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Volume 12 Issue 4
Sullivan’s Island

Spann Argoe
sentenced
for killing

Isle of Palms

June 17, 2016
Goat Island • Dewees Island

PICCOLO SPOLETO’S 28TH ANNUAL
S A N D S C U L P T I N G C O M P E T I T I O N I O P, J U N E 4

IOP WOMAN
P L E A D S G U I LT Y
IN HUSBAND'S
SHOOTING

Sand Angels with their mermaid.
PHOTO PROVIDED BY JAY ARGOE

Sifting sand

Jonny Argoe was an outdoorsman
known to enjoy hunting and fishing.

BY SUSAN HILL SMITH

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

D

Argoe continues on page 3

The Marauders work on their creation.

sparks
creative

oris Spann Argoe first
told Isle of Palms police
she shot and killed her
husband because he came at her
with a knife during an argument
at their home, echoing her frantic
911 phone call. She persisted in
showing officers cuts on her torso
and neck as proof, but as police
Capt. Jeffrey Swain considered
the superficial wounds and her
story during questioning that
Saturday in March 2015, “it just
wasn’t making sense to me.”
When the police captain
pressed
her,
she
admitted

Team CharleStrong—comprised of Bryan Beerman, Greg Soyka,
Brian Wurst and Dan Scheaffer, who took home top honors in the
competition—begin their re-creation of Mother Emanuel AME Church.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

teamwork

INSIDE THE ISLAND EYE NEWS
TOOOO
HERE
COOL
COMES THE
Pg 12
BEACH RUN
Pg 14

Team
Drip
use a
unique
method
for their
entry.

HISTORY
COMES
ALIVE
Pg 17

2

CIVIC

June 17, 2016

Message from the Mayor of Sullivan’s Island
THE BUSY SEASON IS UPON US

Dear Island Neighbors,
Jasper, all derive from this event.
We have several items this time:
On the Saturday before Carolina
Fire and Rescue Fish Fry, Carolina
Day, June 25, there will be a number of
Day events, Independence Day events,
events at Fort Moultrie to commemorate
stormwater management update, and
this victory. You can see the schedule
Ben Sawyer Bridge info. So let’s get down
here: http://bit.ly/2016CAROLINADAY.
to business.
FISH FRY IS SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 5
INDEPENDENCE DAY EVENTS ON
TO 8 P.M.
JULY 2 AND 4
This is our 67th (!!!) annual fish fry
Remember that this year our Park
to support our great Fire and Rescue
event with band and evening fireworks
team. You may not know that much of
show will take place on Saturday, July 2.
the equipment they use to keep us and
The traditional golf cart parade will occur
our visitors safe is bought with proceeds
on Independence Day, Monday July 4,
from this event. As just one example: the Andy Benke and Pat O'Neil enjoy some fish at last year's Fish Fry.
rolling out from the school. Bicycles and
ISLAND EYE NEWS FILE PHOTO
squad uses their jet skis a number of
Golf Carts assemble at 8:30 a.m. and the
times each year to quickly reach people
parade starts at 9 a.m.
who get in trouble in the water…and usually these are situations STORMWATER DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS
where seconds literally make a life or death difference.
Recently we have been able to complete a few much-needed
The dinners are a bargain: $5/plate for fried fish, hush-puppies improvements to the Island’s stormwater system. Actually nearly
and sides. As every year, you can get your dinners to take out, or even all of our stormwater system is owned by the state Department
better, consume on-site while visiting with neighbors, listening to live of Transportation, which owns the roads. And we all know what
music and (at an extra but modest cost) enjoying available beverages. their budget is like. But with funding by the Charleston County
The Fish Fry is held at, well, the Fish Fry Shack (AKA “Big Tin”), at Transportation Sales Tax program we were able to take a couple of
Station 15 on the beach side of Middle Street.
bites out of our drainage problems. On Station 24 between Atlantic
You are hereby authorized to eat this fried food with a clear and I’on Avenues, about 800 feet of new pipe and 7 “drop inlets”
conscience.
(storm drains) were installed. On I’on Avenue at Stations 19 and 22,
CAROLINA DAY IS TUESDAY, JUNE 28
about 500 feet of old, inadequate clay pipe was replaced. None of this
If any day should be celebrated on the Island as our own special comes cheap; the first project cost about $230,00 and the second one
day, it is this one. Carolina Day honors the first significant victory about $190,000.
of American Patriot forces against British naval forces, the Battle of BEN SAWYER BRIDGE
Sullivan’s Island, on June 28, 1776, right here on the site of Fort
You may have seen the bridge open for one boat, then close, then
Moultrie. Our state’s symbol of the palmetto tree with adjacent open for another boat just a few minutes later. Do you wonder why
crescent, and the honor we bestow on names such as Moultrie and the bridge tender doesn’t just wait for the second boat time to arrive

3

June 17, 2016
No media attended the quietly Island Eye News. “He was a good
scheduled hearing in Charleston gentle man. I lost my best friend
wounding herself with the knife County criminal court. Attorney and my father the day his wife
blade that she originally said Ronald Richter, who is married decided to take his life.”
her 53-year-old husband, Jonny to one of Jonny Argoe’s sisters ‘No shrinking violet’
Argoe, threatened her with, and helped arrange the plea
“We had, I believe, evidence that
apparently “staging” the scene agreement, spoke on behalf of a jury could have determined she
to bolster a self-defense story. the family.
was guilty of murder,” 9th Circuit
Toward the hearing’s end, a Chief Deputy Solicitor Bruce
“At that point, I knew I wouldn’t
have any choice but to charge sobbing Argoe addressed the DuRant said later in the week.
court. She admitted killing But “she could have walked” if
her with murder,” Swain said.
It became the first Isle of Palms her husband, according to her a jury believed she acted in selfhomicide case in many decades, defense attorney Bart Daniel, but defense. “It was essentially a
and while it didn’t take hold in said that she loved
the national media, the story of him and considered
the attractive professional couple him to be her best
“HE WAS A GOOD, GENTLE MAN, I LOST MY BEST
and their marriage’s violent end friend. She said
has involved the kind of elements she panicked when
FRIEND AND MY FATHER..”
often hyped on TV tabloid news. her husband came
~Jay Argoe
at her, but did not
An emotional hearing
On June 7, Spann Argoe, now reference a knife
45, pleaded guilty to voluntary in her statement
manslaughter and received a to the court. She also told the compromise, because you never
212-month sentence as part of court she has mental health know what a jury’s going to do,
an agreement supported by her issues and Daniel confirmed that and it’s especially difficult when
husband’s family to reduce the an evaluation had been done. you are dealing with a female
original murder charge. She He would not elaborate on the defendant and a male victim.”
While there was no documented
must serve at least 85 percent diagnosis to The Island Eye.
The
victim’s
23-year-old history of physical abuse by
of that time, which calculates to
15 years. She will be credited for son, Jay Argoe of Summerville, Jonny Argoe at any point in their
her 15-month stay at Charleston attended the hearing but did relationship, DuRant said, “that
County Detention Center since not address the court. “I'm still doesn’t prevent her from
the March 21, 2015, killing at just happy that my stepmother taking the stand and claiming
the couple’s Isle of Palms home finally admitted to what she did that there was.”
and stopped trying to tarnish my
In any case, Spann Argoe
at 21 24th Ave.
father’s name,” he later told The “was no shrinking violet,” he
said. “She was a gun enthusiast,
an experienced marksman, an
Mayor continues from page 2
experienced martial artist, very
opinionated
on
stand-yourbefore opening, so that both boats can go through at the same
ground
and
use
of
deadly
force
time?
in
self
defense.
She
certainly
was
There’s a simple answer: $25,000. That’s the maximum fine a
aware of her legal rights in that
bridge tender can be hit with for not “promptly and fully” opening
regard.”
a bridge over a federal navigable waterway (like the Atlantic
Authorities
found
many
Intracoastal Waterway) when a vessel rightfully requests passage.
personal
pictures
of
her
with
guns
It’s a matter of federal law.
and at target practice. During
Your perception of how long it takes for the bridge to let a vessel
the Isle of Palms police search
through understandably depends on whether you’re in a rush to
of the Argoes’ brick ranch home,
get to an appointment or event, or just enjoying the opportunity
they also retrieved more than
to watch the boats and birds. Town Administrator Andy Benke
20 guns, an estimated 10,000
recently timed one complete opening-closing cycle from the time
rounds of ammunition, and an
the gate went down to when it was lifted so traffic could resume.
assortment of other weapons,
The result: six and a half minutes.
including fighting sticks, knives
As a reminder, on weekends and federal holidays, the bridge
and a Samurai-style sword.
opens when needed only on the hour, between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m.,
Most of the guns were
and on demand at other times. On weekdays that are not federal
registered
to Jonny Argoe, not
holidays, the bridge opens at any time on demand, except that it
his
wife,
police
said. But he
will not open between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and between 4 p.m. and
was apparently a hunter, and
6 p.m. Exceptions: the bridge opens at any time when requested
his interest in weapons was not
by a federal government vessel, commercial vessel, or vessel in
necessarily the same as hers, or
distress.
as intense.
Don’t forget, if you are registered for the Nixle notification system
Unanswered questions
you can get alerts from our police if an accident or other situation
Without a trial, complete
forces closure of the bridge or causeway to vehicular traffic. You
answers as to why Spann Argoe
can sign up at https://local.nixle.com/register .
shot her husband of more than 12
years may never become known,
See you at the Fish Fry!
but more details about the case
and her stability emerged with
Pat O’Neil, Mayor
Cell 843 670 9266
Argoe continues on page 4
Argoe continues from cover

