American Caucus of the California
critically acclaimed memoir In the
the execution of sales process standards DR. SHERYLL CASUGA is an
Democratic Party; a founding member of
Body of the World. She is founder of
and sales behavior, including facilitating internationally awarded certified
KAYA which was born from the Filipinos
V-Day, the global activist movement
the execution of sales related activities
for Obama 2008 campaign, and served in
to end violence against women and
sport psychologist specializing in
in the diverse communities. Born and
volunteer positions as Festival Director for
girls which has raised over 100 million
enhancing the mental performance
raised in Hong Kong, Wong maintains
dollars to end violence and One Billion FAAE ‘s Pistahan, Co-Director for Filipina
of athletes; and a CA-licensed clinical
close ties with childhood friends via
Rising, a global mass action campaign Women’s Network’s production of “The
psychologist working with individuals
whatsapp and frequent visits to Hong
Vagina
in over 200 countries. Her play O.P.C.
with developmental disabilities. As a
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 17)
Kong. In her free time, she enjoys hiking proud Filipina, Dr. Sheryll Casuga is an
and traveling.
advocate of women’s empowerment
and has made it her personal mission
ROCIO NUYDA is a retired management to fight oppression in all forms. Sheryll
executive (EVP) having worked for the
has been performing in theaters and
largest processor in the nation. She
choirs as young as 8 years old. It is her
owns an event planning business
third time performing in V-Day FWN’s
allowing her to network with women of production of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina
Civil Engineering | Land Surveying |
various ethnicities and cultures. She is
Monologues.

a staunch advocate for women’s rights
SWPPP
and works on social and civic services in SONIA T. DELEN is a Senior VP at
the U.S. and the Philippines, promoting
Bank of America Merrill Lynch. She has
Filipino Arts and Culture as Chair of
been a cast member of FWN’s “The
FilAm Arts (2014-2015), and member
Vagina Monologues” since 2003; and is
Congratulates the
of the Board of Directors of the Filipino
a FWN Board Member. Her accolades
American Symphony Orchestra (FASO),
include appointment by Governor Jerry
the only one of its kind and ethnicity in
Brown as Trustee of California Health
the nation.
Professions Education Foundation; Class
of 2011 for Leadership California, an
Cast & Crew of
As the former Managing Director and
organization dedicated to advancing the
CEO of Societe Generale de Surveillance, leadership role of women; Presidential
S.A. in the Philippines and Guam,
Citation for community service by
ROSARIO CAJUCOM-BRADBURY was
Philippine President Gloria Macapagal
THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES
in charge of an organization providing
Arroyo; and the 100 Most Influential
integrity to its clients seeking accurate
Filipina Women in the United States
and credible verification and evaluation Award. Sonia chairs the Campaign
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND
reports. Her rise to the top entailed
For Filipino Children for Apl.de. ap
855 Folsom St, Unit 142 1330 Broadway, Suite 952
extensive perseverance, patience and
Foundation International to combat
San Francisco, CA 94107 Oakland, CA 94612
faith. Continuing this impressive journey, retinopathy, a cause of blindness in
Tel: (415) 837-1336 Tel: (510) 893-1668
Rosario has now chosen a current life
premature babies. She is a contributing
Fax: (415) 837-1354 Fax: (510) 893-1669
path to refocus on family while pursuing author in FWN’s leadership book:
www.telamoninc.com

her advocacy on providing mentorship
“DISRUPT. Filipina Women: Proud. Loud.
on leadership and life transition.
Leading Without A Doubt”. She lives
San Francisco based Women-owned Local Business Enterprise

in San Francisco with her spouse, Chris
FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

|

www.filipinawomensnetwork.org

13

A Story Of Healing

ABOUT V-DAY

BY SHERYLL CASUGA

V -Day is a global activist movement
to end violence against women.
Over the past 17 years, V-Day
activists from more than 140
countries have worked tirelessly
on a grassroots level to demand an
end to all forms of violence against
women and girls. In the face of
resistance, and at the intersection
of art and activism, they have
come together around life-saving
safe houses, productions of award
winning playwright Eve Ensler’s
The Vagina Monologues and other
works curated by V-Day. V-Day
organizers have saved lives, raised
consciousness, changed laws to
protect women and girls, funded
rape crisis centers and domestic
violence shelters (often times
these much needed funds kept
them from closing), educated their
communities, and raised over $100
million in urgently needed funds
for groups doing the essential work
of ending violence and serving
survivors and their families.

