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Status Report on the

Millennium Development Goals


Using CBMS Data

Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table of Contents
List of Acronyms .............................................................................................................................vi
List of Maps ..................................................................................................................................viii
List of Tables ....................................................................................................................................x
Foreword ....................................................................................................................................xiii
Acknowledgments ........................................................................................................................xiv
Message ....................................................................................................................................xvi

Executive Summary ...................................................................................... xvii


Part I. Provincial Profile .................................................................................. 1





Brief History of Occidental Mindoro.....................................................................1


Geo-Physical Environment........................................................................................1
Population and Social Environment....................................................................4
Infrastructure/Utilities/Facilities ...........................................................................9
Local Economy.............................................................................................................. 10
Local Institutional Capability ................................................................................ 12

Part II. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)



Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger....................................... 14

1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 14


2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 23
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 25
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 25
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 26
6. Best Practice ..................................................................................... 27

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table of Contents

Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education............................................ 28

1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 28


2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 34
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 35
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 36
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 36
6. Best Practice ..................................................................................... 37

Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women................... 39
1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 39
2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 44
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 45
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 45
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 46
6. Best Practice ..................................................................................... 47

Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality............................................................................. 48
1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 48
2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 51
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 53
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 53
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 54
6. Best Practice ..................................................................................... 54

Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health........................................................................ 55

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1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 55


2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 58
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 59
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 59
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 60

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table of Contents

Goal 6: Combat HIV / AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases ................... 61

1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 61


2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 65
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 65
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 65
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 66

Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability.............................................. 67

1. Status and Trends .......................................................................... 67


2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 74
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 74
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 75

Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development....................... 76


1. Status and Trends ................................................................................ 76
2. Current Policies and Programs ................................................ 81
3. Challenges .......................................................................................... 81
4. Priority Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) ............ 82
5. Financing the MDGs ...................................................................... 82

Annex A. Summary Table of MDG Indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Annex B. Explanatory Text

Appendix A. Definition of MDG Indicators

Appendix B. Poverty and Food Thresholds

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Acronyms

vi

AICS
AIP
ALS Program
BEmONC
BHS
BHW
BnB
CBMS
CEmONC
CHD
CMP
CPR
DepEd
DILG
DOH
DOLE
DOST
DSWD
DTI
EASE Project
EFA
FICS Analysis
HIV/AIDS
ICT
IMR
IP
IPC
IRA
KALAHI-CIDSS
KALIPI
LGU
LUBELCO
MDG
MIMAROPA
MMR
MNCHN

Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situation


Annual Investment Program
Alternative Learning System Program
Basic Emergency Obstetrics and Neonatal Care
barangay health stations
barangay health workers
Botika ng Barangay
Community-Based Monitoring System
Comprehensive Emergency Obstetrics and Neonatal Care
Center for Health Development
Community Mortgage Project
contraceptive prevalence rate
Department of Education
Department of the Interior and Local Government
Department of Health
Department of Labor and Employment
Department of Science and Technology
Department of Social Welfare and Development
Department of Trade and Industry
Effective Alternative Secondary Education Project
Education for All
Family, Individual, Community and SchoolAnalysis
Human Immunodeficiency Virus / Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
information and communication technology
infant mortality rate
indigenous peoples
Island Power Corporation
internal revenue allotment
Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of Social Services
Kalipunan ng Lahing Pilipina
local government unit
Lubang Electric Cooperative
Millennium Development Goal
Mindoro Marinduque Romblon Palawan
maternal mortality rate
maternal neonatal and child health and nutrition

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Acronyms
MNCHN
MOA
MOOE
NCIP
NEDA
NGO
NHA
NHIP
NSCB
NSO
OHSP
OMECO
OPB
PEP-CBMS
PESO
PHO
PIPH
PLDT
PPVO
Project TSD
PSWDO
PWD
RHU
SAMARICA
SBM
SEA-K
SEARCA
SEF
SPES
TB DOTS
TESDA
UNDP
UNICEF
YAKAP

maternal newborn child health and nutrition


memorandum of agreement
maintenance and other operating expenses
National Commission on Indigenous Peoples
National Economic and Development Authority
nongovernment organization
National Housing Authority
National Health Insurance Program
National Statistics Coordination Board
National Statistics Office
Open High School Program
Occidental Mindoro Electric Cooperative
outpatient benefit (OPB) package
Partnership for Economic PolicyCommunity-Based Monitoring System
Public Employment Service Office
Provincial Health Office
Province-wide Investment Plan for Health
Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company
Provincial Agriculture and Provincial Veterinary Office
Project Tulong, Sulong and Dunong
Provincial Social Welfare and Development Office
persons with disabilities
Rural Health Unit
San Jose, Magsaysay, Rizal and Calintaan
School-Based Management
Self Employment and Assistance Kaunlaran
Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture
School Education Fund
Special Program for the Employment of Students
TB Directly Observed Treatment Short Course
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
United Nations Development Programme
United Nations Childrens Fund
Yugtong Aklas Kahirapan Program

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Maps

viii

Map 1. Location of Occidental Mindoro


Map 2. Map of Occidental Mindoro
Map 3. Proportion of population living below the poverty threshold, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 4. Poverty gap ratio, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 5. Employment rate, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 6. Proportion of population who experienced food shortage, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 7. Prevalence of underweight children under 5 years of age, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 8. Proportion of population living below the food threshold, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 9. Proportion of children aged 6-11 enrolled in elementary, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 10. Proportion of children aged 12-15 enrolled in high school, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 11. Proportion of children aged 6-15 enrolled in school, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 12. Literacy rate of population 15-24 years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 13. Ratio of girls to boys in elementary education, 6-11 years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 14. Ratio of girls to boys in secondary education, 12-15 years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2001-2011
Map 15. Ratio of girls to boys in school, 6-15 years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 16. Ratio of literate females to males, 15-24 years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 17. Proportion of child deaths below 5 years old by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 18. Proportion of infant deaths below one year old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map. 19. Proportion of child deaths, 1-4 years old, by municipality, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 20. Proportion of women deaths due to pregnancy-related causes, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 21. Contraceptive prevalence rate, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 22. Proportion of couples using condom among those who are practicing contraception, by municipality, Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 23. Prevalence and death rates associated with malaria (per 100,000), by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Maps
Map 24. Prevalence and death rates associated with tuberculosis (per 100,000), by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 25. Proportion of population with access to improved water source, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 26. Proportion of population with access to sanitary toilet facilities, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 27. Proportion of population who are informal settlers, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 28. Proportion of population who live in makeshift housing, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Map 29. Proportion of population with inadequate living conditions, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2001-2011
Map 30. Proportion of households with access to landlines/telephone lines, by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 31. Proportion of households with access to cellphones, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Map 32. Proportion of households with access to computers, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Tables
Table ES1. Report on the Millennium Development Goals, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table ES2. Summary of budget allocation for meeting the MDGs, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2013-2015
Table 1. Land area in hectares, no. of barangays, income class per municipality: Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2012
Table 2. Status of land classification, Occidental Mindoro, 2003
Table 3. 2010 Census of Population and Housing, final result, Province of Occidental Mindoro
Table 4. Existing health facilities and manpower, 2011
Table 5. Government hospitals, by bed capacity, category and classification, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2010
Table 6. Vital health indices, 2009-2011
Table 7. Ten leading causes of mortality/10,000 pop, 2011
Table 8. Hospital bed patient ratio, 2011
Table 9. Doctor - patient ratio, per hospital, 2011
Table 10. Basic education indicators, Occidental Mindoro
Table 11. Summary of MDG 1 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 12. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living below the poverty
threshold, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 13. Top and bottom municipalities, poverty gap ratio, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 14. Top and bottom municipalities, employment rate, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 15. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population who experienced food
shortage, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 16. Top and bottom municipalities, prevalence of underweight children under 5 years of age, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 17. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living below the food
threshold, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 18. Summary of MDG 2 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 19. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 6-11 years old enrolled in
elementary, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2001-2011
Table 20. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 12-15 years old enrolled in high
school, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 21. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 6-15 years old enrolled in school,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 22. Top and bottom municipalities, literacy rate of 15-24 year old, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 23. Summary of MDG 3 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 24. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in elementary education, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Tables
Table 25. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in secondary education, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Table 26. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in school, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 27. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of literate of females to males (15-24 years old), Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 28. Elected seats held by women in the local government of Occidental Mindoro, 2010
Table 29. Summary of MDG 4 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 30. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 0 to less than 5 who died, Province
of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 31. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of infants who died, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Table 32. Top and bottom municipalities,magnitude and proportion of children aged 1 to less than 5 who died, Province
of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 33. Summary of MDG 5 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 34. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of women deaths due to pregnancy related-causes,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 35. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of couples who use contraception, Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 36. Summary of MDG 6 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 37. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of couples using condom among those who are
practicing contraception, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 38. Top and bottom municipalities, prevalence and death rates associated with malaria (per 100, 000), Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 39. Top and bottom municipalities, prevalence and death rates associated with tuberculosis (per 100, 000) by sex,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 40. Summary of MDG 7 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 41. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population with access to improved
water source, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 42. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population with access to sanitary
toilet facilities, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 43. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population who are informal settlers,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 44. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of household/population who are living in makeshift
housing, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

List of Tables
Table 45. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living in inadequate housing
conditions, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 46. Summary of MDG 8 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 47. Ratio of Barangays With Botika ng Barangay, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2011-2012
Table 48. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to telephone/landlines, Province of
Occidental Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 59. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to mobile phones, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Table 50. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to mobile phones, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Foreword
The Province of Occidental Mindoro, together with the Partnership for Economic PolicyCommunity-Based Monitoring System (PEP-CBMS) Network Office, and with the support
of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), prepared this status report on
the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) in order to provide an insight on where the
province stands in terms of accomplishing the eight goals set by the United Nations
(UN). The preparation of this report was facilitated by the national governments efforts
to localize the MDGs.
This report provides the status in achieving the targets in the eight goals: 1.) Eradicate
extreme poverty and hunger; 2.) Achieve universal primary education; 3.) Promote
gender equality and empower women; 4.) Reduce child mortality; 5.) Improve maternal
health; 6.) Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; 7.) Ensure environmental
sustainability; and 8.) Develop a global partnership for development. In addition, this
report also provides readers with the ongoing projects, programs and activities that are
expected to contribute to the attainment of the goals in the declared target year which
is 2015.
The data gathered from the CBMS census which was conducted in the province in
2009 up until 2011 was the main source of data in this report. One of the many uses of
CBMS data is its ability to track the achievement of MDGs at the local level. The CBMS
methodology captures detailed socio-economic data at the household and memberlevel which can be used to monitor the achievement of the MDGs.
This Status Report on the MDGs using CBMS data evidently presents the situation
across the municipalities through maps and tables and analyzes the performance of the
province in each of the indicators of the eight goals. It also contains current policies and
programs of the province, challenges in achieving the goals, priority programs, projects
and activities in the course of three years until the set year of achievement, and the
corresponding budgetary requirements.

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Acknowledgments
The MDG Status Report of the Province of Occidental Mindoro was put together through
the collaborative efforts of different agencies and individuals. We deeply appreciate the
people and organizations that contributed their time and gave wholehearted support to
turn this endeavor into a reality. They are as follows:
Our Provincial Governor Josephine Y. Ramirez-Sato, for taking the opportunity offered
by PEP Asia-CBMS Network Office and the United Nations Development Programme to
participate in this project and for the trust she gave to the MDG Team, by expressing her
strong belief that they can make it;
The PEP Asia-CBMS Network Team, its team leader, Dr. Celia M. Reyes, and the PEPCBMS staff, especially Ms. Steffie Joi Calubayan, for their technical assistance and
guidance in the preparation of this document. Ms. Calubayan, the MDG mentor for
Occidental Mindoro, had been very supportive of the Team;
The PEP-CBMS-UNDP Project for capacitating the MDG Team through a series of
workshops;
The MDG teams of participating LGUs, for sharing their experiences and best practices;
The agencies and individuals who provided the badly needed data for this undertaking,
such as the following: the Department of Education, Provincial Health Office, Provincial
Agricultural Office, Plan International, Provincial Social Welfare and Development,
Provincial Accounting Office, and Provincial Planning and Development Office.
Our loving families, for their understanding and boundless love, which provided us with
the strength to keep going;
The municipal mayors and municipal planning and development coordinators of the 11
municipalities who gave their all-out support during the CBMS implementation in the
province;

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Acknowledgments
The people of Occidental Mindoro who inspired us most during the preparation of this
report; and
Finally, our God Almighty, for the blessings and guidance, and for leading us the way as
we strove to reach our goalthe completion of this MDG Status Report for Occidental
Mindoro.
A million thanks!

The Provincial CBMS-MDG Team
CORAZON A. ANGELES Team Leader
LORNA A. ESPAOLA
LEANNE M. ORCAS
GLADYS E. BARILE
Provincial Planning & Development
Coordinator

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Message
Republic of the Philippines
PROVINCE OF OCCIDENTAL MINDORO
Mamburao

OFFICE OF THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNOR

This Status Report on the Millennium Development


Goals Using CBMS Data provides readers with
the status of the Province of Occidental Mindoros
commitment to the accomplishment of MDGs.
Despite tremendous and concerted efforts of national
government agencies and local government units,
the MDGs remain a big challenge to the province of
Occidental Mindoro. The End Poverty 2015 Millennium
Campaign has helped raise the level of public
awareness on MDGs and outlined the roadmap to
fast track the attainment of desired targets. Needless
to say, success in these efforts will require a firm
commitment from all stakeholders; and the efficient
and effective utilization of limited resources. This document serves as a reference in
crafting the blueprint for the development of our province.
My profound gratitude goes to the PEP-CBMS Network Coordinating Team for the untiring
support to the local government units that participated in the preparation of the MDG
Report, and to the United Nations Development Programme for financial assistance in
this endeavor.
Mabuhay tayong lahat!

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

JOSEPHINE Y. RAMIREZ-SATO
Governor

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1. Overview
It is barely two years away from 2015
the deadline for Occidental Mindoro to
achieve its Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs)and the province has mixed
performance with regard to achieving the
MDGs. It posted good performance in terms
of reducing child mortality while it did not do
well in developing a global partnership for
development and in eradicating those who
are income and food-poor. Furthermore, the
province also did not fare well in ensuring
environmental sustainability. With this,
strategies to accelerate progress towards
the achievement of the MDGs made in
place.
The
Community-Based
Monitoring
System (CBMS), which was implemented
by the province in 2009, is the major source
of data in preparing this report. The CBMS
was used by the province in tracking down
the status of its MDG accomplishments.
The challenge faced by the province is how
to attain the MDGs in two years, and how
to successfully implement its policies and
programs against poverty. Overcoming
poverty is the key to attaining most of the
targets in the MDG.

2. Millennium Development
Goals: Status of
Achievements
Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger
Results of the CBMS census in 2009
revealed that 67.8 percent of the people of
Occidental Mindoro were living below the
poverty threshold, that is, 7 out of 10 persons
in the province were income poor. On the
other hand, the proportion of population living
below the food threshold was 55.3 percent.
Living below the food threshold means that
the income is not enough to buy the basic
food needs of the family. Moreover, the
poverty gap ratio was posted at 0.4 percent.
The annual per capita income threshold in
2009 was P16,169, according to the National
Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), while
the annual per capita food threshold was
P11,348. These data show that only 32.2
percent of the provinces residents were living
above the poverty threshold (or earning an
annual income of P16,169 or more) while 44.7
percent were living above the food threshold
(earning an annual income of P11,384 or
more).
Employment rate in the province in 2009
was 92.4 percent, which means that 122,110

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

xvii

of the 115,164 members of the labor force


were employed. There were more males
employed (94.5%) than females (87.1%).
Although the employment rate is high, it can
be said that the majority of those employed
do not earn enough for the needs of their
households as evidenced by the populations
poverty threshold and food threshold
profiles. Furthermore, 6.7 percent of the
population experienced hunger during the
last three months prior to the CBMS census.
Meanwhile, the percentage of underweight
children under 5 years of age was 6.7 percent,
or 3,369 children. There were more female
malnourished children (7.1 percent) than
male malnourished children (6.3 percent).
The province has declared war on poverty,
hence, its projects and programs are geared
toward eradicating poverty. The Yugtong
Aklas Kahirapan Program (YAKAP, which
means embrace) was launched in 2008 by the
Provincial Social Welfare and Development
Office (PSWDO), which extended capital
assistance at very low interest rates to
groups and associations that have existing
livelihood projects. The Provincial Agriculture
and Provincial Veterinary Office (PPVO)
have programs that aim to improve the
livelihood of the marginalized farmers. The
Agriculture Office continues to provide
agriculture infrastructure to boost the
production capabilities of the farming
sector. The Veterinary Office implements
animal dispersal programs with the poorest
in the community as main beneficiaries.
The provincial government also provides
programs and projects for fishermen. The
foreign-funded SEARCA project, completed
in 2011, provided skills training and livelihood
projects to the fishing sector in covered
municipalities. Skills training for women

and organized groups were conducted in


cooperation with the Department of Trade
and Industry (DTI), Department of Science
and Technology (DOST), and Technical
Education and Skills Development Authority
(TESDA). The province, through the Public
Employment
Service
Office
(PESO),
also conducts job fairs for those seeking
employment abroad. Another program of the
province, the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan
Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of Social
Services (KALAHI-CIDSS), provides capital to
barangay-identified projects with provincial
counterpart. The womens group Kalipunan
ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI), organized by the
PSWDO, was provided with trainings and
capital for the chosen economic endeavor.
The province also implements the Special
Program for the Employment of Students
(SPES) in cooperation with the Department of
Labor and Employment (DOLE). This program
provides summer jobs in government offices
to deserving college students.
To address the problem of malnutrition
among schoolchildren, the Department
of
Education
(DepEd)
implements
supplementary feeding programs with
financial support from the department, the
school canteen, nongovernment organizations
(NGOs), and local government units (LGUs).
The Department of Health (DOH) through the
Provincial Health Office (PHO) implements
the Garantisadong Pambata and Information
and Education Campaign on Nutrition.
The provincial and municipal governments
allocated funds in their Annual Investment
Programs (AIP) for implementing various
nutrition programs to address the malnutrition
problem among children 0-5 years old.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Achieving Universal Primary Education


The Philippines and many other countries,
signed a commitment to achieve the MDGs by
2015. One of the goals embodied in the MDG
is to achieve universal primary education.
Based on the CBMS census of 2009, 82.1
percent of children 6-11 years old were
enrolled in public and private elementary
schools; those enrolled in high school was
only 54.2 percent. It is to be noted that 84,183
(86.7%) of the 140,214 children in the province
who are 6-15 years old are enrolled in school.
This does not take into account those who
are enrolled in school but do not fall in the
official school age due to late or early entry in
school or due to repetition.
The National Statistics Office (NSO)
defines functional literacy as not only
reading and writing but also numerical and
comprehension skills. A basically literate
person is one who can read and write. There
were 64,639 literate persons aged 15-24 in
the province in 2009, or a literacy rate of
93 percent. There were more male literate
persons (93.6%) than female literate persons
(92.4%).
Republic Act 5155, or the Governance
of Basic Education Act, directs the
transformation of basic education policy into
programs, projects, and services that are
adapted to local needs. Schools and learning
centers now have the authority to decide
what is best for the school and the students.
The law also gave school teachers and the
staff the flexibility to initiate activities for school
improvement. The DepEd set the SchoolBased Management (SBM) in all public
schools in the country to help empower the
schools and their communities to advance
student learning.

Education is a major factor in uplifting the


standard of living of the community. However,
due to poverty, childrens education is often
interrupted, especially among disadvantaged
families.
One of the main thrusts of the province is to
provide a meaningful education for all. Thus,
in collaboration with the DepEd, the Division of
Schools of Occidental Mindoro oversees 298
public elementary and 49 public secondary
schools, and 23 private elementary and 14
private secondary schools. Construction of
school buildings and provision of reading
materials are among the strategies to achieve
universal primary education by 2015.
To address the gaps in attaining 100
percent primary education by 2015, all
stakeholders should prioritize programs/
projects according to the available School
Education Fund (SEF), which is usually limited.
They should also ensure the appropriate use
of this fund through diligent monitoring and
audit.
The current policies and programs of
DepEd for MDG 2 were Kinder Education
Program, Kindergarten Summer Program,
Alternative Learning System, Continuous
Capability Building (training for teachers),
Scholarship to Persons with Disabilities,
and to promote global competence among
schoolchildren, the One-Laptop-Per-Child
program was implemented.

Promoting Gender Equality and Empowering


Women
The Province of Occidental Mindoro has
made a good performance in promoting
gender equality. It has reduced the disparity
in the ratio (1.02) between girls and boys

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

xix

attending elementary education, the ratio


(1.04) between girls and boys aged 6-15 who
are in school, and the ratio (0.99) of literate
females to literate males who are in the
age bracket 15-24. However, for secondary
education, the gap between female and male
remains wide at 1.21.
The proportion of elective seats held by
women in the barangay up to the provincial
level is 30.4 percent, but it should be noted
that the province has a lady governor and its
lone representative in the legislative is also a
woman.
The DepEd, on the other hand, had
launched several programs aimed at solving
the dropout and low enrollment problems.
The programs were successful and some of
them, such as the Trip Mo, Libre Ko Sakay
Program, were selected as a best practice
model.
Furthermore, to ease the problem of
inadequate classrooms, the provincial
government and the DepEd agreed, through
a memorandum of agreement, to a 50-50
cost sharing in the construction of 71 school
buildings throughout the province. This
project was completed in 2012.

Reducing Child Mortality


Based on the Philippine MDG Rate of
Progress at the Sub-National Level, the target
of reducing child mortality is one of the goals
that has a high probability of being attained
by 2015 (NSCB 2012).
Based on the 2009 CBMS census, the
proportion of infants (aged 0 to less than 1)
who died was 0.6 percent. The proportion of
children (aged 1 to less than 5) who died was

0.5 percent. The proportion of children (aged


5) who died during the census period was 0.5
percent. The municipality of Looc recorded
the highest proportion of child deaths at 1.5
percent.
Based on the LGU scorecard, Occidental
Mindoros infant mortality rate (IMR) per 1,000
live births in 2009 was 8.4 percent, 5.6 percent
in 2010, and 6.8 percent in 2011, indicating a
seesaw trend.
The province needs to exert more efforts in
programs and projects that would help attain
the MDG targets. Some of the challenges
that need to be addressed include the (i) low
national health insurance program (NHIP)
coverage, (i) increased awareness among
pregnant women on the importance of
using maternity facilities for deliveries, (iii) a
more intensified maternal and child health
programs, and (iv) training more Mangyan
ethnic minorities as barangay health workers
to take care of community health and
sanitation needs.
Some projects and activities undertaken
by the province specifically to address MDG
4 were as follows:

immunization of children and pregnant


women,
including
awareness
campaign on the importance of
immunization among health workers,
parents, and pregnant women; and


intensification
(with
advocacy
campaign component) of the
breastfeeding program by requiring
mothers to breastfeed their children
one hour after babies are born,
Thus, an information, education and
communication (IEC) campaign on

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

the use of health facilities in deliveries


was also intensified.

Improving Maternal Health


CBMS data from the 2009 census show
that the maternal mortality rate in the province
was 0.3 percent or 271 maternal deaths
per 100,000 live births. The province has
performed well in this indicator considering
that the national data in 2010 on the number
of deaths due to pregnancy-related causes
ranged from 95 to 163.
Meanwhile, only 25.4 of couples were using
contraception or family planning methods.
The 2011 national data for couples using
contraception method was 48.9 (NSCB 2012).
One of the thrusts of the PHO is to increase the
number of couples who use family planning
methods, hence, an IEC campaign on this
program is being intensified.
The Local Action Plan of Occidental
Mindoro to accelerate MDG was prepared
in April 2012 as an output of the activity
dubbed Formulation of the Philippine MDG
Acceleration Plan for Maternal Health
implemented by the National Economic
and Development Authority (NEDA). The
prioritized interventions contained in the plan
were, among others, include the
upgrading of rural health units and
hospitals to make them always ready
for Basic Emergency Obstetrics
and Neonatal Care (BEmONC) and
for
Comprehensive
Emergency
Obstetrics and Neonatal Care
(CEmONC), and
the acquisition of modern hospital
equipment.