CIVIC CALENDAR

Recycle - WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22 - Recycle
Isle of Palms
886.6428
www.iop.net

Tuesday, June 21
Ways and Means Committee
5:45 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, June 28
City Council

6 p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883.3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Tuesday, June 21
Regular Council Meeting
6 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
www.islandeyenews.com

Thursday, June 23
Water & Sewer Committee
9:30 a.m.
2050 Gull Drive
Monday, June 27
Tree Commission
5 p.m.
2050-B Middle Street

Lucky Dog Publishing
o f SC, LL C
Publisher of the
The Island Eye News
and The Island Connection

Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Jennifer Tuohy
managing editor
jennifer@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
Alejandro Ferreyros
graphic designer
Lori McGee 614.0901
advertising executive
Christian LeBlanc
social media
christian@luckydognews.com
Steve Rosamilia
photographer
Joe Stubel
Mimi Wood
staff writers

CONTRIBUTORS
Susan Hill Smith
Aaron Sweet
Mary Pringle
Ruth Thornburg
Dimi Matouchev
Bob Hooper
Krista Ritterhoff
Dawn Davis
Wendy Sang
Geoff Bennett
Colin McCandless

PUBLISHED BY
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
FUTURE DEADLINE:
JUNE 22 for
our JULY 1 issue
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivan’s Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every active
mailbox in our coverage area and are also available at area businesses. Contributions of information, pictures and articles are welcomed and are
used according to space limitations and news
value and cannot be returned except by special
request. Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do
not necessarily reflect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News, or its writers.
All advertising rates are listed at:
under “advertising”.

www.islandeyenews.com

4
Argoe continues from page 3
the resolution of her sentencing.
That includes the fact, verified
by the solicitor’s office, that she
attempted suicide June 1999
by shooting herself in the chest
when she lived in Orangeburg
County.
When the Argoes married in
August 2002, it was her third
marriage and his second. They
were already living on Isle of
Palms, in Wild Dunes, in 2007
when they bought their house at
21 24th Ave., and they did some
fixing up on the 42-year-old home
before moving in.
Spann Argoe worked as a nurse
anesthetist, and Jonny Argoe was
in management with Ryder Truck
Rental Co. in North Charleston.
He was friendly and outgoing,
while she came across as more
reserved, even guarded, to people
in the community. They visited
Holy Cross Church on Sullivan’s
Island together, where he signed
up for the church’s men’s hike in
spring of 2013 with his son.
Church member Randy Shirley
went on the three-day hike with
them and drove them to the
trailhead. “He was dynamic,”
Shirley recalls of Jonny Argoe.
“He was very gracious, just a neat
person to hang around with.”
The couple apparently spent a
lot of their social time with family
members. His father and two of
his sisters live on Isle of Palms,
and Jonny Argoe was reportedly
close with his wife’s mother and
brother, too. When his son would
visit, they would work on home
projects together, like building
the front and back decks
Neighbors on 24th Avenue
often saw the couple outside
doing yard work together, and she
would do martial arts routines
in front of the house in camo
fatigues. The couple also had
two cane corsos—a large Italian
breed often used as guard dogs—
that could seem threatening.
Marriage difficulties emerge
Next-door-neighbor
Buzzy
Bramble became good friends
with Jonny Argoe as they met
in their side-by-side driveways
each day. “He was the nicest guy
you’d ever want to meet.” Before
the shooting, Bramble saw no
indication of violence, and if he
did hear a raised voice it was
hers, he said.

The only other record of the
Isle of Palms police visiting the
couple dates back to 2008, when
Jonny Argoe called from their
Wild Dunes home, worried about
his wife, who had left during
an argument. But by spring of
2015, the couple clearly wasn’t
getting along, based on Swain’s
interviews with people close
to them, and statements by
Spann Argoe herself. There were
accusations of infidelity on both
sides, the police captain said.
“There had been extramarital
affairs on her part at least,” said
Deputy Solicitor DuRant. “I do not
know if one was actively going on
at the time that this happened,
but there was certainly evidence
that she had been unfaithful
during their marriage.”
The
police
investigation
confirmed that she had several
drinks with hard liquor—Jack
Daniels—at a Mount Pleasant
restaurant bar before returning to
the couple’s home the afternoon
of the shooting. She killed her
husband with a single shot from
a .45-caliber semi-automatic
pistol, Swain said. Police later
found the weapon in her black
SUV, which was parked directly
in front of the house, according
to Det. Diane Tarr, who worked
the crime scene.
Aside from the knife in question,
which Swain said looked like a
camping knife, there were no
other unsecured weapons in the
front room where Jonny Argoe’s
body was found. Most or all of the
other guns police recovered from
the house were in an “enormous”
gun safe.
While she placed the 911 call
around 4 p.m., Swain said it’s
not clear exactly when Jonny
Argoe was shot, because of
Spann Argoe’s admission of
scene staging as well as time
discrepancies in her story, which
did not sync up with telephone
calls made to her mother and
other events during the day.
During
the
eight-minute
911 call, Spann Argoe said
her husband’s eyes were open,
and he was unresponsive. She
pleaded for him not to die after
the dispatcher asked her to do
CPR. “Johnny, please! Come on!
I need you.”
‘Jonny’s Tree’
When the firetruck and police

June 17, 2016

Not long before Jonny Argoe died, he planted this tree in front of his home on 24th
Avenue, according to his next-door neighbor Buzzy Bramble, who calls it "Jonny's tree."
The home is in now in foreclosure.

cars rushed to the Argoe house
that day, Bramble ran outside
from his house next door.
He saw Spann Argoe pulled out
and handcuffed. He remembers
her repeating, “Oh my God!” and
“What have I done?” and saying
her husband tried to kill her.
She lifted up her shirt to show
wounds that Bramble couldn’t
see, dropped to her knees,
slumped to the ground and said,
“Please help me.”
Bramble asked her three
times, “Spann, what did you do?”
But she didn’t answer. Then he
saw the bullet hole in his friend’s
chest as Jonny Argoe’s body was

brought out. “He was dead at the
scene.” Bramble can’t forget it.
“Every day I walk out of
my house, it’s there,” he said,
noting that the Argoe house is
in foreclosure. “I hope whoever
buys the property tears the house
down.”
For solace, he considers the
young tree that Jonny Argoe
asked to plant between their
houses just before he died.
Bramble is not sure what kind it
is. He just calls it “Jonny’s tree.”
“That
little
tree
is
a
remembrance of him.”

