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DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK

SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR

REPUBLICAN AGENDA

HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR HEALTH CARE CHANGES

NATION PAGE 6

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR

LIN SISTERS RULE COURT

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Thursday June 23, 2016 XVI, Edition 267

www.smdailyjournal.com

Boost for electrified Caltrain

Bill would authorize high-speed rail bonds for local project

By Juliet Williams

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — A state lawmaker has introduced last-minute legislation that would allow the state to begin selling voter-approved high-speed rail bonds for a connector project in the San Francisco Bay Area. AB1889 by Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South San Francisco, would change the wording of previous legis- lation to approve selling the bonds to pay for upgrades to the Caltrain com- muter line, which for years has been

included as part of the plan to build a California high- speed rail system, currently pegged
included as part of
the plan to build a
California high-
speed rail system,
currently pegged at
$64 billion.
The bill previous-
ly dealt with a dif-
ferent topic but was
modified Tuesday in
Kevin Mullin

an effort to free up funding for Caltrain electrification. Mullin’s legislative director, Andrew Zingale, said the bill is meant to clari- fy a portion of prior legislation that

authorized $1.1 billion for transit improvements at both ends of the high-speed rail project. Zingale said there was a concern that the wording of existing law could mean high-speed rail would have to be up and running to fund an electrifica- tion project, which was not what law- makers intended.

“What we’re trying to clarify is that this does serve the purpose of that but we don’t have to wait for the entire cor- ridor of high-speed rail track to be

See CALTRAIN, Page 18

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR

Artist’s rendering of the electrified Caltrain.

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR

AUSTIN WALSH/ DAILY JOURNAL

Former professional football player Jonathan Martin shares his strategies for coping with bullying during a speech in San Mateo before students in the Peninsula Bridge summer school program.

Tackling the threat of bullying

Former NFL lineman shares perseverance strategies with students

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

No one is too big to be bullied, not even a budding offensive line- man in the National Football League. Jonathan Martin, a former offensive tackle for the San Francisco 49ers and Miami Dolphins, shared the strategies he used to overcome torment suffered at the hands of classmates grow-

ing up as a child, in hopes local

students would be able to learn

from his experience and avoid the same pain. Martin, 26, addressed students enrolled in the Peninsula Bridge summer school program Wednesday, June 22, at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Day School in San Mateo during an informal speaking engagement designed to teach them the value of persever- ance in overcoming challenges.

After retiring in 2015 due to injuries, Martin has turned to using his platform to encourage students to treat each other with kindness and avoid bullying. A self-described nerd with a deep passion for learning stuffed inside a massive frame, Martin said he met the nasty treatment he received with similar behavior in an attempt to defend himself,

See MARTIN, Page 20

Belmont ice rink sold, still no plans

Skaters report offering more than $5 million to buy property

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It’s official, the former Belmont ice rink has been sold. However, there’s still no indication on what the new owners plan to do with the property. But a group of local skaters who have rallied to keep it open — even raising millions of dollars — aren’t ready to give up hope. Perhaps most disappointing to the newly formed nonprofit the Silicon Valley Ice Skating Association, it appears to have sold for less than the group offered

to the original owner, East Bay

Iceland.

After months of little confirma- tion with who the former owner was under contract to sell the prop- erty and exactly what the new own- ers envisioned for the site at 815 Old County Road, a few details emerged after the sale was recorded last Friday. According to records filed with the San Mateo County Assessor’s Office, the property was sold twice in one day. MMA Belmont LLC bought the site for slightly over

See RINK, Page 20

Official says district is open to election shift

Sequoia high school district to further consider by-district system next week

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

In the interest of ensuring all voices in the Sequoia Union High School District community are heard and represented equally dur- ing the policy making process,

board President Alan Sarver said

officials are open to considering

altering the district’s election sys-

tem. Officials are set to discuss the proposed shift to regional by-dis- trict elections during a meeting next week, with the potential to officially move away from the cur-

See SHIFT, Page 18

DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR
DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR
DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR
DELPHINIUMS ARE WORTH THE WORK SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 REPUBLICAN AGENDA HOUSE GOP OFFERS PROPOSALS FOR
  • 2 Thursday June 23, 2016

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“A bore is a man who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company.”

— Giovanni Vincenzo Gravina, Italian scholar

This Day in History

  • 1960 The Food and Drug Administration for- mally approved Enovid as the first oral contraceptive for sale in the U.S.

In 1314 , during the First War of Scottish Independence, the two-day Battle of Bannockburn, resulting in victory for the forces of Robert the Bruce over the army of King Edward II, began near Stirling. In 1757, forces of the East India Company led by Robert Clive won the Battle of Plassey, which effectively marked the beginning of British colonial rule in India. In 1812, Britain, unaware that America had declared war against it five days earlier, rescinded its policy on neutral shipping, a major issue of contention between the two coun- tries. In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office at the Republican national conven- tion in Chicago. In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours. In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Authority was established. In 1947, the Senate joined the House in overriding President Harry S. Truman’s veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor. In 1956 , Gamal Abdel Nasser was elected president of Egypt. In 1969, Warren E. Burger was sworn in as chief justice of the United States by the man he was succeeding, Earl Warren. In 1972, President Richard Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed using the CIA to obstruct the FBI’s Watergate investigation.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

“American Idol” ex-judge Randy Jackson is 60.

Birthdays

Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actress Frances McDormand is 59.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Actress Selma Blair is 44.

Singer Diana Trask is 76. Musical conductor James Levine is 73. Actor Ted Shackelford is 70. Actor Bryan Brown is 69. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is 68. Actor Jim Metzler is 65. Rock musician Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth) is 54. Actor Paul La Greca is 54. Writer-director Joss Whedon is 52. Rhythm-and-blues singer Chico DeBarge is 46. Rock singer KT Tunstall is 41. Rhythm-and-blues singer Virgo Williams (Ghostowns DJs) is 41. Actress Emmanuelle Vaugier is 40. Singer-songwriter Jason Mraz is 39. Actress Melissa Rauch is 36. Rock singer Duffy is 32.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

 

TAYRP

   
   
TAYRP
 
TAYRP
 

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

NFGIL
NFGIL
VOITEM HRALEB
VOITEM
HRALEB
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as

suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: ORBIT SOUPY HIATUS SAYING Yesterday’s Answer: They loved the new wine
Answer
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles:
ORBIT
SOUPY
HIATUS
SAYING
Yesterday’s
Answer:
They loved the new wine bar and its —
BIG “POUR-TIONS”
Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

REUTERS

A circular staircase is seen in the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.

Bear that walks like a human re-emerges in New Jersey

OAK RIDGE, N.J. — A New Jersey black bear that walks upright on its two

hind legs and has become a social media darling has re-emerged and has been cap- tured on video months after its last

sighting. The bipedal bear nicknamed Pedals was spotted in the town of Oak Ridge, NJ.com reported Wednesday. The bear appeared to be in relatively good health and was moving briskly in a video post- ed to Facebook featuring the bear. The man who posted the video wrote that he spotted the bear Monday.

Pedals apparently has an injured leg or

paw that doesn’t allow it to walk com- fortably on all fours, according to experts. Prior to the latest video, there had been no reported recent sightings and officials asked the public for help in locating the bear. Lawrence Hajna, spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection, said officials expect the bear to make it through next winter. “The bear has an indomitable spirit,” Hajna said. The bear first gained fame after it was spotted ambling around neighborhoods and was caught on videos that were post- ed on social media and shown on nation- al television. Last year, supporters pushed for Pedals to be moved to a sanctuary in

New York state, but New Jersey officials have said they won’t allow the bear to

In other news ...

be captured and transferred to the facili- ty. Hajna said at the time that the bear would do better in its natural habitat and the agency would step in if its condition deteriorated.

Gator captured on beach killed; head to be mounted

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. — The trapper who captured an alligator seen swim- ming in the Atlantic Ocean a few yards off a Georgia beach says the reptile has been killed and its head will be mounted. Authorities temporarily closed b each- es on Tybee Island for several hours as they watched the 7-foot gator just off-

shore on Friday. They said it was highly

unusual for an alligator to cause alarm at the beach, since they’re typically found in fresh water such as ponds, lakes, rivers and swamps. The gator was eventually reeled onto the beach by trapper Jack Douglas and his crew. Douglas tells The Savannah Morning News that the gator was harvested for its meat and hide, and its head will be mounted. He said releasing such a large gator elsewhere could be dangerous for someone else, so it was euthanized.

Police bust teen party bus stocked with booze, drugs

LARKSPUR — An anonymous tip led police in Marin County to a party bus loaded with teens and stocked with alco- hol and drugs.

After stopping the bus Monday evening police found 33 teens with 30 empty and partially empty containers of hard alcohol, a case of hard lemonade, and a jar of marijuana. Prescription drugs were also located in a purse. Drugs and alcohol were also found in the bus driver’s compartment. He was arrested. Police say a teen who rented the bus online did not have to show any identi- fication after making a cash payment of $900 for the bus rental. The teen with the prescription drugs was cited for possession of a controlled substance and marijuana, and posses- sion of false identification cards. The teens were released to their parents.

The

California

Public

Utilities

Commission Transportation Enforcement Section has been notified about the incident.

