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Reducing Network Alarm Flow

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The information in this document is subject to change without notice and describes only the
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Contents

Contents
Contents 3
List of tables 4
List of figures 5
1
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
1.2

About this document 7
Prerequisites 7
Prerequisites for alarm reduction
Functionality used 8
Terms 9

2

Connect NMS compatibility and capacity information 11

3

Overview of the alarm reduction process 13

4

Analysing network alarm behaviour 15

5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5

Selecting alarms for alarm reduction 17
Identifying the top alarms 18
Finding alarms related to the same fault 19
Finding the recurring alarms 20
Identifying fault types 20
Selecting the correct alarm reduction technique

6
6.1
6.2
6.2.1
6.2.2
6.3
6.3.1
6.4
6.5
6.5.1
6.5.2
6.5.3

Reducing the alarm flow in the network 23
Prerequisites 23
Reducing alarms caused by network maintenance 23
Blocking alarms with the Maintenance Mode functionality 24
Creating maintenance mode MRs for sites under maintenance 25
Using Alarm Trigger to automate recovery actions 26
Example of Alarm Trigger rule for automating recovery actions 27
Using Alarm Filtering to reduce load on Connect NMS database 28
Reducing alarms in the network element 28
Using BSC alarm blocking to reduce load on O&M connections 28
BSC alarm parameter handling 30
BTS alarms 30

7

Evaluating effects of alarm reduction 33

8

Where to find more information 35

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List of tables
Table 1.

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Examples of alarm blocking in the BSC

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List of figures

List of figures
Figure 1.

Tasks in network alarm reduction

Figure 2.

Selecting alarms for alarm reduction

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About this document

1

About this document
Reducing Network Alarm Flow provides you information on how to select
and implement effective alarm reduction techniques in the network.
The primary aim of effective network monitoring is to identify the critical
alarms which directly affect the quality of the service that is provided in the
network. If alarm reduction methods are not implemented, a massive flow
of alarms arrives in the Connect NMS database from all parts of the
network. In that case, network monitoring requires continuous and
intensive attention from the monitoring personnel. To optimise the effort
that is spent on the daily network monitoring routines, you can use different
alarm reduction techniques.
For general information on the Connect NMS alarm reduction techniques
and the Connect NMS alarm system, see 1 Alarm system operation and 1
Strategies for reducing the alarm flow in Monitoring Principles.

Note
It is recommended that you familiarise yourself with the other
monitoring documents that are included in the Connect NMS user
documentation set. This document complements the information that is
contained in those documents.

1.1

Prerequisites
The following sections list the prerequisites for alarm reduction and the
software and functionality requirements that you need for performing the
tasks that are described in this document.

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1.1.1

Prerequisites for alarm reduction
Before you start implementing alarm reduction techniques, you need to
consider the following:
.

How consistent and reliable is the data in the Connect NMS alarm
database? For more information, see 1 Investigating the reliability of
alarm statistics in Analysing Network Alarm Behaviour.

.

Which are the genuine faults in the database that need to be fixed?

.

What are the recurring alarm trends in the network? For more
information, see Chapter 4 Analysing network alarm behaviour.

Note
It is not recommended that you start any alarm reduction technique
before you perform an analysis of the alarm behaviour in the network.

1.1.2

Functionality used
If you want to implement the alarm reduction strategies that are described
in this document, you must have the following Connect NMS functionality:
Connect NMS Monitor functionality
.

Alarm Monitor

.

Alarm History

.

FM Reports

.

Maintenance Mode (optional functionality)

.

FM Rule Editor

Connect NMS common functionality

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.

Top-level User Interface

.

Network Editor

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1.2

Terms
If you are unfamiliar with any of the terms used in this document, see
Glossary.

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Connect NMS compatibility and capacity information

2

Connect NMS compatibility and capacity
information
For information on Connect NMS system and capacity, and the
compatibility between Connect NMS and network element releases, see
the Connect NMS Compatibility and Capacity Information document.

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Overview of the alarm reduction process

3

Overview of the alarm reduction process
The following figure shows the tasks involved in network alarm reduction.

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Start

Analyse alarm behaviour
in network

Correct genuine faults

Select candidates
for alarm reduction

Implement feasible alarm reduction
techniques

Evaluate effects
of alarm reduction

Update network monitoring documentation
and make necessary modifications to your
alarm reduction strategies

Export feasible rules to other NetAct
management centers

Monitor network in a focused fault
localisation environment

Figure 1.