Funding for the health infrastructure comes


from the DOH Regional Office while funding
for other initiatives comes from the LGUs.
To support the achievement of MDG 5,
the province adopted Executive Order No. 7,
series of 2010 from the Office of the Governor.
The order provided for a province-wide
implementation of the Maternal Neonatal and
Child Health and Nutrition (MNCHN) Strategy.

Combating HIV/AIDS, Malaria and


Other Diseases
The PHO has no record of HIV/AIDS
occurrence in the province. However, the
DOH, DepEd, and Plan International conduct
IEC on this infectious disease. CBMS data
on the rate of condom use among couples
practicing family planning was 1.6 percent in
2009. However, PHO data in 2011 indicated
a condom use rate of 3.5 percent, or an
increase by 1.9 percent.
Tuberculosis continued to be one of the 10
leading causes of mortality in the province.
According to the CBMS census, the death rate
from tuberculosis in 2009 was 27.4 percent
(per 100,000 population). Data from the PHO
in 2011 showed a TB cure rate of 92.3 percent
and a TB case detection rate of 126.5 percent.
The big challenge ahead for TB cure lies
in the fact that the rural health units (RHUs)
in the province are not certified TB DOTS (TB
Directly Observed Treatment Short Course).
Only one RHU, the San Jose RHU, is TB
DOTS-certified.
Malaria is still endemic in Occidental
Mindoro, hence, the PHO and the DOH
Regional Office continue to monitor this
disease. CBMS survey reveals that the death

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

xxi

rate from malaria (per 100,000 population) in


2009 was 7.4 percent or a total of 28 deaths.

the labor/labor cost as the counterparts of


beneficiaries.

The Malaria Control Program of the PHO


aims to reduce malaria cases from 20 percent
to 25 percent. Prevention and treatment
measures include insecticide residual
spraying and distribution of treated mosquito
nets, especially in malaria-risk areas.

The same survey also indicated that 2.0


percent of the population was classified
as informal settlers while those living in
makeshift housing comprised 2.4 percent.
Furthermore, 34.1 percent of the population
lived in inadequate living conditions.

Ensuring Environmental Sustainability


To achieve goal 7 of the MDG, which is
ensuring environmental sustainability, much
has yet to be done. The CBMS survey of 2009
revealed that the proportion of population
with access to improved water source was
81.6 percent while the target for 2015 is 86.5
percent. However, data from PHO for 2011
indicated 92.2 percent. Some projects being
implemented at present, aim to achieve the
target by 2015. These projects are SALINTUBIG
of the Department of the Interior and Local
Government (DILG), which provided a grant
of P7 million for the installation of piped water
systems in four beneficiary municipalities.
At least three barangays in the municipality
of Sta. Cruz implemented barangay water
projects with funds from KALAHI-CIDSS
and with counterparts from the community,
barangay, municipality, and the province.
On the other hand, the proportion of
population with access to sanitary toilet
facilities was 75.6 percent in the CBMS
survey of 2009. Those without access were
identified as those situated in coastal areas,
in some far-flung barangays, and in the
upland areas where the indigenous peoples
(IPs) lived. The LGUs at the municipal level
usually provide materials to indigent families
for the construction of toilet facilities with

Socialized
housing
projects
and
construction of more water and sanitation
facilities are undertaken to address the
gaps in these indicators. Poverty alleviation
programs of the national, provincial, and
municipal governments are seen to be of
great help in uplifting the living conditions of
the poorest of the poor.

Building a Global Partnership for


Development
Based on the 2009 CBMS survey, the
proportion of households with landline/
telephone lines was 2.5 percent, those
households with cellphones was 39.7
percent, while households with computers
was only 5.4 percent.
Considering that
advanced information and communication
technologies (ICTs) currently play an
important role in promoting social and
economic development, the liberalization of
the telecommunications sector along with
the adoption of major policies and regulatory
reforms, are expected to enable the public to
have more access to ICTs.
The provincial government, recognizing
the importance of ICT in upgrading tax
collection, has started the computerization of
its assessment records (ERPTS Program) for
the benefit of schoolchildren to make them

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

more globally competitive. The provincial


government has also launched the OneLaptop-per-Child program in central schools.
A target under goal 8 of MDG is to
increase the peoples access to affordable
essential medicines. The strategy of DOH is
to establish Botika ng Barangay (BnB) or a
Barangay Pharmacy. The target is one BnB
for every two barangays and the province
has 162 barangays. As of December 31,
2012, 125 BnBs were already operational
and 28 more are in the process of becoming
operational. Practically, the province has
already exceeded the national target for this
goal.

2. Conclusion and
Recommendations
The Province of Occidental Mindoro
has made good and not so good progress
in achieving the MDGs according to the
results of the CBMS Census in 2009-2011. It
performed well in child mortality reduction,

maintained a high employment rate, reduced


children who were malnourished, minimized
population who have experienced food
shortage, among others. On the other hand,
there were still some households who were
food and income-poor. The province also
lagged behind in ensuring environmental
sustainability and in developing a global
partnership for development.

3. Financial Requirements
A total of 29 projects, programs and
activities amounting to PhP299.9 million were
proposed for the three- year period 20132015 to achieve the MDG (Table 2). The funds
came from regional agencies, such as the
DOH and Department of Agriculture. Other
projects include the priority projects listed in
the Annual Investment Plan. The total revenue
of the province in 2012 was PhP733.1 million
of which 94 percent came from the internal
revenue allotment (IRA).

xxiii
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table ES 1. Report on the Millennium Development Goals, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 20092011
Occidental
Mindoro

Latest Regional
Data

Proportion of population living below poverty threshold 1/

67.8

42.1 (2011)

Employment rate 3/

92.4

95.7 (Oct. 2012)

Prevalence of underweight children under 5 years of age 4/

6.7

8.9 (2011)

Proportion of population who experienced hunger


due to food shortage 5/

6.7

12.7 (Dec. 2012)

55.3

20.0 (2011)

Proportion of children aged 611 years old enrolled in


elementary 2/

82.2

88.6 (2010)

Proportion of children aged 1215 years old enrolled in


high school 2/

54.2

56.6 (2010)

Proportion of children aged 615 enrolled in school 1/

86.7

95.3 (2011)

Literacy rate of 1524 year-olds 2/

93.0

95.1 (2008)

Ratio of female primary participation rate to male primary


participation rate (611 years old) 2/

1.02

1.01 (2010)

Ratio of female secondary participation rate to male


secondary participation rate (1215 years old) 2/

1.21

1.08 (2010)

Ratio of female tertiary participation rate to male tertiary


participation rate 6/

1.43

1.2 (2010)

Ratio of literate females to literate males aged 1524 years


old 2/

0.99

1.02 (2008)

Proportion of seats held by women in the province 7/

30.4

21.4 (2010)

Indicators

Performance of
Occidental Mindoro
vs. Region

Goal 1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger

Proportion of population with income below food threshold


1/

Goal 2. Achieve Universal Primary Education

Goal 3. Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women

Goal 4. Reduce Child Mortality


Proportion of children aged 0 to less than 5 years old who
died
Child mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) 8/
Proportion of infants who died (0 to less than 1 year old)
Infant mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) 8/

0.5
5

50 (2010)

0.6
6

39 (2011)

0.3

300

25.4

55.8 (2011)

50.5 (2008)

Goal 5. Improve Maternal Health


Proportion of women who died due to pregnancy-related
causes
Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births) 9/
Proportion of couples who use contraception 9/
Proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel 9/

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table ES 1 continued...

Occidental
Mindoro

Indicators
Goal 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases

Latest Regional
Data

Performance of
Occidental Mindoro
vs. Region

Number of reported cases of HIV/AIDS (20082011) 10/

47 (2007-2012)

Death rates associated with tuberculosis (per 100,000) 10/

27.4

29.7(2006)

1.04 (2012)

Proportion of population with access to improved water


source

81.6

80.1 (2011)

Proportion of population with access to sanitary toilet


facilities 1/

75.6

84.7 (2011)

Proportion of population who are informal settlers 1/

2.0

4.0 (2011)

2.4

0.8 (2011)

34.1

31.9 (2011)

Proportion of households with access to landlines/


telephone lines 1/

2.5

2.7 (2011)

Proportion of households with access to mobile phone 1/

39.7

66.6 (2011)

Proportion of the households with access to computers 1/

5.4

9.6 (2011)

Death rates associated with dengue (case fatality ratio) 10/


Goal 7. Ensure Environmental Sustainability

Proportion population who are living in makeshift housing


Proportion of population who are living in inadequate
housing conditions 1/

1/

Goal 8. Develop a Global Partnership for Development

Proportion of barangays with Botika ng Barangay

xxv
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 2. Summary of budget allocation for meeting the MDGs, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2013-2015
Millennium
Development
Goals

No. of
Projects

Budgetary Allocation
2013

2014

2015

TOTAL

Goal 1

45,000,000

33,000,000

33,000,000

111,000,000

Goal 2

31,000,000

15,500,000

15,500,000

62,000,000

Goal 3

2,500,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

9,500,000

Goal 4

8,675,000

8,675,000

8,675,000

26,025,000

Goal 5

15,224,639

6,195,640

6,195,640

27,615,910

Goal 6

12,040,660

12,040,660

12,040,660

36,121,980

Goal 7

14,700,000

5,700,000

5,700,000

26,100,000

Goal 8

544,000

500,000

500,000

1,544,000

TOTAL

29

129,686,312

85,113,314

85,113,315

299,906,890

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Provincial Profile
Brief History of Occidental
Mindoro
The word Mindoro is a contraction of the
Spanish phrase Mina de Oro, meaning gold
mine. It was called Mai by early Chinese
traders.
The significance of Mindoro dates back
to pre-Spanish times. Due to its geographic
location, it served as an important trading
center of Chinese goods. As early as 872
AD, Mindoro had a good trade with Canton
because of their proximity to each other.
A Chinese chronicle of 1125 AD gave the
first documentary account of the island of
Mindoro. Following the sea routes during
ancient time, trading ships sailed to Mindoros
north and west coasts, which were then
densely populated urban centers. For local
products like beeswax, pearl, sandalwood,
and tortoise shells, the Chinese traders
bartered porcelain, silk, and tea.
In 1591, when the Spanish conquistadores
divided the Philippines into 11 provinces,
Mindoro was grouped together with
Calilaya, Lubang, Batangas, the Calamianes
Group of Islands, and Marinduque. The
third ecclesiastical district of the Philippine
archipelago was established in Calavite by
the Rocolleto Friars on June 18, 1677.
When the Americans occupied Mindoro
in 1899, they set up a military government

on the island until the inauguration of a civil


government on July 4, 1901.
During the World War II, Mindoro gallantly
fought against the Japanese. From Leyte,
Gen. Douglas McArthurs forces staged its
second landing in the southern part of
Mindoro on December 15, 1944 as part of the
campaign to fully liberate the country from
Japanese invasion.
On November 15, 1950, Republic Act
No. 505, divided Mindoro in two provinces:
Oriental Mindoro and Occidental Mindoro.
San Jose was made the provisional capital of
the latter until January 1, 1951, when the seat
of government was transferred to Mamburao.
From the original eight towns, Occidental
Mindoro now has 11 municipalities.

2. Geo-Physical Environment
Location and Boundaries
Mindoro is the seventh largest island in the
Philippines. It is contained in a quadrangle
1209 and 13054 north latitude and 12001 east
longitude. Occidental Mindoro is located 45
kilometers (km) south of Batangas province
and north of Visayas. The entire eastern
portion of the province is bounded by Oriental
Mindoro and the western portion by the Apo
East Passage. On the north, it is bounded
by the Calavite and Verde Island Passages
and on the south by Mindoro Strait. The

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

southernmost tip of Occidental Mindoro lies


in the area of Sibuyan Sea.

Map 1. Location of Occidental Mindoro

Land Area
The province is composed of 11
municipalities, including the municipalities
of Lubang and Looc on Lubang island in the
northern tip of the province. As seen in Table 3,
the Sablayan, with an area of 2,1880.80 square
kilometers (km2) is the largest municipality in
terms of land area. Almost twice the size of
Cavite province, Sta. Cruz, the second largest
municipality, has an area of 681 km2 or 11.59
percent of the provinces land mass. Lubang,
with an area of 113.10 sq km, or 1.92 percent
of the province, is the smallest municipality .

Land Classification

Map 2. Map of Occidental Mindoro

Occidental Mindoros physical feature


is characterized by successive mountain
ranges, valleys, and plateaus with rolling
grazing lands along the coast. It has a very
fertile soil and rich fishing grounds. Its wild
mountains are covered with inaccessible
jungles, which has protected its wildlife,
among them, the famous Tamaraw.
Of Occidental Mindoros land area of
587,985 ha, the non-forest area or the certified
alienable and disposable area is 156,000 ha,
or a little over one-fourth (26.5 percent) of the
province (Table 4).

On the other hand, more than 73


percent of its total land area is forest land
comprising 431,981 ha, of which 26,949 ha
is unclassified forest area. The provinces
classified forest region covers an area of
405,032 ha comprising 192,811 ha (45%) of
national parks and wilderness areas; 101,365
ha (23%) of established timberland; 91,270

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 1. Land area in hectares, no. of barangays, income class, per municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2012
Municipality

Land Area

No. of Barangays

Income Class

Income (PhP)

Abra de Ilog

53,370

2nd

77,929,130

Calintaan

38,250

3rd

66,934,640

Looc

13,230

th

36,119,650

Lubang

11,310

16

th

48,758,790

Magsaysay

29,675

12

rd

64,760,260

Mamburao

29,760

15

2nd

66,997,160

Paluan

56,450

12

3rd

69,376,490

Rizal

24,250

11

60,737,660

Sablayan

218,880

22

San Jose

44,670

Sta. Cruz
Occidental Mindoro

rd

st

241,653,300

38

st

151,185,614

68,140

11

1st

89,994,430

587, 985

162

2nd

737,568,406

Source: National Mapping and Resources Authority (NAMRIA) & Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF)

ha (21%) of established forest reserves; and


19,586 ha (5%) of military and naval reserve,
civil reserve, and fishpond. Moreover, 26,949
ha (6%) of total forest land is unclassified.
Table 4. Status of land classification,
Occidental Mindoro, 2003
Classification

Area (ha)

Total Land Area

587,985

Certified Alienable and Disposable

156,004

Forest Land

431,981

Unclassified

26,949

Classified
Establishment Forest Reserve
Established Timberland
National Parks/GRBS1//WA2/
Military and Naval Reserve
Civil Reserve
Fishpond
Notes:
1/ Game Refuge and Bird Sanctuary
2/ Wilderness Areas

Source: Forest Management Bureau, DENR IV-B

405,032
91,270
101,365
192,811
147
16,190
3,249

Topography
Occidental Mindoro is generally rugged,
with successive mountain ranges, valleys,
and elongated plateaus, with narrow strips of
rolling lowlands along the coast.
Most parts of the province are mountains
fringed with foothills and coastal plains
ranging from 1 to 20 km wide. The plains are
narrow and mostly confined along the West
Philippine Sea boards. On this strips of land
are the municipalities, barangays and sitios,
many of them are located along the highway
that traverses the province from north to
south.

Physiography and Geology


Occidental Mindoro is separated from
Oriental Mindoro by a mountain running
northwest to south on the central portion of

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

the island. Volcanic terrain is limited to areas


near Mt. Calavite in the northern coast, and
Mt. Halcon in the central part. Wider lowlands
exist along the southwest coast, while small
patches of alluvial flat lands are found along
the west coast, principally where the rivers
meet the sea.
The provinces eastern portion has two
major highland systems that serve as
boundaries for Occidental Mindoro. On
the northern portion of the two systems is
Mt. Halcon, which forms the core while on
the central part is Mt. Baco around which
the second highland system is located. Mt.
Calavite and Abra de Ilog are near the north
coast of the island. The second system is
accessible only through mountain trails.

Climate
The province has two pronounced
seasons, dry season from November to
April, and wet season during the rest of the
year. From June to October, the eastern part
is rainy, low-altitude areas and the coastal
plains suffer from excess heat and humidity,
while the extensive mountain ranges have
cool climate. During the northwest monsoon,
most air coming from the northwest side
becomes dry after crossing the mountains.
This accounts for the dry climate during the
months of northeast monsoon. Also, from
June to October, the province is affected
by the southeast monsoon. The average
annual volume of rainfall is 2,000 millimeters
(mm). Temperature ranges from 30.70C to
160C. Humidity ranges from 63 percent to
87 percent with an annual average of 75.4
percent.

3. Population and Social


Environment
Population Distribution Per Municipality

Total population of Occidental Mindoro
based on the 2010 census of the National
Statistics Office is 452,971 (Table 5), with a
growth rate of 1.76 percent over a 10-year
period (2000-2010). The most populated is
San Jose with 131,188 residents; followed
by Sablayan with 76,153 residents; and
Mamburao, the capital town, is 3rd with 39,237
inhabitants. The least populated is Looc with
7,037 people.

Health Services
The health care system of the province
follows the mandate of Republic Act 7160,
known as Local Government Code of 1991.
In this set up, all public hospitals (1 provincial,
3 districts, and 4 community hospitals) and the
PHO were placed under the administration of
the provincial government, hence, the budget
and funding support of both public health
and hospital operations come from the local
government.

Health Facilities
Occidental Mindoro has 7 government
hospitals, 5 private hospitals, 12 rural health
units, and 131 barangay health stations (BHS).
Of the 162 barangays, 996 or 80 percent have
BHS. As frontliners in rural health delivery,
especially in catchment areas, the midwives
and barangay health workers (BHWs)
comprise the largest number of health
workers in the province.
The Occidental Mindoro Provincial
Hospital is the lone tertiary hospital located

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

in Mamburao and considered the most


advanced hospital in the province Based on
2010 data, the province had a doctor-patient

ratio of 1:125 on average per month while the


hospital bed-patient ratio was 1:5 on average
per month.

Table 3. 2010 Census of Population and Housing, final result, Province of Occidental Mindoro
Municipality

Total Population
May 1, 1990

Population Growth Rate

May 1, 2000

May 1, 2010

1990-2000

2000-2010

1900-2010

Abra de Ilog

13,609

22,212

29,225

5.02

2.78

3.89

Calintaan

18,117

23,503

28,148

2.63

1.82

2.23

7,037

9,132

9,758

2.64

0.66

1.65

Lubang

18,800

22,896

23,068

1.99

0.07

1.03

Magsaysay

21,580

28,740

31,969

2.90

1.07

1.98

Mamburao

21,781

30,378

39,237

3.38

2.59

2.98

7,549

12,023

15,223

4.76

2.39

3.57

Rizal

23,379

29,785

34,458

2.45

1.47

1.96

Sablayan

46,546

63,685

76,153

3.18

1.80

2.49

San Jose

87,520

111,009

131,188

2.40

1.68

2.04

Sta. Cruz

16,675

26,887

34,544

4.89

2.54

3.71

282,593

380,250

452,971

3.01

1.76

2.39

Looc

Paluan

TOTAL

Source: National Statistics Office, 2010

Table 4. Existing health facilities and manpower, 2011


No. of Health Workers in LGUs
Municipality

No of
No. of
RHUs Barangays

No. of
BHSs

Doctors Dentists Nurses

Midwives Nutritionists

Engrs./
Medical
Active
Sanitary
Technologists BHWs
Inspectors

Dental
Aides

Calintaan

3-Jun

0/1

174

Looc

0/1

63

Lubang

16

14

0/1

154

Magsaysay

12

12

0/1

131

Mamburao

15

0/2

114

Paluan

12

0/1

90

Rizal

11

11

0/1

208

Sablayan

22

23

7-Jan

23-Oct

0/1

281

San Jose

38

29

17

0/4

589

Sta. Cruz

11

18

0/1

243

Province

12

160

136

12

13

55

2185

Source: Provincial Health Office, 2011

5
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 5. Government hospitals, by bed capacity, category and classification, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2010
Hospital

Bed Capacity

Category

Classification

Service Areas

Occidental Mindoro
Provincial Hospital

125

Level 2

Provincial

San Jose District Hospital

75

Level 2

District

San Jose, Magsaysay,


Calintaan, Rizal

San Sebastian District


Hospital

50

Level 1

District

Sablayan

Lubang District Hospital

25

Level 1

District

Lubang, Looc

Sta. Cruz Community


Hospital

10

Level 1

Municipal

Sta. Cruz

Paluan Medicare Hospital

10

Level 1

Medicare

Paluan

Abra de Ilog Municipal


Hospital

10

Level 1

Municipal

Abra de Ilog

Mamburao, Abra de Ilog,


StaCruz, Paluan

Source: Provincial Health Office, 2010

Vital Health Indices


Infant mortality rate for the last three years
showed a decreasing trend from 8.36 percent
per 1,000 live births in 2009 to 6.76 percent per
1,000 live births in 2011. Maternal mortality rate
also decreased during the same period (20092011). Meanwhile, crude birth rate decreased
from 21.00/1,000 in 2009 to 19.21/1,000 in
2012 but went up to 23.5/1,000 in 2011. The
same is true with crude death rate, which
decreased from 3.52/1,000 population in 2009
to 2.66/1,000 in 2012 but increased in 2011 to
3.61/1,000 population.

Data from PHO in 2011 showed that the


leading cause of mortality among adults
was hypertensive vascular disorder (Table
9). The hospital bed-patient ratio in the seven
government hospitals, on average, was, 1:57
(Table 10), which was below the national
standard ratio of 1:1,000.
The doctor-patient ratios (per hospital) are
shown in Table 11. The national standard set
by the Department of Health (DOH) is 1:1,000
(that is, 1 doctor for every 1,000 patient.).

Table 6. Vital health indices, 2009-2011


Data

2009

2010

2011

Infant Mortality Rate

8.36/1,000 LB

5.60/1,000 LB

6.76/1,000 LB

Maternal Mortality Rate

0.78/1,000 LB

0.29/1,000 LB

0.75/1,000 LB

Crude Birth Rate

21.00/1,000 pop

19.21/1,000 pop

23.51/1,000 pop

Crude Death Rate

3.52/1,000 pop

2.66/1,000 pop

3.61/1,000 pop

Source: PHO, 2009-2011

6
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 7. Ten leading causes of mortality/10,000 pop, 2011


Causes

Rate

Hypertensive Vascular Disorder

3.58

Cardiovascular Disease

3.04

Undetermined/Unknown

2.72

Cancer

2.52

Pneumonia

2.50

Accidents

2.14

TB

2.05

Senility

1.72

Sepsis/Septicemia

0.90

COPD

0.84

Source: PHO, 2011

Table 8. Hospital bed patient ratio, 2011


Hospital

Number of Beds

No. of In-Patients

Ratio

OMPH

100

6600

1:66

SJDH

50

4753

1:95

SSDH

25

1157

1:46

LDH

25

1154

1:46

ADICH

10

564

1:56

PCH

10

333

1:33

STCCH

10

587

1:59

Source: PHO, 2011

Table 9. Doctor-patient ratio, per hospital, 2011


Hospital

No. of Doctors

No. of Patients

Ratio (per month)

OMPH

27

41,328

1:1,531

SJDH

28

22,290

1:796

SSDH

25

18,778

1:751

LDH

25

7,373

1:294

ADICH

10,806

1:3,602

PCH

3,509

1:877

STCCH

6,113

1:3,056

Source: PHO, 2011

7
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Education
Literacy Rate
NSO defines functional literacy as a higher
level of literacy, which includes not only
reading and writing skills but also numerical
and comprehension skills. A basically literate
person is one who can read and write. In
Occidental Mindoro, the functional literacy
rate in 2010-2011 was 83.2 percent while the
basic literacy rate was 95.5 percent. These
figures showed that the province was way
below the Philippine literacy rate of 97 percent
(among 1524-year-old male) and 98 percent
(among female) in 2005-2010.

School Participation and Dropout Rate


There was a small improvement in the
participation rate of school-age children at
the elementary level in SY 2009-2010 to SY
2010-2011. Participation rate in elementary
was higher compared to the rate in
secondary/level, which was 45.9 percent
in SY 2010-2011. More than 50 percent of
children in secondary school-age level of
the population failed to attend school in two
succeeding school years (SY 2009-2010, SY
2010-2011).

Sending children to elementary school


requires very minimal expenses because most
of the schools are just within their barangays.
Secondary schools, on the other hand, are
usually found in the town proper, requiring
costs in transportation, meals, and other related
expenses. This is also one of the many reasons
for the 5 percent dropout rate among secondary
school students. Poverty eradication remains
a strong factor in ensuring that all school-age
children complete the basic education.