Ten horses, two goats found dead after desert barn fire

LANCASTER — Los Angeles County fire officials say 10 horses and two goats have been found dead after a barn fire in the desert community of Lake Los Angeles.

Fire

Inspector

Joey

Marron

says

crews were called to the fire on Mossdale Avenue around 12:45 p.m. Wednesday.

The bodies of the animals were found after firefighters knocked down the blaze, which took less than 15 minutes. Marron says two people with smoke inhalation were taken to a hospital. There’s no word on their conditions.

Lotto

June 22 Powerball

Fantasy Five

 
14 40 42 43 52 17 Powerball
14
40
42
43
52 17
Powerball
12
12
18
18
21
21
26
26
27
27

June 21 Mega Millions

6 13 21 49 50 10 Mega number
6
13
21
49
50 10
Mega number

Daily Four

6
6
3
3
6
6

Daily three midday

6
6

June 22 Super Lotto Plus

4
4
9
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4
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6 12 26 28 24 Mega number
6
12
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28
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  • 33 Daily three evening

 
2
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2
1
1
Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous

George, No. 8, in first place; Gold Rush, No. 1, in

second place; and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:45.98.

Local Weather Forecast

Thurs day : Cloudy in the morning then

becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the

morning. Highs in the mid 60s. Northwest

winds 10 to 20 mph. Thurs day ni g ht : Mostly cloudy. Patchy

fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s.

Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY JOURNAL Thought for the Day

Fri day : Mostly cloudy in the morning

then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in

the upper 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph

to 10 mph in the afternoon.

...

Becoming 5

Fri day ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s. Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s. Saturday ni g ht thro ug h Tues day : Partly cloudy. Lows

in the lower 50s. Highs in the 60s to mid 70s. Tues day ni g ht : Partly cloudy.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Thursday June 23, 2016

3

County approves budget; loan for clean energy program

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors passed a budget that has $219 million more in spending in it then when the board first saw the recommended budget back in September. That represents a 9.2 percent increase in spending from County Manager John Maltbie’s original proposed budget which adds 20 more positions to the county’s workforce, which now sits at 5,438 author- ized positions. Following approval of the budget Tuesday, the board then approved a financ- ing mechanism for the Peninsula Clean Energy Authority which includes a $6 mil- lion loan to use as collateral to secure a $12 million loan from Barclays Bank. The $6 million loan is forgivable as is an earlier $1.48 million loan to cover startup costs. It is anticipated that the clean energy program will deliver cleaner, more renew- able energy at competitive prices compared to Pacific Gas and Electric’s pricing, accord- ing to the authority. By October, Peninsula Clean Energy is scheduled to become the county’s default electricity provider as it starts to enroll its first customers into the community choice aggregation program.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

The program will allow the county and its 20 cities to pool the electricity demands of their communities, purchase power with higher renewable content and reinvest in local infrastructure. PCE is preparing to launch as a board of directors comprised of elected officials from the county and cities is in pl ace now. The board meets Thursday, June 23, to approve the same funding mechanism super- visors did on Tuesday. About 297,000 Pacific Gas and Electric customers will automatically become cus- tomers of PCE unless they opt out. Customers, however, will not be all enrolled at once. The fiscal year 2016-17 budget supervi- sors approved Tuesday required the use of $61.8 million in reserves to balance the 1.68 billion General Fund budget. The county now has $154 million in reserves, the lowest level in 10 years. The budget for all funds was approved at $2.6 billion, which includes restricted funds that can only be used for specific projects such as road or sewer fixes.

The county has also invested in paying down its long-term pension liabilities. Changes to the budget from the September version include:

• $94.3 million for capital projects, including trail improvements and Mirada Road erosion protection; • $162 million in Measure A initiatives, including $11.9 million for the Big Lift and $2.8 million for parks improvements; • $14.1 million in pension prepayment contributions; • $4.6 million in retiree health contribu- tions; • $7.7 million in loans for the Half Moon Bay and Brisbane libraries; • $7.5 million loan for start-up costs for Peninsula Clean Energy Authority; • $2.8 million loan to repl ace two hangars at San Carlos Airport; • $2 million in administrative costs for the flood control zone; • $2 million for a one-year employee com- muter bus pilot program; • $1.7 million for mental health pods in county jails; • $580,000 to complete a countywide sea level rise vulnerability assessment; • $500,000 for the Affordable Housing Task Force; and • $3.5 million for the “Sunny Day” crimi- nal trial costs.

Judge: Enough evidence to try man for stealing doughnut shop ATM

A judge ruled Wednesday there is enough evidence to prosecute a San Francisco man for allegedly stealing an ATM from Royal Donut Shop in Burlingame May 2, accord- ing to the San Mateo County District Attorney’s Office. Three men entered the shop on an early Monday morning and ordered some dough- nuts. One of the men, Denis Reynieris Velasquez, allegedly then put a gun to the clerk’s head while the other two suspects dismantled the ATM. Velasquez struggled

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean

Denis

Velasquez

with the clerk and allegedly struck him with a dough hook causing cuts to his head. The gun turned out to be a fake. Velasquez was detained in Daly City days later with the ATM in his pos-

session and was prompt-

ly arrested for the crime in Burlingame. The other

two suspects are still on the loose. The confrontation was caught on surveillance tape. Velasquez faces charges of r obbery,

Local brief

assault and grand theft. The loss by the theft of the ATM was

$8,740.

He remains in custody and is bail was raised to $100,000 Wednesday. His arraign- ment is set for July 12.

Exhibitor space and sponsorships available! Call 650-344-5200

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean

For information call the Daily Journal (650) 344-5200

Police reports

Taco takedown

An intoxicated subject was standing in front of the driveway of a Taco Bell and not moving for customers on El Camino Real in South San Francisco before 12:28 a.m. Saturday, June 4.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Di s turbance . A patient was being aggres- sive and swearing at staff at the South San Francisco Clinic on Grand Avenue before 10:41 a.m. Wednesday, June 8. Di s turbance . Five people were seen drink- ing and urinating outside near vehicles at Deluxe Inn on El Camino Real before 12:59 a.m. Wednesday, June 8. Acci dent . A car was hit causing damage to the tail lights and rear bumper on Randolph Avenue before 8:24 p.m. Tuesday, June 7. Hazardo us co ndi ti o n. A chair was in the middle of the road near Westborough Boulevard and Camaritas Avenue before 2:47 p.m. Tuesday, June 7.

HALF MOON BAY

Arres t . A 57-year-old man was arrested after he was determined to be in violation of his probation conditions and too intoxicat- ed to care for himself on the 500 block of Kelly Avenue before 12:12 p.m. Sunday, June 19.

Citation . A 19-year-old San Jose man was

cited for driving with a suspended license near Alsace Lorraine and Kelly avenues before 2:52 p.m. Thursday, June 16. Vandal i s m . A vehicle’s window was smashed on the 400 block of Cypress Avenue before 7 a.m. Thursday, June 16.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Thursday • June 23, 2016 3 County approves budget; loan for clean
  • 4 Thursday June 23, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Central Park Music Series marks summertime

4 Thursday • June 23, 2016 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Central Park Music Series marks summertime

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF SAN MATEO

Reggae band Native Elements will be kicking off the Central Park Music Series in downtown San Mateo Thursday, June 23.

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed, routinely loot public money - and people’s pockets. Here are just a few examples:

“If you want the unvarnished truth about what is wrong in America, read this book. Cotchett spares no sacred cows as he shines a spotlight on the creed of greed.”

- Congresswoman Jackie Speier

Unhealthy health care: America’s medical system is riddled with critical failures, and big drug compa-

nies and polic y makers are responsible. Insurance fraud and false medical billing cost billions of tax

and public dollars - and a number of lives.

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

consideration of the human beings that he was abusing.”

Paul D. Borman, U.S. District Judge sentencing a Michigan oncologist, 2015

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

Oil, chemical and big food companies are killing our country, and our govern-

ment is unable to stop them. Pharmaceuticals that are supposed to cure are marketed only to make

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

“Rogue internet pharmacies continue to pose a serious threat to the health and safety of Americans.

Simply put, a few unethical physicians and pharmacists have become drug suppliers to a nation.”

—U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein

Banks Run for Personal Gain:
Banks Run for Personal Gain:

lions of people.

-
-

ing entity. These companies and other entities don’t operate on automatic pilot.”

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

Climate Change Denied: Many energy companies lobby politicians who claim there is no climate change

due to fossil fuels or gas emissions. Scientists tell us we are close to losing all land ice on the planet.

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

ethical imperative to act.”

—Pope Francis, 266th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church

Politics is Money: Our U.S. Supreme Court in Citizens United and follow-up cases, has allowed the million-

aires to give as much money as they want to elect politicians who keep the public from participating.

“Where enough money calls the tune, the general public will not be heard

...

And a cynical public can

lose interest in political participation altogether.”

