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Lynne Brady

Time Markers: Past Simple and Present Perfect

Students page

Decide which of these words can be used for the Past Simple and which can be used for the
Present Perfect. Can any be used for both tenses?
Tick the correct box
Past Simple
during
for
yet
just
ago
still
the day before
yesterday
yesterday
ever
last week
never
this morning
when
already

Write your own examples for each word:

Present Perfect

Both

Lynne Brady
Time Markers: Past Simple and Present Perfect

Teachers page

Decide which of these words can be used for the Past Simple and which can be used for the
Present Perfect. Can any be used for both tenses?
Tick the correct box
Past Simple
During
For
Yet
Just
Ago
Still
the day before
yesterday
Yesterday
Ever
Last week
Never
This morning
When
Already

Present Perfect

Both
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

Get students to write their own examples in class or for HWK


Spend more time on the difficult ones for each specific student
Help them to come up with a way to remember e.g. for = four (used when you count!)

Already (used to emphasize that an action has been accomplished in the past) follows the normal pattern of Verb +

Adverb + Verb, as in I have already read that book.


Yet (used to signify the intention to do something) follows an unusual pattern. You use yet at the end of a sentence, and
the verb must be negative, as in I havent read that book yet.

Still (like yet, it is used to signify the intention to do something) also follows an unusual pattern. You use still before

both parts of the verb, and the verb must be negative, as in I still havent read that book. Be careful that students dont get
confused wth the other use of still(used to emphasize an ongoing action), which is commonly used with a positive verb and
the present progressive tense, as in I am still waiting for your call. No wonder English is difficult to learn!

During- used to describe a period of time and something happens within this period

For- used when counting the duration of the action

Just- when an action has very recently been done

When+ past simple specifying a certain time

Ever used in questions about your general life experience Have you ever?

Never used to emphasize that you have not done something

This morning (depends on whether the morning is finished or not)