“A night of hurtfulness happened once
again. Fighting for the love I deserve
while hiding the profound scars of
my shame for letting anyone treat
me this way. How did I end up in this
situation? I thought I was the luckiest
woman to have found the love of my
life. We shared a dream of spending
the rest of our lives together. A great
guy but when he feels insecure, such
as the case tonight, he hurts me - not
physically, but with hurtful words aimed
at my heart. I defend myself and things
always escalate. He pushes the right
buttons and I say things in anger. Later,
he reverses the story. He becomes ”the
victim”, while I become “the monster.” I
feel guilty, feel sorry, become depressed.
I resent myself. These situations make it
impossible for love to grow, for wounds
to heal, for futures to be hopeful...”
I wrote this passage two and a half
years ago, when I was in an emotionally
abusive relationship. It took a lot of
strength for me to break away. The
healing process is gradual. I am still
healing. I hope to impart what I learned
from my painful experience to help
others in similar situations.
Emotional health is not easy to gauge
as physical health. There are no
thermometers that tell us when we
reach a critical temperature, to warn us
when we are vulnerable. Sometimes, we
do not look into our emotions because
we are afraid of what we will find. I have

learned the answer is within us. What
we see in the mirror can give us a clue
as to what we feel inside, whether
there is a smile or a tearful face staring
back at us. At first, it was easier for me
to live in denial about my unhappiness.
I focused on the happy moments,
even though they were few and far in
between. Awareness is the first step to
healing.
It helps to find friends for support
during the healing process. Although
I lost some friends who did not
understand my life decisions, I had
a few friends who listened without
judgment and reminded me of better
days ahead. I have found that the
healing process is a community
process. We are all interconnected by
emotions. As I heal, I am creating a
world where it is possible for love to
grow and for futures to be hopeful.

V-Day’s work is grounded in 4
core beliefs: Art has the power
to transform thinking and
inspire people to act; Lasting
social and cultural change is
spread by ordinary people doing
extraordinary things; Local women
best know what their communities
need and can become unstoppable
leaders; One must look at the
intersection of race, class, and
gender to understand violence
against women.
V -Day’s global campaign, One
Billion Rising, has galvanized
overone billion women and men on

Suzanne Elaine Burns
L ov i n g w i f e , m o t h e r ,
dau g h t e r , s i s t e r a n d
grandmother

S h e wa s a s b r i g h t a s t h e
da f f o d i l s s h e l ov e d

Performing in The
V a g i n a M o n o l o g u e s wa s a
highlight

Fe b r ua ry 1 2 , 1 9 4 3 - M ay 1 3 , 2 0 1 0

a global day of action towards ending
violence against women and girls.
ONE BILLION RISING: 1 in 3 women
across the planet will be beaten or
raped during her lifetime. One Billion
Rising is the biggest mass action to
end violence against women in human
history. This year we are rising for
Revolution to change the paradigm,
demand accountability, justice and
systematic CHANGE. We invite you
to join us. www.onebillionrising.org
#Rise4Revolution.
Stay informed, sign up for RisingMail,
the movement’s online newsletter at
http://bit.ly/1iQkGZs and follow us on
Twitter @VDay and Facebook www.
facebook.com/vday

MISSION
STATEMENT
• V-Day is an organized response
against violence toward women.
• V-Day is a vision: We see a world
where women live safely and freely.
• V-Day is a demand: Rape, incest,
battery, genital mutilation and sexual
slavery must end now.
• V-Day is a spirit: We believe women
should spend their lives creating
and thriving rather than surviving or
recovering from terrible atrocities.
• V-Day is a catalyst: By raising
money and consciousness, it will
unify and strengthen existing antiviolence efforts. Triggering far-reaching
awareness, it will lay the groundwork
for new educational, protective, and
legislative
• V-Day is a process: We will work as
long as it takes. We will not stop until
the violence stops.
• V-Day is a day. We proclaim
Valentine’s Day as V-Day, to celebrate
women and end violence.
• V-Day is a fierce, wild, unstoppable
movement and community.

V-Day F W N M IL E STO N E S
11 YEAR Victories
2004

» March 30: First
all-Filipina
production of The
Vagina Monologues
in Taglish at the
Herbst Theatre to
mark Women’s
History Month.
36 cast members, 12
production team
members.
» “Handprints” – Men
Against Violence
collected signed
pledges on canvas
and paper that
“These Hands Will
Not Hurt Women
and Girls.”