—Justice Stephen Breyer, U.S. Supreme Court from his dissenting opinion in McCutcheon v. FEC

The list goes on and on. The author, one of the most honored lawyers in the United States, warns of the

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

The author is Joseph W. Cotchett - He has a legendary reputation and is considered one of the country’s

foremost trial lawyers. The National Law Journal

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

America. He has been in the top 100 attorneys selection by the Los Angeles Daily Journal and Fellow of

many prestigious bar organizations. He received the Trial Lawyer of the Year Award by Trial Lawyers for

Public Justice, the Anti-Defamation League’s Distinguished Jurisprudence Award, honored by Disability

Rights Advocates, inducted into the National Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame and was awarded the prestigious

Many and growing every day, bankers, executives, politicians, lawyers, accountants, doctors, and professionals driven by greed,

awarded the Legion of Merit.

A relentless advocate for the underprivileged and for victims of a society now moving into the hands of

unscrupulous powers. As Martin Luther King, Jr. said,

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

Available through Amazon.com

San Mateo hosts free concerts every Thursday near downtown

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Summer’s here and so are the tunes. San Mateo’s annual Central Park Music Series kicks off Thursday, June 23, with some good vibrations and community bonding near downtown.

The free weekly concert series is a trade- mark city-sponsored event that turns the historic 16-acre park into a destination for families and music lovers looking to enjoy a warm Thursday evening outdoors. This year, an eclectic lineup of musicians rang- ing from reggae to country and rock to Latin will take to the stage while visitors can dab- ble in a variety of food from local restau- rants.

“The Central Park Music Series is one of the finest events we have in San Mateo, It really brings a lot of people out into the community and it’s a great way to gather in the park, connect with friends and family, and really just enjoy a night of music and food and festivities in downtown,” said Rebecca Zito, senior management analyst with the city.

The nine-week series commences this week with the San Francisco-based reggae band Native Elements slated to celebrate summer in San Mateo. But visitors stay tuned, as there’s more to come whether you’re into swing, 1960s tributes, salsa, classic rock, pop or even “yacht rock” — the later of which is presented by party band Mustache Harbor, a San Francisco-based group expected to arrive in costume and hand out free mustaches.

Zito noted the city has always tried to showcase diverse genres of music to make sure the series “will appeal to a broad audi- ence. And it’s always upbeat music and pos- itive so it’s fun and lively for the audience.”

In years past, families and people of all

ages have set up lawn chairs to relax with a

meal from one of the local vendors, or boo- gie down near the stage while sipping on a drink. Either before or after sprawling along the park’s main lawn during the two-hour shows, those attending are encouraged to check out some of the restaurants, bars and other businesses offered just a short jaunt away in downtown. Ann Fienman, executive director of the Downtown San Mateo Association, noted more and more people have heard about the outdoor concert series that takes advantage of a great venue. “Central Park is a popular spot any time, for both active and quiet experiences, and its downtown location means it’s just steps away from numerous dining, shopping and parking options,” Fienman said in an email. “Visitors who attend a concert in Central Park can enjoy good, upbeat music with a friendly, relaxed crowd in a beautiful setting. Just an overall fun experience. What better way to spend a summer evening?” The event is put on by the city’s Park and Recreation Department with the help from local sponsors. It’s also grown tremendous- ly since it first began nearly 15 years ago, with more vendors and nearly 1,000 visi- tors attendees expected each week, Zito said. “It’s a really well-attended event and it’s evolved over the years,” Zito said. “It’s been really awesome to see it grow from its infancy and continue to build over the years. I think it’s something that the community looks forward to.”

Visit cityofsanmateo.org for a schedule and more information about the concert series.

Oakland mayor faces test amid embarrassing police scandals

By Kristen J. Bender

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

4 Thursday • June 23, 2016 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Central Park Music Series marks summertime

Libby Schaaf

vetting her choices. In announcing the departure of Acting Chief Paul Figueroa after just two days last week, Schaaf angrily denounced the department’s “toxic, macho culture” and vowed to root out bad officers.

“As the mayor of

Oakland, I’m here to run

a police department, not a frat house,” she

said. Some members of the department are being investigated for sending racist text messages while others are embroiled in a sex scandal. An 18-year-old who has called her- self a sex worker says she had sexual rela- tionships with Oakland officers, including

some when she was underage. She is the daughter of a department employee.

-

OAKLAND — Libby Schaaf is a trained lawyer who left her legal career years ago for grassroots community service in Oakland that eventually led to her election as mayor of the long-troubled California city. Now, midway through her first term, she is

-

facing the toughest trial of her political career with the scandal-ridden Oakland

Police Department providing a seemingly

daily dose of embarrassment for her and the city. The department, which has been moni- tored by a federal judge since a 2003 settle- ment in a civil rights case, has had three chiefs just this month. Twice, Schaaf’s hand- picked successors left their jobs within days and Schaaf was forced to hold news confer- ences and take the blame for not sufficiently

Herbert Archie Miller

Herbert Archie Miller, 101, died p eaceful- ly in his sleep at Covenant Village, Turlock, California, May 29, 2016. The youngest of 12, he was born to John and Lula May Miller in Stratford, California, March 21, 1915.

Herb served in the California Conservation Corps for eight years, then joined the U.S. Navy in 1939. Gunner’s Mate 1C Miller was onboard the USS Detroit (CL-8) at Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. He also served on the USS La Vallette (DD-448) and USS Franklin (CV-13). He was a reservist until 1975. He married his wartime YWCA pen pal, Wilma Boehl of Duluth, Minnesota, July 7, 1945, two weeks after their first face-to-face meeting, celebrating 70 years together in 2015. His professions were watchmaking

Obituary

4 Thursday • June 23, 2016 LOCAL THE DAILY JOURNAL Central Park Music Series marks summertime

and precision assembly. Before moving to Turlock, they lived on Ruby Street in Redwood City for 50 years. Herb is missed by Wilma; daughters Jean Hanamoto (George),

Willits; Sandy Miller-

George (John), Paradise; and Gail Waldo, Belmont; grandchildren Linda Waldo, Barbara Waldo, Tom Nelson, Bob Nelson and great-grandson Jackson Waldo. A private memorial was June 15, 2016, officiated by Pastor Rod Toews who retired to Turlock from Peninsula Covenant Church.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Thursday June 23, 2016

5

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE Thursday • June 23, 2016 5 The nominal Bay Area home price

The nominal Bay Area home price is at its highest ever, but in inflation-adjusted terms, the price is 12 percent below its peak of nearly 10 years ago.

Median Bay Area home price reaches another new record

DAILY JOURNAL WIRE REPORT

A short supply and healthy demand for Bay Area homes lifted the median sales price last month to a historic high of $700,000, surpassing the previous peak of $690,000 set in April, according to research firm CoreLogic. “The tight supply of homes on the market continues to constrain sales, while low mortgage rates and job growth help fuel healthy demand,” research analyst Andrew LePage said in a statement. “This results in a pressure cooker effect, and the market’s traditional pressure release valve — new home construction — isn’t helping much, given that new-home sales are running more than 40 percent below historically normal levels.” The number of homes, 7,888, sold in the Bay Area in May was up 3.2 percent from April but down 4.2 percent from last May and well below the peak May sales month of 13,567 in 2004 and the May average of 9,463 since 1988 when data for the firm’s report began. In Alameda County, the median price rose to $700,000 from $685,500, while the median price in Contra Costa County rose $20,000 to $540,000. In Solano County, where the region’s

lowest-priced homes can be found, the

median price rose to $370,250 from

$350,000.

In the highest-priced counties of San Francisco and San Mateo, the median price fell 13.3 percent to $1,127,500 and 3.4 percent to $1,036,500, respectively. On a percentage basis, the price in Sonoma County and Solano County jumped the most at 5 percent and 5.8 percent. LePage said the nominal Bay Area home price is at its highest ever, but in inflation- adjusted terms, the price is 12 percent below its peak of nearly 10 years ago. Statewide, the median price for a California home climbed year-over-year for the 51st consecutive month, hitting $427,000 in May. The median price increased 0.5 percent in April and 5.4 per- cent from May 2015. Home sales statewide hit nearly 42,800, up 2.7 percent from May 2015. In the six-county Southern California region, sales and prices both trended up. Nearly 22,500 houses and condos sold in May, up 3.3 percent from last year. The median price was $459,500, up 6.9 percent from May 2015. Homes in Orange County posted the highest median at a record $651,500, followed by Los Angeles at $525,000.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE Thursday • June 23, 2016 5 The nominal Bay Area home price

Prosecutor in Stanford case seeks tougher sex assault law

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — The California lawyer who prosecuted a former Stanford University swimmer convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman is spon- soring legislation to toughen mandatory sentencing. Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeff Rosen and two lawmakers announced AB2888 on Wednesday. Brock Turner was sentenced to six months in jail June 3, though current law does not require hard time if force is not used.

The bill would prohibit probation and

effectively require jail time for anyone con- victed of rape or sexual assault against a per- son who was unconscious or too intoxicated to consent. Democratic Assemblymen Bill Dodd of Napa and Evan Low of Campbell are carry- ing the bill with co-author Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo. Another bill introduced following the Stanford case would expand California’s legal definition of rape to include penetra- tion by any object without consent.