Cohort Survival Rate


There was a slight decline (2%) in
elementary survival rate, from 59.7 percent
in SY 2009-2010 and 57.7 percent in SY 20102011. At the secondary level, the survival rate
also decreased by 3.7 percent in SY 20102011. This decreasing trend is an issue that
education and local officials have to look into.

Classroom-Pupil/Student Ratio
The classroom-pupil/student ratio at public
elementary schools was 1:39 in SY 2009-2010,
and 1:38 for both SY 2010-2011 and SY 20112012. Occidental Mindoro is the third highest
in MIMAROPA region in terms of number of
pupils per classroom at elementary level.

Table 10. Basic education indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro


Indicators

Elementary
SY 2009-2010

High School

SY 2010-2011

Literacy Rate(functional)

83.2

Simple or Basic Literacy Rate

95.5

SY 2009-2010

SY 2010-2011

Participation Rate

88.1

89.7

46.8

45.9

Dropout Rate

0.5

0.4

5.5

5.3

Cohort-Survival Rate

59.6

57.7

73.2

69.6

Classroom-Pupil/Student Ratio

1:34

1:4

1:5

1:5

Teacher-Pupil/Student Ratio

1:4

1:4

1:4

1:4

Source: DepEd

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

At high school level, the ratio was 1:47


in SY 2009-2010, 1:48 in SY 2010-2011, and
1:47.98 in SY 2011-2012. The ratio is within
MIMAROPAs average.

Pupil-Teacher Ratio
MIMAROPAs pupil-teacher ratio in 20112012 was, on average, 1:36. While Occidental
Mindoro has a 1:39 average ratio, this was
considered acceptable or satisfactory.

4. Infrastructure/Utilities/
Facilities
Roads and Bridges
The provinces road arteries total 2,000 km,
concentrated mostly along the coastal areas
where population centers are located in the
West Coast Arterial Road. About 200 bridges,
made mostly of concrete and steel and
totaling 6,305 linear meters, span the various
creeks and rivers along the road. National
roads total 313 km (19.8%) of the total road
network, provincial road is 329 km (20.9%),
municipal road is 142 km (29.0%), while
barangay road totals 794 km (50.4%).

Transport Facilities
The province has five ports of entry located
in Matabang, Abra de Ilog; Tayamaan in
Mamburao; Sablayan; Tilik in Lubang; and
Caminawit in San Jose. The port of Abra de
Ilog could accommodate medium-sized
roll-on-roll-off (RORO) passenger cargo
ships. It is two hours away by ship from
Batangas and 31.4 km from the capital town
of Mamburao. All other mentioned ports,
except the Tayamaan port in Mamburao, are
serviced by RORO vessels. There is also a
fishing port in Barangay 6, Mamburao. Land

transport within the province is facilitated by


public utility vehicles (buses, cargo trucks,
jeepneys, and tricycles, or motorbikes with
side cars). A number of jeepneys offer doorto-door direct transport and cargo service
from different municipalities to Manila and to
neighboring provinces.

Airport
Occidental Mindoro is the only province
that has more than one airport. It has two
domestic airports, one in Mamburao and one
in San Jose and a military airport on Lubang
island.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

The airport in San Jose has the longest


runway among the three. Regular flight
is scheduled daily by Asian Spirit and
Air Philippines, alternately. At present in
Mamburao, small private aircrafts and military
planes use the airport. During bad weather,
flights are usually cancelled because the
airports are not equipped with modern
navigational facilities.

Communication

10

In key municipalities, the direct dial


telephone system is in place, providing
communication access to other provinces
and countries. The use of two-way radios
and cellular phones is common among
businesses operating in the interior of the
province. Globe Telecom, RCPI, PT&T and
Digitel offer telephone and fax services. The
provincial government has also installed intermunicipality telephone and radio systems in
nine towns of the province.

Power Supply
Electric power is supplied by the National
Power Corporation and the Island Power
Corporation (IPC) through the Occidental
Mindoro Electric Cooperative (OMECO),
while the island municipalities of Lubang
and Looc are supplied by the Lubang Electric
Cooperative (LUBELCO). The power supply is
still inadequate, and plans are underway to
increase the supply through private capital
intervention.

5. Local Economy
Agriculture
Occidental Mindoro is rich in marine and
mineral resources. Its varied topography is
dominated by rugged mountain ranges, fertile
valleys, and rich fishing grounds. It is among
the countrys top agricultural producers, one
of the major food baskets of the Philippines.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

It has a contiguous fertile land of 75,851


ha, which is fully farmed and is producing
rice of various varieties, corn, tobacco, garlic,
and world-class mango. It has a vast grazing
ground for quality cattle, with 89,889 hectares
of grassland suited for large-scale ranching,
a rebounding industry.
Occidental Mindoro is the highest palay
producer in Region IV, accounting for more
than 25 percent of total palay harvest in the
region. It enjoys a high volume of yield despite
the fact that only 50 percent of its agricultural
land is serviced by irrigation systems.
The municipality of Magsaysay in the
south has more than 2,000 hectares of
saltbeds. Thus, it is a major producer of salt.
It supplies 40 percent of the countrys iodized
salt requirements.
The province is a major source of milkfish
(bangus). It yields some 30,000 metric tons of
milkfish yearly. The provinces milkfish is noted
for its fine texture, thick belly fat, and tastiness.
The fish is exported to Australia, the Middle
East, and Europe, among other destinations.
Hundreds of tons of milkfish are also regularly
exported to the United States (US) west coast
and US naval facilities in the Pacific Rim.
The tiger prawn from Occidental Mindoro
is a favorite in Japanese, Chinese, and
American markets. The industry is a boon to
fishpond owners looking for more lucrative
products and markets.
The West Philippine Sea in west of the
province teems with tuna, grouper, mackerel,
and herring. The province is a major supplier
of marine products for exporters in Luzon and
Metro Manila.

Eco-Tourism
The island of Mindoro is internationally
recognized as an area for bio-diversity
conservation. It has great potential for ecotourism. It has two well-known national
parksthe Apo Reef Marine National Park
and the Mt. Iglit-Baco National Park, both
found in Occidental Mindoro.
The Apo Reef Marine National Park is the
largest reef in the country and second largest
in the world. This paradise for divers can
be reached from Sablayan in two or three
hours by motorized banca. Its crystalline blue
water covering an area of 35 km2 of coral
reef teeming with wide varieties of marine
life offers good drift-diving opportunities.
This atoll-like reef is divided by a narrow
lagoon that runs from east to west with
depths ranging from 1.8 to 27 meters. Its fine
white sand bottom, numerous patches of
branching corals, and the smooth current of
its channel provide delights to both neophyte
and advanced divers.

The Apo Reef is a world within a world,
with its population of some 385 species of
colorful fishes, including families of sharks,
stingrays, and mantas, schools of jacks and
snappers, tropical aquarium fishes and the
crevice-dwelling moray eels, blemish, and
gobi. It has no less than 500 species of corals
with spectacular underwater scopes and
challenging terrains that are ideal for divers.
The Mt. Iglit-Baco National Park, on the
other hand, was proclaimed as a Tamaraw
Reservation and Bird Sanctuary in November
1970. It covers the municipalities of Sablayan,
Calintaan, Rizal and San Jose, all in
Occidental Mindoro and the municipalities
of Pinamalayan, Gloria, Bongabong, Bansud

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

11

and Mansalay, in Oriental Mindoro. It is here


where one can find endemic flora such as
the Mindoro Bagto, Litok, Duguan, Kalimug,
Lanutan Mangyan, and fauna such as
the famous tamaraw, Mindoro imperial
pigeon, bleeding heart pigeon, scoops owl,
black-hooded coucal, and scarlet-collared
flowerpecker. The park is also a watershed
area.
There is a lot of places to go for mountain
climbing and hiking such as the Malatongtong River and Falls and the Cabacungan
Lake and Falls, both found in Sablayan and
both offering scenic verdant forest backdrops
and crystal clear waters. Another spot is
the Calawagan Mountain River and Falls,
awarded in 1996 and 1997 as the Cleanest
Inland Body of Water by the DILGs National
Clean and Green Program. Located 1.5 km
from the town proper of Paluan, it offers
a picturesque rock formation and an air
of mountain serenity. Its cold refreshing
spring water, towering trees, mini forest and
a collection of endemic animals are but
some of its features. One may also visit the
Tamaraw Gene Pool located in Rizal. It is here
where the few remaining tamaraws, one of
the worlds rarest animal species found only
in Mindoro, are bred in captivity.

12

For mountain climbers, Mindoro offers the


Devils Mountain, Mt. Baco and Mt. Iglit, and
Mt. Halconthe third highest mountain in the
Philippines. For cave enthusiasts, there are
the Purnaga Caves of Magsaysay and many
others in the municipalities of Sablayan, Sta.
Cruz, and Abra de Ilog. The ones found on
Iling Island contain ancient coffins indicating
that these caves served as burial places in
prehistoric era. Many of these caves also
contain large deposits of bat manure (guano).

White sand beaches abound in the


numerous islets of the province. The White
Island of San Jose and the Pandan Grace
Island in Sablayan are only two of the best.
Lakes and forests in the area are in their
pristine state. The Libuao and Tabtaban
Lakes of Sablayan, and the Lanas Lake of Sta.
Cruz have been developed into fishponds for
tilapia, carp and other fish varieties. Libuao
Lake is considered the cleanest lake in the
province.
The largest tract of lowland forest
remaining in Mindoro, the Siburan Forest
is adjacent to Libuao Lake. Mt. Siburan has
5,000 ha of old growth (primary forest), which
supports a diverse and unique range of
plants and animals some which are endemic
to Mindoro. Around 80 species of plants are
found in Siburan, 30 of which are found only
in the Philippines.
For the history buff, Mindoro has Parola
Park, a historic watchtower built in 1861
against pirates and intruders. Lumang
Simbahan, a 16th century legacy of Spanish
missionaries, is located at the foot of Bundok
Bayan, a centennial forest in the middle the
town proper.
The provinces indigenous culture is
showcased by the Mangyan Village in Sitio
Nalbuan, San Jose about an hour-and-ahalf by jeepney from the airport. The village
is home to some 400 Hanunuos. Every
Saturday, the Mangyans sell harvests and
native weavings and trinkets at the village
store.

6. Local Institutional Capability


Local administration function consists
of organization and management, local

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

legislation,
fiscal
administration
and
development
planning.
These
local
government functions are of key importance
in the delivery of basic services to the people.
In 2011 the province was awarded the Seal of
Good Housekeeping.
The provincial government had a total
workforce of 1,378 in CY 2012. There are 278
males and 171 females holding permanent
first-level positions while there are 81 males
and 162 females holding permanent secondlevel positions. There are 2 males holding
co-terminus positions with the appointing
official. There is 1 male on contractual basis,
and 449 males and 234 females on job order
basis.

For its budget, the province depends


mainly on internal revenue allotment (IRA).
The actual amount of IRA transferred by
the national government to the provincial
government was PhP625.3 million in 2009;
PhP670.1 million in 2010; and PhP724.5 million
in 2011. On the other hand, real property tax
collection was PhP7.7 million in 2009; PhP6.6
million in 2010; and PhP5.3 million in 2011.
The 20 percent Development Fund
allocation for development projects and
programs in 2009 was P117.4 million in 2009;
P133.2 million in 2010; and P144.0 million in
2011.

13
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger


Status and Trends
Eradication of poverty in Occidental
Mindoro remains a big challenge. As can be
seen in Table 13, Occidental Mindoro has a
high proportion of population living below
the poverty threshold, which is 67.8 percent
(CBMS 2009-2011). This translates to 257,187
individuals who are income-poor. This is
way up beyond the 28.9 percent national
proportion this indicator (NSCB 2009). On the
other hand, the proportion of the provinces
population who are food-poor is 55.3 percent,
equivalent to 209,958 individuals living below
the food threshold. At the national level, the
proportion of food-poor population is 10.9
percent (NSCB 2009).

14

The other three indicatorsfood shortage


and hunger incidence, employment ratio, and
prevalence of underweight childrenshowed

good performances compared to national


data. Table 13 shows only 6.7% percent of
the provinces population experienced food
shortage during the past three months of the
reference period. It further shows that more
males (6.9%) have experienced hunger than
females (6.6%). The employment rate in the
province was posted at 92.1 percent. There
were more males employed (94.2%) than
females (86.8%). Although the employment
rate is high, it can be said that the majority of
those employed do not earn enough for their
household needs as seen in the proportion
of the population with income below the
poverty and food thresholds. In terms of the
provinces malnutrition condition, it can be
seen from Table 13 that only 6.7 percent of
children below 5 years old are underweight.
More female children (7.1 percent) than male
children (6.3 percent) are underweight.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 11. Summary of MDG 1 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Millennium
Development Goals
and indicators

Households
Magnitude

Population

Proportion

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

257,187

133,111

124,064

67.8

68.2

67.4

0.4

0.4

0.4

Goal 1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger


Proportion of
population living
below poverty
threshold

52,480

Poverty gap ratio


Proportion of
population who
experienced food
shortage

61.7
0.4

5,302

6.2

Employment rate
Prevalence of
underweight
children under 5
years of age
Proportion of
population with
income below food
threshold

41,792

49.1

25,543

13,402

12,141

6.7

6.9

6.6

112,788

82,181

30,607

92.4

94.5

87.1

3,369

1,619

1,750

6.7

6.3

7.1

209,958

108,744

101,203

55.3

55.7

54.9

Source: CBMS census, 2009 2011

Target 1A. Halve, between 1990


and 2015, the proportion of
people whose income is less
than one dollar a day
Proportion of Households/Population Living Below
the Poverty Threshold
As pointed out earlier, 67.8 percent of
the provinces population was living below
the poverty threshold. The performance
of municipalities on this indicator is seen
in Table 14 and Map 3. Data on top and
bottom municipalities, as to which ones are
faring well or lagging behind in terms of
population living below the poverty threshold,
are presented in Table 14. Mamburao
topped the list of municipalities that fared

well in this indicator with 46.1 percent of its


population living below the poverty threshold,
followed by San Jose, with 61.3 percent. The
contributory factor here is that Mamburao,
being the capital town, has more livelihood
opportunities for its residents than the
adjacent municipalities. The same is true for
San Jose, the prime town in the southern part
of the province. This is the business center of
SAMARICA (San Jose, Magsaysay, Rizal, and
Calintaan) area. Aside from palay farming,
farmers cultivate high-value crops, such as
onions, tobacco, and corn. The municipalities
of Looc (63.7%), Lubang (67.3), and Calintaan
(69.4%) also performed better in regard to
this indicator.
Magsaysay is
municipality with

the
85.4

worst-performing
percent of its

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

15

population living below the poverty threshold.


Thousands of hectares of fishponds and
salt farms owned by rich entrepreneurs
are found in Magsaysay. Workers in these
farms are hired on a seasonal basis; they are
unemployed for most of the year. Abra de Ilog
was second on the list of municipalities that
had not performed well, with 82.5 percent
or 22,006 of the population living below the
poverty threshold. Almost 39% percent of the
towns population is indigenous peoples (IPs),
better known as Mangyan. The IPs usually
lived simply by cultivating root crops such as
sweet potato and cassava for consumption.
Otherwise, they roam the mountains looking
for food. The municipality of Paluan is third on
the list of poor performers, with 79.2 percent

or 10,929 of its population living below the


poverty threshold. Rizal had 75.0 percent and
Sta. Cruz, 71.2 percent of their population
reported as income poor. Economic activities
in the three lower-performing municipalities
are predominantly agriculture and are
seasonal in nature. Thus, farm laborers have
no steady income.
Map 3 shows municipalities (in dark
green color) that had performed well while
those in red color are municipalities that
had not performed well. As expected, the
municipalities of Magsaysay and Abra de Ilog
are in red color.

Table 12. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living below the
poverty threshold, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Mamburao

3,130

San Jose

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

39.1

16,183

8,389

7,794

46.1

46.8

45.3

12,662

54.8

63,172

32,256

30,911

61.3

61.5

61.0

Looc

1,128

54.9

5,154

2,721

2,433

63.7

64.1

63.3

Lubang

2,584

58.8

11,053

5,816

5,237

67.3

68.7

65.7

Calintaan

3,379

62.8

16,520

8,644

7,873

69.4

69.5

69.3

Magsaysay

4,286

81.4

20,694

10,584

10,106

85.4

85.4

85.4

Abra de Ilog

4,716

77.0

22,006

11,366

10,640

82.5

82.9

82.0

Paluan

2,137

71.1

10,929

5,740

5,189

79.2

79.7

78.8

Rizal

3,683

70.9

18,931

9,869

9,062

75.0

75

74.9

Santa Cruz

4,874

67.4

22,919

11,952

10,967

71.2

71.4

71.0

Top 5

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

16
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 3. Proportion of population living below the poverty


threshold, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

gap ratio at 0.3. These three municipalities


also performed well in other indicators, such
as the proportion of population living below
the poverty threshold and the proportion of
population that experienced food shortage.
These municipalities had been among the
top performers in the abovementioned
indicators.
Table 13. Top and bottom municipalities, poverty gap
ratio, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Ratio

Top
Mamburao

0.2

Looc

0.3

San Jose

0.3

Lubang

0.3

Bottom

Source: CBMS Census, 2009-2011

Poverty Gap Ratio


Poverty gap ratio estimates how far, on
the average, the poor are from the poverty
threshold. In the case of Occidental Mindoro,
CBMS census estimates the poverty gap
ratio of the province at 0.4. The estimate
means that it takes 0.4 to get to the poverty
line or to be non-poor. Table 15 shows the
poverty gap ratio of the top and bottom
municipalities. Among the municipalities,
Mamburao, which has a poverty gap ratio
of 0.2, has the greatest chance of getting
to the poverty line or to become non-poor.
Mamburao has the highest employment
rate and the least number of population
living below the poverty line. San Jose,
Lubang, and Looc have the same poverty

Magsaysay

0.6

Abra de Ilog

0.5

Rizal

0.5

Santa Cruz

0.4

Paluan

0.4

Sablayan

0.4

Calintaan

0.4

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Shown in Map 4 are municipalities (in red


color) that have not fared well in this indicator.
As per CBMS census, 85.4 percent of
Magsaysays population was living below the
poverty line and 10 percent of its population
had experienced food shortage. This factor
may have contributed to the poverty gap ratio
of 0.6 for Magsaysaythe worst performer in
this indicator. Abra de Ilog, in red color, is the
other municipality that did not perform well.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

17

Map 4. Poverty gap ratio, by municipality, Province of


Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Map 5. Employment rate, by municipality, Province of


Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009-2011

Target 1B. Achieve full and


productive employment and
decent work for all, including
women and young people
Employment Rate

18

The CBMS census of 2009-2011 revealed


that 92.4 percent of the labor force (age 15 and
above) in the province are gainfully employed.
It should be noted, however, that Occidental
Mindoro has the lowest employment rate in
the MIMAROPA region based on the NSO
Labor Force Survey of 2009-2010. Across
municipalities, Mamburao posted the
highest employment rate at 95.2 percent.
This municipality is the seat of the provincial

government, where almost all offices are


located, thus, providing employment to
residents. Likewise, the municipality of Sta.
Cruz registered an employment rate of
94.6 percent. Being 40 minutes away from
Mamburao, many employment opportunities
are available in the area, which explains its
high employment rate. These two adjacent
municipalities are both in green color on Map
5. Completing the top five municipalities with
high employment rate are San Jose (94.5%),
Magsaysay (93.5%) and Rizal (92.2%). San
Jose recorded a high employment rate too
because business establishments abound
the area providing employment to residents.
San Jose is considered the business capital
of SAMARICA.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Looc, with 98.8 percent employment rate


and Calintaan (97.4 %) are also in green
color on the map. They belong to the top
5 best performing municipalities in terms
of employment. San Jose also has a high
employment rate of 98.3 percent. Business
establishments abound the area providing
employment to residents. San Jose is
considered the business capital of SAMARICA.
Magsaysay had 92.9 percent employment
rate and Sablayan has 92.0 percent.

Among the bottom municipalities, Abra de


Ilog had the lowest employment rate of 93.5
percent, which translates into 6,017 employed
persons. Paluan was the second least
performer with 96.6 percent employment
rate. Economic activities in the municipality
are limited to agriculture and fishing, which
leave most residents unemployed for most of
the months.

Table 14. Employment rate, top and bottom municipalities, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipality

Magnitude
Total

Male

Proportion
Female

Total

Male

Female

Top 5
Mamburao

11,387

7,965

3,422

95.2

96.3

92.9

Santa Cruz

10,726

7,903

2,823

94.6

96.5

89.7

San Jose

31,709

22,734

8,975

94.5

96.2

90.7

Magsaysay

6,229

4,630

1,599

93.5

95.8

87.4

Rizal

6,403

5,011

1,392

92.2

95.3

82.7

Abra de Ilog

6,017

4,498

1,519

81.8

84.8

74.1

Paluan

3,409

2,769

640

85.4

89.6

71.0

Lubang

4,815

3,557

1,258

89.6

91.6

84.3

Looc

2,617

2,018

599

90.5

93.4

81.9

Calintaan

7,420

5,433

1,987

91.3

94.0

84.6

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Target 1C. Halve, between 1990


and 2015, the proportion of
people who suffer from hunger
Proportion of Households/Population That
Experienced Food Shortage
Some 25,543 people in Occidental Mindoro
experienced food shortage according to
the CBMS census in 2009-2011. This means

that these people had been hungry or had


experienced hunger in the past three months
of the reference period due to food shortage.
The top and bottom municipalities that
experienced food shortage are presented in
Table 17. Lubang was the only municipality
in the province where residents did not
experience food shortage within the three
months duration prior to the CBMS census.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

19

Map 6. Proportion of population that experienced food


shortage, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Looc reported only 1.4 percent and San


Jose 1.5 percent of their population that had
experienced food shortage.
Lubang and Looc are island municipalities
where fishing grounds surround their area,
thus, food is available all year round. In San
Jose, economic activities are available,
therefore the people can always get livelihood
and the population is able to sustain its daily
need. The municipalities that did not fare well
are shown in red colors on Map 6. Abra de
Ilog had the highest proportion (20.1 percent)
of population that experienced food shortage.
Sta. Cruz is next with 15.2 percent, followed
by Magsaysay with 10.0 percent. Calintaan
had 9.5 percent while Mamburao had 8.4
percent of its population that experienced
food shortage.

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Table 15. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population who
experienced food shortage, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Population

Magnitude

Proportion

Lubang

Looc

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

21

1.0

112

65

47

1.4

1.5

1.2

San Jose

314

1.4

1,555

791

764

1.5

1.5

1.5

Sablayan

711

4.6

3,629

1,951

1,678

5.1

5.3

4.9

Rizal

288

5.5

1,480

772

708

5.9

5.9

5.8

Abra de Ilog

1,137

18.6

5,353

2,789

2,564

20.1

20.4

19.8

Santa Cruz

1,149

15.9

4,891

2,580

2,311

15.2

15.4

15.0

Magsaysay

439

8.3

2,433

1,253

1,180

10.0

10.1

10.0

Calintaan

456

8.5

2,264

1,210

1,054

9.5

9.7

9.3

Mamburao

614

7.7

2,955

1,521

1,434

8.4

8.5

8.3

Top 5

Bottom 5

20

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

It is alarming to note that 2 out of 5


people in Abra de Ilog had experienced
food shortage. As mentioned earlier, 39
percent of the population of Abra de Ilog is
IP. Most often, they subsist on root crops or
whatever they can find in the forest. The 2007
census of population registered a high rate
of in-migration in Sta. Cruz, meaning that
most respondents during the 2009 CBMS
census were new settlers and have no stable
livelihood yet.

Prevalence of Underweight Children Under


5 Years Old
The proportion of underweight children,
according to the CBMS census in 20092011, was 6.7 percent, or 3,369 malnourished
children, of which 6.3 percent were males
and 7.1 percent were females. This rate is
lower than the national target of 17.3 percent
by 2015, which meant the province has
performed well in this indicator.