2005

» March 13: First
publication
of the V-Diaries,
FWN’s anti-violence
resource guide.
30,000 copies were
printed and inserted
in The San Francisco
Chronicle, The
Examiner, and the
Bay Area Business
Woman.
» March 13 & 14: 2nd
V-Day Filipina show
becomes ambitious!
Two English shows
at the Herbst
Theatre!
» FWN’s CourtWatch is
created – Track
domestic violence
cases involving
Filipina women.

2006

» FWN goes coast-tocoast!
Two V-Day
productions –
San Francisco (Feb
26) and New York
(June 12-27) at
the Skirball Center
for the Performing
Arts at NYU.
» Launched Usaping

Puki –
the first Tagalog
version of
The Vagina
Monologues.
» June 12-27, New
York:
Joined Eve Ensler’s
two-week festival of
“Until the Violence
Stops: NYC.”

2007

» FWN continues its
coast-to-coast
campaign – SF and
NY.
» March 30 & April 14:
New York shows held
at the Philippine
Consulate to bring
anti-violence
message closer to
“home.”
» Cecivim, in
collaboration with
FWN, holds first
anti-domestic
violence workshop
for men.

2008

11 years: 2004 – 2016
23
productions of
The Vagina Monologues
4
productions of
Usaping Puki
4
productions of A
Memory,

A Monologue, A Rant and A
Prayer

655
total volunteer
cast and crew
$251,805

total funds raised
through
April 2012 to benefit:

2004: CORA - Community
Overcoming Relationship
Abuse
(San Mateo County); V-Day
2004 Spotlight: The Missing &
Murdered Women in Juarez,
Mexico
2005: West Bay Pilipino Multi-

2006: My Sister’s House –
Sacramento’s First Shelter for
Battered Asian Pacific Islander
Women and Children; The
Outstanding Women in the
Nation’s Service (TOWNS)
Foundation: Legal Fund
for “Nicole” Rape Case in
Subic, Philippines; V-Day
Spotlight: Justice
to Comfort Women
2007: Filipino American
Human
Services, Inc. (FAHSI) – New
York
V-Day Spotlight: Women in
Conflict Zones
2008: Lila Filipina: Comfort
Women Survivors in the
Philippines;
V-Day Spotlight: Katrina
Warriors – Women of New
Orleans & the
Gulf South
2009: API Domestic Violence
Resource Project (DVRP) –

Washington, D.C.;
V-Day Spotlight: Stop the
Rape
of Congo Women and Girls
2010: The Shade Tree and
House
of Lorie – House of Hope;
V-Day Spotlight: The Women
of
the Democratic Republic of
Congo
2011: My Sister’s House;
V-Day Spotlight: Women of
Haiti
2012: Women of Color
United Against Violence and
the
Filipino Anti-Domestic
Violence Billboard project;
V-Day Spotlight: Women of
Haiti
2013: Women of Color
United Against Violence
V-Day Spotlight: One Billion
Rising
2016: Comfort Women
Justice Coalition

VAG I N A WA R R I O R S

2012 Adam Keigwin • John Delgado • Julie Soo | 2011 Katrina Socco • Noelani
Sallings • Nwe Oo • Susie Quesada | 2010 Gerri Nuvall • Gloria T. Caoile • Nilda
Valmores • Rozita Villanueva | 2009 Elizabeth Aguilar-Tarchi • Genevieve
Jopanda • Paulita Lasola Malay • Rodel Rodis | 2008 Annalisa Enrile • Ken
Marquis • Ken Theisen • M. Evelina Galang • Mona Pasquil • Nenette Flores •
Sonia Delen • Justice Tani Gore Cantil-Sakauye | 2007 Al S. Perez • Bettina
Santos Yap • Elena B. Mangahas • Laureen Laglagaron • Perla De Jesus • Rudy
Asercion • Bincy Jacob • Krittika Ghosh • Venessa Manzano | 2006 Beverly
Upton • Dorka Keehn • Gloria Megino Ochoa • Imelda Oppenheim • Jonah
Oliverio • Ligaya Hattari • Sarah Jane Ilumin • Tess Crescini | 2005 Kamala D.
Harris • Giovannie Pico • Gloria Ramos • Rita Villavicencio Schmidt • Velma Roset
Veloria | 2004 Blesilda Ocampo • Cherie Querol Moreno • Clara Tempongko •
Genevieve Dwyer • Tisa Mendoza • Vangie Cononizado Buell • Leni Marin