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Tasks in network alarm reduction

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Analysing network alarm behaviour

4

Analysing network alarm behaviour
This chapter provides an overview of the alarm analysis procedure. Before
you implement any alarm reduction technique in the network, you need to
analyse the reliability and consistency of the alarm information in the
database and the alarm trends in the network.
To get information on the alarm behaviour in the network, you need to
analyse the following:
.

Alarm filtering and blocking techniques that are used in the network
elements

.

Daily flow of alarms

.

Distribution of alarm classes among the different alarm severities

.

Top alarms, top alarming network element types, and top alarming
network elements

Note
It is not enough to analyse the network alarm behaviour once and
implement a number of alarm reduction techniques. Because of factors,
such as climate, maintenance procedures, and network capacity, the
number of alarms vary constantly. Therefore, you need to evaluate
regularly the effects of the implemented alarm reduction techniques.
For more information, see Chapter 7 Evaluating effects of alarm
reduction.

For an overview of the tasks that are involved in statistical alarm analysis,
see 1 Overview of the alarm analysis process in Analysing Network Alarm
Behaviour.
For more information on why alarm analysis is needed and for instructions
on how to investigate the alarm flow and alarm trends, see Analysing
Network Alarm Behaviour.

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When you have identified the alarm trends that are typical of your network,
continue with Chapter 5 Selecting alarms for alarm reduction.

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5

Selecting alarms for alarm reduction
This chapter provides information on the criteria to select alarms for your
alarm reduction plan. You need to identify the following:
.

Top alarms
It is most effective to apply the Connect NMS alarm reduction
techniques to alarms that are raised in high numbers.

.

Alarms related to the same fault
Based on a list of daily alarms, you need to analyse which of the
alarms that are related to a fault situation must be hidden and which
must be shown in network monitoring.

.

Recurring alarm patterns
You can apply alarm reduction techniques only to alarms that are
raised repeatedly in a specific fault situation.

.

Fault types
For selecting the correct Connect NMS alarm reduction technique,
you also need to identify the type of the fault that raised the alarm.

After investigating the alarm behaviour in the network, you have enough
information to select the alarms for which you use alarm reduction
techniques. For more information on the type of statistical criteria and the
Connect NMS applications you can use for investigating the alarm trends
in the network, see Analysing Network Alarm Behaviour.
The following figure gives you an overview of the tasks that are involved in
selecting the alarms for an alarm reduction plan.

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Start

Identify
the top alarms

FM Report Set

Identify alarms related
to the same fault

Alarm History

Find out if alarm is
recurring or
occasional

FM Report Set

Group alarms
by fault type

Select feasible alarm
reduction technique

Repeat regularly

Figure 2.

5.1

Selecting alarms for alarm reduction

Identifying the top alarms
If you have information on the most common alarms in the network, you
can easily prioritise the faults for which you use Connect NMS alarm
reduction techniques. It is recommended that you implement automated
alarm reduction techniques only for those alarms that are raised
repeatedly in high numbers. At the same time, you need to consider which
are the regions or sites that need focused attention in network monitoring.

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You can use the FM Report Set for identifying the top alarms. For
instructions, see 1 Identifying the top alarms and the most alarming
network elements in Analysing Network Alarm Behaviour.
You can make the statistics more focused if you leave out any or all of the
following data from the statistics:
.

Warnings
Although a high number of warnings are typically raised in the
network, you do not need any alarm reduction techniques for them
because they are not visible in Alarm Monitor. Most of these
warnings do not have any effect or have only a minor effect on the
level of service. However, warnings can indicate a potentially serious
fault, and therefore, you must not ignore them. It is recommended
that you include the warnings in alarm statistics.

.

Transitory alarms
They are active for less than 25 seconds.

.

5.2

The fraction of transitory alarms that are statistically not observed in
network monitoring because of the update interval that is used in
Alarm Monitor.

Finding alarms related to the same fault
You can create a list of all alarms that are raised during a day with Alarm
History.

To find out daily alarms with Alarm History
1.

Start Alarm History from Application Manager or from the Top-level
User Interface.

Note
It is not recommended that you use the Top-level User Interface as a
launch pad only. If you only want to start applications, use Application
Manager.
2.

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In the Setting Search Criteria window, select From and To in the
Alarm Time and Ack Time panes.

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The Setting the Starting Time pane opens, and you can define the
day for which you want to display the alarms.
3.