State: Dry California town soon to have running water return

FRESNO — Officials say families in a poor community where hundreds of wells dried up during California’s record drought will soon have clean water again flowing into their homes. State water officials on Wednesday revealed plans to spend $10 million in the Tulare County’s East Porterville. Officials will connect the residents to a neighboring city’s water system. East Porterville drew wide attention when residents were forced to drink bottled water and install large tanks for washing, or use portable showers at a church parking lot. Resident Tomas Garcia says hope is returning to his neighborhood. He says that in America today water is a right for everybody, not just the wealthy.

Weather helps crews battling Western wildfires — for now

LOS ANGELES — Cooler, more humid weather gave at least some temporary help Wednesday to crews battling dangerous wildfires in Southern California, while other bl azes across the West were on the move. Improved weather in the aftermath of a

Around the state

severe heat wave allowed firefighters to make progress against two fires in the steep San Gabriel Mountains 20 miles northeast of Los Angeles. Some evacuations below in the foothill city of Duarte were lifted, but the calm was not expected to last. “We will have stronger winds, so it could push the fire,” incident commander Mike Wakoski said.

California lawmakers advance bill to end tampon tax

SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers on Wednesday joined a growing number of legislators in other states showing support for repealing so-called “tampon taxes” on feminine hygiene products. A California Senate committee approved AB1561 with a 5-0 vote, sending it to the appropriations committee for further con- sideration. Supporters of the bill say tampons and sanitary pads are n ecessities for women and should not be subject to state taxation. Five other states have already enacted laws ending such taxes. Two other state measures that were passed this year in New York and Illinois await signatures from gov- ernors.

     
 

Obituary

 
 

Helen Mary (sullivan) Whelan

Helen Mary (Sullivan) Whelan beloved wife of the late Raymond James Whelan, passed away peacefully at home on June 19 surrounded by her family. She was the adoring daughter of the late Daniel and Bridget Sullivan, loving sister of the late Abina Sullivan and Cecelia McElearney, and loving mother of the late Michael Whelan (Christine.) Helen is survived by her loving children, Daniel Whelan, James Whelan (Nancy), Mary

Patricia Whelan-Miille (Michael Miille), Joanne Thurau (John), and Aileen Whelan.

She will be missed by her grandchildren Lisa Oshima (Rob), Lauren Go (PJ), Cameron Miille (Jamie), John Paul Thurau II (Gabriela), Raymond Whelan, Mark Thurau, and

Daniel Whelan. She is also survived by her precious great grandchildren Olivia, Gabriel,

and Samantha Go, Caelyn Oshima, and Parker Miille, as well as three who will soon be

joining the family. Helen’s extended family of greatly loved nieces and nephews includes

the Whelan, Lyons, and McElearney families. Helen is also survived by her cousins Sr.

Rosaleen O’Sullivan, RSM, Claire D’Amico, and the Duignan family of Ireland.

Helen grew up in the Mission District of San Francisco amidst a very close knit Irish

community. She attended Corpus Christi grammar school, and graduated from St. Paul’s

High School in 1941. Helen graduated from the College of Notre Dame, Belmont, in

1944.

She met her husband Raymond (SCU Fighting ‘44, class of 1947) at a Santa Clara

University dance. They were married in 1947 until his death in 1995. Helen & Ray moved

to Burlingame in 1954 where they raised their family in Our Lady of Angels Parish. Both Helen and Ray were active in the Our Lady of Angels School and church community.

Helen was a Mothers’ Club president and volunteered for many years at the church

rectory. She was also in the “Pink Lady” Auxiliary at Peninsula Hospital in Burlingame

for many years.

 

Helen loved being a wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, and aunt. She greatly

enjoyed hosting family gatherings with Ray in their home. Sewing was a creative outlet

for Helen, and her daughters greatly benefited from this!

 

In her later years, Helen enjoyed the friendship and support of the Our Lady of Angels

Parish community especially the Capuchin Franciscans and rectory staff. Helen’s family

would like to thank Visiting Angels, in particular, Beth and Patricia, for the wonderful

care they provided, and most especially Jennifer Leone for her loving care during Helen’s

final days.

Donations in Helen’s memory may be made to the Capuchin Franciscans, Western

Province, 1345 Cortez Avenue, Burlingame CA 94010.

 

A Visitation will be held on Thursday June 23 at 6pm and the Rosary will begin at 7pm at

Our Lady of Angels Church, 1721 Hillside Drive, Burlingame CA 94010.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11:30 am on Friday, June 24 at Our Lady of

Angels Church, 1721 Hillside Drive, Burlingame CA 94010. A graveside service will be

held at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma following the mass. A reception will be held back

in Burlingame following the graveside service (details will be provided at the church.)

  • 6 Thursday June 23, 2016

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Rebellious Dems disrupt House and stage protest

By Matthew Daly

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Rebellious Democrats disrupted the House’s legislative work on Wednesday, staging a sit-in on the House floor and refusing to leave until they secured a vote on gun control measures. Exasperated Republicans were forced to recess while cutting off the C-SPAN cameras that showed the protest. A group of nearly 100 Democrats led by Georgia Rep. John Lewis demanded a vote on measures to expand back- ground checks and block gun purchases by some suspected terrorists in the aftermath of last week’s massacre in Orlando, Florida, that killed 49 people. It was the worst shooting in modern U.S. history. “No bill, no break,” shouted Democrats, who demanded that House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., keep the House in session through its planned weeklong recess next week to debate and vote on gun legislation.

Democrats accused Republicans of political cowardice by failing to schedule a vote. “Are they more afraid than the children at Sandy Hook?” asked Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., referring to the 2012 shooting that killed 26 people, including 20 elementary school children, in Newtown, Connecticut. “What is so scary about having a vot e?” Lewis, a veteran civil rights leader revered by Democrats, said action on gun violence is long overdue. “We have lost hundreds and thousands of innocent people to gun violence,” Lewis said as he urged fellow Democrats to stand with him in the area near the podium, known as the well. “What has this body done” to respond to the violence, Lewis asked, then answered his own question: “Nothing. We have turned a deaf ear to the blood of innocents. We are blind to a crisis. Where is our courage? How many more

mothers

...

and

fathers need to shed tears of grief?”

About 30 minutes after the sit-in began, Rep. Ted Poe, R-

Texas, tried to start the House’s work at noon.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Rebellious Dems disrupt House and stage
Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Rebellious Dems disrupt House and stage

REUTERS

Paul Ryan takes questions at a news conference in Washington, D.C.

House GOP offers proposals for health care changes

By Erica Werner

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — House Republicans on Wednesday unveiled new proposals to repeal and replace President Barack Obama’s health care law, as Speaker Paul Ryan seeks to showcase a GOP governing agenda amid the tumult of the presidential campaign. “Obamacare is fundamentally flawed,” Ryan told reporters at an event rolling out the GOP plan. “We’re saying, don’t force people to buy insurance. Make insurance companies compete for our business.” The plan, revealed Wednesday, relies on individual tax credits to allow peo- ple to buy coverage from private insur-

ers, and includes other largely familiar

GOP ideas such as medical liability

reform and expanding access to health savings accounts. It proposes putting $25 billion behind high-risk pools for people with pre-existing conditions and for others, and transforming the federal-state Medicaid program for the poor by turning it into state block grants or individual per-capita allot- ments to hold down spending. But the 37-page white paper falls far short of a full-scale replacement pro- posal for “Obamacare” and leaves key questions unanswered, including the size of the tax credits, the overall price tag of the plan, and how many people would be covered. Republican aides said it’s intended as an overall roadmap showing how the GOP would approach

undoing and replacing Obama’s health law with a Republican in the White House, and specific legislative details would be answered as the actual bills

are written next year. A White House statement early Wednesday denounced Ryan’s propos- al as “nothing more than vague and recycled ideas to take health insurance away from millions and increase costs for seniors and hardworking fami- lies.” The report is an aspirational docu- ment like the rest of Ryan’s “Better Way” agenda, a six-topic blueprint that the speaker has been rolling out this month at carefully choreographed events that have been getting largely overshadowed by the latest Donald Trump campaign controversy.

Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION THE DAILY JOURNAL Rebellious Dems disrupt House and stage
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Thursday June 23, 2016

7

Trump attacks Clinton: ‘She gets rich making you poor’

By Julie Pace and Jill Colvin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Donald Trump launched a blistering attack Wednesday on Hillary Clinton’s record and character, slamming his presidential rival as a “world class liar” who raked in personal profits from her tenure at the State Department. The billion- aire businessman claimed, “She gets rich making you poor.” Trump’s broadside marked his opening salvo in a general election faceoff with Clinton that has already turned bruising and deeply personal. The presumptive Republican nominee called Clinton the “most corrupt” person to ever run for presi- dent and accused of her of spreading “death, destruction and terrorism” while serving as the nation’s top diplomat. Clinton, campaigning in North Carolina, called Trump’s charges “outlandish lies.” “He’s going after me personally b ecause he has no answers on the substance,” Clinton said. “All he can try to do is try to distract us.” Trump’s tone was pointed yet measured as he ticked through several of Republicans’ favorite critiques of Clinton, including her use of private email as secretary of state and her role in responding to the attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya. Several of his claims were inaccurate or exaggerated,

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Thursday • June 23, 2016 7 Trump attacks Clinton: ‘She gets rich

Hillary Clinton

including incorrectly saying she wants to spend hundreds of bil- lions to resettle Middle Eastern refugees in the United States. Wednesday’s address came at a pivotal moment

for Trump’s presidential

campaign. The political

novice has struggled with the transition to a general election race, getting bogged down by self-created controversies and failing to invest in the staff and infrastructure needed for the fall campaign. Earlier this week, Trump abruptly fired his campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, a move widely viewed as an acknowledgment of a need to recalibrate his organization. A new fundraising report released hours after Lewandowski’s firing underscored how much ground Trump has to make up: He started June with just $1.3 million in the bank, a stunningly paltry amount for a major party nominee. Even as Trump blasted Clinton, he returned to some of the core themes that first powered his surprising presidential campaign. He railed against professional politicians and urged Americans to seize an opportunity to shake up a “rigged” sys- tem.