June 17, 2016

CIVIC

5

Encroachments on Right of Way
present safety concerns
BY MIMI WOOD

D

ISLAND EYE NEWS STAFF WRITER

id you know that nearly to allow the street to function
every property on Isle of properly, provide a shoulder for
Palms and Sullivan’s has the road, and to provide for water
a South Carolina Right Of Way drainage.
easement? Do you know what
So, if it’s a given, always been
that means?
there, always going to be there,
In the simplest of terms, it and no chance of getting the
means the state owns a portion state to mow it for you, why
of your front yard. Which begs should you care? Because it’s
the question,
“How
much
do they own?”
(and,
more
“WE ARE HOPING BY BRINGING THIS ISSUE TO
importantly,
why
aren’t
LIGHT, RESIDENTS WILL VOLUNTARILY COMPLY.”
they mowing
Marty Bettelli
it? And could
I get them to
do the whole
lawn
while
they’re at it?!”).
not your land and technically you
Typically a strip of land are not allowed to put anything
between 10’ and 20’ running there. However, more and more
parallel to the paved portion of encroachments into the rightthe street, the right-of-way width of-ways are popping up, and the
varies depending upon your safety concern is real.
location. Robert Clark, District
Most residents treat the right
6 Engineering Administrator of way as their own yard, placing
for the South Carolina DOT, objects, or more commonly,
explains that, from the State’s plantings, wherever they see fit.
perspective, the primary purpose Some do it unknowingly, “A little
of the right-of-way is threefold: fence with Noisette roses would

brighten the entry to my home.”
Some are a bit more deliberate,
“A stand of shrubs at the base
of my lawn might eliminate the
pesky parking situation.” These
actions, innocuous or not, can
have serious ramifications.
While the state is more
attuned
to
street
function
and water management, the
local governments are highly
concerned about safety. Right
of way encroachments on the
narrow streets of both Sullivan’s
Island and Isle of Palms prohibit
a driver’s ability to quickly pull
off and yield to an emergency
vehicle,
needing
immediate
access. This is particularly
critical during the peak summer
season on the islands.
Andy Benke, Sullivan’s Island
Town Administrator, exhorts
another major concern that is
less visible but equally critical:
infrastructure. Benke reminds
islanders of what’s hidden in
the right of ways; water, sewer,
phone, cable and electricity lines
are all often buried there. The
roots of trees and shrubs wind
themselves around these utilities.

When the ground becomes
saturated after a heavy storm
and a tree goes down, it’s likely to
take a water pipe or electric line
with it, along with the potential
to disable an entire block of
residents. “Infrastructure is a
BIG concern,” Benke said.
“It’s an ongoing maintenance
issue,” he said. “People think
they are trying to make the area
prettier.” Typically, Sullivan’s
tries to address encroachments
in a friendly, non-confrontational
way, managing the issue on
a local level, directly with the
homeowner.
Officials on Isle of Palms
are trying to do the same. “We
think most encroachments are
inadvertent,”
Marty
Bettelli,
Chairman of IOP Public Safety
Committee, said. “We are hoping
by bringing this issue to light,
residents will voluntarily comply.”
If you have plantings or other
landscaping in your front yard
that might be in the right of way,
check with your town or city
administration for guidance on
how best to proceed.

6

7

June 17, 2016

King tides prompt
emergency turtle
nest relocation
PHOTOS BY BARB BERGWERF

BY MARY PRINGLE

R

ISLAND TURTLE TEAM

ecent rainfalls and flooding tides not
only have an impact on people, but they
can also destroy loggerhead nests. Of
course the turtles themselves are in the ocean,
except when laying their eggs, but it’s the eggs
that are vulnerable to flooding.
On June 2nd we were experiencing the seven
foot plus “king” tides caused by the alignment
of the earth, moon and sun. All but one of our
Isle of Palms nests had been relocated because
they were laid on the flat beach or in areas
of extreme erosion where steeply chopped
off dunes made more flooding very likely. It
seems that the majority of our beach is now
eroded causing less than ideal nesting habitat.
However, we took a chance and left Nest #3
laid on May 22 at 50th Avenue where it was
laid by the turtle. It was up on a rise next to

www.islandeyenews.com

a gully. Several Team members on patrol had
expressed worry that the rising water in the
gully was coming too close to the egg chamber.
When Barb Gobien checked on it on June 2,
she realized that the sand was very wet at the
nest site.
When we dug down to the eggs, we saw
that they were being covered with rapidly
rising groundwater. Turtle eggs, like bird
eggs, need not only warmth but also oxygen
for the embryos to grow and develop. So being
underwater will surely kill them. It is also a
bad thing to handle them during incubation
because these embryos attach to the inside of
the shell and jostling can stop development
and prevent hatching. However, in this case
we had no choice except to do an emergency
relocation if they were to have any chance at
all to survive.
Statistically the nests that are relocated have
a higher hatch rate than the ones that are left

where they are laid. We are told that the hatch
rate on the South Carolina coast was about 10
percent before volunteers such as the Island
Turtle Team started finding, relocating, and
protecting loggerhead nests.
Last season the hatch success for the 31
nests on the Isle of Palms was 88 percent and
for the 7 nests on Sullivan’s Island it was 67
percent. Average number of eggs in a nest was
124. The coyote predation of one Sullivan’s
nest is what brought that hatch rate down.
We will not know until the end of July
whether Nest #3 will produce any loggerhead
hatchlings. But we tried our best to save them.
And we are hoping that our mother turtles will
be able to find elevated spots that won’t flood
for the rest of the summer. It’s very hard to see
a good spot to nest when you are crawling on
the beach in the dark.

www.islandeyenews.com

Exchange Club supports
Florence Crittenton
BY RUTH THORNBURG

A

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

pril was Child Abuse
Prevention
Month
and on Friday, April
29, 2016, two members of
the Isle of Palms Exchange
Club’s
Child
Abuse
Prevention committee—
Barbara Harrington and
Ralph
D’Amigo—visited
the Florence Crittenton
Home to present a check
and tour the historic
facility.
Executive Director, Lisa
Van Bergen, explained
that Florence Crittenton’s
services are available to
both residents of the home
as well as those living
outside the Crittenton Barbara Harrington and Ralph D’Amigo, of IOP
facility. The Exchange Exchange Club, present Florence Crittenton
Club donation will be Executive Director Lisa Van Bergen with a check on
used for the “Family their recent visit.
Development
Program,”
which is a parent nurturing program that provides comprehensive,
home-based support services to at-risk, low-income single parents
with children, ages five and under, who live in the Tri-County area of
Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester.
The Exchange Club donation will support a Charleston County
family. The program promotes positive family dynamics and selfsufficiency by assisting mothers with stable housing, individual
counseling, academic education, parenting education and career
growth. The results of the program are measured and amazing.
Van Bergen noted that last year (2014-2015), 100 percent of the
parents participating in the program increased their parenting skills,
most were employed, and most of those leaving the program moved
into permanent housing. The children of these parents thrive as well
and almost all demonstrated that they were ready for school and
for learning to read. Clearly, Florence Crittenton’s programs provide
hope, safety and opportunity so that every child and family served
gains a sense of self worth and the capacity to achieve their fullest
potential thereby playing a positive role in the prevention of child
abuse and neglect.
Be sure to mark your calendars for the fourth annual “Wine, Women,
and Shoes” fundraising event happening on Sunday, September 25,
2016, 1 to 4 p.m., at the Francis Marion Hotel in Charleston, South
Carolina. For more information about the event or about the Florence
Crittenton Home or projects see florencecrittentonsc.org.
The Isle of Palms Exchange Club is a national service organization
established in 1948. Members of the Club raise funds through various
community projects for scholarships to local students and to provide
support to other community organizations dedicated to the prevention
and treatment of child abuse. Money for the Florence Crittenton Family
Development Program was a combination of donations from the Easter
Sunrise Breakfast and proceeds from the Isle of Palms Connector Run.
For more information about these and other projects or to join the club,
visit iopexchange.org.