Table 18 shows the top and bottom


municipalities and the prevalence in them
of underweight children less than 5 years
old. Among the municipalities, Mamburao
had the lowest prevalence of underweight
children under 5 years old at only 49 or
1.1percent. Second lowest was Magsaysay
with 4.1 percent prevalence of underweight
children below 5 years old. We can associate
this to the accessibility of health facilities and
nutrition programs in the area. Completing
the top 5 municipalities with the lowest
prevalence are the municipalities of Paluan
(4.2%), San Jose (4.6%) and Abra de Ilog
(7.0%).
Map 7 shows the municipalities (in red
color) which had the worst performance in this
indicator.Looc had the highest prevalence of
12.7 percent, although it is still lower than the
national target of 17.3 percent. Among other
municipalities, Sablayan had 11.9 percent,
Rizal, 11.5 percent, Calintaan, 7.1 percent and
Lubang, 6.6 percent.

Table 18. Prevalence of underweight children under 5 years old, top and bottom municipalities,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Mamburao

49

25

24

1.1

1.0

1.1

Magsaysay

137

57

80

4.1

3.4

5.0

Paluan

84

39

45

4.2

3.9

4.6

Top 5

San Jose
Abra de Ilog

627

308

319

4.8

4.6

5.0

1,619

280

137

7.0

6.6

7.4

124

70

54

12.7

13.7

11.5

Bottom 5
Looc
Sablayan

1,189

546

643

11.9

10.7

13.0

Rizal

399

202

197

11.5

11.7

11.4

Calintaan

223

101

122

7.1

6.3

7.8

Lubang

112

58

54

6.6

6.7

6.6

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

21

Map 7. Prevalence of underweight children under 5 years old,


by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

The high prevalence of underweight


children under 5 years old in some
municipalities maybe due to limited access
to health facilities. In the case of Looc, which
had the highest prevalence, it has three island
barangays. The insufficient knowledge of
parents on health and nutrition, and the limited
capacity of poor families to buy nutritious
foods may also be among the reasons for
the high prevalence of underweight children
below 5 years old.

Proportion of Households/Population Living Below


Food Threshold
The CBMS census of 2009 showed that 55.3
percent of Occidental Mindoros population
was living below the food threshold, that is,
household income was not enough to buy
the basic food and non-food needs. A daily
wage earner in the province earned from
P160 to P200 a day. (Cost of Doing Business
in Occ. Mindoro, The Winning Edge, 2007).

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Table 17. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living below the
food threshold, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Mamburao

1,949

San Jose

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

24.3

10,571

5,459

5,112

30.1

30.5

29.7

9,360

40.5

47,825

24,420

23,401

46.4

46.6

46.2

886

43.1

4,305

2,267

2,038

53.2

53.4

53

Lubang

2,023

46.0

9,052

4,740

4,312

55.1

56.0

54.1

Calintaan

2,726

50.7

13,737

7,211

6,523

57.7

58.0

57.5

Magsaysay

3,780

71.8

18,623

9,525

9,094

76.9

76.9

76.9

Abra de Ilog

4,067

66.4

19,447

10,051

9,396

72.9

73.3

72.4

Paluan

1,737

57.8

9,405

4,954

4,451

68.2

68.8

67.6

Rizal

3,160

60.8

16,466

8,590

7,876

65.2

65.3

65.1

Sablayan

8,134

53.2

41,661

21,680

19,981

58.8

59.2

58.3

Top 5

Looc

Bottom 5

22

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 17 presents the top and bottom


municipalities with population living below
the food threshold while Map 6 shows the
municipalities that did not fare well (in red
color) in this indicator, and municipalities
that also did not fare well (in pink color) but
not as bad as those in red color.

Map 8. Proportion of population living below the food


threshold, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Mamburao, the capital town (Table 19),


had 30.1 percent of its population living
below the food threshold, of which 30.5
percent were males and 29.7 were females.
Mamburao had fared well in this indicator. It
is, in fact, the best performer in this indicator
since it has the highest rate of employment
and the lowest number of population living
below the poverty threshold.
Next to Mamburao is San Jose, with
46.4 percent of its population living below
the food threshold. As mentioned earlier,
more jobs are available in this municipality
because of the various economic activities
available, which provide residents more
income opportunities. Looc followed with
53.2 percent, Lubang with 55.1 percent, and
Calintaan, 57.7 percent.
Magsaysay again was at the bottom of
the list, with 76.9 percent of its people living
below the food threshold. The reason for
this is that most of its workforce, especially
the agricultural laborers and small farmers,
only had seasonal jobs and thus seasonal
income. This situation is also true for other
municipalities, such as Abra de Ilog (72.9%),
Paluan (68.2%), Rizal (65.2%) ,and Sablayan
(58.8%).

Source: CBMS census, 20092011

Current Policies and Programs


Yugtong Aklas Kahirapan
To fight poverty, Occidental Mindoro has
launched various programs and projects,
one of which is the Yugtong Aklas Kahirapan,
or YAKAP Program. It was started in 2008
under the PSWDO. The program provides
capital assistance at a very low interest rate
to individuals, groups, and associations
that have existing livelihood projects. A fund
of P3 million is allocated annually for this
program.

23
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Sulong Agrikultura sa Tagumpay ng Oksidental


Mindoro
To enhance the income of farming
communities, the Provincial Agriculture Office
also launched the Sulong Agrikultura sa
Tagumpay ng Oksidental Mindoro program.
The Seeds Subsidiary Project under this
program subsidizes the cost of palay seeds.
The farmers pay only 50 percent of the cost
of palay seeds that they need. The farmers
are also given seeds of high-yielding sweet
potato, cassava, and vegetables under the
Cassava Production and Food Always in the
Home program. Farm-to-market roads and
small-water impounding projects are also
constructed.

Animal Dispersal Program


The PVO implements an Animal Dispersal
Program. This program distributes piglets,
goats, and chicken to poor families, but they
pay back for this to the Provincial Treasurers
Office. The PVO also launched in 2008 the Bull
Loan Program, which loaned hybrid stocks to
cattle raisers.

Livelihood Skills Training


The provincial government, in coordination
with the DTI, DOST, and TESDA conducts
livelihood skills training for women, senior
citizens, unemployed and out-of-school
youths. The women and senior citizens are
trained in food preserving and processing.
Based on requests, the LGUs and TESDA
also conduct training on welding.

Supplemental Feeding Program

24

Among the programs conducted yearly


or regularly, through the PHO and the
PSWDO, is the Garantisadong Pambata or

Micronutrient Supplementation program.


These programs are conducted provincewide. Severely wasted children are given
an egg and vitamins daily to address their
nutritional deficiencies.
For the Garantisadong Pambata or the
Micronutrient Supplementation, Vitamin A
had been given to 5,988 children aged 6-11
months, a total of 49,620 children 12-59
months old were given iron supplementation,
508 infants were given iron drops, and 1,506
children 3-6 years old were given iron syrups.

Construction and Maintenance of Agricultural


Infrastructure and Support Facilities
This is an annual program of the provincial
government to enhance and sustain
agricultural productivity. The program
includes, among others, the construction
of farm-to-market roads, acquisition of
farm implements, and other post-harvest
facilities.

Assistance to Individuals in Crisis Situation (AICS)


This program is implemented with PhP1.5
million allocation annually. While it is under
the KALAHI-CIDSS, the beneficiaries are
identified by the barangays and municipalities.
The province provides a counterpart to this
program.

Self-Employment and Assistance Kaunlaran [SEA-K]


SEA-K fund comes from the DSWD
Regional Office. This program provides
livelihood projects to poor beneficiaries. The
maximum amount granted to an individual is
P5,000 for projects such as buy-and-sell, hog/
poultry raising, food processing, and others.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Special Employment of Students (SPES)


Occidental Mindoro, in partnership with the
DOLE, implements the Special Employment
of Students (SPES) in which eligible college
students are employed by local government
offices during summer.

Agri-Tramline Construction
This was constructed to help upland
dwellers, especially the IPs, to bring their
agricultural products to the market place. Two
Agri-Tramline were constructed in Manoot,
Rizal and Burgos, Sablayan. These were
funded by the Department of Agriculture (DA)
with provincial counterpart.

Challenges
Poverty incidence in the province is high,
which can be attributed to the following
factors:
Although the province has large tracts
of agricultural land and abundant
marine resources, the agricultural
sector is composed of large farm
owners, agricultural laborers, and
small farm owners.

Infrastructure and agricultural support


facilities are inadequate. The cost of
farm inputs is high and this poses
a problem to small farm owners.
Climate change is also a big factor
that affects farm production.
Limited budget of the LGU hinders
the creation of more jobs through
livelihood programs and projects.

activities to combat the malnutrition problem


among children. A continuous IEC program
(nutrition education) should be pursued by
the health sector and the LGUs.

Priority Programs, Projects and Activities


(PPAs)
The following PPAs were identified in
the Annual Investment Plan as priorities.
These PPAs are specifically focused on
poverty reduction, empowerment of the poor
and vulnerable, and promoting sustained
economic growth.
a. Provision and maintenance of infrastructure facilities such as farmto-market roads, ports, small-water
impounding projects, irrigation, and
post-harvest facilities.
b. Promotion of diversified farming systems, incorporating high-value crops,
and implementation of a seeds subsidy program.
c. Provision of livelihood and entrepreneurship skills training/and capital
to cooperatives, women, and senior
citizens.
d. Animal dispersal program
e. Institutionalization of Supplemental
Feeding Program.
f.

Intensification of tax collection at the


municipal and provincial level.

g. Improved access to credit facilities


and microfinance services.

The LGUs need to allocate additional funds


for supplemental feeding program and other

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

25

Financing the MDGs


The province will be allocating funds to achieve the MDGs. Below is the breakdown of
funds for the programs, projects and activities for Goal 1.

Programs, Projects, and Activities


Provision/Maintenance of Agricultural
Infrastructure

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)


2013

2014

2015

Total

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

30,000,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

4,500,000

Seeds Subsidy Program (Corn &Palay)

23,000,000

11,000,000

11,000,000

45,000,000

Acquisition of Agricultural Machineries

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

30,000,000

TOTAL

45,000,000

33,000,000

33,000,000

111,000,000

Supplemental Feeding Program


Provision of various livelihood /entrepreneurship
trainings/projects to cooperatives, women and
senior citizens.

26
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

BEST
PRACTICE

Adopt A Child

The Adopt a Child initiative of the Provincial


Health Office is a home-based rehabilitation of
identified malnourished preschool children in
MAPSA District. Public/ private partners adopted
a child to augment the nutritional needs of children.
Target children were given food assistance
through the assigned Barangay Nutrition Scholar
(BNS) or Barangay Health Worker (BHW) in
the area. The volunteer closely monitored the

proper feeding of the child in the household.


This was initially implemented in Sitio Aroma,
Brgy. 8, Tayamaan, Fatima, and Balansayall
in Mamburao. This was funded out of donations
from provincial officials and employees and from
the Rotary Club of Mamburao. The first set of
104 adopted children including those identified
in Sta. Teresa, Magsaysay graduated from being
severely wasted after 120 days of feeding.
With the success of the program, this was
replicated in 2012 in the municipality of Paluan
with 99 children beneficiaries. This was followed
by Abra de Ilog with 60 children rehabilitated
with whole day meals for 120 days, funded by
the LGU.
Another set of 41 severely wasted children
in the municipality of Sablayan is undergoing
a feeding program. The funds were donations
from Sablayan District Hospital employees. In
all the municipalities mentioned above, the PHO
provided vitamins as counterpart to children
undergoing feeding.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

27

Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education


TARGET 2A. Ensure that, by
2015, children everywhere,
boys and girls alike will be able
to complete a full course of
primary schooling
Status and Trends
One of the main thrusts of the province
is to provide a meaningful education for all
children, thus the province, in collaboration
with the DepEd, Division of Occidental
Mindoro, oversees 298 elementary and 49
secondary public schools and 23 elementary
and 14 secondary private schools.

28

A total of 84,183 children out of 140,244


children 6-15 years old (or 60%) were enrolled
in both public and private schools, as per

CBMS census in 2009-2011. The proportion


of children 6-15 years old who are in school is
higher for females (88.3%) compared to males
(85.3%). Data from the DepEd, Occidental
Mindoro, showed total enrollment of 116,410
for SY 2011-2012 in both elementary and
secondary schools.
NSO defines functional literacy as a higher
level of literacy, which includes not only
reading and writing but also numerical and
comprehension skills. A basically literate
person is one who has the ability to read and
write. Based on the CBMS census of 20092010, Occidental Mindoro has an average
literacy rate of 93 percent for population
15-24 years old. Literacy rate was higher
among males (93.6%) than females (92.4%).
The national literacy rate was 97 percent for
males and 98 percent for females, a bit higher
than that of the province for both sexes.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 18. Summary of MDG 2 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Population
Millennium Development Goals

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Proportion of children 6-11 years old enrolled in


elementary

49,491

25,159

24,331

82.1

81.4

83.0

Proportion of children 12-15 years old enrolled in


high school

19,962

9,435

10,527

54.2

49.2

59.7

Proportion of children 6-15 years old enrolled in


school

84,183

42,746

41,435

86.7

85.3

88.3

Literacy rate among children 15-24-years old

64,639

34,072

30,567

93.0

93.6

92.4

Goal 2. Achieve Universal Primary Education

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Proportion of Children 6-11 Years Old Enrolled


in Elementary
Based on the CBMS census in 2009-2011,
there were 86,793 children 6-11 years old
in the province. Only 49,494 (57.0%) were
enrolled in elementary at the time of census.
Of those enrolled, 25,161 were boys and
24,332 were girls. Based on data from DepEd
for SY 2011-2012, there was a total enrolment
of 82,537 students, or an enrolment rate of
95.1 percent.

and Sta. Cruz with 4,070 (80.6%). These five


bottom municipalities have an IP population
(the Mangyans) who are not easily convinced
to send their children to school, thus, the poor
performance in this indicator.

Map 9. Proportion of children 6-11 years old enrolled in


elementary, by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

The top five municipalities that performed


well in this indicator included Lubang with
2,384 children 6-11 years old enrolled in
elementary. This is actually 95.3 percent of
the municipalitys total number of children
in this age category. Looc has 1,258 children
enrolled, Mamburao with 4,512, Calintaan
with 3,338, and San Jose with 13,602.
The bottom five municipalities that did not
perform well were as follows: Magsaysay
(most especially in barangays Caguray,
Sibalat, and Alibog) with 2,563 (68.2%); Paluan
(Harrison) with 1,694 (75.7%); Rizal with 3,280
(77.4%); Abra de Ilog with 3,446 (78.8%);

Source: CBMS Census, 20092011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

29

Table 19. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 6-11 years old enrolled
in elementary, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Magnitude

Municipalities
Total

Male

Proportion
Female

Total

Male

Female

Top 5
Lubang

2,384

1,195

1,189

95.3

95.1

95.5

Looc

1,258

660

598

93.4

93.9

92.9

Mamburao

4,512

2,305

2,207

84.6

83.1

86.2

Calintaan

3,338

1,698

1,640

84.4

83.9

84.9

San Jose

13,602

6,932

6,669

84.2

83.1

85.3

Magsaysay

2,563

1,301

1,262

68.2

68.1

68.3

Paluan

1,694

880

814

75.7

75.1

76.2

Rizal

3,280

1,652

1,628

77.4

75.7

79.3

Abra de Ilog

3,446

1,789

1,657

78.8

79.3

78.2

Santa Cruz

4,070

2,006

2,064

80.6

79.5

81.7

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Proportion of Children 12-15 Years Old Enrolled in


High School
The proportion of children 12-15 years old
enrolled in high school, based on the CBMS
census in 2009-2011, was 54.2 percent. This
translates to a total of 19,962 children enrolled
in high school. Of those enrolled, 49.2 percent
were males and 59.7 percent were females,
which means that there were more enrolled
females than males. This is may be because
males were often obliged to work and help
the family to earn a living. Since most high
schools are located in urban barangays, they
are forced to skip schooling. DepEd data for
SY 20112012 showed that there were 33,873
children 12-15 years old enrolled in high
school.

The top five municipalities with high


proportions of children 12-15 years old
enrolled in high school were as follows:
Lubang (78.5%), Looc (64.0%), Mamburao
(57.1%), San Jose (57.1%), and Sta. Cruz
(55.4%).
The bottom five municipalities with low
proportion of children 12-15 years old enrolled
in high school were as follows: Magsaysay
(33.0%), Abra de Ilog (44.6%), Paluan (48.3%),
Rizal (50%), and Calintaan (53.2%).

30
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 20. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 12-15 years old enrolled
in high school, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

1,380

724

656

78.5

75.4

82.3

Top 5
Lubang
Looc

455

236

219

64.0

58.9

70.6

Mamburao

1,915

876

1,039

57.1

50.8

63.7

San Jose

5,522

2,596

2,926

57.1

52.5

62.0

Santa Cruz

1,749

856

893

55.4

50.0

61.8

754

352

402

33.0

30.4

35.8

1,141

540

601

44.6

41.0

48.4

691

323

368

48.3

42.8

54.4

Rizal

1,305

577

728

50.0

42.6

57.9

Calintaan

1,226

600

626

53.2

48.1

59.2

Bottom 5
Magsaysay
Abra de Ilog
Paluan

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 10. Proportion of children 12-15 years old enrolled in


high school, by municipality,Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Proportion of Children 6-15 years Old Enrolled


in School
Occidental Mindoro has a total of
140,244 children 6-15 years old, as per
CBMS census in 2009-2011. Of these
children, 84,183 (60.02%) were enrolled in
elementary and secondary schools, both
public and private. Of those enrolled 42,746
(50.7%) were males while 41,435 (49.21%)
were females. In terms of proportion, 86.7
percent of all children 6-15 years old are in
school. Conversely, 14 percent of children in
this age range are not in school. Data from
the DepEd, Occidental Mindoro showed
total enrolment of children 6-15 years old
for SY 2011-2012 in both elementary and
secondary schools at 116,410, or 83.01
percent of all children 6-15 years old.

31

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

The
top
and
bottom
performing
municipalities are shown in Table 22. It can be
seen that Lubang has the highest proportion
of children 6-15 years old who are in school.
Map 11 also shows Lubang in green color,
which means that it performed well. The
adjacent municipality of Looc is also in green
color, with its school participation rate of 92.6
percent. It is interesting to note that these two
municipalities are island municipalities, that
is, they are not within the mainland of Mindoro,
but they still managed to perform well. On the
other hand, the bottom municipality in this
indicator is Magsaysay, depicted in red color
in the map. Magsaysay posted a 73.6 percent
school participation rate among children 6-15
years old.

Map 11. Proportion of children 6-15 years old enrolled in


school, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 21. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 6-15 years old enrolled
in school, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Lubang

4,154

2,148

2,006

97.5

96.9

98.2

Looc

1,906

992

914

92.6

89.9

95.8

Mamburao

7,756

3,933

3,823

89.3

87.5

91.2

San Jose

22,846

11,578

11,266

88.5

87.1

89.9

Calintaan

5,473

2,805

2,668

87.4

85.8

89.3

Magsaysay

4,446

2,236

2,210

73.6

72.9

74.3

Paluan

2,994

1,534

1,460

81.6

79.7

83.7

Santa Cruz

6,917

3,498

3,419

84.3

82.6

86.1

Abra de Ilog

5,956

3,055

2,901

85.9

85.5

86.4

Rizal

5,912

2,973

2,939

86.4

84.1

88.8

Top 5

Bottom 5

32

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 12. Literacy rate of men and women 15-24 years old, by
municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Literacy Rate of Women and Men


15-24 Years Old
Functional literacy includes not only reading
and writing abilities but also numerical and
comprehension skills, according to the NSO
definition. Basic literacy, on the other hand,
includes only the ability to read and write.
Occidental Mindoros population of men
and women who are 15-24 years old has an
average literacy rate of 93 percent based on the
CBMS census in 2009-2011, which reported a
composition of 93.6 percent for male and 92.4
percent for female. The national literacy rate is
97 percent for male and 98 percent for female.
Across municipalities, it was found out that
Lubang has the highest literacy rate at 98.2
percent, which is equal to 1,827 literate men
and women who are 15-24 years old out of
1,860. This makes Lubang the top performing

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 22. Top and bottom municipalities, literacy rate of 15-24 year old, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Lubang

1,827

1,089

738

98.2

98.3

98.1

Looc

1,003

589

414

97.5

97.7

97.2

18,890

9,616

9,274

96.6

96.9

96.2

Mamburao

6,184

3,195

2,989

96.0

96.3

95.7

Rizal

4,526

2,507

2,019

94.2

94.6

93.7

Abra de Ilog

4,100

2,166

1,934

84.7

87.3

82.0

Magsaysay

4,020

2,072

1,948

85.1

86.3

83.9

Paluan

2,066

1,133

933

86.4

87.6

85.1

Santa Cruz

5,597

3,005

2,592

88.6

90.0

87.1

Calintaan

4,029

2,177

1,852

93.1

92.7

93.5

Top 5

San Jose

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

33

municipality in terms of literacy rate and thus


the municipality is in green color (Map 12).
Along with Lubang, and completing the list
of top 5 municipalities in this indicator are
Looc (97.5%), San Jose (96.6%), Mamburao
(96.0%), and Rizal (94.2%). The bottom
municipality is Abra de Ilog with only 84.7
percent literacy rate. In this municipality,
there is a big gap between literate males
(87.3%) and literate females (82.0%). Other
municipalities that also did not fare well in
this indicator are Magsaysay (85.1%), Paluan
(86.4%), and Santa Cruz (88.6%). They are
seen in red color in the map.

Current Policies and Program


To attain the goal of 100 percent coverage
of primary education, that is, education for
all children by 2015, the DepEd through the
Division of Occidental Mindoro undertakes
the following programs:

with an honorarium of P3,000.00 per


month from DepEd.

Kindergarten Summer Program


this program, also subsidized by
DepEd, aimed to provide early child
care development experience to
all grade one entrants who had
no previous early childhood care
development experience. It was
started in 2010. In April to May 2012
some 23 classes were organized.

Health and Nutrition Program - This


program has two sub-programs/
activities:

Breakfast Feeding Program 77


schools had already been served,
benefiting 4,778 children from
kindergarten to Grade III. These
severely wasted pupils were
served breakfast for 120 days.

Hapag-Asa Integrated Nutrition


Program Started in October
2912, this program had served 24
schools benefiting 1,288 severely
wasted children from kindergarten
to Grade 6. Education classes for
parents were also conducted,
covering topics on effective
parenting, health and nutrition,
responsible parenthood, and
values. Skills training, livelihood,
and employment opportunities
were provided in partnership with
the LGUs and NGOs.

Kindergarten Education Regular


Program Started in 2005, this
program aimed to expand the
coverage of kindergarten education
among children in vulnerable and
underserved areas. In 2011, 750 pupils
enrolled in the program increasing the
number of enrolled children to 1,923
in 72 classes. A total of 36 regular
kindergarten teachers were deployed
in selected elementary schools. Funds
were subsidized by DepEd.

34

Kinderga rten Volunteer Program A total of 377 classes were organized


with an enrolment of 8,524 children.
Due to inadequate position items
for kindergarten teachers, those
who passed the licensure exams for
teachers were taken in as volunteers

The following projects/programs were


initiated by the province and NGOs:
1. One laptop per two children in
District 1 (San Jose, Magsaysay,
Rizal, and Calintaan) and District 2

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

(Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, Sablayan,


Paluan, Abra de Ilog, and Looc).
2. Construction of school buildings.
The province entered into a MOA with
DepEd for a counterpart arrangement
in the construction of school buildings.
The project was completed with 71
elementary and secondary school
buildings constructed at a total cost
of PhP97.7 million of which PhP48.1
million came from the provincial
government and PhP49.6 million from
DepEd.
3. Augmentation
of
teaching
personnel. To augment the teaching
personnel, the province employed
locally paid teachers (LPT) or para
teachers usually assigned in far-flung
barangays.
4. Provision of learning materials
to schoolchildren. This was made
available through the UNICEF.
5. Establishment and maintenance
of the Mindoro Sped Center.
In partnership with the Cord
Foundation, an NGO, the province
established and maintained the
Mindoro Special Education Center,
which offers scholarship to persons
with disabilities (PWDs). Beneficiaries
are given financial assistance for
tuition fee and stipend. The province
provides the augmentation fund.
6. Implementation of a Mangyan
Literacy Program. The province
entered into a MOA with Plan
International for the implementation
of the Mangyan Literacy Program in
Occidental Mindoro. This program is
ongoing.