Dump Trump movement preps for fight at GOP convention

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The movement to dump Donald Trump from the GOP ticket is gain- ing followers among delegates to next month’s Republican National Convention, an effort that could tarnish Trump’s corona- tion even if it ultimately fails. The growing rebellion has at least one top party official warning of a backlash if Trump is dumped. “Can you imagine the rage if Trump is denied the nomination?” Bruce Ash of Arizona said in a letter to fellow members of the Republican National Committee. Several hundred Republican delegates are

organizing to oppose Trump at the conven-

tion. That’s not enough to topple Trump. But it’s more than enough to create turmoil at an event that typically unifies a party in support of a presidential candidate. “If Trump is the nominee, we truly believe it’s the end of our party,” said Kendal Unruh, a Colorado delegate who is leading the effort to dump Trump. “We’re trying to save the party.” There could be floor fights over conven- tion rules and the party’s platform. And instead of a coronation, the roll call to nominate Trump could allow delegates to voice their displeasure on national televi- sion.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Thursday • June 23, 2016 7 Trump attacks Clinton: ‘She gets rich
THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Thursday • June 23, 2016 7 Trump attacks Clinton: ‘She gets rich

REUTERS

Donald Trump delivers a speech at the Trump Soho Hotel in Manhattan, New York.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Thursday • June 23, 2016 7 Trump attacks Clinton: ‘She gets rich
  • 8 Thursday June 23, 2016

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

IS militants push back in Syria, Iraq and Libya

By Philip Issa and Susannah George

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Even as internation- ally backed forces chip away at Islamic State-held territory in Syria, Iraq and Libya, the militants have demonstrated a stubborn resilience this week in the face of recent losses. The IS forces dealt an embarrass- ing setback to the Syrian army near the militants’ self-styled capital of Raqqa with a swift counteroffensive that rolled back incremental gains by troops loyal to President Bashar Assad. Pockets of extremist fight- ers north and west of Fallujah con- tinued to hold off elite Iraqi special forces Wednesday, preventing them from making significant advances one month after the government launched its campaign to retake the city west of Baghdad. And in the battle for the Libyan city of Sirte, pro-government forces besieging the IS stronghold were stunned by renewed clashes there, with 36 people killed, a hos- pital spokesman said. Just two weeks ago, the Islamic State had suffered setbacks in all three countries in the region where the Sunni militant group captured large tracts of territory in Iraq and Syria two years ago. Seesaw battles raged in Syria’s Raqqa province, with IS fighters retaking areas from government forces Tuesday. Two days earlier, the Syrian troops briefly seized an IS- held oilfield in Thawra and threat- ened to retake the Tabqa air base, which would have opened a direct line for troops to the city of Raqqa.

8 Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL IS militants push back in Syria,

REUTERS

Fighters from forces aligned with Libya’s new unity government walk past the dead body of an Islamic State fighter in the Zaafran area in Sirte.

The government began its highly publicized campaign to retake Raqqa on June 2. On Sunday, the troops advanced to within 6 miles (10 kilometers) of the Tabqa base, which is about 28 miles (45 kilometers) from Raqqa and holds strategic and symbolic value for the government. It was the last position held by government forces in Raqqa province before the militants overran it in August 2014, killing scores of detained

Syrian soldiers in a massacre docu- mented on IS video. The commander of an elite, pro- government militia known as the Desert Hawks explained the gov- ernment’s rapid withdrawal from large parts of Raqqa province. “It is vital to understand that (IS) adopted new tactics to fight the Desert Hawks in this area,” said retired Gen. Mohamad Jaber. Writing on his Facebook page Tuesday, he said the militants were

sending explosives-packed vehi- cles at the pro-government line, and he predicted the battle for Tabqa would be “harsh and mighty.” Activists gave conflicting casu- alty counts for civilians killed in airstrikes on the city of Raqqa, with death tolls ranging from 18 to 32. Differing casualty figures are com- mon in reporting from Syria’s civil war, now in its sixth year. The activists said the Syrian air force, backed by warplanes from its

ally, Russia, had pummeled the Islamic State extremists after gov- ernment losses earlier this week. The U.S.-led coalition also has been bombing Raqqa. Col. Christopher Garver, the Baghdad- based spokesman for the coalition, told the Associated Press that four airstrikes were carried out Tuesday near Raqqa. They targeted an IS tac- tical unit, a finance center, a head- quarters and an oil facility, Garver said. He had no reports on casual- ties. The activist group known as Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently said at least one of the airstrikes targeted a neighborhood popular among “foreign fighters” — mili- tants who have traveled to Syria to fight with the IS group. In northern Syria, U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish forces encircled IS militants in the town of Manbij, a vital position that connects the Turkish border to Raqqa. As the Iraqi military offensive to retake Fallujah entered its second month Wednesday, clashes contin- ued to try to dislodge IS militants from besieged neighborhoods. Iraqi special forces pushed into the center of the city last week and retook a government compound and the central hospital. Officials said they are still working to secure the territory. At the central hospital, Corp. Ahmad Ahmad warned that only parts of the first floor were fully cleared of homemade bombs because teams specializing in defusing the explosives are in short supply and have been mostly deployed to help troops on the front lines.

8 Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL IS militants push back in Syria,

Nearly 1 in 3 on Medicare got commonly abused opioids

CHICAGO — Nearly 12 million Medicare beneficiaries received at least one prescrip- tion for an opioid painkiller last year at a cost of $4.1 billion, according to a federal report that shows how common the addic- tive drugs are in many older Americans’ med- icine cabinets. With an overdose epidemic worsening, nearly one-third of Medicare beneficiaries received at least one prescription for com- monly abused opioids such as OxyContin and fentanyl in 2015. Those who did received an average of five such prescrip- tions or refills, according to the report from the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “We are concerned about the high spend- ing and the number of people receiving opi- oids,” said Miriam Anderson, who led the study, which was released Wednesday. “This raises concerns about abuse. This is a seri- ous problem facing our country.” Among all ages, there were nearly 19,000 fatal overdoses on prescription opioids in 2014, which was the most on record and the last year for which that data

Around the nation

set was available.

Ouch! Flu spray fails again, panel urges shot instead

NEW YORK — The nasal spray version of the annual flu vaccine failed to protect kids again last year, the latest in a string of fail- ures that has prompted an expert panel to recommend that doctors stop giving it to patients. Health officials reported Wednesday that the spray performed dismally for the third straight year, while the traditional flu shot — the one that stings — worked reasonably well this winter. “We could find no evidence (the spray) was effective,” said Dr. Joseph Bresee, a flu expert at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The product, AstraZeneca’s FluMist, was once regarded as the best vaccine for pro- tecting children against flu. Only two years ago, officials advised doc- tors that whenever possible they should use FluMist on young kids instead of tradition- al flu shots.

8 Thursday • June 23, 2016 NATION/WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL IS militants push back in Syria,

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Thursday June 23, 2016

9

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • June 23, 2016 9 REUTERS Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron

REUTERS

Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron speaks at a ‘Britain Stronger in Europe’ rally at Birmingham University in Birmingham, Britain.

Politicians in Britain make final appeals in EU vote campaigns

By Danica Kirka

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — Campa igners on both sides of the crucial vote over whether Britain should remain in the European Union crisscrossed the country Wednesday, their last day to win support from the undecided.

Prime Minister David Cameron outlined his vision for a future with Britain retain- ing its pl ace in the 28-na tion bloc, bris- tling at the notion that the country would be headed in the wrong direction if it stayed in. He flatly rejected the charge that the institution is moribund.

“We

are

not

shackled to a corpse,”

Cameron told the BBC. “You can see the European economy’s recovery. It’s the largest single market in the world.” The most notable figure in the “leave” campaign, former London Mayor Boris Johnson, kicked off a whirlwind tour of England as he pushed for a British exit — or Brexit. Touring the Billingsgate Fish Market, Johnson mugged for the cameras with fish in hand — a not-so-subtle reminder that this is an island nation — and one very proud of its independence and self-assurance.

“It’s time to have a totally new relation- ship with our friends and partners across the Channel,” Johnson said. “It’s time to speak up for democracy, and hundreds of millions of people around Europe agree with us. It’s time to break away from the failing and dysfunctional EU system.” Voters go to the polls Thursday after a campaign that has been unusually heated, even by the lively standards of British politics. Nigel Farage, a “leave” campaigner and

leader

of

the U.K.