Leave all other criteria undefined.

4.

Start the database query by clicking Search → Search.
Alarm History shows a list of the alarms that were raised during the
specified day. The alarms are listed in the order of arrival.

5.

You can also print out the alarm list by clicking the Print icon or
Alarm → Print.

For instructions on how to use Alarm History, see Alarm History Help.

5.3

Finding the recurring alarms
You can use the FM Report Set for finding out whether an alarm is
recurring or occasional. Once you have identified recurring alarms that are
related to a single network fault, you can start analysing which technique
would be feasible for reducing the number of these recurring alarms.
For instructions on how to identify recurring alarms, see 1 Identifying the
recurring alarms in Analysing Network Alarm Behaviour.

5.4

Identifying fault types
When you identify a typical sequence of alarms that are related to a
network fault, you also need to identify the origin of the fault. For example:
.

BTS access network failure

.

SS7 route failure

.

BTS intrusion

After you have identified the fault type, you can proceed with Chapter 5.5
Selecting the correct alarm reduction technique.

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5.5

Selecting the correct alarm reduction technique
You can implement different alarm reduction techniques depending on the
situation. Your aim in reducing the number of alarms in the network can be
either of the following:
.

Preventing alarms that are raised because of maintenance work
from being shown in the network monitoring application.

.

Correlating alarms that are all related to the same fault, so that one
fault results in one alarm in network monitoring.

.

Assigning a higher or lower priority to a particular alarm, depending
on its effect on the level of service.

.

Reducing the load on the O&M links. In this case, you can use alarm
reduction techniques that are available in the network element.
However, it is important to be familiar with the effects of the network
element blocking techniques.
For more information on alarm reduction in the network element, see
Section 6.5 Reducing alarms in the network element.
You can also use Connect NMS alarm reduction techniques for this
purpose. For more information, see Section 6.4 Using Alarm
Filtering to reduce load on Connect NMS database.

When you select the alarm reduction technique that is feasible for your
particular need, consider the following:
.

Can the alarm be filtered from the Connect NMS database, or can it
be filtered only from the Connect NMS alarm monitoring
applications? Is it feasible to use local alarm blocking in the network
element?

Note
You must be very careful when you block and filter alarms in the
network element. Sometimes the same alarm is raised in more than
one fault situation, therefore blocking an alarm entirely can cause
important faults remaining unnoticed. Furthermore, the alarms must be
stored in the database so that they can be retrieved in the alarm
statistics.

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.

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If the alarm cannot be filtered out, can it be suppressed by a primary
alarm? Is it enough to have only one primary alarm, or does the
secondary alarm have to be suppressed by two or more primary
alarms?

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6

Reducing the alarm flow in the network
This chapter provides you instructions on how to use the Connect NMS
applications effectively for reducing the flow of alarms in network
monitoring. You can find examples of typical fault situations and of the
feasible alarm reduction methods for GSM networks.

Note
The type of alarm reduction techniques that are most feasible in a GSM
network depend on the actual situation. It is recommended that you
analyse the alarm flow in your own network to see how you can apply
the Connect NMS alarm reduction techniques that are described in this
chapter.

6.1

Prerequisites
Before you start implementing Nokia alarm reduction techniques, you
need to identify the recurring alarm trends in the network. For more
information, see the following chapters:

6.2

.

Chapter 4 Analysing network alarm behaviour

.

Chapter 5 Selecting alarms for alarm reduction

.

Chapter 5.5 Selecting the correct alarm reduction technique

Reducing alarms caused by network maintenance
When some maintenance work or network element integration is
performed in the network, and some network functions are therefore
temporarily non-operational, a lot of unnecessary and irrelevant alarms are
raised. Before starting the maintenance work, you can exclude the network

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elements from monitoring, so that the maintenance alarms are not visible
among the live network alarms in the Connect NMS monitoring
applications. You can handle the maintenance alarms in Connect NMS in
the following ways:
.

When the Maintenance Mode functionality is available:
Hide maintenance alarms from the monitoring applications. For more
information, see Section 6.2.1 Blocking alarms with the
Maintenance Mode functionality.

.

When the Maintenance Mode functionality is not available:
Define dedicated maintenance mode MRs. For more information,
see Section 6.2.2 Creating maintenance mode MRs for sites under
maintenance.