Challenges
Education is a major factor in uplifting
the standards of living in the community.
However, due to poverty, the education
of children, especially those belonging to
disadvantaged families, is often interrupted.
This poses a big challenge to stakeholders:
to keep alive the Education for All policy.
The stakeholders should all work together to
come up with strategies that would allow all
school-age children to enroll in school and
complete their elementary and secondary
education.
The DepEd data on school participation rate
of children for SY 2009-2010 in the province
was very low at 45.9 percent. More than 50
percent of secondary school-age children
failed to go to school in SY 2009-2010 and
SY 2010-2011 because secondary schools
are usually located in the town proper, away
from their areas. Thus, secondary schooling
requires additional costs for transport, meals,
and other expenses. This is also one of the
reasons for the 5 percent dropout rate among
secondary school students.
The elementary survival rate declined
by 2 percent, from 59.7 percent in SY 20092010 to 57.7 percent in SY 2010-2011,while
the secondary survival rate declined by 3.7
percent in SY 2010-2011. The MDG target
for 2015 is to have a 100 percent universal
access to education. However, the province
only recorded 74.2 percent in 2010.
The LGUs play an important role in
providing opportunities for livelihood and
other income-generating activities to help the
marginalized sectors improve their income

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

35

and enable them to spend more for the


education of their children.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)
1. Establishment of secondary/annex
schools in strategic and populated
rural barangays. Priority is given to
the construction of school buildings
in areas where there are many
secondary school-age children in order
to increase the enrolment rate and
reduce the dropout cases, especially
among males 12-15 years old.
2. Provision of laptops. Provision of
XO laptops to Grade 4 students
for CY 2013-2014 to make them
computer literate and allow them to
use computer in day-to-day school
activities.
3. Livelihood training and soft loan
program for marginalized families
to help them improve their income
and send their children to school.

Programs, Projects and Activities

5. Financial assistance to indigent


high school students. In order to
encourage IP students to enrol in
school, the provision of financial
assistance is also prioritized.
6. Counterpart to school feeding
program. The provincial government
extends a counterpart fund for school
feeding program especially among
severely malnourished children.
7. Salary for locally paid teachers.
Augmentation of salaries of locally paid
teachers by DepEd is a priority program
of the province so that teachers will be
inspired, become competitive, and are
motivated to teach.

Financing the MDGs


Below is the list of programs, projects
and activities and the breakdown of funds
the provincial government will allocate to
achieve the MDGs.

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)

Total

2013

2014

2015

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

6,000,0000

11,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

15,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

10,500,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

20,500,000

Counterpart to school feeding program


(province-wide)

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

4,500,000

Salary for Locally Paid Teachers (LPT)

1,000,000

1,000,000

31,000,000

15,500,000

15,500,000

62,000,000

Establishment of secondary/annex
schools in strategic and populated
barangays
Provision of laptops
Construction or rehabilitation of \roads
Financial assistance to indigent high
school students

36

4. Construction/Rehabilitation of roads
This project is prioritized to make it
easier for students to go to school.

TOTAL

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

BEST
PRACTICE

One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Program


The provincial government of Occidental
Mindoro, through the initiative of the Governor
Josephine Y. Ramirez-Sato, launched the
One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) program in
December 2010 (after it was launched by the
Municipality of Lubang) intended for Grade 4
students in central schools in the remaining
10 municipalities.

The broad components of this education


program are the following:

The model ratio for deployment is 1


laptop:2 students. The idea is to reach more
students and still operate in an acceptable
level of laptop utilization considering the
financial limitation. This is the first batch
of deployment made by the provincial
government of Occidental Mindoro in central
schools.

In the 1:2 OLPC deployment model, the


program has covered less than 10 percent
of the total population of Grade 4 students.
Infrastructure and human support have been
set up. Lesson plan development has been
integrated in the first four central schools in
the province.

XO laptops (peripherals and internet


connectivity)
Technical support
Training programs for project team,
teachers, parents, students.

In Year 1, deployment was for Grade


4 students. The first batch of 550 units of
1.5 XO Laptops arrived in November 2011
and distributed to schools on a ratio of one
laptop per two students (1:2). There were
four beneficiary schools, namely, Magsaysay
Central School, San Jose Pilot School, Adela
Central School, and Calintaan Central School.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

37

The province is continuing to work closely


with eKindling (Education Kindling), a non-profit
organization which possesses the relevant range
of expertise, specialization, and experience
to design, develop and co-create meaningful
educational programs using the OLPC XO laptops.
The multinational teams of educational technology
consultants and volunteers have been collaborating
with the community of stakeholders, in the current
combined deployments covering a total of 755
laptops in Lubang, Rizal, Magsaysay, San Jose, and
Calintaan municipalities.
For the first batch, the laptops were funded by the
provincial government of Occidental Mindoro while
the second batch was financed by the provincial
government fund and by donations from local and
international donors through Phildev (formerly Ayala
Foundation), which facilitates the donations to the
LGU of Occidental Mindoro for the OLPC Occidental
Mindoro project.
The OLPC deployment in Lubang is now at Year
2. So far initial results indicate that the use of laptops
brought some positive learning behavioral changes
among the Grade 5 students.
For one thing, the built-in learning platform, which
is Sugar, enables them to explore new ways of
learning, somehow boosting their self-confidence
and enabling them to grow and express themselves.

38

The core objective of this project is to empower


the students and develop their ability to express
and explore their own version of learning, a kind of
education that is not locked in a box. This will give
the learners a chance to excel and focus on the field
of their choice.
The project is now on its second year and requires
another round of 550 units for the first batch of towns,
and 550 units more for the remaining six towns of the
province, for a total deployment of 1,100 laptop units
for SY 2012-2013.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality and


Empower Women
Target 3A. Eliminate gender
disparity in primary and
secondary education, preferably
in 2005, and in all levels of
education no later than 2015
Status and Trends
Today, women are recognized as equal to
men. The rights enjoyed by men are equally
enjoyed by women. There are even fields
of endeavor that are dominated by women
or where women excel. There are excellent
women leaders around the world.
Based on data gathered during the CBMS
census in 2009-2011, the ratio of girls to boys
in elementary education was 1.02 or almost
the same number of boys and girls enrolled
in elementary level, while data on secondary
education showed a more pronounced

Table 23. Summary of MDG 3 indicators, Province of


Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Millennium
Development Goals

Ratio

Disparity
Indicator

Goal 3. Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women


Ratio of girls to boys in
elementary education
(6-11)

1.02

Low disparity

Ratio of girls to boys in


secondary education
(12-15)

1.21

Moderate
disparity

Ratio of girls to boys in


school (6-15)

1.04

Low disparity

Ratio of literate females to


males (15-24)

0.99

Low disparity

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

disparity gap at 1.21. The reason for this is


that male children of poor families are made
to work at an early age to help in the familys
livelihood. Still, the ratio of girls to boys in
both levels comprising ages 6-15, which is
1.04:1.0, remains within the acceptable ratio.
With proper interventions of the national and
local governments, the ideal ratio of 1:1 is still
achievable by 2015.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

39

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education (for 6-11


years old)
The top and bottom municipalities for the
ratio of girls to boys in primary education are
shown in Table 26. Among municipalities,
Lubang and Magsaysay showed an
ideal ratio of girls to boys in elementary
education at 1:1 or 1 girl for every boy who
are in elementary school (for children 6-11
years old). This is according to the CBMS
census of 2009-2011. Calintaan and Paluan
had low disparity at 1.01 ratio of girls to boys
in school. Abra de Ilog and Looc had a low
disparity at 0.99 ratio.
The municipalities that did not fare well
in this, as per CBMS census, were Rizal and
Mamburao with respective ratio of 1.05:1 and
1.04:1 as compared to other municipalities.
San Jose, Sta. Cruz, and Sablayan were also
in the bottom 5 municipalities, as shown in
red color on Map 13.

Map 13. Ratio of girls to boys in elementary education, 6-11


years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 24. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in elementary education, Province
of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Ratio

Disparity Indicator

Lubang

1.00

No disparity

Magsaysay

1.00

No disparity

Calintaan

1.01

Low disparity

Paluan

1.01

Low disparity

Abra de Ilog

0.99

Low disparity

Looc

0.99

Low disparity

Rizal

1.05

Low disparity

Mamburao

1.04

Low disparity

San Jose

1.03

Low disparity

Santa Cruz

1.03

Low disparity

Sablayan

1.02

Low disparity

Top 6

Bottom 5

40

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 14. Ratio of girls to boys in secondary education, 12-15


years old, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education (for


12-15 years old)
Table 27 shows the top and bottom
municipalities in terms of the ratio of girls to
boys who are in secondary education. The
municipality in dark green color, as illustrated
in Map 14, fared well in this indicator with 1.09
ratio of disparity. Other municipalities that
had good performance are shown in yellow
green color. Those in red color in Map 14 did
not perform well in this indicator, and those in
pink color had moderate gaps.
Dropout rate in secondary education during
SY 2008-2009 was 7.8 percent for males and
4.7 percent for females. The high dropout rate
was due to problems of accessibility (schools
located in town proper) and poverty.

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 25. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in secondary education,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Ratio

Disparity Indicator

Lubang

1.09

Moderate disparity

Magsaysay

1.18

Moderate disparity

San Jose

1.18

Moderate disparity

Abra de Ilog

1.18

Moderate disparity

Looc

1.20

Moderate disparity

Rizal

1.36

High disparity

Paluan

1.27

High disparity

Sablayan

1.27

High disparity

Mamburao

1.25

Moderate disparity

Santa Cruz

1.24

Moderate disparity

Top 5

Bottom 5

41

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 15. Ratio of girls to boys in school, 6-15 years old,


Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary and


Secondary Education (for 6-15 years old)
Eight out of the 11 municipalities in
Occidental Mindoro registered low
disparity in the ratio of girls to boys
6-15 years old who are in school.
The municipalities with almost equal
participation of girls and boys in school
were Abra de Ilog and Lubang, both
posting a ratio of 1.01. The bottom
municipality in this indicator was Looc,
with a ratio of 1.07. Note, however, that
this ratio is still within the moderate
disparity range.

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 26. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of girls to boys in school, Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Ratio

Disparity Indicator

Abra de Ilog

1.01

Low disparity

Lubang

1.01

Low disparity

Magsaysay

1.02

Low disparity

San Jose

1.03

Low disparity

Calintaan

1.04

Low disparity

Mamburao

1.04

Low disparity

Sablayan

1.04

Low disparity

Santa Cruz

1.04

Low disparity

Looc

1.07

Moderate disparity

Rizal

1.06

Moderate disparity

Paluan

1.05

Low disparity

Top 8

Bottom 3

42

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Ratio of Literacy Rate for Male and Female


(for 15-24 years old)

Map 16. Ratio of literate females to males, 15-24 years


old, top and bottom municipalities,Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

Per CBMS 2009 census, only Lubang


had an ideal literacy ratio of 1:1 female
to male for those who are 15-24 years
old. Calintaan followed with 1.01:1.0
female to male literacy ratio. Looc,
Mamburao, Rizal, Sablayan, and San
Jose also showed low disparity in this
indicator with their female to male ratio
of 0.99:1.0.
Magsaysay, Paluan, and Sta. Cruz
are the lowest performers in this
indicator, all with female-male literacy
ratio of 0.97:1.0. Abra de Ilog was also a
low performer, with a ratio of 0.94:1.0.

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 27. Top and bottom municipalities, ratio of literate of females to males (15-24 years
old), Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Ratio

Top 7

Disparity Indicator

Lubang

1.00

No disparity

Calintaan

1.01

Low disparity

Looc

0.99

Low disparity

Mamburao

0.99

Low disparity

Rizal

0.99

Low disparity

Sablayan

0.99

Low disparity

San Jose

0.99

Low disparity

Magsaysay

0.97

Low disparity

Paluan

0.97

Low disparity

Santa Cruz

0.97

Low disparity

Abra de Ilog

0.94

Low disparity

Bottom 4

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

43

Percentage of Elective Seats held by Women


Results of the 2010 elections showed
that 30.4 percent of elected officials in the
province were women. The seat of governor,
the highest position in the province, is held
by a woman. The lone district of Occidental
Mindoro is represented by a woman. At
the Sangguniang Panlalawigan (Provincial
Board), two seats are held by women. In the
municipality of Mamburao, data showed that
72 out of 175 elective seats (41.1%) were held
by women.

Conduct of Orientation on Effective


Parenting for Adolescents. This
was cascaded from division level,
district/high school, and year/class
level down to barangay level with
values education teachers, guidance
counselors, and coordinators as lead
implementers.

Crafting of Student Handbook. The


handbook contained school rules
and regulations, prohibitions and
sanctions. These were presented to
parents/guardians of students and

Current Policies and Programs

signed if approved [by parents].

The following programs/activities were


launched/initiated by the Division of Schools
as solutions to high dropout rates among
high school students:

Project Tulong, Sulong and Dunong


(TSD). This was initiated by Sablayan
Comprehensive National High School
to provide scholarship to poor but
deserving students.

Table 28. Elected seats held by women in the local government of Occidental Mindoro, 2010
Number
of
Seats

Provincial

Municipal

Barangay

Total

Percentage

1,905

18

557

579

30.4

Provincial

13

30.8

Abra de Ilog

109

29

29

26.6

Calintaan

87

30

32

36.8

Looc

109

24

25

22.9

Lubang

186

56

57

30.6

Magsaysay

142

43

45

31.7

Mamburao

175

68

72

41.1

Paluan

142

42

43

30.3

Rizal

131

40

40

30.5

Sablayan

252

56

58

23.0

San Jose

428

125

127

29.7

Sta. Cruz

131

44

47

35.9

Province/
Municipalities
Occidental Mindoro

44

Number of Women Elected

Source: DILG-Occidental Mindoro, 2010

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Launching of Find the Herd Program.


Its primary objective is to bring back
to school all those who left school.

Implementation of Effective Alternative


Secondary Education (EASE) Program
for those who temporarily left school.

Implementation of OHSP (Open High


School Program) to 49 secondary
schools specifically those schools
with the highest dropout rates.

Provision/reproduction of OHSP
Modules financed by PLAN
International, Inc.

OHSP Module Writing financed


by PLAN International, Inc.

Series of reorientation training


workshop on the implementation
of ADM/OHSP financed by PLAN
International, Inc., LGU Office
Calintaan, Occidental Mindoro
and division INSET Funds.

Reentry program for OSY through


the Balik Paaralan of ALS Program,
specifically
in
the
Sablayan
Comprehensive
National
High
School.

Sponsorship by the LGU, barangay


officials, canteen funds of the Trip
Mo, Libre Ko Sakay Program

Construction of 2 School Community


Dormitories for 2 Mangyan tribes
(Buhid and Alangan Mangyans)
in Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro
financed by the LGU of Sablayan,
initiated by Arnaldo G. Ventura,
Principal IV, Sablayan Comprehensive
National High School.

Challenges
Poverty among the population is a major
factor that prevents poor households from
sending their children to school, especially
the male children who are made to work in
order to help in the familys livelihood.
To
address
gaps
in
educational
opportunities, the LGUs need to provide
livelihood opportunities to the poor families.
More funds/resources should be allocated
to education programs. Moreover, there is
a need to activate the Local School Boards
and the Local Councils for the Protection of
Children of every municipality. The LGUs
should also ensure the proper utilization of
the SEF. Womens organizations should be
encouraged to participate in development
activities of the community and the
government.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)

Counterpart Funds to Localized


DepEd Programs. Putting up funds
or appropriations for programs of
DepEd that are being implemented
at the Division level. This program is
more of fund augmentation.

Expansion of scholarship program


to include high school students. This
program should focus on providing
school supplies and allowance to
students in high school. At present, the
provincial governments scholarship
program gives more to students who
are in college. To lessen dropout
cases in high school, the province will
expand the program to include poor
and deserving high school students.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

45

Financing for this PPA is incorporated


in Goal 2 PPA under the Financial
Assistance to indigent high school
students.

Continuous training and provision


of livelihood projects to womens
groups such as KALIPI, etc. The
LGU will provide annual funding for
livelihood trainings and projects for
womens group.
Establishment of school annexes/
extension classes especially in far-

Programs, Projects and Activities

flung barangays. The province will


appropriate additional funds for the
establishment of school annexes
in selected far-flung barangays.
Financing for this PPA is also
incorporated in Goal 2 PPA.

Financing the MDGs


The provincial government will implement
programs, projects and activities aimed at
achieving the MDGs. Below is the breakdown
of funds.

Philippine Peso (PhP)

Total

2013

2014

2015

Establishment of Secondary Annex


Schools in Strategic/populated
baranggay

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

5,000,000

Training on Livelihood /Projects for


Womens Group

1,000,000

500,000

500,000

2,000,000

500,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

9,500,000

Scholarship Program for High School


TOTAL

46
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

BEST
PRACTICE

Handog Hatid Paaralan

The Family, Individual, Community and


School (FICS) Analysis revealed that the
two most common causes of high dropout
rates among high school students are (i)
inaccessibility of school, or distance of
residence from school, and (ii) poverty. The
Handog Hatid Paaralan was practiced in
some schools in Rizal and Calintaan where
the distance of schools posed a big problem to
students residing in far-flung areas. Selected

students were provided transport (school bus,


jeepneys, tricycles, motorbikes, and tora-tora)
sometimes in the form of cash, sponsored by
the LGU, barangay officials, Parent, Teachers
and Community Associations (PTCA),
canteen proceeds, and other stakeholders.
Students pay minimal transport fare just
enough for the maintenance of the service
vehicle.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

47

Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality


Status and Trends
The CBMS data of 2009-2011 revealed that

50,569 or 13.3 percent of Occidental Mindoros

population were children below five years


old, of which 25,890 were males and 24,679
were females. Table 31 shows a summary
of MDG 4 indicators; it also shows that the
rate of child deaths in age ranges 1-4 and 0-4
was 0.5 percent. Males (0.6%) outnumbered
the females (0.4%) in this indicator. On the
other hand, infant mortality rate (IMR) was 0.6
percent. Note that Occidental Mindoros infant
mortality rates in 2010 and 2011 were 5.6 and
6.8 percent, respectively. The Philippines IMR
rate in 2011 was 22 percent, according to
NSCB-MDG Watch 2011.

48

Across MIMAROPA provinces, it must


also be noted that Occidental Mindoros IMR

is low considering that the regions IMR is


8.5 percent. One reason for this may be the
increase in facility-based deliveries in the
province. Also, untrained birth attendants
or hilots are discouraged from performing
deliveries. Only midwives are allowed to do
maternal deliveries in the absence of doctors.

Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less Than


5 Who Died
According to PHO data, pneumonia and
diarrhea were the leading causes of infant
mortality in 2009-2011. Map 17 shows
the municipalities that fared well in this
indicator. They are shown in dark green
and light green colors; those that did not
fare well are shown in red and light pink
colors. San Jose ranks number one as best
performer, with a death proportion of only

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 29. Summary of MDG 4 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Magnitude

Millennium Development Goals

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Proportion of infant deaths (below one year old)

63

35

28

0.6

0.7

0.6

Proportion of child deaths (1-4 years old)

206

128

78

0.5

0.6

0.4

Proportion of child deaths (below 5 years old)

269

163

106

0.5

0. 6

0.4

Goal 4. Reduce Child Mortality

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

0.2 percent (Table 32). This is so because


as a major growth center in the province,
San Jose has a significant number of health
facilitiesa district hospital, rural health
units, and private hospitals. The other top
performing municipalities in terms of low
incidence of deaths of children aged 0 to
less than 5 are Sablayan (0.4%), Magsaysay
(0.5%), Mamburao (0.5%), and Calintaan
(0.6%).

Map 17 Proportion of child deaths (below 5 years old),


Province of Occidental Mindoro, by municipality, 2009-2011

The municipality that performed the


worst in this indicator was Looc, with 1.5
percent child death rate. This is because of
unavailability of hospitals in the municipality
and because it comprises island barangays
in which residents have to travel by bancas to
reach the rural health center or hospital.

Proportion of Infants Who Died


Table 33 shows the top five municipalities
that performed well in the IMR indicator.
Magsaysay tops the list, with 0.2 percent,
because the district hospital is accessible by
land in just an hour. Sablayan also posted
an IMR of 0.2 percent because it has an
accessible district hospital, just within the
municipal proper. San Jose (0.3%), Paluan
(0.4%), and Rizal (0.6%) complete the top 5
municipalities. On the other hand, it can be

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

seen by its red color that Looc is the worst


performer in this indicator. This municipality
registered a 5.8 percent IMR, which is very
alarming since the disparity is very wide as
compared to other municipalities. One factor
that may have caused this high proportion is
that Looc is an island municipality wherein
access to mainland with complete facilities is
only through motor boats or by plane.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

49

Table 30. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 0 to less than 5 who died,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

San Jose

27

15

12

0.2

0.2

0.2

Sablayan

37

25

12

0.4

0.5

0.2

Magsaysay

15

0.5

0.4

0.5

Mamburao

21

11

10

0.5

0.5

0.5

Calintaan

18

14

0.6

0.9

0.3

Looc

15

1.5

1.4

1.7

Abra de Ilog

40

26

14

1.0

1.2

0.7

Lubang

16

0.9

1.0

0.8

Rizal

32

19

13

0.9

1.1

0.7

Paluan

16

0.8

0.8

0.8

Top 5

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 31. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of infants who died, Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Magsaysay

0.2

0.3

Sablayan

0.2

0.2

0.2

San Jose

0.3

0.5

0.2

Paluan

0.4

0.9

Rizal

0.6

0.6

0.5

Looc

10

5.8

4.9

6.6

Lubang

1.5

1.8

1.2

Abra de Ilog

10

1.2

0.9

1.6

Calintaan

0.7

1.1

0.3

Mamburao

0.7

0.6

0.9

Santa Cruz

0.7

0.8

0.6

Top 5

Bottom

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

50
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 18. Proportion of infant deaths below one year old, by


municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 who


Died
Table 34 shows the top and bottom
performing municipalities in this indicator.
Ranked as first is San Jose with 0.2 percent,
second is Mamburao with 0.4 percent, third is
with 0.5 percent, and lastly, Magsaysay with
0.5 percent.
The bottom municipalities in this indicator
were Rizal with 1.0 percent, Abra de IIog with
0.9 percent, Paluan with 0.9 percent, Lubang
with 0.8 percent, and Sta.Cuz with 0.7 percent.

Current Policies and Programs

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 19. Proportion of child deaths, 1- 4 years old, by


municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

The main objective of the Province-wide


Investment Plan for Health (PIPH) is to improve
the quality and capability of government
hospital services in Occidental Mindoro.
The province invested in infrastructure,
upgrading of facilities, capability building,
and manpower augmentation in seven
hospitals in the province. Some of the specific
programs already undertaken are as follows:
Merging of Rizal Community Hospital
with San Jose District Hospital. A new
hospital building was constructed in
2010 at a new location in Barangay
Bagong Sikat, San Jose.

Total investment in the 2012 Annual


Operation Plan (AOP) amounted to
P29.5 million catering to both indigent
and IP families compared to the 2011
AOP, which amounted to only P3.1
million.

The BHWs and BNS were mobilized


for information dissemination on
national nutrition programs being
adapted and localized up to barangay

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

51

Table 32. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of children aged 1 to less than 5 who died,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

San Jose

19

10

0.2

0.2

0.2

Mamburao

14

0.4

0.4

0.3

Sablayan

33

23

10

0.4

0.6

0.3

Calintaan

13

10

0.5

0.8

0.2

Magsaysay

14

0.5

0.4

0.6

Rizal

28

17

11

1.0

1.2

0.8

Abra de Ilog

30

22

0.9

1.3

0.5

Paluan

14

0.9

0.8

1.0

Lubang

11

0.8

0.8

0.8

Santa Cruz

25

18

0.7

1.0

0.4

Top 5

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

level, such as the Milk Code of 1986,


the Asin Law, breastfeeding program,
and other advocacies.

The Mangyan Barangay Health


Workers were trained to take care of
their health and sanitation needs.

In consonance with meeting the MDG


goal for 2015, the province, through the PHO,
continuously implemented the following

Health Facilities Development, such


as improvement/upgrading of the
district/community hospital, which
includes construction of buildings
and purchase of medical equipment.

Service Delivery

programs/projects:

52

Human Resource Development.