Independence Party,

resisted fresh calls to apologize for a

poster showing hundreds of migrants mak-

ing their way across Europe along with the words “Breaking Point.” The poster, labeled racist and misleading by opponents, was unveiled hours before Labour lawmaker Jo Cox was killed in a knife and gun attack outside a library in her Yorkshire constituency last week. She had been an outspoken supporter of migrants. Friends and family planned to hold a celebration of Cox’s life in cities around the world Wednesday, which would have been her 42nd birthday. “I apologize for the timing and I apolo- gize for the fact that it was able to be used by those who wish us harm,” said Farage. “But I can’t apologize for the truth.” “This was a photograph that all newspa- pers carried, it is an example of what is wrong inside the European Union,” he said. The reach of the EU into every aspect of life has made the issues at stake more com- plex than in a general election and prompted all sorts of groups, from scien- tists to CEOs, to register their opinions on whether to stay or go. The stakes are high as the vote is final — unlike an election in which the results can be reversed in the next term. However, the vote is not legally binding, and Parliament would have to vote to repeal the law that brought Britain into the EU in the first place. A vote to leave would invoke Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, which allows a member state to withdraw. The article has never been invoked and it would trigger a period of uncertainty during years of negotiations on the relationship between the EU and the U.K.

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • June 23, 2016 9 REUTERS Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron

North Korea trumpets successful midrange ballistic missile launch

By Foster Klug and Hyung-Jin Kim

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea on Thursday trumpeted the success of a power- ful new midrange ballistic missile test that propelled one of the weapons about 1,000 kilometers (620 miles), saying it would allow strikes on U.S. forces throughout the region. That ability would back up years of threats and boasts from North Korea and has long been a worry for the United States and its allies, Tokyo and Seoul. It explains in part North Korea’s tenacious testing of the Musudan missile, which was only a success after five failures in about two months. The missile’s potential 3,500-kilometer (2,180-mile) range puts much of Asia and the Pacific within reach. Official news agency KCNA quoted North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as saying the launch now gives his country the “sure capa- bility to attack in an overall and practical way the Americans in the Pacific operation theatre.” Japanese Defense Minister Gen Nakatani said Wednesday’s launch demonstrated a “certain level of capability,” and could lead to a further strengthening of North Korea’s ballistic missile capabilities that can cover Japanese territory.

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • June 23, 2016 9 REUTERS Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron

Kim Jong Un

Each new test — appar- ently linked to a com- mand from Kim — likely provides valuable insights to North Korea’s scientists and military officials as they push toward their goal of a

nuclear and missile pro-

gram that can threaten

the U.S. mainland. Pyongyang earlier this year conducted a nuclear test, its fourth, and launched a long- range rocket that outsiders say was a cover for a test of banned missile technology. A statement from South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said a suspected first Musudan launch from the east coast city of Wonsan failed. It didn’t elaborate, but Japan’s Defense Ministry said the missile fragmented and pieces fell into waters off the Korean Peninsula’s east coast. Later on Wednesday, the South’s military said the North fired another suspected Musudan, which flew about 400 kilometers (245 miles). Seoul didn’t immediately clas- sify this launch as either a success or failure. Japan’s Defense Ministry said that its radar analysis found that the missile reached an altitude ex ceeding 1,000 kilometers (620 miles), which suggests it was a Musudan missile.

Syrian refugees: Clean water is scarce after Jordan seals border

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AMMAN, Jordan — Syrian refugees strand- ed along the Jordanian border said Wednesday that clean water is getting scarce in their desert tent camp after the area was sealed by Jordan in response to a deadly cross-border attack. Cellphone footage taken in the Ruqban camp showed refugees chanting, “We want water.” Three Ruqban residents said by phone that people have begun drinking polluted water. Some 64,000 Syrians live in two encamp- ments along the border, awaiting admission to Jordan. Many have been in the camps for months and depend on daily deliveries of food and water by international aid agencies based in Jordan. Jordan declared the area a “closed military zone” after a car bomb attack launched from the Ruqban area killed six Jordanian troops

and wounded 14 at dawn Tuesday. There has

been no claim of responsibility, but Jordan says it has evidence that militants, including Islamic State fighters, are present in the camps. King Abdullah II warned after the attack that Jordan will “respond with an iron fist” to anyone harming its borders or security. Jordan-based international aid officials confirmed Wednesday that the border area was sealed and that they couldn’t send aid there. However, they gave conflicting accounts of whether any water had been delivered to the camps since the attack. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity b ecause they were not authorized to brief reporters. Jordanian government spokesman Mohammed Momani could not be reached for comment. The U.N. refugee agency said it is working with other aid groups and Jordanian authori- ties to get water delivered.

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • June 23, 2016 9 REUTERS Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron
THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • June 23, 2016 9 REUTERS Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron
  • 10 Thursday June 23, 2016

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks slip as energy, tech companies struggle

By Marley Jay

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks gave up some early gains to finish lower Wednesday as energy com- panies sank with the price of oil and weak quarterly reports weighed down technology compa- nies. After two days of closing high- er, stocks rose in the morning but couldn’t hang on to the gains. Energy companies fell after U.S. energy stockpiles shrank by a smaller amount than analysts expected, and announcements from Adobe Systems and HP hurt tech stocks. Drug companies trad- ed higher. Trading was light as investors watched Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s testimony before Congress and waited for Thursday’s referendum on Britain’s membership in the European Union. “There’s not a lot of trading out there. People are tentative,” said Randy Frederick, managing direc- tor of trading and derivatives at Charles Schwab. Britons will vote Thursday, but results won’t be known until after U.S. markets are closed. Frederick said stocks could tumble if Britain votes to leave the European Union, but if the “remain” campaign wins, he expected that U.S. stocks would-

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS High : 17,920.16 Low : 17,770.36 Close : 17,780.83 Change : -48.90 OTHER

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

High:

17,920.16

Low:

17,770.36

Close:

17,780.83

Change:

-48.90

OTHER INDEXES

S&P 500:

2085.45

-3.45

NYSE Index:

10,473.06

-17.72

Nasdaq:

4833.32

-10.44

NYSE MKT:

2348.77

+1.34

Russell 2000:

1148.97

-4.90

Wilshire 5000:

21574.95

-41.35

10-Yr Bond:

1.69

-0.01

Oil (per barrel):

48.95

+0.10

Gold :

1,268.90

-3.60

n’t have a huge reaction. Polls indicate it will be a tight race, but bookies are giving the “remain” camp a higher probabil- ity of winning. International experts, including Yellen, have said that a British exit would cause volatility in global markets and uncertainty for the world economy. The Dow Jones industrial aver- age dipped 48.90 points, or 0.3 percent, to 17,780.83. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 3.45 points, or 0.2 percent, to 2,085.45. The Nasdaq composite edged down 10.44 points, or 0.2 percent, to 4,833.32. Yellen said the Federal Reserve will be cautious in raising interest

rates because of the mixed state of the economy, with consumer spending rising but investment spending weak. The U.S. government said crude inventories fell by about 900,000 barrels last week, substantially less than experts had expected. Oil prices have tumbled in the last few years because growth in sup- plies has far outstripped demand. Benchmark U.S. crude fell 72 cents, or 1.4 percent, to $49.13 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, the benchmark for international oil prices, lost 74 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $49.88 a barrel in London. Chevron gave up 95 cents to $102.29 and Marathon Oil lost

34 cents, or 2.3 percent, to

$14.75.

Health care stocks climbed after Medicare spending did not ex ceed levels that would have required action by a cost-cutting board. While the review board doesn’t have any members yet, investors have been worrying for months that the government will pressure drug companies to cut their prices. Alliance Bernstein analyst Tim Anderson said the development is good for health care investors, but said spending may hit the tar- get next year, giving the next president more leverage in trying to lower drug prices. Bristol- Myers Squibb rose $1.06, or 1.5

percent, to $72.31 and cancer drug maker Celgene jumped $2.37, or 2.4 percent, to $99.23. Tesla shareholders r eacted harshly after the electric car maker offered to buy solar panel maker SolarCity for up to $2.8 billion in an attempt to create a one-stop shop for clean energy. Tesla CEO Elon Musk is the chair- man and largest shareholder in both companies, and SolarCity CEO Lyndon Rive is his cousin. Tesla slumped $22.95, or 10.5 percent, to $196.66. SolarCity stock added 69 cents, or 3.3 per- cent, to $21.88, far below the value of the offer. Software maker Adobe Systems announced a larger-than-expected profit, but analysts were less excited about its projections for the current quarter. Adobe lost $5.71, or 5.7 percent, to $94.01. Computer and printer maker HP forecast strong results in its fiscal third quarter but won’t offer as many discounts and will carry reduced supplies. An analyst for Citi called the change a “radical shift.” HP fell 72 cents, or 5.4 percent, to $12.61. FedEx gave a cautious outlook as the package delivery company spends more money on expanding its network and acquires more air- craft to keep up with the e-com- merce boom. Its stock fell $7.44, or 4.5 percent, to $156.51.