6.2.1

Blocking alarms with the Maintenance Mode functionality
You can hide maintenance alarms from monitoring applications with
Maintenance Mode, which is a Top-level User Interface functionality.
For more information on the Maintenance Mode functionality, see 1 Using
Maintenance Mode in Monitoring Principles.

To hide maintenance alarms from the monitoring applications
1.

Start the Top-level User Interface.

2.

Set the network element that is under maintenance and the
subnetwork to which the network element belongs into Maintenance
Mode.
For instructions, see Handling the Maintenance Mode in Top-level
User Interface Help.

3.

Verify the activation of the maintenance mode for the objects
selected in Alarm Monitor or Alarm History.
For the objects that are set to maintenance mode, Alarms 9251
Maintenance Mode activated (for the root object) and 9252 Element
in Maintenance Mode (for the child objects) are raised. These alarms
are auto-acknowledged by default.

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Note
To avoid inconsistency in the alarm system, do not cancel maintenance
mode alarms manually. Always deactivate Maintenance Mode from the
Top-level User Interface. If you cancel alarm 9251 manually, Alarm
Trigger automatically deactivates the maintenance mode for the object
that has been set to maintenance mode.
4.

Perform the maintenance activities.

5.

After the maintenance work is done, deactivate Maintenance Mode
in the Top-level User Interface.
The maintenance alarms are cancelled automatically, and alarm
upload is started to restore the real-time alarm situation in the
network elements. Alarm 9228 Alarm Database Upload in progress
is raised to indicate that alarm upload has started.

6.

Verify the deactivation of Maintenance Mode in Alarm Monitor by
locating the Alarm 9228 Alarm Database Upload in progress.

Note
Alarms that indicate a critical accident at the site, for example a fire,
must never be blocked from monitoring.
To display in Alarm Monitor the fire alarms or other critical alarms that
indicate a serious accident at the site under maintenance, the System
Administrator can modify the arcmaimx.cf Maintenance Mode file
accordingly.

6.2.2

Creating maintenance mode MRs for sites under maintenance
You can hide maintenance alarms from monitoring also when Maintenance
Mode is not available by defining dedicated maintenance mode
maintenance regions (MRs) for the equipment under maintenance.

To create maintenance mode MRs

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1.

Start Network Editor from Application Manager or from the Top-level
User Interface.

2.

Create a separate view that contains the maintenance mode MR.

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Use a name that indicates the purpose of the view. For instructions,
see Network Editor Help.
3.

Create a new maintenance mode MR to the maintenance mode
view.
Use a name that indicates the non-operational purpose of the
maintenance region, for example Maintenance Mode MR.

4.

Create the new sites or add the existing sites into the new MR.

5.

Define the monitoring criteria to exclude the maintenance mode MR
from monitoring in Alarm Monitor.

6.

When the new sites can be added to the operational network, start
Network Editor.

7.

Change the MR information for the BCF and the child objects with
the BCF pop-up menu:
a.
In the BCF pop-up menu, select Modify Information...
b.
Change the MR information in the Maintenance region pane.
c.
Click the Update All Children button.
d.
Apply the change.

Tip
If you want to monitor the maintenance mode MR, you can open a new
instance of Alarm Monitor and specify the monitoring criteria so that
only the maintenance mode MR is shown.

6.3

Using Alarm Trigger to automate recovery actions
You can use Alarm Trigger for starting processes based on an alarm event
or according to a schedule. You can use all processes that can be
executed from command line, for example, Unix commands, Connect
NMS applications, SQL scripts, and PERL scripts.
You can initiate recovery actions in recurring alarm situations when the
alarm severity class is not critical, but the actual fault is still severe enough
to decrease the service level of a site, and to result in dropped calls or
degraded quality of service.
Alarm Trigger can be applied in the case of the following alarm types:

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.

Any alarms sent by the network elements

.

External alarms, for example, fire alarms

.

Supervision alarms

.

Threshold alarms that are raised with the Thresholds for
Measurements application

You can use Alarm Trigger for:

6.3.1

.

Automating laborious or routine tasks, such as problem reporting

.

Controlling object settings, object status, and network events, for
example by automating execution tests and diagnostics

.

Executing well-defined corrective actions, such as state change and
unlocking

.

