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Material structure (microstructure and microstructure)

Physical property
Mechanical property
Chemical property

Property of
material

Electrical property
Magnetic property
Optical property
Thermal property

Physical properties result


from the response of
material to some
environmental variable
such as a mechanical
force, temperature field, or
an electromagnetic field.

A measure of a materials ability to carry or resits mechanical forces or stresses.


Stress results from such as forces as tension, compression, or shear, which pull,
push, twist, cut, or in some way deform or change the shape of a piece of material.
Stress
Strain
Stress-strain diagram
Ultimate strength (tensile strength)
Resilience

Mechanical
properties

Shear stress
Toughness
Ductility
Malleability
Fatigue strength
Torsional strength
Hardness

Stress
is the resistance offered by a material to external forces or loads
is measured in terms of the force exerted per unit area
Is the amount of force (F) divided by the area (A) over which it acts.

A
Units: ponds per square inch; N/m2; Pa
When a load or force is applied to an object, we are unable to measure the stress
produced by this force in material, instead of ... Identify and measure the area over
which the force acts.

Strain (unit deformation)


- Deformation is the change in physical dimension due to loading with the froce (cf.
Figure)
- The change in the length is called a total axial or longitudional deformation (long)
and the change in lateral dimension is known as total lateral deformation (lat)

long

Lo
Lo

Longitudional unit deformation

lat

do
do

Lateral unit deformation

- The ratio of the lateral unit deformation to the longitudional unit deformation is
known as Poissons ratio,

lat

long