Click here when I die: Sites lay out plans for loved ones

By Joseph Pisani

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Several websites are trying to make death easier -- for the people left behind. Everplans, Everest Funeral, My Life & Wishes and other compa- nies are helping with end-of-life planning. Users can upload digital copies of their wills, plan their funeral or name the person who will take care of the dog when they die. Access to the information can be given to a spouse, child or any- one else you’d like. The idea is to reduce the arguments over funeral plans or the frantic search for doc-

uments that can happen after a

death. Some of the sites charge

fees, but others are free or offer a free service through financial planners or employee benefits. Financial advisers say everyone should write down important financial information and funeral wishes in a safe place, whether it’s on a website or in a notebook. Heirs risk losing out on money if they’re in the dark about accounts or insurance policies, says Len Hayduchok, president of Dedicated Senior Advisors in Hamilton, New Jersey. But getting people to think about their demise is a challenge.

“People just don’t want to do it,” says Hayduchok. “It’s some- thing that is easy to put off.” The sites are trying to make the process more inviting. Everplans guides users through everything they need to do, such as uploading information about life insurance policies or pen- sions. There’s also room to leave letters to loved ones and a pl ace to put passwords for emails and instructions on what to do with Facebook accounts and other social media sites. The site charges $75 a year for the service. But about 150 finan- cial firms and advisers around the

country offer Everplans to their clients, sometimes for free, says co-founder and co-CEO Abby Schneiderman. Some employers are also starting to offer Everplans to workers as a benefit, she says. Another service, called Everest , is offered as a free perk with employee benefits. On Everest’s site, users can write out their funeral wishes or upload photos, their will or other documents. The company also offers concierge service that helps those left behind to plan funeral and deals with all the details. If your employer offers group life insur- ance from Aetna, Hartford or Voya,

ask your human resources office if it comes with Everest. It likely does; more than 25 million people have access to Everest, says CEO Mark Duffey. My Life & Wishes , which was launched this year, helps put together end-of-life plans online for $79 a year. Michelle and Jonathan Braddock came up with the idea after Michelle’s father passed away and left the couple scrambling to pi ece together his financial life. My Life & Wishes was first published as a workbook that the couple handed out to clients of the insurance company they owned.

10 Thursday • June 23, 2016 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Stocks slip as energy, tech companies
10 Thursday • June 23, 2016 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Stocks slip as energy, tech companies

Trustees: Tiny rise in Social

Security benefits next year

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Stephen Ohlemacher

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Millions of Social Security beneficiaries would get a tiny

increase in monthly payments next year —

less than $2.50, about enough to buy a gal- lon of gas. Meanwhile, Medicare is expected to go

bankrupt sooner than expected — 12 years

from now. And some beneficiaries could face higher monthly premiums next year. The annual report from the trustees of the government’s two bedrock retirement pro-

grams warned that politically gridlocked

Washington needs to act sooner, rather than

later, to shore up finances and avoid upend- ing the lives of millions of retirees and their families. Social Security’s trust funds are expected to be depleted in 2034, unchanged from the

trustees’ projection a year ago. Medicare’s

trust fund for inpatient care will be exhaust-

ed in 2028, two years earlier than previous- ly projected.

If Congress allows either fund to run dry,

millions of Americans living on fixed incomes would face steep cuts in benefits. “Lawmakers should address these finan-

cial challenges as soon as possible,” said the trustees’ report. “Taking action sooner

rather than later will permit consideration

of a broader range of solutions and provide more time to phase in changes so that the public has adequate time to prepare.”

The projected 0.2 percent increase in Social Security payments would come a year after beneficiaries received no increase. By law, increases are based on a government measure of inflation, which has been low. The official 2017 cost-of-living adjust- ment, or COLA, won’t be determined until the fall.

Advocates complained that the govern- ment’s measure of inflation — the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers — doesn’t ade- quately reflect the prices that older Americans pay.

“Seniors continue to see their modest Social Security benefits eaten away by growing health care costs,” said Max Richtman, who heads the National

Committee to Protect Social Security and Medicare.

More than 60 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and surviving children receive Social Security benefits. The aver- age monthly payment is about $1,232.

UNDERDOGS, FAVORITE ADVANCE: IRELAND, ICELAND ADVANCE AT EURO 2016, ALONG WITH PORTUGAL >> PAGE 13 <<<
UNDERDOGS, FAVORITE ADVANCE: IRELAND, ICELAND ADVANCE AT EURO 2016, ALONG WITH PORTUGAL >> PAGE 13
<<< Page 12, After brief
reprieve, A’s back in loss column
Thursday • June 23, 2016

Lin sisters dominate the postseason

UNDERDOGS, FAVORITE ADVANCE: IRELAND, ICELAND ADVANCE AT EURO 2016, ALONG WITH PORTUGAL >> PAGE 13 <<<

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Individually, South San Francisco High School badminton players Jakin and Raeka Lin are very good. Together, they were nearly unbeatable. The sisters played the regular season as the Warriors’ No. 1 and No. 2 singles play- ers but, once the playoff rolled around, they teamed up to steamroll their way to the Peninsula Athletic League girls’ doubles title, the Central Coast Section girls’ dou- bles crown and capped the season by win- ning the inaugural Northern California girls’ double champion .. With that kind of dominance, Jakin and Raeka Lin earned the Daily Journal’s Badminton Players of the Year honors. “Because we were sisters, we knew we could make a good team,” said Jakin Lin, a junior-to-be at South City. “We never expected to win CCS. We know there are a lot of good players out there. … We were hoping to get third.” Their successful 2016 postseason is a far cry from earlier in their careers. The sisters have played competitive badminton for the last three years and have teamed up before — to varying degrees of success. Raeka Lin said the two used to bicker about anything and everything and it detracted from their game. The constant butting of heads, cou- pled with the fact they play in different age brackets on the junior-tournament circuit, forced them to find different partners. They soon realized that their best shot at winning was playing together.

See LINS, Page 16

Twitter proves to be prophetic

A bout a month ago, I ran across a

tweet from Carl Steward, a long-

time Bay Area sports columnist.

In his 140 characters, Steward typed, and I paraphrase, that Bay Area sports fans would be in for a big surprise when they looked up from the Warriors and Sharks playoff runs to find the San Francisco Giants holding an eight-game lead in the National League West.

Twitter proves to be prophetic A bout a month ago, I ran across a tweet from

Now that the NBA and NHL playoffs are over, Steward wasn’t far off. Entering play Wednesday, the Giants topped the NL West standing with a 45-27 record, the second- best record in the National League,

and a 5 1/2 game lead over the sec- ond-place Dodgers. Despite a slew of injuries, and a back end of the rotation and bullpen that has been suspect at times, the Giants just keep reeling off wins. Before Monday’s 1-0 loss to Pittsburgh, San Francisco had won eight in a row. The pitching triumvi- rate of Madison Bumgarner, Johnny Cueto and Jeff Samardzija could all arguably make the All-Star team. Jake Peavy, who was in danger of losing his job just three starts ago, has found the fountain of youth, much the same way he did last year. And while the offense is just as apt to

See LOUNGE, Page 16

UNDERDOGS, FAVORITE ADVANCE: IRELAND, ICELAND ADVANCE AT EURO 2016, ALONG WITH PORTUGAL >> PAGE 13 <<<

USA TODAY SPORTS

The 2010-11 MVP, injuries have crippled Derrick Rose the last several years, but hopes to put those troubles behind him in New York.

Bulls trade Rose to Knicks to begin the NBA offseason

By Brian Mahoney

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The New York Knicks acquired Derrick Rose from the Chicago Bulls on Wednesday, hoping the former NBA MVP can be their answer at point guard.

The Knicks sent center Robin Lopez and guards Jose Calderon and Jerian Grant to the Bulls in the deal. New York also received guard Justin Holiday and a 2017 second- round pick, and waived point guard Tony Wroten.

New coach Jeff Hornacek said recently the Knicks needed a point guard and Rose was

one of the NBA’s best before multiple knee injuries slowed the former No. 1 pick’s career. He played in 66 games last season, his most in five years, and averaged 16.4 points.

“This is an exciting day for New York and

our fans,” Hornacek said in a statement.

“Derrick is one of the top point guards in the NBA who is playoff battle-tested. He adds a whole new dynamic to our roster and immediately elevates our backcourt.” After missing the playoffs in a disap- pointing first season under Fred Hoiberg, the Bulls decided to move on without the hometown kid they selected with the top pick in the 2008 draft. It seemed a perfect fit when Rose led Chicago to the top of the Eastern Conference in the 2010-11 regular season, earning MVP honors and leading the fran- chise to success it hadn’t enjoyed since Michael Jordan. But he wrecked his knee for the first time in the playoffs the following year and no longer has the speed that once made him

See TRADE, Page 14

Rietmann-Grout to coach at alma mater

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It took LeBron James two years upon his return to Cleveland to bring a champi- onship to his hometown. Half Moon Bay native Claire Rietmann-Grout was able to do the same in half the time.

And while James has been rumored to be intent on parting ways with the Cleveland Cavaliers via free agency this offseason, Rietmann-Grout has got the King beat in

that capacity as well.

In her first year as head coach of the Half

Moon

Bay

High

School

softball

team,

Rietmann-Grout — a native of the coast-

side city — led the Cougars to their first

Central Coast Section crown since 1988. In the days following the championship-game win, however, Rietmann-Grout announced to her team she would be stepping down after her one-and-only season as the Cougars’ coach.