10

June 17, 2016

COMPUTER CORNER

Is your phone listening to you? Maybe.
BY BOB HOOPER

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

I

f you use Google services,
you probably already know
that Google has been keeping
tabs on you and what you search
online, but a recent report
from British newspaper The
Independent, says the search
giant may also be recording
things you say when you’re
near your phone. However, you
can delete this and other stored
information. Sign in to your
Google account and go to history.
google.com/history/audio. Here
you can view and delete any
stored audio recording and turn
this off if you want.
If you’d rather opt out of Google
entirely, I've been testing out
some different search engines
looking for one that does as well
as Google but don’t track me
as much. A couple seem to do
a pretty good job, although I do

find myself reverting to Google
occasionally.
The first would be www.
Startpage.com—it is powered by
Google but strips out the tracking
data that Google uses, in other
words it gives you an answer and
that’s it, nothing being stored or
“tracked” about you. Another is
www.duckduckgo.com—I used it
more in the past, but recently it
partnered with Yahoo and some
fear it will start sending data
to that company but for now it
seems to be fine.
With all apps you put on an
iPad, iPhone or any Android
product, make sure you invest
a bit of time checking out your
options or settings. In many
cases nowadays the apps follow
Facebook and other corporations
and opt you in to a whole host
of things you might not want,

by default. If you wonder why
all of the sudden you are getting
ads for boating equipment on
all your devices after going to
a boat show or talking
to a friend about
his
boat…
you might be
telling
your
phone what you want.
Mobile devices are not the
only product that can do
this, you need to check
the same settings on a
laptop/desktop and
make sure your
Virus Protection
is up to date.
Malware
nowadays is
not just out
to damage you
hard drive or get
one bank account,
they want all your
data and your friends,
neighbors, etc. Many of the

malware
threats
today
are
hiding
in
plain sight and
are designed to
track/listen to you
and anyone around
you.
I look forward to some
good questions and helping
you out. If you need immediate
assistance contact Rent A Bob at
843.822.7794 or at rentabob@
live.com.

Exclusively Sullivan’s
RESIDENTIAL & VACATION
HOUSEKEEPING

Call for a free consultation

843.593.4473

2o year resident of Sullivan’s Island
Insured & Bonded

June 17, 2016

Jane Parker Merritt Memorial
Scholarship awarded
BY RUTH THORNBURG

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

S

cholastic
achievement,
community
involvement, and good character define
Lillian Wilson, a student at Wando High
School, who is the recipient of this year’s Jane
Parker Merritt Memorial Scholarship.
The scholarship, founded to honor a close
friend, Jane Parker Merritt, was presented at
the Isle of Palms’ dinner meeting on Thursday,
April 28, 2016. Students at Wando High School
are eligible for the scholarship and must be
of good character and in need of financial
assistance to attend college.
Wilson is planning to major in Public Health
at the University of South Carolina in the
fall. She is a member of the Beta Club and
the National Honor Society and has played on
the varsity lacrosse team. Additionally, she
has worked as a volunteer for “Warriors at
Work,” an organization that completes various
community service projects such as collecting
clothing for needy children. Currently, Wilson
lives with her parents, Jeanne and William
Wilson in Mt. Pleasant.
The Isle of Palms Exchange Club is a service
organization whose members raise funds for
scholarships and other youth programs as well
as for organizations dedicated to the prevention
of child abuse. For additional information about
Exchange Club events, please visit facebook.
com/IOPExchangeClub or iopexchange.org.
Lilian Wilson receives her scholarship at IOP Exchange Club dinner meeting in April.

11

12

SC Aquarium offering discounted
memberships in June

June 17, 2016

BY KRISTA RITTERHOFF

S

ummer is just getting
started, and the South
Carolina Aquarium is ready
to show you some fun! With
new summer shows and Shark
Week right around the corner,
the Aquarium is a great place to
spend a day beating the heat and
avoiding the crowds at the beach.
A visit to the Aquarium is
not only fun but also a great
educational experience to keep
young minds learning in cool
and interactive ways while school
is out. The Aquarium is starting
summer off strong in June with
Member Month. There is no
better time to become a member
and ensure a summer of fun for
the whole family.
Membership at the Aquarium
is one of the best values in town,
paying for itself in just two
visits. Now through June 30,
take an additional $10 off the
price of membership for Member
Month. Members enjoy unlimited
admission and complete access
to all the fun happening at the
Aquarium for an entire year,

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

the
Aquarium’s
publication,
tributaries, and your very own
official membership card and car
decal to show your support of the
South Carolina Aquarium.
While membership provides
unbelievable
opportunities
for fun, it also gives back to
our animals and conservation
programs. Because the South
Carolina Aquarium is a nonprofit
organization, your membership
purchase supports animal care
and helps us continue our efforts
to protect the Lowcountry and
its ecosystems. This support
is especially important as our
conservation efforts grow with
groundbreaking on a new exhibit,
Sea Turtle Care Center this fall.

There are lots of fun, educational opportunities at the Aquarium this summer.

as well as a series of exclusive
discounts and benefits.
Benefits include invitations to
special members-only events and
programs at the Aquarium, free
admission to the 4-D Theater,

discounted Sea Turtle Hospital
tours, discounts at the Sea Turtle
Café and on souvenir photos,
monthly e-updates on special
programs
and
promotions,
a year-long subscription to

www.islandeyenews.com

To find out how to get $10
off a South Carolina Aquarium
membership
and
to
help
the
Aquarium
advance
its
conservation
initiatives,
visit
scaquarium.org.

ISLAND EYE NEWS FILE PHOTO

June 17, 2016

More running, less Floppin’

13

STAFF REPORT

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

T

Brooke Barnhardt, Lauren Smith and Jess Granson get
ready to race.

he hugely popular 5k Floppin’
Flounder race, hosted by the
Charleston Running Club and
the Sullivan's Island Fire and Rescue
Department, took place Saturday, June
4 on Sullivan’s Island.
The event, which has had a loyal
following for 25 years, was won by
Michael Banks, 29, of North Charleston
in 15:22. The women’s champ, Laurie
Knowles, 38, of Charlotte, NC, came in
3rd overall with a time of 17:04.
Island residents Blair Turnage, 34,
and David Kellner, came in 15 and 17
respectively, with times of, 20:19 and
20:49. For full results see media.wix.
com/ugd/cca229_7823d99f7d424e9bb
54bde97d8e8a6fd.pdf.

(right)Sixteen
year old Ryan
Moosbrugger, of
Hilton Head, took
6th place overall
in the race.

Men’s Champ Michael Banks.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

Women’s Champ Laurie Knowles.

www.islandeyenews.com

Boy Scout Than Sembos helps out with the tags.

14

S

June 17, 2016

Don’t cook tonight!

aturday, June 25, from 5 to 8 p.m., head out to the Fish Fry
Shack at 1459 Hennessy Street, for $5 plates of fried fish, hush
puppies and more fixins. Proceeds support the Sullivan’s Island
Fire & Rescue Fish Fry. Tickets available at Fire Department, Town
Hall, Simmons Seafood, Exit Realty and Harris-Teeter (Sea Island
Shopping Center, Ben Sawyer Boulevard).

PHOTOS COURTESY IOP REC. DEPT.

IOP beach run
heats up summer
BY AARON SWEET

T

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

he 2016 Isle of Palms Beach Run takes place Saturday, July 16
on Front Beach, behind the Windjammer on the Isle of Palms.
Competitors can enter in the following divisions; 5K Run/Walk
or 10K Run. The race begins at 8 a.m. Youth fun runs start at 9 a.m.
The registration fee is $35 for the 5K Run/Walk or 10K Run and
$15 for the Youth Fun Runs. Registration will also be open at 7
a.m. the day of the race. The first 200 participants to register are
guaranteed a free moisture wicking t-shirt.
Sponsors involved in the race are The Windjammer, The Foot
Store, East Cooper Medical Center, Play It Again Sports, Atlantic
Game and Tackle, Chic-fil-A, PowerAde, Barrier Island Eco Tours,
Coconut Joe’s, Island Ice Frozen Yogurt, Harris Teeter, Isle of Palms
Marina, Acme Lowcountry Kitchen, East Cooper Sporting Goods,
Race Management Systems, The Health Source, Springhill Suites
Marriott Charleston Mount Pleasant, Fleet Feet Sports, and Beach
House Spa.
Leigh Amrhein and Catherine Detyens serve up a quadruple order of fish.

Register at www.racesonline.com or at the Isle of Palms Recreation
Department, #24 28th Avenue or call 843.886.8294.

June 17, 2016

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

Learning from our
gardens, and our
dads
BY WENDY SANG

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

In a new column, Isle of Palms’
resident and gardening expert
Wendy Sang offers our readers
tips on how to grow their gardens
on a barrier island.