» March 26: FWN
press conference
with Eve Ensler to
Arts Center.
protest Judge
Sold-out show!
Benson’s ruling
»
May 2: First all-Asian
to reduce the Corpuz
American Women
conviction to second
cast for The Vagina
degree.
Monologues at the
» April 4: Premiere of
Herbst Theatre.
the
new show A
2010
Memory,
» April 10: Mona Pasquil
A Monologue, A
makes theatrical
Rant and
debut in FWN’s 7th
A Prayer (MMRP).
production of The
Men supportive of
Vagina Monolgues
FWN’s anti-violence
and Benefit Reading
campaign are invited
of A Memory,
to read for V-Day.
A Monologue, A Rant
and
2009
A Prayer at Herbst
» April 11: First V-Day
Theatre.
FWN show in
Washington
D.C. at The John F.
2011
Kennedy Performing » May 13: FWN

FILIPINA WOMEN’S NETWORK

Service Center; V-Day
Spotlight: Women of Iraq:
Under Siege

|

Celebrates Asian
Pacific Heritage
Month with
production of The
Vagina Monologues
at Herbst Theatre.

2012

» FWN Unites with La
Casa in campaign to
raise awareness about
domestic violence in
San Francisco
» May 25: FWN
Produces
The Vagina
Monologues with
Women of Color
United cast

2013

» February 14: One
Billion Rising. Rise! at

San Francisco City
Hall
» April 5: FWN’s 10th
year of producing The
Vagina Monologues
and Usaping Puki

2014

» February 14: One
Billion Rising Rise for
Justice at San
Francisco City Hall

2015

» February 12: One
Billion Rising
Revolution at San
Francisco City Hall

2016

» May 13: FWN’s 11th
year of producing The
Vagina Monologues

www.filipinawomensnetwork.org

15

Statistics on
Violence in the
Asian Pacific
Islander Community
• 41 – 61% of Asian women report
experiencing physical and/or sexual
violence by an intimate partner during
their lifetime.
Source: A. Raj and J. Silverman,
Intimate partner violence against
South-Asian women in Greater Boston
Journal of the American Medical
Women’s Association.
• 56% of Filipinas and 64% of Indian
and Pakistani women had experienced
sexual violence by an intimate in a
study interviewing 143 women.
Source: Yoshihama M, Bybee D, Dabby
C, Blazevski J. Lifecourse Experiences of
Intimate Partner Violence and HelpSeeking among Filipino, Indian and
Pakistani Women:
Implications for Justice
System Responses.
Washington, DC:
National Institute of
Justice; 2011.

Filipino, Indian and Pakistani Women:
Implications for Justice System
Responses. Washington, DC: National
Institute of Justice; 2011.
• Research shows that children who
witness domestic violence show more
anxiety, low self esteem, depression,
anger and temperament problems than
their peers. They are at greater risk for
abuse and neglect as children and to
become abusers themselves as adults.

• 44.8% of the Asian women surveyed
reported that they or other Asian
women they knew to have been abused
did “nothing” to protect themselves
from abusive events; 32.1% said they
“kept quiet.” The report’s authors
noted that “Doing nothing can serve as
a strategy of resistance in an attempt
[to] avoid or lessen abuse.”

Family Violence Prevention Fund. Fact
Sheet: The Effects of Domestic Violence
on Children. San Francisco, CA: Author;
(n.d.). Statistics from: Asian-Pacific
Institute on Gender-Based Violence

• 34.3% sought help from their family,
and 32.1% from friends. Only 15.7%
reported having called the police, and
9.0% actually obtained help from an
agency.

The glaring statistics show that
silence, shame and victim-blaming
prevent many women from getting
the support they need to end abuse
in their homes and relationships.
Stop the silence! Stand in solidarity
with our sisters.

• 78.0% (the majority of women) who
confided in someone about their
experience of abuse felt better
afterwards, but 35.4% indicated that
they felt ashamed.

#FWNAgainstViolence

• 5,200 – 7,800 Asians
and Pacific Islanders
comprise the largest
group of people
trafficked into the U.S.,
out of an estimated
total of 14,500-17,500
individuals trafficked in
2004.
Source: U.S.
Department of Justice.
Assessment of U.S.
Government Activities
to Combat Trafficking in
Persons.
• 68% of Filipinas and
50% of Indian and
Pakistani women
reported being stalked
by an intimate partner.
Source: Yoshihama M,
Bybee D, Dabby C,
Blazevski J. Lifecourse
Experiences of Intimate
Partner Violence and
Help-Seeking among
16

IN THE PROJECT AWARE STUDY*

WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED AGAINST VIOLENCE

* McDonnell KA, Abdulla SE. Project
AWARE: Research Project: API Domestic
Violence Resource Project; 2001.