More medical doctors and midwives
were trained on BEmONC to
encourage referrals to CEmONC
health facilities rather than to
manage pregnancy and childbirth
complications. The program also
trained more Mangyan barangay
health workers to take care of their
own health and sanitation needs.

Maternal and Child Care


Program.
This
includes
a
campaign for full immunization
of children 05 years old,
breast feeding campaign, and
distribution
of
MotherBaby
Incentive Kit/Mother and Child
book to mothers who gave birth
at health facilities.

Governance

Adaption of existing national


laws, such as the Asin Law
of 1995, to end the nutritional
problem called Iodine Deficiency
Disorders, and the Milk Code of

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

1986 to promote breastfeeding.


Proper implementation of said
laws is being monitored by the
PHO team.

Since the province is a major


producer of salt, the Sangguniang
Panlalalawigan
(Provincial
Board) passed Resolution No.
65 mandating that all salt should
be iodized locally before they are
shipped out to Metro Manila and
other provinces in the Visayas
and that iodized salt should be
used for local consumption.
Resolution No. 99 Series of 2010
was also passed for the provincewide implementation of Maternal
Neonatal and Child Health and
Nutrition Strategy.

Challenges
The following challenges in meeting Goal
4 were identified:

53

Low NHIP coverage. Coverage of


poor families was dependent on
LGU-sponsored program (PHO data).
There should be an expansion of
NHIP coverage to include IPs and
poor families.

Percentage of health budgets and


Maintenance and other Operating
Expenses (MOOE) did not meet the
acceptable proportion prescribed
in the national target (according
to PHO data). Thus, LGUs should
considerably improve the budget for
the health sector.

Inadequate
complement

underwent infrastructure expansion.


There should be an increase in the
number of health personnel through
local and national initiatives.

More effort is needed to increase


public awareness on facility-based
deliveries of pregnant women.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)
1. Health
Facility
Improvement
Program. This involves improvement
and rehabilitation of the seven
hospitals in the province with
provision of hospital equipment.
2. Mother and Child Care Program.
This includes expanded immunization
program, breastfeeding program,
nutrition, and information and
education campaign. It also includes
monitoring and evaluation of the
breastfeeding program to attain
breastfeeding coverage within one
hour after birth.
3.
Training
for
Administrators

human
resource
in
hospitals
that

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Teachers

and

Financing the MDGs


Programs, projects and activities aimed at
achieving the MDGs will be implemented by
Programs, Projects, and Activities

the province. The provincial government will


be allocating funds to finance these projects
as shown below.
Philippine Peso

Total

2013

2014

2015

Health Facility Improvement Program

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

15,000,000

Child Care Development Province-wide) a. Immunization


b. Breastfeeding Program
c. Nutrition Program
d. Dental Program

2,175,000

2,175,000

2,175,000

6,525,000

Information and Education Campaign


(Province-wide) for Child & Maternal Health

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

3,000,000

500,000

500,000

500,000

1,500,000

8,675,000

8,675,000

8,675,000

26,025,000

Monitoring & Evaluation (TEV)


TOTAL

BEST
PRACTICE

54

A booklet on child care (see below) was distributed to pregnant mothers


after they were given information and education classes by the PHO staff
designated as coordinator on Mother and Child Care Services.
A total of 1,611 booklets and 760 kits were distributed province-wide in
2011 to pregnant mothers with a total amount of P248, 250. For 2012, the
amount of P245,000 was allocated for the same purpose. Thus, the increase
in facility-based delivery resulted in the reduction of maternal mortality rate
and infant mortality rate.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health


Status and Trends
The primary concern of the health
department of Occidental Mindoro is to
provide ante and post natal care to all
pregnant and lactating mothers. The three
district hospitals and the provincial hospital
are all CEmONC while one community
hospital is BEmONC.
The CBMS census of 2009 showed that
there were 27 or .03 percent women deaths
due to pregnancy-related causes. It was also
reported in the same year that 25.4 percent of
couples used any methods of contraception.
The province is not yet performing well on
this aspect.
The reasons for maternal deaths were
categorized by the DOH according to the

following: (i) delay in deciding to seek medical


care (poor capacity to recognize danger signs,
financial and cultural constraints); (ii) delay in
reaching appropriate care (lack of access to
health care facility, lack of awareness about
existing services); and (iii) delay in receiving
care at health facilities (inadequate health
workers, lack of equipment, drugs and
supplies).
The LGUs Contraceptive Prevalence Rate
(CPR) as per PHO data in 2011 was 62.0
percent. The province demonstrates higherthan-national average provision of injectibles
(18.2% vs. 14.8%), condom (5.6% vs. 4.4%),
natural family planning (6.8% vs. 2.6%), and
lactational amenorrhea method (21.3% vs.
13.5%). Data from PHO showed that facilitybased delivery in 2011 was 40.4 percent.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

55

Table 33. Summary of MDG 5 indicators, Province of


Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Mindoro. The Health Profile of the PHO


revealed that the maternal mortality rate
Population
(MMR) had decreased from 1.06 percent
Millennium Development Goals
Magnitude
Proportion in 2007 to 0.87 percent in 2008 per 1,000
live births. The latest data on MMR was 0.2
Goal 5. Improve Maternal Health
percent in 2011. According to PHO records,
Proportion of women deaths
due to pregnancy related27
0.3
the leading causes of maternal mortality were
causes
post-partum hemorrhage, uterine atony, preContraceptive prevalence rate
eclampsia, retained placenta, pulmonary
(proportion of couples using
17,880
25.4
contraceptive methods)
embolism, and septicemia.

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Target 5A: Reduce by threequarters, between 1990 and


2015, the maternal mortality
ratio
Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancyrelated Causes
Data from the CBMS census of 2009-2011
revealed that there were 27 or 0.3 percent
maternal deaths that occurred in Occidental

The municipalities that fared well in this


aspect during the census period were Abra
de Ilog and Lubang, both without deaths,
followed by Sablayan and San Jose with 0.1
percent or 3 deaths for each municipality
(Table 34). Magsaysay and Mamburao had
0.2 percent or 1 maternal death in Magsaysay
and 2 in Mamburao. Both Lubang and Abra
de Ilog have BEmONC. hospital. Hospitals in
Mamburao and San Jose are both CEmONC.
The Sablayan District Hospital is also
CEmONC. These municipalities are shown on
Map 18_in dark green and yellow green colors.

Table 34. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of women death due to pregnancy related-causes,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

Abra de Ilog

0.0

Lubang

0.0

Sablayan

0.1

San Jose

0.1

Magsaysay

0.2

Mamburao

0.2

Looc

1.2

Rizal

0.8

Santa Cruz

0.6

Paluan

0.4

Calintaan

0.3

Top 6

Bottom 5

56

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

The bottom municipality, as shown in Table


34, is Looc with two deaths or 1.2 percent.
This municipality has no hospital at all and
has three island barangays. The nearest
hospital is located in Lubang. The next bottom
municipalities, completing the bottom 5, were
Rizal with 0.8 percent or 6 deaths, Sta. Cruz
with 0.6 percent or 6 deaths, Paluan with 0.4
percent or 2 deaths, and Calintaan with 0.3
percent or 2 deaths. There are community
hospitals in these municipalities but they are
not BEmONC.

Map 20. Proportion of women deaths due to pregnancy


related-causes, by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

Target 5B. Achieve, by 2015,


universal access to reproductive
health
Proportion of Couples Who Use Contraception
According to the CBMS census of 20092011, 25.4 percent or 17,880 couples used
contraceptive methods for family planning in
2011, based on PHO data. The Contraceptive
Prevalence Rate (CPR) was posted at 62
percent.
To increase the CPR, the LGUs had the
following initiatives: (i) continuous supply of
family planning commodities through LGU
procurement and through MNCHN grant,
and (ii) contraceptive self-reliance. The
municipalities with the highest and lowest
CPR according to the CBMS census of 2009
are shown in Table 35. Looc ranked highest
with 34.8 percent or a total of 590 couples using
any methods of contraception. Sablayan
ranked second with 33.0 percent, followed
by Sta. Cruz with 31.9 percent, Mamburao
with 30.0 percent, and Rizal with 25.5 percent.
Magsaysay had the least number of couples
using contraceptive methods at 12.8 percent..

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

The other municipalities with low CPR were


Paluan (19.7%), San Jose (20.5%), Lubang
(21.8%), Abra de Ilog (22.4%), and Calintaan
(22.4%).
The municipalities that performed well
in this indicator are shown on Map 19 in
dark green or light green colors while those
that did not fare well are in red or light pink
colors.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

57

Table 35. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of couples who use
contraception, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

590

34.8

Sablayan

4,389

33.0

Santa Cruz

2,074

31.9

Mamburao

2,002

30.0

Rizal

1,134

25.5

469

12.8

Top 5
Looc

Bottom 6
Magsaysay
Paluan

522

19.7

San Jose

3,759

20.5

Lubang

746

21.8

Abra de Ilog

1,181

22.4

Calintaan

1,014

22.4

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 21. Contraceptive prevalence rate, by municipality,


Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Current Policies and Programs


The Local Action Plan of Occidental
Mindoro to Accelerate MDG 5 was prepared
in April 2012 as an output of the activity
entitled Formulation of the Philippine MDG
Acceleration Plan for Maternal Health
implemented by the National Economic
and Development Authority (NEDA). The
following are the priority interventions
contained in the plan:
1. Upgrading of rural health units
(RHUs) and community hospitals
to make them functional BEmONC
and CEmONC.
2. Strengthening of the
system in the province.

referral

3. On health financing, increasing

58

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

the enrolment of indigents to


PhilHealth through counterparting,
in which the LGUs shall assume
part of the cost for enrolment.

4. Allowing public health facilities,


through municipal board or provincial
board resolutions, to retain their
earnings and become part of their
budget.
5. Promoting the functionality of Local
Health Boards.
6. Developing partnership with NGOs to
advocate for maternal health.
7. Strengthening of inter-local health
zones by promoting cooperation
among
provincial
and
district
hospitals
through
building
of
networks and sharing of resources.
The timeline set for achieving these priority
interventions under the Action Plan was June
2012 to May 2013.

Challenges
The cost of materializing the Action Plan
to Accelerate MDG 5 is P71.7 million (P71,
761, 412.00). This makes the action plan an
ambitious undertaking considering the time
frame it has to meet and that the maternal
health care is only one aspect of the health
services that the province must provide to the
population.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)
1. Upgrading of RHUs and district and
community
hospitals,
including
provision/acquisition of medical
equipment.
2. Health promotion and advocacy
through information and education
campaign
on
various
health
programs of the DOH.
3. Health financing program to widen
the coverage of government health
insurance through counterpart fund
from the provincial government
to subsidize the cost of enrolling
indigents in PhilHealth.
4. Family planning, where appropriation
for this item is purely for travelling
expenses of health workers while
fund for commodities is provided by
the DOH Regional Office.

The DOH should facilitate the release of


funds for this program while the provincial
government and the municipalities should
explore outside funding sources given the
limitations of the LGU budget.
The PHO and the provincial government
should collaborate with NGOs such as Plan
International in undertaking the information
and education campaign on maternal health
care.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

59

Financing the MDGs


Programs, projects and activities aimed at achieving the MDGs will be implemented by
the province. The provincial government will be allocating funds to finance these projects as
shown below.

Programs, Projects and Activities

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)

Total

2013

2014

2015

14,028,990

5,000,000

5,000,000

24,028,990

Health Promotion and Advocacy

34,570

34,570

34,570

103,710

Counterpart for the enrolment of


indigents in PhilHealth

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

3,000,000

161,070

161,070

161,070

483,210

15,224,639

6,195,640

6,195,640

27,615,910

Health Facilities Development

Family Planning
TOTAL

60
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and


Other Diseases
Status and Trends
The PHO has no data on HIV/AIDS in the
province. However, the PHO, in cooperation
with NGOs, continues to conduct information
and education/awareness campaign on
this disease. The PHO has also launched
a school-based Malaria-Filariasis-Dengue
control campaign during the last quarter
of 2012, supported by the Center for Health
Development (CHD) lV, rural health units,
the DepEd, and Plan International. The
Malaria Control Program is supported by the
Movement Against Malaria of the Pilipinas
Shell Foundation. Insecticides and treated
mosquito nets were distributed especially
in endemic areas, such as IP communities.
Meanwhile, tuberculosis continues to be
among the top 10 leading causes of mortality

among the provinces population. However,


case detection and cure rates, according to
the PHO, are high at 133.8 percent and 90.1
percent, respectively.
The CBMS census of 2009-2011 showed
that there were 27.4 percent prevalence
and death rates (104 deaths) associated
with tuberculosis (per 100,000 populations)
in the province and 7.4 percent prevalence
and death rates (28 deaths) associated with
malaria.
The census also revealed that 1.6 percent
(291 couples) used condom among those
who were practicing family planning. The
PHO data for condom use rate was 3.9
percent for 2011.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

61

Table 36. Summary of MDG 6 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Population
Millennium Development Goals

Magnitude
Total

Male

Proportion
Female

Total

Male

Female

Goal 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Other Diseases


Proportion of couples using condom among those
who are practicing contraception

291

Prevalence and death rates associated with


tuberculosis (per 100,000)

104

68

36

27.4

34.8

19.5

Prevalence and death rates associated with


malaria (per 100,000)

28

14

14

7.4

7.2

7.6

1.6

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Target 6A. Have halted by


2015 and begun to reverse
the spread of HIV/AIDS

Map 22. Proportion of couples using condom among those


who are practicing contraception, by municipality,
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Proportion of Couples Using Condom among


those Practicing Family Planning
Table 39 reflects the top and bottom
municipalities on the proportion of
couples using condom in family
planning.
Lubang had the largest proportion
(3.8% or 28 couples) of couples using
condom, followed by Rizal (2.4% or 27
couples). In Sablayan, 88 couples (2.0%)
used condom. The municipalities that
performed poorly in this indicator are
Sta. Cruz with only 13 couples (0.6%)
who used condom, followed by Looc
(0.7%). Both Mamburao and Paluan
with 1.1 percent ranked third among the
bottom municipalities.

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

62
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 37. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and


proportion of couples using condom among those who
are practicing contraception, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

Lubang

28

3.8

Rizal

27

2.4

Sablayan

88

2.0

Magsaysay

1.9

San Jose

63

1.7

Santa Cruz

13

0.6

Looc

0.7

Mamburao

22

1.1

Paluan

1.1

Abra de Ilog

15

1.3

Top 5

Target 6C. Have halted by


2015 and begun to reverse the
spread of malaria and other
major diseases
Death Rates Associated with Malaria
Table 40 reflects the top and bottom
municipalities on the prevalence and death
rates associated with malaria. The CBMS
census of 2009-2011 showed that there was
no occurrence of death associated with
malaria in Looc and Magsaysay. On the other
hand, Paluan showed the largest proportion
of deaths (36.2%) associated with malaria
across all the municipalities. The total rate in
the province for 2009-2011 CBMS result was

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 38. Top and bottom municipalities, prevalence and death rates associated with malaria (per 100, 000),
Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Looc

0.0

0.0

0.0

Magsaysay

0.0

0.0

0.0

San Jose

1.9

1.9

2.0

Calintaan

4.2

8.0

0.0

Sablayan

4.2

0.0

8.8

Paluan

36.2

41.6

30.3

Santa Cruz

24.8

23.9

25.9

Rizal

11.9

15.2

8.3

Abra de Ilog

11.2

7.3

15.4

Lubang

6.1

11.8

0.0

Top 5

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

63
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

36.2 percent per 100,000 population.


The municipalities of Lubang and Looc,
located on Lubang Island, were identified by
the Provincial Health Office as non-endemic
municipalities as there was no occurrence
of death associated with malaria. In 2010
Disease-free zone initiative of PHO, the
municipalities of Lubang and Looc were
identified as non-endemic municipalities as
there was no occurrence of death associated
with malaria.

Map 23. Prevalence and death rates associated with malaria


(per 100,000), by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis, by Sex


(per 100,000)
Table 41 reflects the top and bottom
municipalities on th e prevalence and
death rates associated with tuberculosis
(TB). Municipalities that performed well in
this indicator are Magsaysay (4.1%), Looc
(12.4%), Sablayan (18.3%), San Jose (18.4%)
and Calintaan (29.4%).
Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 39. Top and bottom municipalities, prevalence and death rates associated with tuberculosis (per 100,
000) by sex, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Population
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Magsaysay

Looc

Sablayan

13

San Jose

19

10

Calintaan

Santa Cruz

19

Paluan

Total

Male

Female

4.1

8.1

0.0

12.4

23.6

0.0

18.3

21.8

14.6

18.4

19.1

17.8

29.4

40.2

17.6

11

59.0

65.6

51.8

43.5

83.2

0.0

Rizal

10

39.6

60.8

16.5

Abra de Ilog

10

37.5

43.8

30.8

Mamburao

13

10

37.0

55.8

17.4

Top 5

Bottom 5

64

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Map 24. Prevalence and death rates associated with


tuberculosis by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011 (per 100,000 population)

Current Policies and Programs


Malaria Control Program
The target is reduction of malaria cases
from 20 percent to 25 percent. This is a regular
program and implemented province-wide by
the DOH Regional Office and the PHO. Some
of its activities are residual spraying and
distribution of treated mosquito nets. This is
done annually to control the spread of the
disease.

TB Control Program
This program maintains the 99 percent
detection rate and 85 percent cure rate,
continuous provision of drugs/medicines,
and the regular conduct of IEC, such as
orientation on TB protocol and TB classes.

Challenges
Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

The municipalities that performed poorly


were Sta. Cruz with 59.0 percent or 19 deaths
associated with TB (per 100,000 population),
Paluan with 43.5 percent or 6 deaths, Rizal
with 39.6 percent or 10 deaths, and followed
by Abra de Ilog and Mamburao.
Per PHO data of 2010, only the RHU of San
Jose is TB DOTS-accredited and the RHUs of
Abra, Calintaan, Lubang, San Jose, and Sta.
Cruz are Outpatient Consultation and Benefit
Package (OPB)-accredited. The highest
TB detection rate was in San Jose since its
RHU is TB DOTS-accredited, meaning it has
the manpower and complete equipment to
undertake the test. It is followed by Sta. Cruz
and Mamburao. The lowest detection rate
was in Abra de Ilog.

The province lagged behind in the


accreditation of OPB and TB DOTS.
The LGUs should facilitate processing
of application of RHUs and community
hospitals for accreditation. The LGUs should
also assist in satisfying the requirements for
accreditation.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)
1. Malaria Control Program
2. Commodities used in this program
come from the DOH Regional Office.
Maintenance and Other Operating
Expenses (MOOE) are shouldered by
the PHO.
3. TB Control Program

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

65

4. Funding for this program is used


mostly for IEC and MOOE.
5. Other disease control program
6.
Filariasis
control,
prevention
and control of STD, and leprosy
elimination are programs of the
DOH Regional Office. Thus, funding
and implementation are under the
regional offices jurisdiction.

Financing the MDGs


The provincial government will be
allocating funds to finance programs,
projects, and activities aimed to achieving the
MDGs as shown below:

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)


Malaria Control Program

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)


2013

2014

2015

Total

1,074,740

1,074,740

1,074,740

3,224,220

TB DOTS Program

10,965,920

10,965,920

10,965,920

32,897,760

TOTAL

12,040,660

12,040,660

12,040,660

36,121,980

66
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability


Status and Trends
The natural resources of the province had
become under threat. Data from the Forest
Management Bureau revealed that as of 2003,
the total forest cover of the province was 38.5
percent. Illegal logging, the kaingin farming
system, and mining activities contributed
to soil degradation and erosion, siltation of
rivers, and deterioration of the coastal and
marine ecosystems. The thinning forest cover
adversely affects the watershed, resulting in
depletion of water sources. The national and
local governments, together with the private
sector and other stakeholders, should work
hard toward the conservation and renewal of
these natural resources.
The CBMS census of 2009-2011 showed
that the proportion of population with access

to improved water sources was 81.6 percent.


The NSCB data in 2010 showed 84.8 percent.
Annually, the LGUs and other development
partners, such as the Plan International,
implement community water project/system.
Two municipalities have water districts while
two more municipalities are serviced by
level 3 water system s. To complement the
water service gaps, water refilling stations are
available in most urban areas.
In 2012, four municipalities were
beneficiaries of SALINTUBIG, a program
of the Department of the Interior and Local
Government (DILG). Each beneficiarymunicipality was granted P7 million for the
installation of a piped water system.
The CBMS census of 2009-2011 revealed
that the proportion of population with access

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

67

to sanitary toilet facilities was 75.6 percent or


286,859 households. The PHO data of 2011
say that 78.0 percent of the population has
access to sanitary toilet facilities. Whichever
data is used as point of reference, the
proportion is still below the MDG target of
83.8 percent for 2015. Most residents without
access to sanitary toilet are those found in
coastal areas and the IPs in upland areas with
distinct cultural practices. The LGUs at the
municipal level usually provide materials to
indigent families for the construction of toilet
facilities with labor cost as the counterpart of
beneficiaries.

in land parcels that are part of a landed


estate or hacienda. Those living in makeshift
housing are poor families who cannot
afford to construct decent houses, transient
fishermen, and IPs from upland communities.

Meanwhile, 2 percent of the population


(7,435 individuals) were classified as informal
settlers while 2.4 percent (9,119 individuals)
were classified as living in makeshift housing
(CBMS Census, 2009). Most informal settlers
are located in coastal areas. They are mostly
in-migrant fishermen from other parts of the
country and households who used to reside

Other municipalities, such as Abra de Ilog,


have an existing low-cost housing program
where beneficiaries are mostly victims of
calamities and indigent families. The available
157 and 50 units are already occupied. For the
IPs, 369 lots (former timberland) in Pambuhan,
Abra de Ilog, have been titled for distribution;
as of this writing, there are 80 applicants.

The provincial government of Occidental


Mindoro had signed a MOA with the National
Housing Authority (NHA) and the National
Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP)
for the implementation of a housing program
in IP settlements in San Jose, Sablayan, and
Sta. Cruz. Some 259 housing units will be
constructed in the three settlements.

Table 40. Summary of MDG 7 indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011


Table 42. Summary of MDG 7
Indicators

Households
Magnitude

Population

Proportion

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Goal 7. Ensure Environmental Sustainability


Proportion of population with
access to improved water
source

69 ,546

81.8

309,841

159,230

150,607

81.6

81.5

81.8

Proportion of population with


access to sanitary toilet
facilities

64,745

76.1

286,859

146,978

139,878

75.6

75.3

75.9

Proportion of population who


are informal settlers

1,658

1.9

7,435

3,807

3,628

1.9

Proportion of population who


live in makeshift housing

1,993

2.3

9,119

4,727

4,392

2.4

2.4

2.4

28,444

33.4

129,478

67,315

62,162

34.1

34.5

33.7

Proportion of population
with inadequate housing
conditions

68

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

The municipality of Sta. Cruz has three


housing projects under the Community
Mortgage Project (CMP) of the NHA. Most of
the beneficiaries are those already occupying
the lands.
The proportion of population with
inadequate living conditions was 34.1
percent, which translates to 129,478
households. These are the residents who
live in households that lack one or more of
the following: safe water sources, complete
sanitation facilities or durable housing, and
security of tenure.