F

ather’s Day is almost upon
us, which means we’re
heading full-sail into fullblown summer. How the heck did
that happen so fast? I don’t know
about you, but my garden and
yard are going like gangbusters
right about now. And the reason
is simple: all the glorious rain!
Did you know that rainwater
is far better for plants than
tap water? Just look at your
yard—even if you are diligent
at watering, all it takes is one
good rain, and your plants are
like, KA-BOOM! (Why, you ask?
How should I know? What do I
look like, a meteorologist?) Just
kidding; I looked it up, and here’s
what I discovered:
Tap water has stuff added to
it—stuff like chlorine. Which, as
anyone who has ever showered
with an open mouth in Mexico
can tell you, is probably a good
thing. No one wants bacteria
swimming around in their water.
Tap water also has fluoride in
it. Again, great for humans, but
given the fact that few plants
have teeth, the benefit to them is
negligible.
Rainwater has stuff in it too;
little souvenirs it picks up on
its trip from the clouds to the
ground. For example, rainwater
picks up carbon dioxide, making
it slightly acidic, which most
plants love. This slight acidity
helps a plant’s roots absorb
minerals more readily. That’s one
of the reasons everything looks
so green and lush after a good
rain. The other reason is that
there’s nitrogen in rainwater, and
nitrogen is a natural fertilizer.
Rainwater also has more oxygen
than tap water, so it’s less likely
to suffocate delicate roots.
Know what else is good
about rainwater? It’s free! Rain
barrels are becoming immensely
popular, and they’re easy to find
online. Or if you’re crafty, you
could probably rig something up
pretty quickly. Just make sure
it’s covered to keep those pesky
mosquitoes from laying eggs in
there. Everything from recycled

50 gallon drums to antique
whiskey barrels, to garbage cans
can be used as rain collectors.
Did someone just say “perfect
Father’s Day present?”
Speaking of dear old dad, one of
my earliest and fondest memories
of my dad is from when I was
about five years old.   My mom
would take my older brother and
sister to church and leave me
home with my dad, who wasn't
(yet) Catholic. I was too young
for communion, and I definitely
couldn't sit still for an hour, so
instead of going to church, I got
to tinker in the greenhouse with
my dad. What a gift that was!
Not only did I cultivate a love
plants, but more importantly, I
discovered the joy of entertaining
myself. I'm not sure who coined
this phrase but it's true: the
antidote to boredom is a vivid
imagination.  
Helping
children
(or
grandchildren, nieces, nephews—
even that annoying neighbor
kid) to explore gardening is an
incredible gift, because it fosters
respect for all living things. A
garden illustrates exactly how
interdependent life is, and the
lessons we learn in the garden
apply to every aspect of life. Plus,
it's not just plants that have
lessons to teach. Everything
outside, from the birds and the
bees (probably no need to discuss
that one with the neighbor kid) to
the ants and worms, plays a role
in a garden. Gardening with kids
gets you all that plus a healthy
dose
of
awesome...watching
a seed sprout is downright
miraculous, and a common
dragonfly can rival a Transformer
any day of the week.
  Spending time with my
dad on those Sunday mornings
helped me understand how
much can be learned through
the simple act of tending
plants: Patience. Hope. Faith.
And being mindful of nature's
everyday miracles. Hmmm…
maybe I wasn't skipping church
after all.

Rain is really good for your garden. (Like really!)

Wendy Sang is owner of
Garden Pixies, find her online at
www.gardenpixies.com or call
843.822.1044.

www.islandeyenews.com

15

16

June 17, 2016

ON THE WATER

Seasonal species are reappearing
in our waterways
BY GEOFF BENNETT

W

eeks
full
of
sunny
weather
and
warm
temperatures have made
our fishery come alive. Bait is
everywhere and eager fish are
chasing it down. Anglers have a
whole host of options now that
our seasonal species have arrived
to complement the traditional
targets of redfish and trout.
Redfish are very active and
attacking artificial lures. Jerk
shad lures rigged on flutter
hooks are my go to option. These
artificial lures, usually 4"-5"
in length, imitate the baitfish
flooding our waters. Flutter
hooks have a weight on their
shank that let you cast a far
distance and also put motion on
the lure. I use them in size 3/0
with a 1/8oz. weight. Make sure
to cast to the edges of the schools
to avoid spooking the fish.
With water temperatures so
warm, our trout bite continues
to improve. The preferred choice
of live bait under a popping cork

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

a popping cork and make your
drag zing. Their acrobatic jumps
and hard runs make these fish
so entertaining. Look for them in
some of the same spots that you
find trout.

See you on the water!  

is hard to beat. Live shrimp
are now available and will give
you another option than mud
minnows. It’s a good idea to start
carrying your cast net and see if
you can find some finger mullet.
Finger mullet under a cork is just
deadly.
Spanish
mackerel
are
beginning to show up especially
in the harbor and can be best
found at first light. If you find
schools of fish slashing across

the surface, throw reflective
casting jigs and reel them quickly
through the school. Alternatively,
if you know fish are present but
not up top, try trolling Clark
Spoons at different depths and
different speeds. Remember to
check your leader often as it only
takes catching a few of these
teethy fish to cut through it.
My favorite summer fish is
the ladyfish. These dynamic
fish will smack shrimp under

your island hair salon
843-883-9101

2205 Middle St, Sullivan's Island
www.islandeyenews.com

Capt. Geoff Bennett operates
Charleston
Charter
Fishing
providing light tackle and fly
fishing charters. Clients choose
from a full menu of fly rods,
artificial and live bait fishing
options with charters tailored
to their desires. USCG licensed
and insured, Capt. Bennett is
committed to providing a safe and
enjoyable charter to anglers of all
skill levels and ages. For more
information, call Capt. Bennett at
843-324-3332, visit his website
at www.charlestoncharterfishing.
com or email him at captain@
charlestoncharterfishing.com.

June 17, 2016

Fort Moultrie celebrates Carolina
Day with living history
BY DAWN DAVIS

C

arolina
Day,
observed annually
in South Carolina,
commemorates
the
successful
defeat
of
British land and naval
forces by Carolina and
Virginia
patriots
on
June 28, 1776. This
was the first decisive
victory by the American
Colonies in their fight
for independence and
prevented the British
from gaining a foothold
in South Carolina for
another four years. This
year marks the 240th
anniversary of the Battle of
Sullivan’s Island.
Fort
Sumter
National
Monument invites the public
to celebrate Carolina Day with
special programs at Fort Moultrie
on Saturday, June 25, 2016 from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors can
explore the life of a Revolutionary
War soldier, and learn why
musket fire and artillery were not
the chief sources of casualties

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

through a look at medical
practices of the war. Musket
demonstrations will take place at
10 a.m., 11 a.m., 2:30 p.m., and
3:30 p.m.
At 1 p.m., author Danny
Bernstein will talk about her
recent book, “Forests, Alligators,
and Battlefields: My Journey
through the National Parks of the
South.” In her book, Bernstein,
uncovers hidden treasures and
human stories for seventy-one

National
Park
sites
in the South. Signed
copies will be available
for purchase.
Fort
Moultrie
is
located at 1214 Middle
Street, Sullivan’s Island,
South Carolina. The site
is administered by the
National Park Service
as a unit of Fort Sumter
National
Monument.
Fort Moultrie represents
the entire history of
static seacoast defense
in the United States,
from
the
American
Revolution to the end
of World War II. The site is open
daily from 9-5 p.m. and includes
a visitor center with museum
exhibits and an orientation film.
An entrance fee of $3 for adults
and $1 for senior citizens is
charged for the park.
For more information on park
news, events and programs visit
facebook.com/FtMoultrieNPS or
nps.gov/fosu.

www.islandeyenews.com

17

ANNUAL FORT PASS
OFFERED
Fort Moultrie is now offering
a new annual pass which
covers the pass holder and
up to 3 accompanying adults
for
unlimited
recreational
entries for one calendar year
from the month of purchase
for a cost of $20. Annual
passes have two signature
lines and can be shared by
two adult pass owners. The
launch of this annual pass
will be accompanied with new
parking lot signage clarifying
that entry fees are required
to recreate Fort Moultrie, the
visitor center, and grounds
including the parking area,
picnic area, and dock.
“In light of the changes
in parking enforcement on
Sullivan’s Island and Isle of
Palms, we wanted to make
sure that our visitor center
parking lot remains available
for visitors to Fort Moultrie.
Fort Moultrie is a popular
destination for local visitors
and we wanted to be sure
that they had the option to
purchase a single pass that
allows unlimited recreational
access,” said Administrative
Officer Laura Segars.
PHOTOS BY STEVE ROSAMILIA

Is l a nd E y e C a l e nda r

June 16
ONGOING
Mondays
Memoir Writing Circle 
Every Monday at 10:30 a.m. 
Come, write and share your
stories.  CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue. 
843.883.3914. 