Economics of Human
Trafficking
How much money do you suppose a
pimp with 4 women makes annually?
Anyone hazard a guess? $100,000?
$200,000? Guess again.
A single sex trafficker with 4 prostituted
women can make $600,000 annually
tax-free.
According to the Alameda County
District Attorney’s office, a typical quota
per woman is $500 a night. At $40 per
trick, that’s over 10 tricks a night.
Multiply $500 per night by days in the
year and a pimp reaps $730,000 from 4
women. Minus expenses, that’s about
$600,000 annually tax free.
Did you know that, internationally,
organized crime is moving out of the
drug trade and gun running and moving
into human trafficking?
The reason is that while drugs and guns
can only be sold once, a human, a
woman, can be sold multiple times in a
single night, thousands of times in a
single year.
We must become modern day
abolitionists, give voice to the voiceless,
fight as hard as Harriet Tubman did.
This former slave stood 5 foot tall and
was disabled, having suffered a head
injury for helping another slave escape
an abusive master.
After her escape to freedom in
Pennsylvania, she spent 11 years
returning to Maryland 13 times to
rescue 70 slaves, providing instructions
to another 60 on how to escape to the
north.
We’re talking about a disabled African
American former slave, a wanted fugitive
in the pre-Civil War South, securing
freedom for 130 people. We can, we
must do at least what Harriet Tubman
achieved and free our sisters from the
violence, the inhumanity of human
trafficking.
SOURCE: SAN FRANCISCO
D E PA R T M E N T O N T H E S TAT U S O F
WOMEN
T V M 2 0 1 6 | C E L E B R AT I N G 1 1 Y E A R S

WHO’S WHO IN THE CAST AND CREW

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13)

Monologues,” and advisor to Soulciety.org, a nonprofit for at-risk youth.
Educated as an accountant, JOHNNY VELOSO’S
fierce love for dance and choreography led
him to pursue a career in the arts. He currently
provides artistic direction for six well known San
Francisco Bay Area dance groups, ranging from
folkloric dancing to ballroom, hula, and hiphop.
He is also director for international activities
for Sampaguita Filipina International Dance
Company and the Philippine Ballet Theatre.
Johnny is a community leader and promotes
cultural preservation, repertoire and creativity in
the SF Bay Area. He is a member of several nonprofit organizations including the 2016 Kalayaan
Organizing Committee.
Johnny’s love and dedication to the arts has
garnered him recognition from the California
State Assembly, the Mayor of Delano, and various
other organizations.
JOY LAM is originally from Maryland. She
relocated to the Bay Area after graduating
from the University of Maryland. She is an
Apprentice Carpenter and is a proud member of
the San Francisco Carpenters Union. She is also
a delegate for the San Francisco Building trades
council, Labor Council and Regional Council. Joy
gained most of her theater experience from Brava
Theater’s running crew. On her days off, she is
currently building a Tiny Home on wheels
MARILY MONDEJAR is a senior business leader
with global experience as an entrepreneur,
strategist and advisor to leading organizations.
She advises executives on leadership and career
derailment issues, and consults on corporate
image strategies, merger implications, scenario
planning, alliance-building, and inter-cultural
communications.

She’s the Founder & CEO of Filipina Women’s
Network and has dedicated the last decade to
transforming how global Filipina women view
themselves and how others perceive them. Her
initiatives include producing positive internet
search results for “Filipina,” embracing Eve Ensler’s
The Vagina Monologues and the campaign to
end violence against women, and creation of
a pipeline of Filipina leaders with the skills to
compete at all levels in all sectors.
As the sixth of 13 children, Marily learned early
how to get her voice heard by her family and
carried this over throughout her career in roles
as board member for organizations and as
commissioner on commissions and task forces
appointed by San Francisco Mayors Gavin
Newsom and Edwin Lee.
MELINDA MORSE is a voting member of
the Delaware Indian Nation. Her academic
achievements include a Masters in Music and
various teaching certifications. Her piano awards
range from collegiate ones to recently being a
semi-finalist in Chicago and Washington D.C.