Target 7C. Halve, by 2015,


the proportion of population
without sustainable access
to safe drinking water and
improved sanitation
Proportion of Households/Population with Access to
Improved Source of Drinking Water

of rehabilitation. Next to Abra de Ilog is


Sablayan with 71.1 percent of its population
having access to improved water source.
Although Sablayan is the largest municipality
in terms of area and has the second largest
population, only the poblacion area is
serviced by a water district. Most barangays
depend on level 1 system or point-source
connection. Third in the list is Looc, with
77.0 percent of its population having access
to safe water, followed by Paluan (81.5
percent) and Magsaysay (81.8 percent). The
municipalities of Abra de Ilog, Paluan, Sta.
Cruz, and Magsaysay were beneficiaries of
the SALINTUBIG program, which gave them
a grant of P7 million each for the installation
of Level III water system in 2012. Sablayan, on
the other hand, was included in the DILGs list
of waterless municipalities.
Map 25. Proportion of population with access to improved
water source, by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

According to the CBMS data, 81.6 percent


of the provinces population has access to
safe water. Rizal was No.1 among those who
fared well in this indicator with 93.8 percent
of its population having access to improved
water source. Calintaan, Lubang, Mamburao,
Sta. Cruz, and San Jose also fared well
with this indicator. Rizal and Calintaan were
beneficiaries of a foreign-funded water
project implemented in 2004-2007. Lubang,
Mamburao, Sta. Cruz, and San Jose have
level 3 water systems.
Abra de Ilog had the least number of
population (59.9%) with access to improved
water source. Although the poblacion
area is serviced by a level III water system,
it is not operating full time and is in need

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

69

Table 41. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population with access to
improved water source, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

Population
Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Top 5
Rizal

4,861

93.5

23,696

12,332

11,364

93.8

93.8

93.9

Calintaan

4,773

88.7

21,157

11,011

10,144

88.9

88.5

89.4

Lubang

3,897

88.6

14,610

7,536

7,074

88.9

89.0

88.8

Mamburao

7,102

88.7

31,177

15,948

15,229

88.8

89.0

88.6

Santa Cruz

6,248

86.4

28,304

14,719

13,585

87.9

87.9

87.9

Bottom 6
Abra de Ilog

3,669

59.9

15,9925

8,186

7,809

59.9

59.7

60.2

10,906

71.3

50,390

26,035

24,355

71.1

71.1

71.1

Looc

1,577

76.7

6,231

3,272

2,959

77.0

77.1

76.9

Paluan

2,466

82.1

11,237

5,817

5,420

81.5

80.7

82.3

Magsaysay

4,292

81.5

19,809

10,119

9,690

81.8

81.7

81.9

19,755

85.5

87,235

44,255

42,978

84.6

84.4

84.9

Sablayan

San Jose
Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Proportion of Households/Population with Access to


Sanitary Toilet Facilities

Map 26. Proportion of population with access to sanitary toilet


facilities, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Shown in Table 44 are the top and


bottom municipalities in terms of proportion
of population with access to sanitary
toilet facilities. Lubang and Rizal, as good
performers, are shown in Map 26 in dark green
color while the municipalities of Sablayan,
Mamburao, and San Jose, which are among
the top 5 municipalities, are shown in light
green color.
On the other hand, Abra de Ilog, Paluan,
and Sta. Cruz are shown in red color. They
belong to the bottom municipalities. It was
found that communities or households
along the coastlines and those in the upland
communities are those with low access to
sanitary toilet facilities.

70

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 42. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population with access to
sanitary toilet facilities, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Population

Magnitude

Proportion

Abra de Ilog

3,058

Santa Cruz

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

49.9

12,779

6,517

6,262

47.9

47.6

48.2

4,186

57.9

19,145

9,910

9,235

59.5

59.2

59.8

Paluan

1,857

61.8

8,293

4,290

4,003

60.1

59.5

60.8

Magsaysay

3,793

72

17,371

8,844

8,527

71.7

71.4

72.1

Looc

1,620

78.8

6,142

3,204

2,938

75.9

75.5

76.4

Lubang

4,125

93.8

15,337

7,872

7,465

93.3

93

93.7

Rizal

4,382

84.3

21,371

11,117

10,254

84.6

84.5

84.7

12,576

82.2

58,199

30,028

28,171

82.1

82

82.3

6,447

80.5

28,144

14,266

13,878

80.1

79.6

80.7

San Jose

18,497

80.1

81,504

41,282

40,220

79.1

78.7

79.4

Calintaan

4,204

78.1

18,574

9,648

8,925

78.1

77.6

78.6

Top 5

Bottom

Sablayan
Mamburao

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 27. Proportion of population who are informal settlers, by


municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011

Target 7D. By 2020,


have achieved significant
improvement in the lives of at
least 100 million slum dwellers
Proportion of Households/Population who are
Informal Settlers

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Table 45 presents the top and bottom


municipalities in terms of proportion of
population who are informal settlers. The
island municipalities of Looc, Lubang,
Magsaysay, Sablayan, and San Jose have
good performance in this indicator while
Rizal has the largest number of informal
settlers. Most of these settlers are found in
coastal barangays and in landed estates or
haciendas. Sta. Cruz also has a significant
number of informal settlers which are
composed of in-migrants seeking greener
pasture.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

71

Table 43. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population who are
informal settlers, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Magnitude

Population

Proportion

Magnitude
Total

Proportion

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Top 5
Rizal

270

5.2

1,340

682

658

5.3

5.2

5.4

Santa Cruz

348

4.8

1,281

664

617

4.0

4.0

Abra de Ilog

164

2.7

740

373

367

2.8

2.7

2.8

Mamburao

183

2.3

833

437

396

2.4

2.4

2.3

Paluan

65

2.2

291

142

149

2.1

2.0

2.3

Bottom 6
Looc

0.4

38

21

17

0.5

0.5

0.4

Lubang

35

0.8

140

71

69

0.9

0.8

0.9

Magsaysay

58

1.1

266

136

130

1.1

1.1

1.1

Sablayan

175

1.1

821

412

409

1.2

1.1

1.2

San Jose

260

1.1

1,242

632

610

1.2

1.2

1.2

Calintaan

92

1.7

443

237

206

1.9

1.9

1.8

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

In Map 27, municipalities that have a


significant number of informal settlers are
shown in red color.

Map 28. Proportion of population who are living in makeshift


housing, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Proportion of Households/Population Living in


Makeshift Housing

72

The top and bottom municipalities with


population living in makeshift housing are
presented in Table 44. Looc, Paluan, Lubang,
Sablayan, and Calintaan are good performers
in this indicator. Abra de Ilog has the largest
number of population living in makeshift
housing (shown in red color in Map 28). Rizal,
Magsaysay, Mamburao, and Sta. Cruz are
among the bottom municipalities. Residents
in makeshift housing are mostly in-migrant
fishermen and IPs from upland communities
who cannot afford to build permanent houses
made of durable materials.
Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 44. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of household/population who are living in
makeshift housing, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Population

Magnitude

Proportion

Abra de Ilog

359

Rizal

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

5.9

1,652

834

818

6.2

6.1

6.3

184

3.5

883

451

432

3.5

3.4

3.6

Magsaysay

170

3.2

783

403

380

3.2

3.3

3.2

Mamburao

211

2.6

951

508

443

2.7

2.8

2.6

Santa Cruz

193

2.7

824

447

377

2.6

2.7

2.4

Looc

0.3

22

12

10

0.3

0.3

0.3

Paluan

22

0.7

96

64

32

0.7

0.9

0.5

Lubang

37

0.8

181

100

81

1.1

1.2

Sablayan

180

1.2

777

407

370

1.1

1.1

1.1

Calintaan

102

1.9

523

291

232

2.2

2.3

San Jose

529

2.3

2,427

1,210

1,217

2.4

2.3

2.4

Top 5

Bottom 6

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 29. Proportion of population in inadequate living


conditions, by municipality, Province of Occidental
Mindoro, 2009-2011

Proportion of Households/Population Living in


Inadequate Housing Conditions
In terms of proportion of population
living in inadequate housing conditions,
Lubang, Rizal, San Jose, Calintaan,
Mamburao, and Magsaysay are the
bottom municipalities (Table 47). They
have the biggest proportion of population
living in inadequate housing conditions.
They are shown in Map 27 in red color.
The top municipalities are Abra de Ilog,
Paluan, Santa Cruz, Looc, and Sablayan.

73

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 45. Top and bottom municipalities, magnitude and proportion of households/population living in
inadequate housing conditions, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households
Municipalities

Population

Magnitude

Proportion

Abra de Ilog

4,005

Paluan

1,378

Santa Cruz

Magnitude

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

65.4

17,827

9,206

8,621

66.8

67.2

66.4

45.9

6,628

3,529

3,099

48

49

47

3,207

44.4

13,834

7,239

6,595

43

43.2

42.7

770

37.5

3,175

1,676

1,499

39.2

39.5

39

5,666

37

26,240

13,560

12,680

37

37

37

772

17.6

2,921

1,533

1,388

17.8

18.1

17.4

Rizal

1,229

23.6

5,948

3,104

2,844

23.5

23.6

23.5

San Jose

5,744

24.9

27,283

14,090

13,193

26.5

26.9

26.1

Calintaan

1,509

28

6,726

3,610

3,115

28.3

29

27.4

Mamburao

2,323

29

10,375

5,372

5,003

29.5

30

29.1

Magsaysay

1,841

35

8,521

4,396

4,125

35.2

35.5

34.9

Top 5

Looc
Sablayan
Bottom 6
Lubang

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Current Policies and Programs


1. Waterworks program. SALINTUBIG,
one of the waterworks program of the
province, is implemented with funding
from the DILG for the construction of
Level 3 water system in Paluan, Abra
de Ilog, Sta. Cruz, and Magsasaysay.
2. Sanitation program. The province
conducts a continuing IEC campaign
on proper sanitation practices.

74

3. Housing program. In partnership


with Gawad Kalinga (GK) and donors,
a GK housing project was established
in Rumbang, Rizal. A housing project
for IPs is underway; a MOA had been
signed between the province and
the NHA. The target locations are IP
settlements in San Jose, Sablayan,
and Sta. Cruz.

Challenges
There are difficult areas in terms of source
of safe water , due to salt intrusion and high
iron content of water in many areas. The
depletion of watershed areas also affects
supply of safe water. LGUs should explore
means to solve these problems. Reforestation
should be undertaken in watershed areas.
1. Priority Programs,
Activities (PPAs)

Projects,

and

Construction,
repair,
and
rehabilitation
of
various
waterworks projects.

Augmentation
of
fund
for
various sanitation projects of
municipalities.

Information
and
education
campaign on proper sanitary
practices.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Financing the MDGs


Projects, programs and activities will be implemented by the provincial government to
achieve the MDGs. Shown below is the breakdown of funds for these projects.
Programs, Projects, and Activities

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)

Total

2013

2014

2015

14,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

24,000,000

Augmentation of fund for various


sanitation projects of municipalities

500,000

500,000

500,000.00

1,500,000

Information and education campaign on


proper sanitary practices

200,000

200,000

200,000.00

600,000

14,700,000

5,700,000

5,700.000

26,100,000

Construction/rehabilitation/repair of
various waterworks projects

TOTAL

75
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership


for Development
Status and Trends
At present, advanced technology is a big
factor for development. The province can now
transmit information and communicate with
anyone anywhere in the world in just a few
seconds with the aid of landline telephones,
mobile phones, and the internet.
During the CBMS census in 2009-2011,
only 2.5 percent or 2,118 households in
the province had landline telephones.
This figure does not include the telephone
connections in government offices and
business
establishments.
The
Digitel
Telecommunications, Phils. (Digitel) was the
one operating then. In 2011, the Philippine
Long Distance Telephone Company (PLDT)
started operating in the province.

The number of households with cellular


phones during the 2009-2011 CBMS census
was 33,749 or 39.7 percent of total households.
With cell sites installed strategically by Globe,
Smart, and Sun Cellular companies in
several municipalities, almost all barangays
have become reachable through cellular
phones. Even some IPs own a mobile phone.
This has become an important means of
communication in the province.
As shown by result of the CBMS census in
2009-2011, there were only 4,606 households
(5.4%) that had computers. This proportion is
considered very low, which can be attributed,
among others, to low household income and
absence of internet service provider in some
areas. However, internet cafes are available
in many corners of the urban areas.

76
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Recognizing the importance of information


technology tools as aid in nurturing global
competence, the province implemented the
One Laptop Per Two Children in 2011. A total
of 550 XO laptop units had been distributed to
Grade 4 pupils in four central schools. Another
batch of 1,000 XO laptops are available for
distribution to the remaining central schools
starting December 2013.
Table 46. Summary of MDG 8 indicators, Province of
Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Millennium
Development Goals

Households
Magnitude

Proportion

Goal 8. Develop A Global Partnership for Development


Proportion of households
with landline/telephone
connections

2,118

2.5

Proportion of the households


with cellphones

33,749

39.7

Proportion of population with


computers

4,606

5.4

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Target 8E. In cooperation with


pharmaceutical companies,
provide access to affordable
essential drugs in developing
countries
Proportion of Barangays with Botika ng Barangay
(BnB)
Latest data from the PHO reveals that
there were 125 operational BNBs in the
province as of 2012. In 2011, there were
110 operational BNBs province-wide. The
Botika ng Barangay, or barangay pharmacy,
is an important health facility that provides
affordable, essential drugs especially to poor
families in the barangays.

The DOH national standard is 1:1 (1 BNB


per Barangay). The overall ratio for the
province was 1:1.47 in 2011 and 1:1.30 in
2012. It can be noted that there was a slight
increase by 15 BnBs from 2011 to 2012.
The top five municipalities with the highest
number of BnBs are Abra de Ilog with 10 BNBs
or a ratio of 1:0.90, followed by Calintaan and
Looc, both with the ideal ratio of 1:1. Sablayan
follows with 21 BnBs out of 22 barangays or a
ratio of 1:1.05. Magsaysay has 11 BnBs out of
12 barangays or a ratio of 1:1.09.
The municipalities with the least number
of BnBs are Lubang, with six BnBs out of 16
barangays or a ratio of 1:2.66; Mamburao has
6 BnBs out of 15 barangays or a ratio of 1:2.50;
Paluan has 7 BnBs out of 12 barangays, or
a ratio of 1:1.77; and San Jose has 29 BnBs
out of 38 barangays or a ratio of 1:1.31. On
the other hand, Rizal has 9 BnBs out of 11
barangays, or a ratio of 1:1.22; and Sta. Cruz
has 10 BnBs out of 11 barangays, or a ratio
of 1:1.10.

Target 8F. In cooperation


with the private sector,
make available the benefits
of new technologies,
especially information and
communications
Proportion of Households with Access to Telephone
Results of the CBMS census of 2009-2011
revealed that in 2005, there were only 2,118
telephone connections in the whole province,
for only 2.5 percent of total households. At that
time there was only one telephone company,
the Digitel Telecommunications, Phils.,

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

77

Table 47. Ratio of Barangays with Botika ng Barangay (BnBs), Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2011-2012
Municipalities

No. of Barangays

Operational BnBs (2012)

Ratio

Abra de Ilog

10

1:0.90

Calintaan

1:1.00

Looc

1:1.00

Sablayan

22

21

1:1.05

Magsaysay

12

11

1:1.09

Lubang

16

1:2.66

Mamburao

15

1:2.50

Paluan

12

1:1.71

San Jose

38

29

1:1.31

Rizal

11

1:1.22

Sta. Cruz

11

10

1:1.10

Top 5 unicipalities

Bottom 6

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

operating in the province, which holds office


in San Jose. Digitel used to have a branch
office in Mamburao but closed in 2006 and
transferred all transactions to its San Jose
Office. In 2011, the PLDT started operating in
Mamburao.
Mamburao had the highest proportion
of households with telephone lines at 4.6
percent. As the capital town, it has many
business establishments. It is also the center
of the provincial government, so there is a
necessity for this service facility.
San Jose ranks second in terms of
proportion of households with telephone
lines with 3.1 percent or 704 households.
San Jose is considered the prime town of
Occidental Mindoro. It is the business center

78

with 2.8 percent of households with telephone


lines. Fourth is Sablayan, with 2.7 percent.
Sablayan is strategically located in the middle
of the province. It is also considered a first
class municipality by income classification.
Sablayan is a fast-growing town. Calintaan
ranked fifth, with 95 households (or 1.8%)
with landlines.
The bottom municipalities, those with the
least number of telephone lines, are Looc,
with only 9 households (0.4%) with telephone
landlines, followed by Lubang, with 44
households (1.0%). Telephone lines are not
yet available for most households on Lubang
Island.

of SAMARICA (San Jose, Magsaysay, Rizal,


and Calintaan). Third on the list is Magsaysay,

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 48. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to
telephone/landlines, Province of Occidental Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households

Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

San Jose

369

4.6

Paluan

704

3.1

Calintaan

146

2.8

Rizal

413

2.7

Lubang

95

1.8

Looc

0.4

Mamburao

44

1.0

Abra de Ilog

76

1.2

Sablayan

49

1.6

Santa Cruz

87

1.7

Magsaysay

126

1.7

Top 5

Bottom 6

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Map 31. Proportion of households with access to mobile


phones, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Proportion of Households with Access to


Mobile Phones
A total of 33,749 households had cellular
phones during the CBMS census of 20092011. This is equivalent to 39.7 percent of
total households. The mobile phone has
now emerged as the most convenient and
widely used means of communication. The
signals have considerably improved with
the installation of more cell sites by service
providers. On top of the list is Lubang with
2,461 households (56.0%) owning cellular
phones; followed by Mamburao with 4,274
households (53.4%); third is Looc with 1,043
households (50.7%) owning cellular phones.
The high number of households with cellular
phones in Lubang and Looc maybe due to
a very low number of telephone landline
connections. Sablayan follows with 43.3
percent and Rizal with 42.9 percent of
households having cellular phones.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

79

Table 49. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to mobile
phones, Province of Occidental Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Municipalities

Households
Magnitude

Proportion

Mamburao

2,461

56.0

San Jose

4,274

53.4

Looc

1,043

50.7

Rizal

6,625

43.3

Santa Cruz

2,230

42.9

Calintaan

662

12.6

Sablayan

747

24.9

Abra de Ilog

1,703

27.8

Magsaysay

2,214

30.6

Lubang

1,925

35.8

Top 5

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Lowest in the list of bottom municipalities


is Magsaysay, with only 662 households
(12.6%) having mobile phones. The reason
for this could be that this municipality has two
barangays located in mountainous areas that
have very low signal.

Map 32. Proportion of the households with access to


computers, by municipality, Province of Occidental Mindoro,
2009-2011

Proportion of Households with Access to Computers


The CBMS census of 2009 showed that
there were only 4,606 households with
computers, or a very low proportion of
5.4 percent of the total households in the
province. A reason for this is that the poor
families usually cannot afford the cost of
owning a computer unit. Another reason is
the absence of internet service provider in
some municipalities.

80

The top five municipalities in terms of


proportion of households with access to
computers are Mamburao, with 12.2 percent;

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

Table 50. Top and bottom municipalities, proportion of households with access to
computers, Province of Occidental Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households

Municipalities

Magnitude

Proportion

975

12.2

1,462

6.3

Mamburao

236

5.4

Rizal

828

5.4

Looc

90

4.4

Santa Cruz

148

2.8

Magsaysay

199

2.8

Calintaan

151

2.9

Abra de Ilog

201

3.3

Sablayan

111

3.7

Top 5
San Jose
Paluan

Bottom 5

Source: CBMS Census, 2009 2011

and San Jose, with 6.3 percent. Lubang


ranked third with 5.4 percent (236 households)
with computers, followed by Sablayan with
5.4 percent, and Looc with 4.4 percent. The
bottom municipalities in this indicator are
Rizal and Sta. Cruz, both with 2.8 percent.

Current Policies and Programs


The provincial government of Occidental
Mindoro launched the One Laptop Per Child
(OLPC) program in December 2010.
In Year 1, the program deployed in
November 2011 the first batch of 550 units
of 1.5 XO laptops among Grade 4 pupils in
four beneficiary schools, namely, Magsaysay
Central School, San Jose Pilot School, Adela
Central School, and Calintaan Central School.
The program model adopted was one laptop

per two students (1:2 model). This model


was adopted to reach more students and still
operate in an acceptable level.
This project is currently on its second
year and the province is taking a leap in its
implementation through adoption of the
world-renowned model One Laptop Per
Child (OLPC) and through expansion of
coverage from one central school across four
municipalities to the rest of the municipalities
of the province. Another set of 1,100 units
of XO laptop will be distributed beginning
December 2013 to an estimated 1,844 student
and teacher users.

Challenges
Coverage of the one laptop per child is
limited to central schools. This project is

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

81

financed by a fund from the province and


a very minimal donation from a private
institution. The LGUs should explore the
possibility of getting funding from outside
sources and the possibility of counterparting
between municipalities and the DepEd to
expand coverage to other schools.

Priority Programs, Projects, and Activities


(PPAs)
Facilitating the processing of license to operate for
Botika ng Barangays

processing the pending applications of


Botika ng Barangay for special license
to operate by providing some of the
requirements needed.

Financing the MDGs


Shown below is the breakdown of funds for
projects, programs and activities that will be
implemented by the provincial government
to achieve the MDGs.

The PHO and the LGUs at the municipal


level should assist the barangays in quickly

Programs, Projects, and Activities

Budgetary Requirements (in Php)


2013

2014

TOTAL

2015

Improvement of access to low cost quality drugs and


commodities

44,000

Provision of funds (as augmentation of the province)


for the procurement of drugs, medicines and
commodities to BnBS

500,000

500,000

500,000

TOTAL

544,000

500,000

500,000

82
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data: Province of Occidental Mindoro

44,000

1,500,000
1,544,000

ANNEX A
Summary Table of MDG Indicators, Province of Occidental Mindoro, 2009-2011
Households

Population
Magnitude

Millennium Development Goals


Magnitude Proportion

Proportion

Total

Male

Female

257,187

133,111

124,064

112,788

82,181

3,369

Total

Male

Female

67.8

68.2

67.4

30,607

92.4

94.5

87.1

1,619

1,750

6.7

6.3

7.1

25,543

13,402

12,141

6.7

6.9

6.6

49.1

209,958

108,744

101,203

55.3

55.7

54.9

Goal 1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger


Proportion of population living below poverty threshold

52,480

Poverty gap ratio

61.7
0.4

Employment rate
Prevalence of underweight children under 5 years of age
Proportion of population who experienced hunger due to food
shortage
Proportion of population with income below food threshold

5,302
41,792

6.2

Goal 2. Achieve Universal Primary Education


Proportion of children aged 6-11 years old enrolled in elementary

29,398

77

49,494

25,161

24,332

82.2

81.4

83

Proportion of children aged 12-15 years old enrolled in high school

13,486

49.2

19,963

9,434

10,529

54.2

49.2

59.7

Proportion of children aged 6-15 years old enrolled in school

38,467

80.4

84,191

42,750

41,439

86.7

85.3

85.3

64,639

34,072

30,567

93

93.6

92.1

Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds


Goal 3. Promote Gender Equality and Empower Women
Ratio of female primary participation rate to male primary
participation rate (6-11 years old)

1.02

Ratio of female secondary participation rate to male secondary


participation rate (12-15 years old)

1.21

Ratio of female primary and secondary participation rate to male


primary and secondary participation rate (6-15 years old)

1.04

Ratio of female tertiary participation rate to male tertiary


participation rate

1.43

Ratio of literate females to literate males aged 15-24 years old

0.99

Goal 4. Reduce Child Mortality


Proportion of children aged 0 to less than 5 years old who died
Proportion of infants who died (0 to less than 1 year old)
Proportion of children aged 1 to less than 5 who died

269

163

106

0.5

0.6

0.4

63

35

28

0.6

0.7

0.6

206

128

78

0.5

0.6

0.4

Goal 5. Improve Maternal Health


Proportion of women death due to pregnancy related-causes

27

Proportion of couples who use contraception

0.3

17,880

25.4

Goal 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases


Proportion of couples using condom among those who are
practicing contraception

291

Death rates associated with malaria (per 100,000)

28

Death rates associated with tuberculosis (per 100,000)

1.6
7.4

7.2

7.6

104

14
68

14
36

27.4

34.8

19.5

Goal 7. Ensure Environmental Sustainability


Proportion of population with access to improved water source

69,546

81.8

309,841

159,230

150,607

81.6

81.5

81.8

Proportion of population with access to sanitary toilet facilities

64,745

76.1

286,859

146,978

139,878

75.6

75.3

75.9

1,658

1.9

7,435

3,807

3,628

1.9

Proportion of population who are informal settlers


Proportion of population who are living in makeshift housing
Proportion of population living in inadequate housing conditions