Tuesdays
Team Trivia
8 to 10 p.m., Home Team BBQ,
Sullivan's Island
Thursdays
Mah Jongg Nights (adults) 
Every Thursday from 5:30 – 8
p.m.  Learn to play American
Mah Jongg.  Join us for a couple
rounds or the whole evening.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914. 
Pajama Storytime
7 p.m. June 9, 16, 23 and 30.
Wind down after a full day with
poems and stories by Mrs. Marie.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843.883.3914.
Battery Gadsden Cultural
Center
The monthly meeting is held the
third Thursday of every month
at 6 p.m. at 1917 I'On Ave.,
Sullivan's Island. A speaker
discussing historically relevant

topics is typically scheduled or
there is a fun and interesting
lesson on Sullivan's Island
history. Anyone is welcome and
anyone interested in becoming
a member can sign up at these
meetings. Membership is free!
Sullivan's Island Farmers'
Market
2:30 to 7 p.m., every Thursday
through June 30 at 1921 I'On
Avenue. Contact Farmers Market
Manager Lisa Darrow at Town
Hall for more information,
843.883.5744, ldarrow@
sullivansisland-sc.com and to
apply to be a vendor.
Pajama Storytime (children)
7 p.m., June and July. Wind down
after a full day with poems and
stories by Mrs. Marie. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
843-883-3914.

Fridays
Party at the Point
The spring/summer concert
series takes place every Friday
afternoon starting at 5:30 p.m.
at the Charleston Harbor Resort
and Marina on Patriot’s Point
and features a full cash bar,
including draft specials. Tickets
are available at the gate and cost
$7 per show. Gates open at 5:30
p.m. and bands start at 6:30 p.m.

CharlestonPartyAtThePoint.com.
June 17 Sibling Rivalry with The
Steppin Stones and The High
Divers
June 24 The Blue Dogs with
Whiskey Run
July 1 Season Finale with
Banana Pancakes "A Tribute to
Jack Johnson"

VFW Post 3137 Steak Night
Open House Steak Night every
Fri. 6 p.m. claim your steak (we
only do 30 each week), season to
your liking, then you have until 8
p.m. to cook it yourself on Ocean
Deck grills.
Choice Ribeye, Baked Potato &
Salad $15.

Saturdays
Yoga
10 a.m. at IOP Recreation Center,
24 28th Ave., IOP. Contact
Karrie Ferrell for more info.
843.886.8294, kferrell@iop.net.
VFW Post 3137 Fish Fry
Every 3rd Sat. of each month
June through Oct. 2016. Whiting
fillets, hush puppies, tater tots,
cole slaw, baked beans and
desserts $8 plate. Proceeds go
to VFW and Veteran programs,
and local community and youth
programs.
Shaggin’ on the Cooper
Celebrate the arrival of warmer

weather with some dancing at
Shaggin’ on the Cooper! Gates
open at 7 p.m. and music
starts at 8 p.m. Tickets for
each event are $10 per person
($8 in advance for Charleston
County residents). Space is
limited, so advance purchase is
recommended, call 843-795-4386
or visit CharlestonCountyParks.
com. Schedule: June 11
– The Sugarbees, July 16 Recollections, August 13 - Vinyl
Daze, September 10 - The
Sneakers.
Birdwatching at the Center For
Birds of Prey
Join the Center’s experienced
birding guides for an introduction
to the Painted Bunting and other
colorful migrants that frequent
the Center’s campus each spring.
June 4 and June 11, 8:30 a.m. to
10:30 a.m. Admission is $20 for
members of the Center and $25
for non-members and includes
admission to the regular bird
of prey program at 10:30 a.m.
Reservations can be made at
www.zerve.com/BirdsofPrey/
BirdWalk or by calling
843.971.7474.
Summer Reading Programs
From babies to adults, everyone
can "Get in the Game" and read
this summer. Visit the Edgar
Allan Poe Branch or www.ccpl.
org for details and to learn about

great summer programs and
prizes. CCPL Poe Branch Library,
1921 I’on Avenue. 843.883.3914.

Thursday, June 16
Battery Gadsden Cultural
Center Speakers Program
6 p.m. Charleston Mayor John
Tecklenburg, a gifted musician
and raconteur, will play piano
and tell stories of the time he
has spent on Sullivan’s Island,
at Sunrise Presbyterian Church.
This not-to-be-missed event is a
fundraiser to help support the
Oral History Project of Battery
Gadsden Cultural Center.
Admission is free, though
donations are encouraged and
greatly appreciated. Future
speakers include Dorothea Benton
Frank, July 7, Dr. Nic Butler, Aug.
18, former Charleston Mayor Joe
Riley, Nov. 17. For more info, go to
batterygadsden.com.

Friday, June 17
Puppet Show by All Hands
Productions
10:30 a.m. Laugh along during
a performance of Billy Goats
Gruff and Other Stuff. CCPL Poe
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
843-883-3914.
Cowboy Mouth at The
WIndjammer
9 p.m., Friday, June 17 and
Saturday, June 18, $20 entry,
www.cowboymouth.com, The
Windjammer, 1008 Ocean Blvd,
Isle Of Palms.

Saturday, June 18
PLAY: “Meet Us at the National
Parks” storytime
10:30 a.m. Ranger Sarah shares
stories helps us discover cool
national treasures in our own
backyard. CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue. 843883-3914.
Beach Lovers Book Club
10:30 a.m. Come to discuss The
Tilted World by Tom Franklin
and Beth Ann Fennelly. Light
refreshments provided. CCPL Poe

July 4
Branch Library, 1921 I’on Avenue.
843-883-3914.

Sunday, June 19
Father’s Day Fishing
1 – 2 p.m., Mount Pleasant Pier.
Fathers and their families are
invited to join this free seminar
with a local fishing guide in
honor of Father’s Day. For more
information, call 843-762-9946.

Friday, June 24
Jamming with Farmer Jason
10:30 a.m. Enjoy music by this
Emmy award-winning entertainer.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.

Saturday, June 25
PLAY: Sail into a Good Book
10:30 a.m. Our friends from
the Charleston Sail and Power
Squadron share stories and
crafts. CCPL Poe Branch Library,
1921 I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.
SI Fire & Rescue Fish Fry
Come out and enjoy freshly fried
fish served with a smile. One
of the three major fundraisers
to support the volunteer rescue
operations on Sullivan’s at the
Sullivan’s Island Fish Fry Shack,
1459 Hennessy St., Sullivan’s
Island, Saturday, June 25, 5 to 8
p.m. sullivansisland-sc.com

Monday, June 27
National Park Service
Centennial Story Hour
2 p.m. A free, one-hour story
time takes place once a month
at the Charleston Main Public
Library and includes stories,
songs, music, crafts, and free
play. Geared for children ages
3-9, the event is designed to give
youth a fun introduction into
the history and culture of our
National Park sites here in the
Charleston area, including Fort
Sumter National Monument, Fort
Moultrie, and Charles Pinckney
National Historic Site. The Library
is located at 68 Calhoun Street in
downtown Charleston.

Tuesday, June 28
Carolina Day
Celebrate the defeat of the British
at the Battle of Sullivan’s Island
on June 28, 1776 with Fort
Sumter National Monument’s
weekend of free activities, as well
as musket programs on June 25.
nps.gov/fosu
Wild Wednesday Lowcountry
Boil & BBQ
6-8 p.m. $40 for adults, $15 for
children Children 3 and under
complimentary Reservations
required: 843.886.2307 Head to
Wild Dunes’s Palm Cove for a 4th
of July themed lowcountry boil.

Friday, July 1
Imani Milele Children’s Choir
from Uganda
10:30 a.m. Play a part in this
once-in-a-lifetime experience.
CCPL Poe Branch Library, 1921
I’on Avenue. 843-883-3914.

Saturday, July 2
Sullivan’s Island Fireworks
Town park event with a band and
evening fireworks show will take
place on Saturday, July 2, when
we can get a better deal on the
pyrotechnics.

PLAY: DIY Crafts with Ms.
Grace
10 a.m. Ms. Grace helps young
hands create fun paper and
felt projects. CCPL Poe Branch
Library, 1921 I’on Avenue. 843883-3914.