international amateur piano competitions. She
belongs to Toastmasters, runs on the Impala
Racing Team, spends time with her boyfriend
of 16 years and belongs to Bay Area Piano
Enthusiasts (thorough which she received
the invitation to play tonight.) Through foster
parenting, she has a wonderful daughter, son-inlaw and grandchildren.
MOCA OLAES is the daughter of Retired Chief
Master Sergeant of the U.S. Air Force Rogelio
Olaes and Jojina Coronel Olaes. Moca is a
supervisor with Chartwells Dining Services in UC
Berkeley. She supervises the first Equator Coffee
& Tea locations in the East Bay. She currently
studies Construction Management and will be
starting her Pre-apprenticeship with City Build
Academy in San Francisco. Her hobbies are
dancing, spending time with family, and she has
a passion for volunteering. When she’s not at
work, school, or with her family she tries to find
time to give back to her community.
ROSIE JOSUE is a professional actress and
director who has performed in multiple theatre
productions, including The Odd Couple, Troy,
Mad Love, Death on the River Ganges and The
Vagina Monologues with the Filipina Women’s
Network. She has produced and directed her
own short film. Her most recent performance
with Siren Productions was aired on India TV
Network and the most recent theater production
she directed, Disney’s Aladdin Jr., was a sold out,
standing-room-only show.

Her community organizing roles include
coordinating one-act play writing workshops for
maximum-security detained youth, serving as a
red carpet host for The Third World International
Film Festival, Chief Operating Officer for Create
Social Change, VIP Artist Coordinator for Pistahan
Filipino Heritage Festival and spokeswoman for
Target Corporation community events.
TRISHA MARCO was born and raised in Manila,
Philippines. She earned her BS in Business
Management at De La Salle University – Manila.
Currently, she is the Marketing Manager at
Telamon Engineering Consultants Inc, a minority/
women-owned civil engineering firm in San
Francisco, CA. She was part of the cast of FWN’s
2013 “The Vagina Monologues” production and is
back this year as the Production Manager.
TRIYA MARCO was born in Manila, Philippines
and immigrated to the United States at the
age of 10 years old. She is currently a second
year student at San Francisco State University
with an interest in Asian American Studies.
Currently she is a volunteer mentor at the Filipino
Education Center’s after school program, Galing
Bata. Her past work includes photography and
writer for various high school and college aged
publications. This is Triya’s first time to be part
of V-Day FWN’s production of Eve Ensler’s “The
Vagina Monologues”. – 88 words
RAISSA ALVERO is a visual arts industry
professional based in Montreal, Canada. She
is a currently a Fellow for the Filipina Women’s
Network Fellow in San Francisco.

17

Community
leaders on why
they volunteer
to perform for
V-DAY FWN’s
benefit
productions:

The Vagina Monologues sends
a powerful message to women
(and men) that violence is not
acceptable and women are not
alone and can find strength in
hearing other women’s stories.
– Fiona Ma, Chair, Board of
Equalization, Cast member since
2009

So long as there are women
being violated, then the message
and outreach program provided
by FWN has to continue. We have
to put in everyone’s hearts and
minds that this behavior is not
acceptable. There is strength in
numbers. FWN’s community of
women and men against violence
gives voice to those who are
afraid to speak out.
– Chelo Pallas, V-Day FWN Cast
Member 2004 and 2013
“My years in social services
have shown me how violence
against women diminishes the
economic development of our
nation. Annually, more than 4.5
million violent crimes against
women occur worldwide. In the
United States, victims of
domestic assaults lose eight
million days of paid work a year.
We need to highlight the link
between women’s needs to be
safe from violence and their
economic self-sufficiency.”
– Elena Mangahas, Co-Chair
Little Manila Foundation

18

WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED AGAINST VIOLENCE

Photos:
1. V-Day FWN Cast & Crew 2013, San Francisco
2. V-Day FWN Cast & Crew, 2012, San Francisco
3. V-Day FWN Cast & Crew, 2006, San Francisco

R i s e s t o e n d v i o le n c e

a g a i n s t w o me n a n d g i rl s

Filipina LEADERSHIP
Global Summit 8.21-24.16
INFLUENCE. ACCELERATE. ACTION.
CEBU • PHILIPPINES
FILIPINASUMMIT.ORG

100 MOST
INFLUENTIAL
FILIPINA WOMEN IN
THE WORLD AWARD
Nominate an amazing
Filipina Woman!

#FWNSummit2016

http://filipinasummit.org/
nominate

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