Forwarding low-volume data to external systems

Example of Alarm Trigger rule for automating recovery actions
The following example shows the formula that you can use for defining an
Alarm Trigger rule for recovery actions.
(TriggerRule "MyOwnRecoveryTrigger"
(Criteria ""
(Priority "100")
(Mode "INCLUSIVE")
(AlarmNumber "7530")
)
(Process "...")
(NbrOfSimilarProcesses "...")
(MaxExecutionTime "...")
)

The rules are created in the archoomx.cf file. For more information on the
Alarm Trigger functionality, see 1 Using Alarm Trigger in Monitoring
Principles.

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6.4

Using Alarm Filtering to reduce load on Connect
NMS database
If you need to reduce the flow of alarms arriving in the Connect NMS
database, you can filter certain alarms, for example warnings, from it.
When you filter the alarms from the Connect NMS database, the alarm
data is still available in the database of the network element for closer
analysis. In that case, the alarms are not visible in the network monitoring
applications.
You can filter alarms from the Connect NMS monitoring applications or
from the Connect NMS database with Alarm Filtering. For more
information on Alarm Filtering, see 1 Alarm filtering in Monitoring
Principles.
In certain cases you can use Alarm Filtering from the Connect NMS
database instead of one of the alarm blocking techniques that are
available in the network element. For information on the alarm blocking
techniques that are available in the network element, see Section 6.5
Reducing alarms in the network element.
For more information on the Nokia default rules, see 1 Default rules
provided by Nokia for FM Rule Editor in Monitoring Principles.

6.5

Reducing alarms in the network element
This section provides information on BSC alarm blocking, BSC parameter
handling, and BTS alarms.

6.5.1

Using BSC alarm blocking to reduce load on O&M connections
You can block alarms to save transmission and Connect NMS HP-UX
Server resources. In that case, alarms are not sent from the BSC. It is
recommended that you block alarms if the information contained in the
alarm does not have added value to the operator. You can use alarm
blocking also if there is a known permanent network condition that causes
continuous alarms.
For instructions on how to block and unblock alarms that originate from
BSC, see Alarm Administration. This document is included in the BSC
documentation.

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For more information on the MML commands that are used for alarm
blocking in the BSC, see Base Transceiver Station Alarms Handling. This
document is included in the BSC documentation.
The following table contains examples of alarms that could be blocked in
all BSCs:

Table 1.

Examples of alarm blocking in the BSC
Alarm
class

Number

Alarm text

Why candidate for blocking

690

Working state
change

W

This warning is always raised when an
MML session to the NE is started.

2842

BTS alarm
printout failed

*

This alarm is caused by a missing alarm
printer on the BSC. If no printer is in
active use in this network element, you
can block the alarm.

Note
You must apply the same alarm blocking method to all elements (for
example, all BSCs) in the network. For more information, see 1
Investigating the reliability of alarm statistics in Analysing Network
Alarm Behaviour.

Effects of NE alarm blocking on alarm statistics
If an alarm has been blocked in the network element, no entry of the alarm
event indicating a failure is available in the database of the network. This
can make it difficult to analyse the alarm behaviour in the network in a
reliable way, because the alarms that are blocked in the network element
are not available in the database of the network elements and, therefore,
not reflected in the network-wide alarm and performance statistics. As a
result, you can have insufficient information available on the performance
of the particular network element and of the entire network. Instead of
blocking, you can use different alarm filtering techniques that are available
in Connect NMS. For more information, see Section 6.4 Using Alarm
Filtering to reduce load on Connect NMS database.

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6.5.2

BSC alarm parameter handling
There are several BSC parameters, or thresholds, that you can use for
supervising, for example, the minimum and maximum mean holding time
of traffic and signalling channels, or the functioning of signalling channels.
For more information on their use, see Base Station Controller Parameter
Handling in BSC. This document is included in the BSC documentation.
Setting delays for alarm activation to reduce system load
Threshold warnings belong to the top alarms, and therefore they can
cause an unnecessarily heavy load on the Connect NMS database and
the O&M connections between Connect NMS and the BSC. To reduce this
load, you can set delays for alarm activation and cancelling in the BSCs.
However, you must not set a delay in the network element for an alarm that
requires immediate user action, that is, for a critical alarm or any other
alarm that is important in the network.
You can use Alarm Filtering in Connect NMS to filter alarms from the
Connect NMS database. For more information, see Section 6.4 Using
Alarm Filtering to reduce load on Connect NMS database.
Modifying the alarm severity
You can modify the parameters of selected BSC warnings. For example, to
make important threshold warnings more visible to users, you can modify
the alarm severity of the threshold in the network element. As a result,
when a threshold is exceeded, an alarm is raised instead of a warning.