1,993

2.3

9,119

4,727

4,392

2.4

2.4

2.4

28,444

33.4

129,478

67,315

62,162

34.1

34.5

33.7

Goal 8. Develop a Global Partnership for Development


Proportion of households with telephone lines

2,118

2.5

Proportion of households with mobile phones

33,749

39.7

4,606

5.4

Proportion of households with computers


Source: CBMS Census, 2009 - 2011

ANNEX B

Explanatory Text
Preparation of Subnational Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) Report Using
CBMS Data
Background and Justification
The availability of good statistics and
the capacity of governments, donors and
international organizations to systematically
measure, monitor and report on progress
in all social and economic spheres are at
the heart of development policy and the
achievement of the MDGs.
The Millennium Development
Goals Report 2007
While progress toward the attainment
of the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs) is systematically being measured,
monitored and reported at the national
level, clearly, there must be a parallel effort
at the local level to bring the MDGs into
the mainstream of the local development
agenda.
This is especially called for under
decentralized
regimes
where
local
government units (LGUs) are at the
forefront of policy or program execution.
Unfortunately, however, national statistical
systems have yet to respond adequately to
the demand for micro-level statistics that
can aid LGUs in their poverty alleviation

efforts, as noted in a joint World Bank and


Asian Development Bank report, to wit:
the most comprehensive and consistent
comparative subnational data (are) is at
the regional level although this is simply
an administrative level of government
that has no responsibilities for delivery of
social services. More data (are) is gradually
becoming available at the provincial level,
but not at lower levels which are at the
1
frontline of efforts to reduce poverty.
In response, the Philippine Government
has embarked on an initiative to localize
the MDGs using the Community-Based
Monitoring System (CBMS). In 2005,
the National Statistical Coordination
Board (NSCB) issued Resolution No. 6
recognizing and enjoining support to
the CBMS as a tool for strengthening the
1

Decentralization in the Philippines: Strengthening Local Government Financing and


Resource Management in the Short-Term, 2005 (A Joint Document of the World Bank
and the Asian Development Bank)

statistical system at the local level that


will generate statistics for monitoring and
evaluation of development plans, including
the progress of the local governments in
attaining the Millennium Development
Goals.
Meanwhile, several approaches are
being carried out by the Department of
the Interior and Local Government (DILG)
in capacitating LGUs to contribute to the
attainment of the MDGs and uplifting the
quality of life of their constituents. These
interventions are particularly stated in DILG
Memorandum Circular (MC) No. 2004-152
Guide to Local Government Units in the
Localization of the MDGs dated November
2004, which provides for the: (a) menu of
Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs)
per MDG goal and target to guide LGUs
in responding to the MDGs; (b) diagnosis
of the local situation using existing local
indicators and monitoring system; and (c)
call for documentation and replication of
good practices.
The CBMS that is
being implemented in
the Philippines is indeed
well-positioned to track
progress
toward
the
attainment of the MDGs
at the local level. For one,
a number of indicators
being monitored in the
CBMS are included in the
indicators for monitoring
the progress in achieving
the MDGs. Moreover,
CBMS is intended to be
done on a regular basis
and can therefore be
used for updating MDG

indicators and facilitating preparation of


regular MDG reports. The CBMS can also
be used as basis by national and local
governments for costing and identifying
appropriate
interventions
needed
toachieve the MDGs as well as for resource
allocation. Finally, given the large spatial
disparities, the CBMS can help identify
where focus has to be given to achieve the
targets.
The CBMS role in localizing the MDGs
was recognized during an Experts Group
Meeting on Localizing the MDGs held on
November 28, 2006 at the United Nations
Economic and Social Commission for Asia
and the Pacific (UN ESCAP) in Bangkok,
Thailand. The Committee on Poverty
Reduction composed of 24 nation-states
agreed that the CBMS could complement
the official data collection activities of
national statistical offices and improve the
availability of the MDG and other indicators
at the local level. It also agreed that
localizing the MDGs through CBMS would

CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of April 8, 2013)

help integrate the goals into the national


development strategies. It therefore urged
other developing countries to initiate and
implement similar innovative systems that
would help localize the MDGs.
As of April 8, 2013, CBMS is being
implemented in 68 provinces (32 of which
are province-wide), 791 municipalities and
63 cities in the Philippines, covering 21,424
barangays all over the country (see map on
CBMS coverage below). A good number of
these LGUs have already consolidated their
CBMS databases and are well-positioned
to generate their own local MDG Reports.
For one thing, CBMS collects information

that reflects the multi-faceted nature of


poverty. In addition, data generated by the
CBMS can be broken down by municipal,
barangay, purok and even household level,
thereby presenting meaningful information
and enabling deeper analysis of the
poverty situation. Moreover, the CBMS can
generate color-coded maps showing the
poverty status at each geopolitical level.

CBMS-Based MDG Indicators


Unless otherwise indicated, all the
statistical tables, graphs, charts and
poverty maps presented in this report were
generated using the CBMS methodology.

Box 1. Community-Based Monitoring System


The CBMS is an organized way of collecting data at the local level to be
used by local governments, national government agencies, nongovernment
organizations (NGOs) and civil society for planning, budgeting, and
implementing local development programs as well as for monitoring and
evaluating their performance. It is a tool for improved local governance
and democratic decision-making that promotes greater transparency and
accountability in resource allocation.
It involves the following steps:
Step 1 Advocacy/organization
Step 2 Data collection and field editing
Step 3 Data encoding and map digitization
Step 4 Data consolidation, database-building & poverty mapping
Step 5 Data validation and community consultation
Step 6 Knowledge (database) management
Step 7 Plan formulation
Step 8 Dissemination, implementation, and monitoring

The MDG indicators, which were


estimated using CBMS data, are presented
in Appendix A.

Poverty and Food Thresholds


The official poverty and food thresholds
computed by the NSCB were used and,
in some cases, updated to the reference
period for the CBMS data by inflating
these thresholds using the appropriate
Consumer Price Index (CPI). The poverty
and food thresholds used for each province
are presented in Appendix B.

Authority for the CBMS Census


The NSCB has issued Resolution
No. 6 (2005) which recognizes and
enjoins support to the CBMS as a tool
for strengthening the statistical system
at the local level. It also directs the NSCB
Technical Staff to initiate and coordinate an
advocacy program for the adoption of the
CBMS by the LGUs, through the Regional
Statistical
Coordination
Committees
(RSCCs), the technical arm of the NSCB
Executive Board in the regions.
The NSCB has also approved the
CBMS Survey Instruments through NSCB
Approval No. DILG-0903-01.

Census Operations
All survey operations were undertaken
under the supervision of the CBMS
Technical Working Groups (TWGs) at
the provincial, city and municipal levels.
Technical assistance was provided by the
PEP-CBMS Network Office, the Bureau of
Local Government Development (BLGD)

of the Department of the Interior and


Local Government (DILG), DILG Regional
Office IV-B, and National Economic and
Development Authority (NEDA) IV-B.
Training was mainly conducted at two
levels. The first level training (Training
of Trainors) is conducted for members
of the TWGs. This is usually conducted
by members of the research staff of the
PEP-CBMS Network Office and CBMS
accredited trainors from the DILG, NEDA
and Batangas. Meanwhile, a second
level training (Training of Enumerators) is
conducted for enumerators who are usually
composed of barangay health workers and
students. The members of the TWG acted
as trainors in this training.

Data Processing System


The data processing software used
under this project includes the CBMS
Data Encoding System, the CBMS-Natural
Resources Database and the CBMS
Statistics Simulator (StatSim).
The CBMS encoding system uses
CSPro (Census and Survey Processing), a

software developed by the United States


Bureau of Census for entering, editing,
tabulating, and disseminating data from
censuses and surveys. The CSPro-based
Encoding System converts survey data into
electronic data. It produces text files (ASCII)
described by data dictionaries, which add
flexibility to the output data. This feature
facilitates the interface between the CBMS
data and other database systems and
statistical softwares.
The CBMS Mapping system employs
the Natural Resources Database2 (NRDB)
for CBMS-based poverty mapping and
for storing and displaying householdand individual- level information, The
CBMS-NRDB is capable of creating and
storing spatial (shapefiles) and nonspatial (texts and numbers) data as well
as generating maps, reports and graphs
ideal for presentation and analysis of
poverty attributes in the community. This
has significantly addressed the need for a
simple yet powerful and free geographically
oriented database.
The data presented through poverty
maps using the CBMS-NRDB were
processed using the CBMS StatSim
which was developed by the PEP-CBMS
Network Office to address the need of
local government units to harness outputs
from the CBMS Database such as custom
tables, reports, case lists and queries. The
StatSim simulates simple computations
and tabulations usually done through
statistical software or other tabulation
applications, and also exports indicators
2

The NRDB was developed by Mr. Richard Alexander, a British volunteer who spent three
years working for the Bohol Environment Management Office through the assistance of
the Voluntary Service Overseas (vso.org.uk).

and statistics for use in dissemination, such


as tables and maps.

CBMS Poverty Maps


The poverty map for each indicator shows
the provincial/city map disaggregated by
municipality/barangay.
A simple color scheme is used (green,
light green, pink and red) to represent the
four ranges of data for each indicator. Each
indicator, however, used a different range
relative to the provincial/city data.

Limitations of the Data


While observations are taken from the
entire population, the user of the data
presented in this series of subnational MDG
reports should bear in mind that the local
government units in all the 7 provinces and
3 cities were not able to collect their data
over the same period. Moreover, due to
some difficulties, the CBMS database was
not completed in the Municipality of Silago
and one barangay in Maasin City, Southern
Leyte.
As in other censuses and surveys, the
CBMS enumerators had encountered
non-responses and item non-responses.
Estimates on poverty and subsistence
poverty may also be affected by under- and/
or over-reporting of income or reluctance
on the part of the respondents to reveal
their true levels of income.

APPENDIX A

Definition of MDG Indicators


GOAL 1. ERADICATE EXTREME POVERTY AND HUNGER
Target 1A. Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is
less than one dollar a day
Indicator
1. Proportion of population
below poverty threshold

Definition

Percentage of the total population living below the poverty threshold.


The Poverty Threshold or Poverty Line refers to the cost of the basic food and nonfood requirements (valued in peso). The basic non-food requirements cover the
non-food expenditure items of the Total Basic Expenditures. In the Philippine official
methodology, the poverty line may be viewed as the minimum income required to
meet the food requirements and other non-food basic needs. (NSCB, 2003)
After the computation of the provincial food threshold (urban-rural), the estimation of
the poverty threshold to include the additional income required for the sustenance
of the minimum non-food basic needs follows. Non-food basic needs include the
following: clothing and footwear; fuel; light and water; housing maintenance and
other minor repairs; rental or occupied dwelling units; medical care; education;
transportation and communications; non-durable furnishing; household operations;
and personal care and effects. Hence, to compute for the poverty threshold, the
food threshold is divided by the ratio of the food expenditures (FE) to total basic
expenditures (TBE). The resulting estimate is the Annual Per Capita Poverty Threshold
(NSCB, 2011).
The poverty threshold used in this publication was estimated, since the official
threshold is not yet available for the reference period, by projecting the official NSCB
thresholds using prevailing prices.

2. Proportion of population
living in food threshold

Percentage of the total population living below food (subsistence) threshold


The Food Threshold refers to the cost of the food requir ed to satisfy nutritional
requirements for economically necessary and socially desirable physical activities
(NSCB, 2003).
In accordance with NSCB Resolution No. 9, Series of 2011, the food threshold is
determined by using provincial food bundles costed using provincial prices. The
one-day provincial food bundles were developed based on an indicative nationally
representative food bundle formulated by nutritionists from the Food and Nutrition
Research Institute (FNRI) and were subjected to the Test of Revealed Preferences
such that the food bundle of a province will be the cheapest in comparison with the
bundles of other provinces. It has the following characteristics: Nutritionally adequate,
that is, it satisfies the 100% Recommended Energy and Nutrient Intakes (RENI) for
energy and protein and 80% RENI for vitamins and minerals; Food items in the food
bundle are locally available and low cost; Least cost; Visualizable; and Edible.

Indicator

Definition

available and low cost; Least cost; Visualizable; and Edible.

The cost of each provincial food bundle is estimated using the actual prices collected
cost of each provincial food bundle is estimated using the actual
by the Bureau of The
Agricultural
Statistics (BAS) for agricultural commodities and the
prices collected by the Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) for
National Statisticsagricultural
Office (NSO)
for non-agricultural
foodStatistics
items. This
is then
commodities
and the National
Office
(NSO)multiplied
for
by 30.4 (the average
number offood
daysitems.
per month)
months to
up with the
non-agricultural
This isand
then12multiplied
by come
30.4 (the
average
number of days
per2011).
month) and 12 months to come up with
Annual Per Capita
Food Threshold
(NSCB,
the Annual Per Capita Food Threshold (NSCB, 2011).

The food threshold


used
this publication
was
estimated,
the official
threshold
The
foodinthreshold
used in this
publication
wassince
estimated,
since the
is not yet available
for the
reference
period,
by projecting
officialperiod,
NSCB by
thresholds
official
threshold
is not
yet available
for the the
reference
projecting the official NSCB thresholds using prevailing prices.
using prevailing prices.
3. Poverty Gap ratio

Mean distance separating the population from the poverty line (with

Mean distance separating


thebeing
population
the poverty
lineexpressed
(with the as
non-poor
the non-poor
given afrom
distance
of zero),
a
percentage
of the expressed
poverty line.as a percentage of the poverty line.
being given a distance
of zero),

3. Poverty Gap ratio

It refers
the sumgap
of theratios
income
for the population
It refers to the sum
of thetoincome
forgap
theratios
population
below thebelow
poverty line,
the poverty line, divided by the total population, which can be
divided by the total
population,
which
can
be
expressed
as
follows:
expressed as follows:

PG

1 q z yi

n i 1 z

where line,
z is the
line, yiof
is individual
the incomei, of
i, q isof
thepoor
where z is the poverty
yi ispoverty
the income
q individual
is the number
number of poor people and n is the size of the population
people and n is the
size of the population
Target 1B. Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young
people
INDICATOR

DEFINITION

4. Employment Rate
Percentage of the labor force who are employed
Target 1B. Achieve
full and productive
employment and decent work for all, including
The official definition of labor force is used in the estimation of the
women and young people
employment rate. This is computed as the total number of employed
persons divided by the total number of persons in the labor force.

Indicator

Definition

Target 1C. Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger

4. Employment Rate

Percentage of the labor force who are employed

INDICATOR
DEFINITION
5. Proportion of The
population
Percentage
of the
total
who
experienced
foodemployment
shortage
officialwho
definition
of labor
force
is population
used in the
estimation
of the
rate.
experienced food shortage
This is computedItasrefers
the total
number
of
employed
persons
divided
by
the
total
number
to the total number of persons who experienced food
of persons in theshortage
labor force.
in the last three months prior to the survey divided by the
total population and multiplied by 100
6. Prevalence of underweight

Percentage of children under 5 yrs old whose weight is below

Target 1C. Halve,


between
2015,
theorproportion
of people who suffer from
children
under 5 years1990
of age and
normal
(moderate
severe)
hunger
Indicator

Definition

5. Proportion of population
who experienced food
shortage

Percentage of the total population who experienced food shortage

6. Prevalence of
underweight children
under 5 years of age

Percentage of children under 5 yrs old whose weight is below normal (moderate or
severe)

It refers to the total number of persons who experienced food shortage in the last three
months prior to the survey divided by the total population and multiplied by 100

GOAL 2. ACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATION


Target 2A. Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to
complete a full course of primary schooling
Indicator

Definition

7. Proportion of children
aged 6-11 years old
enrolled in elementary

The number of children 6-11 years old who are enrolled in elementary as a percentage
of the total number of children 6-11 years old

8. Proportion of children
aged 12-15 years old
enrolled in high school

The number of children 12-15 years old who are enrolled in high school as a
percentage of the total number of children 12-15 years old

9. Proportion of children
aged 6-15 enrolled in
school

The number of children 6-15 years old who are enrolled in school as a percentage of
the total number of children 6-15 years old.

10. Literacy rate of 15-24


year-olds

An estimate which is below 100 percent provides a measure of the proportion of


children 6-11 years old who are not enrolled at the elementary level. However, the
difference does not necessarily indicate the percentage of students who are not
enrolled since some children might be enrolled at other levels of education.

An estimate which is below 100 percent provides a measure of the proportion of


children 12-15 years old who are not enrolled at the high school level. However, the
difference does not necessarily indicate the percentage of students who are not
enrolled since some children might be enrolled at other levels of education.

Percentage of the population aged 15-24 years old who can both read and write with
understanding of a short simple statement of everyday life. It is also called the youth
literacy rate.
This indicator reflects the outcome of primary education over the previous 10 years or
so. As a measure of the effectiveness of the primary education system, it is often seen
as a proxy measure of social progress and economic achievement.

GOAL 3. PROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMEN


Target 3A. Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education, preferably by
2005, and in all levels of education no later than 2015
Indicator

Definition

11. Ratio of girls to boys in


primary education

Primary education participation rate of female students divided by Primary education


participation rate of male students, regardless of ages

12. Ratio of girls to boys in


secondary education

Secondary education participation rate of female students divided by Secondary


education participation rate of male students, regardless of ages

13. Ratio of girls to boys in


tertiary education

Tertiary education participation rate of female students divided by Tertiary education


participation rate of male students, regardless of ages

14. Ratio of literate females to


literate males aged 15-24
years old

Number of literate females aged 15-24 years old divided by the number of literate
males aged 15-24 years old

15. Proportion of seats held


by women in the city

Number of seats held by women in the city expressed as a percentage of all occupied
seats
The city-level indicator includes elective seats from the City mayor down to the
Barangay Kagawad.

GOAL 4. REDUCE CHILD MORTALITY


Target 4A. Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate
Indicator

Definition

16. Proportion of children


aged 0 to less than 5 years
old who died

Number of children 0 to less than 5 years old who died divided by the sum of (i) total
no. of children 0 to less than 5 years old, and (ii) the total number of child deaths 0 to
less than 5 years old and then, multiplied by 100

17. Proportion of infants who


died

No. of infants (i.e., below 1 year old) who died divided by the sum of (i) total number of
infants, and (ii) total number of infants who died and then, multiplied by 100

18. Proportion of children


aged 1 to less than 5 years
old who died

Number of children 1 to less than 5 years old who died divided by the sum of (i) total
no. of children 1 to less than 5 years old, and (ii) the total number of child deaths 1 to
less than 5 years old and then, multiplied by 100

GOAL 5. IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTH


Target 5A. Reduce by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio
Indicator
19. Proportion of women
deaths due to pregnancyrelated causes

Definition
Total number of women who died due to pregnancy related causes divided by the
sum of (i) the total number of children less than one year old, and (ii) total number of
women who died due to pregnancy- related causes

Target 5B. Achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health


Indicator
20. Proportion of couples who
use contraception

Definition
Number of couples using any method of contraceptives, expressed as a percentage
of the total number of couples

GOAL 6. COMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASES


Target 6A. Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS
Indicator
21. Proportion of couples
using condom among
those who are practicing
contraception

Definition
Number of couples using condom as a contraceptive, expressed as a percentage of
the total number of couples practicing contraception

Target 6C. Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the incidence of malaria and other
major diseases
Indicator
22. Death rates associated
with tuberculosis

Definition
Number of deaths due to tuberculosis divided by the sum of (i) total population, and
(ii) the total number of deaths due to tuberculosis, multiplied by 100,000

GOAL 7. ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY


Target 7C. Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe
drinking water and basic sanitation
Indicator

Definition

23. Proportion of population


with access to improved
water source

Total population with access to improved sources of drinking water (piped water
into dwelling/yard/plot, public tap/stand pipe, tube well/borehole, protected or
semi-protected dug well, protected water from spring, rainwater and bottled water
provided that the source of water used for other household needs are also from those
mentioned above) expressed as a percentage of the total population

24. Proportion of population


with access to sanitary
toilet facility

Total population with access to water-sealed toilet or closed pit expressed as a


percentage of total population

Target 7D. By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least
100 million slum dwellers
Indicator

Definition

25. Proportion of population


who are informal settlers

Number of persons who are informal settlers expressed as a percentage of the total
population

26. Proportion of population


who are living in makeshift
housing

Number of persons living in housing with makeshift roof and/or walls over total
population

27. Proportion of population


living in inadequate
housing conditions

Number of persons who do not have access to improved water source or sanitary
toilet facilities or living in makeshift housing or no security of tenure, expressed as a
percentage of the total population

GOAL 8. DEVELOP A GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT


Target 8E. In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable
essential drugs in developing countries
Indicator
28. Proportion of Barangays
with Botika ng Barangay
(BnBs)

Definition
Number of barangays Botika ng Barangay (BnBs) expressed as a percentage of the
total number of barangays

Target 8F. In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new
technologies, especially information and communications
Indicator

Definition

29. Proportion of households


with landlines/telephone
lines

Number of households with landlines/telephone lines expressed as a percentage of the


total number of households

30. Proportion of households


with cellphones

Number of households with cellphones, expressed as a percentage of the total


number of households

31. Proportion of households


with computers

Number of households with computer, expressed as a percentage of the total number


of households

32. Proportion of households


with internet

Number of households with internet, expressed as a percentage of the total number of


households

APPENDIX B

Poverty and Food Thresholds


Province/
City
Benguet

Month of Data
Collection
January-June

Year of Data
Collection
2009

July-December
January-June

2010

July-December
January-June

2011

July-December

Ifugao

Urban

Rural

Food Threshold
Urban

Rural

2008

15,506

14,836

10,830

10,362

2009

16,490

15,777

11,517

11,019

2009

16,490

15,777

11,517

11,019

2010

17,016

16,280

11,884

11,371

2010

17,016

16,280

11,884

11,371

2011

17,665

16,901

12,338

11,805

2012

2011

17,665

16,901

12,338

11,805

January-June

2007

2006

14,211

13,738

9,926

9,595

2007

14,432

13,952

10,080

9,745

2007

14,432

13,952

10,080

9,745

2008

16,500

15,950

11,524

11,140

2008

16,500

15,950

11,524

11,140

2009

17,546

16,962

12,255

11,847

2009

15,527

14,761

10,845

10,310

2010

16,022

15,232

11,191

10,639

2010

16,022

15,232

11,191

10,639

2011

16,633

15,813

11,618

11,044

2011

16,633

15,813

11,618

11,044

2011

16,633

15,813

11,618

11,044

2008

15,912

15,121

11,114

10,561

2009

16,549

15,726

11,559

10,984

2009

16,549

15,726

11,559

10,984

2010

17,144

16,292

11,974

11,379

2010

17,144

16,292

11,974

11,379

January-June

2008

July-December
January-June

2009

July-December
January-June

2010

July-December
January-June

2011

July-December
January-June

2012

July-December
Occidental
Mindoro

Poverty Threshold

January-June

July-December

Kalinga

Reference
Year

January-June

2009

July-December
January-June

2010

July-December
January-June

2011

Province/
City
Oriental
Mindoro

Month of Data
Collection
JanuaryDecember

Year of Data
Collection
2008

July-December
JanuaryDecember

2009

July-December
Southern
Leyte

JanuaryDecember

2006

July-December
JanuaryDecember

2007

July-December
JanuaryDecember

2008

July-December

Surigao Del
Sur

Poverty Threshold
Urban

Rural

Food Threshold
Urban

Rural

2007

14,399

13,689

10,057

9,561

2008

16,462

15,651

11,498

10,932

2008

16,462

15,651

11,498

10,932

2009

17,121

16,277

11,958

11,369

2005

12,357

11,738

8,631

8,198

2006

13,177

12,516

9,203

8,742

2006

13,177

12,516

9,203

8,742

2007

13,659

12,975

9,540

9,062

2007

13,659

12,975

9,540

9,062

2008

16,217

15,404

11,326

10,759

JanuaryDecember

2009

2008

16,217

15,404

11,326

10,759

January-June

2008

2007

12,614

12,068

8,810

8,429

2008

15,204

14,546

10,619

10,159

2008

15,204

14,546

10,619

10,159

2009

16,151

15,451

11,280

10,792

2009

16,151

15,451

11,280

10,792

2010

16,774

16,047

11,716

11,208

July-December
January-June

2009

July-December
January-June

2010

July-December

Pasay City

Reference
Year

January-June

2011

2010

16,774

16,047

11,716

11,208

January-June

2011

2010

20,151

20,151

14,075

14,075

2011

20,856

20,856

14,567

14,567

2011

20,856

20,856

14,567

14,567

2011

20,856

20,856

14,567

14,567

2008

13,990

13,361

9,771

9,332

2009

14,550

13,895

10,162

9,705

2009

19,382

18,385

13,537

12,841

2010

20,236

19,195

14,134

13,407

2010

20,236

19,195

14,134

13,407

July-December
January-June

2012

July
Puerto
Princesa
City

January-June

Tabaco City

January-June

2009

July-December
2010

July-December
January-June

2011