Monday, July 4
4th of July Golf Cart Parade
Deck out your golf cart or bicycle
for this annual parade celebrating
America’s independence. Start at
the Sullivan’s Island Fire Station,
end at Stith Park at 8:30 a.m.
4th of July on Isle of Palms
The Isle of Palms hosts a 4th
of July fireworks display over
the ocean near 14th Avenue
beginning at 9 p.m. iop.net/
recreation, 843.886.8294
Wild Dunes Family Fun Run/
Walk
8 a.m. $25 per person, including
t-shirt. Pre-registration required:
843.886.7008
Wild Dunes 4th of July
Watermelon-Eating Contest
Come enjoy waterslides and more
on the lawn next to Palm Cove
pool, from 11 a.m. from 2 p.m.
$10 per person. Watch or compete
in the watermelon-eating contest
at 12 p.m.  

20

It’s not just a donation: it’s a BIG deal

June 17, 2016

B I G B R O T H E R S B I G S I S T E R S R O L L S O U T B I G S P O N S O R C A M PA I G N
BY COLIN MCCANDLESS

D

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

riven by a growing demand for adult role
models to serve as youth mentors, Big
Brothers Big Sisters of Carolina Youth
Development Center is excited to announce
the launch of its Big Sponsor Campaign, a
unique opportunity to transform the life of a
child in the Charleston area.
The Big Sponsor campaign asks that a
group or individual agrees to financially
support one Big/Little mentoring match with
an annual donation of $2,000 for a period
of three years. This donation will ensure
that the Big Brothers Big Sisters program
can continue to support more than 110
mentoring relationships in the Lowcountry,
while expanding to meet the needs of the
community.
Big Brothers Big Sisters currently has over
200 children on its waiting list. If staff must
direct most of its focus and energies into
fundraising, it leaves less time for recruiting,
supporting and sustaining matches. Big
Sponsor funding allows BBBS of CYDC to
prioritize its time and resources on enrolling
more children into the program.
Kryan with his Big Brother Christian. The BBBS program
With the start of summer break comes more is seeking financial mentors as well as physical ones.
free time, which makes it even more important
BBBS of CYDC receives no state funding
for children to have another positive role
and
relies on grants, fundraising events and
model to help guide their decision making
individual
and corporate donors to finance
and serve as a positive influence so they
its
matches.
Following the expiration of
avoid risky behaviors. Each new match that
is funded allows one more young person to significant grants, the program found itself in
benefit from another reliable and trustworthy a precarious financial state in summer 2015
adult in their lives to offer guidance, support and was nearly forced to close.
Today, things are far better. There have
and encouragement.

www.islandeyenews.com

been 157 mentoring matches made year to
date, and the campaign has jumpstarted the
program. But hundreds more at-risk youth
require our life-changing services, so to keep
the momentum going, we are asking generous
benefactors to help us make an even bigger
impact.
“All children need someone to inspire and
encourage their passions and to help them
achieve success in life," says BBBS of CYDC
Program Director Christina Hoffecker. "We
all want to give back, but not everyone can
dedicate the time to volunteer and serve as
a role model. The Big Sponsor Campaign
provides a vital philanthropic opportunity for
individuals or businesses to help support and
sustain a match throughout its duration.”
Big Sponsors will share in the success
and growth of their supported match with
personal letters, photos and other updates
so they will know how the relationship is
progressing and will see the impact of their
donation.
Hoffecker says, “Big Brothers Big Sisters is
the only program of its kind in the Tri-County
Area. Mentoring is wanted and needed, and
is proven to produce positive outcomes in the
youth who are fortunate enough to benefit
from an adult role model.”
For more information on becoming a Big
Sponsor, contact Christina Hoffecker at 843266-5232 or choffecker@cydc.org or visit
www.becomeabig.org.

June 17, 2016

SiP magazine celebrates island life

21

BY JENNIFER TUOHY

ISLAND EYE NEWS EDITOR

L

ast month, Lucky Dog
Publishing, the company
behind Island Eye News
newspaper, launched its second
edition of SiP magazine. The
first magazine of its kind, SiP
combines high quality journalism
with stunning imagery from local
writers and photographers to
capture the spirit of Sullivan’s
Island, Isle of Palms and Dewees.
Published by the Island Eye
News team, the magazine offers
a unique insight into these island
communities, serving up feature
stories and articles on local
people, events and history.
The 2016 edition features
stories on the birth of Isle of Palms
as a residential community, a look
at the slightly solitary lifestyle of
Goat Island residents, a day in
the life of the Isle of Palms county
park lifeguards and a celebration
of the musical heritage of The
Windjammer.
This issue is also filled with
profiles of islanders. Sullivan's
Island fire chief Anthony Stith,
along with his friend and mentee,
Chief Anne Graham of IOP Fire
Department, reminisce on their
childhood growing up on the

islands and discuss what drove
them to become chief protectors
of their communities.
Artist Jim Darlington discusses
how Sullivan’s Island and the
lowcountry inspires his landscape
portraiture, and mystery writer
Leonard Goldberg explains how
the sands of Sullivan’s featured
prominently in his childhood,
prompting him to return here to
continue his writing career.
The magazine also highlights
unique and compelling aspects
of life on Charleston’s favorite
barrier islands; from lazy days
relaxing on docks and frolicking
on the beach with man’s best
friend to fishing for reds in the
intracoastal
and
devouring
island-style brunch at some of
the best restaurants in the area.
Other stories explore the
fascinating history of our islands
and the wildlife that shares
these strips of sand with us.
Learn about the half scorpion/
half spider that mates on our
shores(the
horsehoe
crab),
discover the tiny birds nesting in
plain sight on our beaches and
find out all about the man who
gave Sullivan’s Island his name.

SiP magazine has something
for everyone who holds a piece of
these islands in their hearts.
SiP magazine is mailed to
all residents on
Isle
of
Palms,
Sullivan’s
and
Dewee’s islands. It
is also sent to any
registered property
owner,
meaning
the magazine is
mailed to 38 states
and 5 countries.
You can also pick
up a copy at Delta
Pharmacy,
The
Refuge and The
Marina on IOP,
and at the Fort
Moultrie visitors’
center, The CoOp, gogogreens
and
Sullivan’s
Island
Library
on
Sullivan’s,
as well as many
other locations
across
the
islands.
Read
the
magazine
in full online at
sipmagazinesc.

www.islandeyenews.com

com. For questions or advertising
inquiries contact Lynn Pierotti a
lynn@luckydognews.com.

Acme Lowcountry Kitchen
Specializing in local and
sustainable seafood. All Altantic
Ocean sourced Seafood. $$-$$$
843-886-FISH (3474)
31 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms

High Thyme
A small island bistro, with a wide
range of dishes, from seafood,
tapas on Tuesday, and a Sunday
brunch. $$-$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Beard Cat’s
Gelato made from locally sourced
ingredients, and coffee shop that
sits below Obstinate Daughter. $
416-5020
www.beardcatsweetshop.com
2063 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Home Team BBQ
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves salads,
wraps, tacos, and quesadillas,
Sunday Brunch. $$
883-3131
www.teamteambbq.com
2209 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

The Boathouse
Fresh, local seafood, and
phenomenal sunset views from
the upper deck on Breach Inlet.
$$-$$$
886.8000
www.boathouserestaurants.com
101 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

883-9131

Famous burgers, Irish fare, favorite
locals hangout for over 20 years.
$$
883-9646
www.dunleavysonsullivans.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Banana Cabana
A casual menu suits its beachfront
setting. Nibbles like peel and eat
shrimp and nachos alongside
heartier platters of seafood. $-$$
(843) 886-4361
www.thebananacabana.com
1130 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Ben & Jerry’s
Enjoy an array of ice cream flavors,
from Chocolate Therapy, to Peach
Cobbler on Isle of Palms’ Ocean
Boulevard. $
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

2213 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

island eats

Coconut Joe’s &
Island Joe’s Coffee
Spectacular views of the Atlantic
on the rooftop bar and live music
every night during the summer.
$-$$. Island Joe’s next door
featuring coffee and ice cream. $
886-0046
www.coconutjoes.biz
1120 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms
The Dinghy
Laid back Key West Vibe, great
food options, unique beers on
tap, spacious side porch, and live
music. $-$$
242-8310
www.dinghyiop.com
8 JC Long Blvd, Isle of Palms
Dunleavy’s Irish Pub
The islands’ only Irish Pub.