Tip
You can also use Alarm Reclassification in Connect NMS to raise the
alarm severity of the alarms in Connect NMS. For more information, see
1 Alarm reclassification in Monitoring Principles.

6.5.3

BTS alarms
BTS alarms are handled by a unit that is different from the one that handles
BSC alarms. Although they share many common modifiable parameters,
these parameters cannot be set for an individual BTS, but on the basis of
the alarm number. You can handle the BTS alarms in the following ways.

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Alarm Blocking/Unblocking
You can completely block or unblock an alarm, based on the alarm
number.
Modify alarm parameters
You can enable or disable printing, recovery, or Connect NMS updating, or
change the filter time of a specified alarm. You can give the number of the
alarm, parameter to be modified, type of action (ON/OFF), and filter time
as parameters.
Maintenance mode commands
It is not recommended that you use the maintenance mode commands for
blocking important BTS alarms from Connect NMS or for blocking and
recovery functions in an operative BCF. Instead, an operative BCF uses
local outputting and Connect NMS updating.

Note
Setting the BCFs maintenance mode to BLOCKED or setting the
maintenance mode recovery OFF can have serious consequences.

For information on how to reduce maintenance alarms with Connect NMS
applications, see Section 6.2 Reducing alarms caused by network
maintenance.

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Evaluating effects of alarm reduction

7

Evaluating effects of alarm reduction
This chapter provides information on the assessment indicators that can
be used for evaluating if the Connect NMS alarm reduction techniques that
you have implemented in the network have the required effect on the alarm
flow.
Assessment indicators
You can compare the assessment indicators with the results of the
previous reported period. A study period of 8-14 days is recommended.
It is not recommended that you use the Connect NMS reporting
applications for evaluating the effects of the implemented alarm reduction
techniques, because the alarms that are filtered from the user interface
applications by means of the Connect NMS tools are still entered into the
Connect NMS database and are, therefore, visible in the Connect NMS
alarm statistics.
You can use the following assessment indicators:
.

Number of critical, major, and minor alarms that have been activated

.

Number of alarms that have been correlated by suppression rules
and compression rules

.

Number of alarms to which alarm filtering has been applied

.

Resulting number of alarms seen in network monitoring

Measure the above listed assessment indicators:

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.

For each day of the study period

.

On object class level

.

Over a study period of one week

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When you evaluate the effects of the implemented alarm reduction
techniques, usually you cannot use a study period longer than seven
or eight days because of the large number of events in the database.
Because the number and type of network faults can vary, the weekly
data remains only an estimate. Therefore, regular assessment is
important. To gain an estimate as accurate as possible, it is
recommended that you calculate the alarm reduction that is
achieved based on a snapshot of data from the same period, rather
than benchmarking across two different time periods.

Tip
You can use Alarm History for gaining information on the alarms for
which you have implemented Alarm Filtering rules. Use the filtering
options in the Filtering pane of the Alarm History Setting Search Criteria
window.

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Where to find more information

8

Where to find more information
Connect NMS documentation
For more information on fault management applications, the Connect NMS
alarm system, and the concepts associated with managing network fault
data, see Monitoring Principles.
For more information on performance management applications and the
concepts associated with managing performance data, see Reporter and
Performance Management Principles.
For more information on the Top-level User Interface and Network Editor,
see Desktop Principles.
For information on the fault management database structure, see
Database Description for Fault Management.
For the fault management processes and configuration files, see Monitor
Technical Reference Guide.
For the administrator tasks related to alarm filtering, view upload, see
Administering the Alarm and Fault Management System.
For instructions on how to investigate alarm trends in the network, see
Analysing Network Alarm Behaviour.
For instructions on how to use the applications that are mentioned in the
document, see the following Help documents:

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.

FM Rule Editor Help

.

Alarm History Help

.

Network Editor Help

.

Top-level User Interface Help

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Other Nokia documentation
For information on how to block and unblock alarms that originate from
BSC, see Alarm Administration, dn98685045, in BSC documentation. The
document is available at http://online.nokia.com (authentication is
required).
For more information on the MML commands that are used for handling
BCS alarms, see Base Transceiver Alarm Handling, dn9813239, in BSC
documentation. The document is available at http://online.nokia.com
(authentication is required).
For more information on BSC parameters, see Base Station Controller
Parameter Handling in BSC, dn9813184, in BSC documentation. The
document is available at http://online.nokia.com (authentication is
required).

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