Island Ice Frozen Yogurt
All organic frozen yogurt, with
gluten free and vegan options.
Toppings are all natural or organic.
Local coffee and teas. $
885-7079
www.islandiceyogurt.com
1515 C Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms
Long Island Café
Come in for lunch, dinner, or
Sunday brunch and enjoy all your
favorite seafood, plus so much
more at this island favorite. $$-$$$
886-8809
www.longislandcafesc.com
1515-A Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms

Deliver right to your door or get
carryout. $
886-5759
www.order.pizzahut.com
1515 Palm Blvd, Isle of Palms
Poe’s Tavern
Famous for their gourmet burgers
and chicken sandwiches, this Poeinspired eatery also features great
deals on fresh fish tacos. $$
883-0083
www.longislandcafesc.com
2210 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island
Refuge
Enjoy morning coffee with fresh
bagels and pastries from the coffee
bar and dinner or lunch at the
restaurant along with signature
cocktails.
www.therefugeiop.com
1517 Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms
Saltworks Dockside Deli
Located inside the Isle of Palms
Marina Market, come enjoy
breakfast, smoothies, and
sandwiches.. $-$$
883-3355
www.saltworkscc.com
50 41st Ave, Isle of Palms
Sullivan’s
Grab a casual dinner of fried
flounder or crab cakes in a cozy
atmosphere as well as lunch on the
weekends. $$
883-3222
www.saltstation22.com
2019 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

Morgan Creek Grill
Relax with a front row seat on
the Intracoastal Waterway while
enjoying fresh seafood and
southern hospitality. $$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
8040 1st Ave, Isle of Palms

Taco Mamacita
Enjoy made from scratch ‘Tex
Mex’ soups, salads, tacos, and
enchiladas, and quench your
thirst with one of several specialty
margaritas. $$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle St, Sullivan’s Island

The Obstinate Daughter
Restaurant serving contemporary
Southern cuisine, pizza & pasta
in a rustic, coastal-inspired
space.$$-$$$
416-5020
www.theobstinatedaughter.com
2063 Middle St, Isle of Palms

Windjammer
Lively spot with a bar menu, a
deck overlooking the water, and
beach volleyball court out back.$$$
886-8596
www.the-windjammer.com
1008 Ocean Blvd, Isle of Palms

Pizza Hut
Now serving Isle of Palms in the
Harris Teeter shopping center.

off-island eats
Bacco
Regional Italian restaurant
featuring fresh pastas, fior di latte
mozzarella and Neapolitan style
pizzas from the wood burning oven.
$$$
843.884.6969
www.baccocharleston.com
976 Houston Northcutt Blvd., Mt.
Pleasant
Bistro Toulouse
Classic French cuisine, fine wines
and creative cocktails. Menu
highlights include Crepes, Mussels,
Cassoulet, Bouillabaisse, Cheese
& Charcuterie and house made
Desserts. $$$
843.216.3434
www.bistrotoulouse.com
1220 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant

Eggs Up Grill
Relaxed chain serving a menu of
breakfast, burgers & sandwiches in
a colorful setting. $-$$
388-3654
www.eggsupgrill.com
2664 Highway 17 North,
Mt. Pleasant
Sawyers
True to the low country, Sawyer's
On The Boulevard is surrounded
by beautiful Oak trees and done in
reclaimed wood on the inside with
copper tiles topping the bar area.
Local fresh shrimp and fish tacos
are a favorite here as well as some
of Charleston's best music 5 nights
a week. $$
843.388.5270
www.sawyersotb.com
1528 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant
www.islandeyenews.com

Stack’s Coastal Kitchen
Join us for lunch, where we
offer fresh soup, salads, and
sandwiches. Enjoy dinner in a
casual bistro-style setting, nice
selection and outdoor seating. $$
388-6968
www.stackscoastalkitchen.com
1440 Ben Sawyer Blvd,
Mt. Pleasant
The Wine Bar
Wine, unique variety of 40 +
cheeses and charcuterie meats
from around the world., chocolate,
bon-bons. $$
849-5185
www.thewinebarmtp.com
664 Long Point Rd, Mt. Pleasant

June 17, 2016

FINANCIAL FOCUS

23

Give your children the gift of
(financial) knowledge
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV

FOR ISLAND EYE NEWS

I

t’s almost Father’s Day. If
you’re a dad with young
children, you can expect
some nice homemade cards and
maybe even a baseball cap. But,
of course, your greatest reward is
spending time with your kids and
watching them grow. In return,
you can give them a gift—the gift
of knowledge. Specifically, in the
months and years ahead, teach
them the financial skills that can
help make their lives easier and
more rewarding.
For starters, encourage your
children to become savers. You
can do this in a couple of different
ways. First, set a good example.
You might explain to your kids
that you want to buy a certain
item, but you are waiting for it to
go on sale. Or, if it’s a particularly
big-ticket item, like an ultra highdefinition television, tell your
children that you simply can’t
afford it now, but that you are
putting away some money each
week until you can. You might
even make a chart showing your
progress.
Another way to help your
children become better savers is
to provide them with a monetary
incentive. To illustrate: For every
dollar they put into a “piggy bank”
or an actual savings account, tell
them you’ll put in, say, 50 cents.
They are likely to be pleased

and excited by how much faster
their money grows with your
contribution, and they may well
become more motivated to save.
Furthermore, you’ll be giving
them a valuable lesson for later
on in life, when they work for a
business that offers to match their
contributions to a 401(k) or other
retirement plan. Unfortunately,
many young people, upon taking
on their first “career” jobs,
either under-contribute to their
retirement plans or ignore them
completely—thereby making it
more likely that, later on in their
working lives, they will have to
come up with much bigger sums
each year to accumulate enough
resources for a comfortable
retirement.
Learning to save is certainly
important—but children should
also learn about investing. To
help get your children interested
in becoming investors, point out
that they can actually own shares
of companies with which they are
already familiar—the companies
that make the games they play,
the movies they watch and the
food they eat. In fact, you could
even simulate the investment
process by letting them choose
a stock and then follow it. To
make the results more tangible,
use “play” money to represent
an initial investment, and add or

Breac h Inlet Tide Char t
Date

High Tide

Low Tide

Jun 17
Jun 18
Jun 19
Jun 20
Jun 21
Jun 22
Jun 23
Jun 24
Jun 25
Jun 26
Jun 27
Jun 28
Jun 29
Jun 30

6:14am/6:58pm
7:00am/7:41pm
7:44am/8:21pm
8:26am/9:01pm
9:07am/9:39pm
9:48am/10:18pm
10:31am/10:58pm
11:16am/11:42pm
12:07pm
12:32am/1:02pm
1:26am/2:02pm
2:25am/3:04pm
3:26am/4:06pm
4:29am/5:08pm

12:20am/12:15pm
1:05am/12:57pm
1:48am/1:38pm
2:29am/2:19pm
3:10am/3:00pm
3:52am/3:43pm
4:34am/4:28pm
5:17am/5:17pm
6:04am/6:10pm
6:53am/7:09pm
7:46am/8:13pm
8:42am/9:19 pm
9:40am/10:26pm
10:39am/11:29pm

Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.

Source: www.saltwatertides.com

subtract to the pile to track the
ups and downs of the real stock.
You might even explain some
of the reasons for the stock’s
movements; for example, if you
and your child are following
the stock of an entertainment
company, and that company
produces a blockbuster movie
that leads to sequels, spinoffs
and merchandise tie-ins, you can
point out how these developments
have pushed up the company’s
stock price.
You might also explain that
while these short-term price
movements are interesting—

and maybe even fun—to follow,
investing is actually a long-term
endeavor, and the best investors
often hold stocks for many years
before selling them.
By following these suggestions,
you can help your children
acquire good financial habits—
and seeing them put these skills
to good use can provide you with
many happy Father’s Days in the
future.
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.

2402 PALM BOULEVARD
Isle of Palms
6 bedroom/6.5 baths
5,800,000

C ontact

MEL MILES
843.363.3049

reduced
2601 PALM BOULEVARD
Isle of Palms
3 bedroom/3 baths
1,049,000

1 BEACHWOOD EAST
Isle of Palms
3 bedroom/2 baths
$788,000

C ontact

CHUCK & EDY
843.224.9507

C ontact

SALLY LEYDIC
MULHIG
843-518-1704

Sand D llar
Serving Mt. Pleasant, Sullivans and Isle of Palms

Sullivans Island

843.530.8100

SanddollarSC.com