Rietmann-Grout is leaving Half Moon Bay to take a faculty position at her alma mater Mercy-Burlingame as the assistant director for student life and athletics. And, yes, she will also be taking over as the new head coach for Crusaders varsity softball.

“It’s really been my dream to go back to

Mercy and give back to that community,” Rietmann-Grout said. “When I had the opportunity, I couldn’t say no. I jumped at it and I’m incredibly excited.” A 2004 graduate of Mercy-Burlingame, Rietmann-Grout was a senior pitcher for the only Crusaders team ever to advance to the CCS championship game. In fact, Mercy has not won a CCS playoff game in five appearances since her departure. The Crusaders lost that 2004 champi- onship game 8-1 to powerhouse Notre Dame-Salinas, a loss for which Rietmann- Grout still, to this day, carries a proverbial

See COACH, Page 14

  • 12 Thursday June 23, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Giant comeback tops Bucs

By John Porrotto

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PITTSBURGH — Buster Posey threw out John Jaso attempting to steal second base to end the game, Joe Panik’s two-run double capped a three-run sixth inning, and the San Francisco Giants rallied from an early five-run deficit to beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 7-6 on Wednesday night. Panik put the Giants ahead after Ramiro Pena made it a one-run game with an RBI double earlier in the inning. NL West-leading San Francisco has won 11 of its last 13 and scored 73 runs in that stretch. The Giants’ Jeff Samardzija matched the shortest start of his nine-year career with just three innings and was tagged for six runs and six hits. He also recorded just nine outs on Sept. 15, 2015, while pitching for the Chicago White Sox against Oakland. However, five relievers followed with a combined six scoreless innings. Rookie Derek Law (3-1), who

12 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Giant comeback tops Bucs By John

Derek Law

Giants 7, Pirates 6

was born and raised in Pittsburgh, pitched two innings after Samardzija for

the

win.

second inning among his three hits. Pirates starter Francisco Liriano allowed four runs and six hits in five innings. An RBI single by Crawford in

the fourth started the Giants’ comeback, and they closed to within two runs at 6-4 an inning later as Posey doubled in a run and Angel Pagan followed with a sacri- fice fly. Jaso led off the first inning with a home run for the second time this season and sixth time in his career to open the scoring. It was his fourth homer overall this season. Later in the inning, Matt Joyce’s RBI single made it 2-0. Pena singled in a run in the top of the second, but Polanco extend- ed the Pirates’ lead to 5-1 with his career-high 10th homer, a blast to right field in the bottom of the inning. Kang’s leadoff homer in the third, his 10th, made it 6-1 — but the Pirates didn’t score again.

Santiago Casilla worked around a leadoff single in the ninth for his 15th save, the game ending when Posey caught Jaso attempt- ing to steal after Gregory Polanco struck out — with Andrew McCutchen on deck. Pena, Denard Span and Brandon Crawford each had two of the Giants’ 12 hits. Pena also drove in two runs as San Francisco won back-to-back games at PNC Park for the first time since 2011. Jared Hughes (0-1) gave up all three sixth-inning runs for the Pirates, who lost for the 17th time in 22 games. They blew a 6-1 lead despite getting home runs from Jaso, Polanco and Jung Ho Kang. Polanco had a three-run shot in the

A’s can’t back Mengden

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Sure, Oakland man- ager Bob Melvin and pitching

coach Curt Young will reas- sure rookie pitcher Daniel Mengden he is doing just fine, even
coach Curt
Young will reas-
sure rookie
pitcher Daniel
Mengden he is
doing just fine,
even without a
win to show for
it.
Daniel
“He knows we
think he’s good,
Mengden
and he is,”
Melvin said. “He knows he’s good,
too. He might not tell you that but he

knows he’s good.” Mengden (0-3) struck out nine in his third career start but is still seek- ing his first big league victory after a 4-2 loss to the Brewers Wednesday. “Nah, it’s not frustrating,” Mengden said. “I’m just going out

there and trying to give our team a

chance to

win. ...

We’ll

get

it

Brewers 4, A’s 2

eventually.” The 23-year-old right-hander was

promoted to the majors on June 11

after only 43 appearances and 34 starts over three seasons in the minor leagues. He allowed seven hits and three runs with one walk over six innings. He struck out the side in the sixth and knows a positive result will come soon enough.

Melvin referenced Mengden’s first

start June 11 on a scorching-hot day in Cincinnati. “From the first pitch of the game he looked like he belonged,” Melvin said. Scooter Gennett and Kirk Nieuwenhuis homered to back Junior Guerra’s first victory in more than a month as Milwaukee earned a split of the quick two-game interleague series. Gennett connected on a two-run shot in the fifth and Nieuwenhuis in the eighth.

CWS brief

UCSB’s ousted in Omaha

OMAHA, Neb. — Jared Oliva

homered for the first time in over

12 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Giant comeback tops Bucs By John

JC Cloney

two months and

JC

Cloney

pitched seven strong innings, leading Arizona to a 3-0 victory over UC Santa Barbara in a

College World

Series elimina- tion

game

Wednesday night. The Wildcats (46-22) will play Oklahoma State on Friday in the Bracket 1 final. They need to win that game and another Saturday against the Cowboys to reach next week’s best-of-three finals. The Gauchos (43-20-1) went 1-2 in their first CWS appearance. The Gauchos threatened in the ninth after Clay Fisher doubled and Devon Gradford walked with no outs. Ming struck out Austin Bush, JJ Muno and Dempsey Grover to end the game.

12 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Giant comeback tops Bucs By John

The Alaskan Summer League’s 111th annual Midnight Sun Game between the Goldpanners and the Oilers was called at 1:30 a.m.

Alaska’s Midnight Sun Game called on account of darkness

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

seventh inning, about 1 a.m.

 

“It

was

starting

to

get

quite

ANCHORAGE, Alask — A sum-

Baseball Game in Fairbanks,

dark,” said Tal Norvell,

a

mertime sports tradition in the land of the midnight sun was foiled early Wednesday morning by an unlikely foe: darkness. The 111th annual Midnight Sun

Alaska, was called at 1:30 a.m.

spokesman for the Goldpanners.

The umpires decided to delay the game for 30 minutes to let the sun come back up, Novell said, despite the crowd of just under 2,000 peo- ple chanting “Let’s play ball! Let’s play ball!”

because players had trouble seeing

Soon

after,

the crowd began

after sunset. Storm clouds added to

pouring out of the exits.

 

the darkness.

At

about

1:30

a.m.,

umpires

“Hitters were coming back to

The annual game is played on

called the game.

the dugout saying they were hav-

“I would imagine perhaps the 8-

ing a really difficult time. We don’t

0 scored played a role in

that,”

want to get anybody hurt. It was pretty dark,” said John Lohrke, the president and the interim gen- eral manager of the Fairbanks team, the Alaska Goldpanners.

Lohrke said. “If it had been 4-3, it might have been different.” Players were initially scheduled to finish the game Wednesday evening before another regularly scheduled game between the two teams, but

the solstice, when there is more light than any other day. In Fairbanks, that means 21 hours and 49 minutes of sunlight. The sun sets at 12:48 a.m. and rises at 2:59 a.m., National Weather Service meteorologist Ryan Metzger said. Storm clouds that brought rain before the game started Tuesday evening made it even darker than normal. First pitch for the midnight sun game was 10:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Goldpanners were leading the Kenai Peninsula Oilers 8-0 at the top the

Lohrke said they decided to skip completing the midnight sun game. This isn’t the first time darkness had caused a hitch in a midnight sun game. Lohrke said about 30 years ago, a team walked off the field and refused to play because it was so dark. Despite the glitch, don’t expect the Fairbanks team to ever install artificial lights for the Midnight Sun Baseball Game. “We’re never going to do that,” he said. “That’s the whole mean- ing of the game, is to play it with- out lights.”

12 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Giant comeback tops Bucs By John
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SPORTS

Thursday June 23, 2016

13

Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016 drama

By Graham Dunbar

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — Cristiano Ronaldo dragged Portugal back from the brink of elimination twice, and Ireland found a late goal to stun Italy and stay in the European Championship on Wednesday. Iceland’s winning goal in stoppage-time against Austria wrote another chapter of the tournament’s feel-good story and set up a round of 16 clash with England. Belgium, widely seen as a potential cham- pion, confirmed its pl ace in the supposedly easier half of the knockout bracket by beat- ing Sweden 1-0. The victory also signaled the start of Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s retirement from the Swedes’ national team. Sweden and Austria are heading home now, as are Turkey and Albania, which had hung around in France hoping that results would fall their way and lead to a place in the last 16 among the best third-pl aced teams. Those hopes were dashed on Wednesday. Portugal and Ireland earned the final two slots on a day of wildly swinging fortunes and emotions. Ronaldo showed an array of anguished expressions and gestures as Portugal, need- ing at least a draw to advance, trailed three times to a Hungary side that already was sure to advance - yet sought to top Group F. First, Ronaldo created one equalizer for teammate Nani, and then he scored two him- self in the second half — the first with an audacious flick of his right heel — as a thriller ended 3-3 in Lyon.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016

REUTERS

Ireland’s Shane Long, left, and Robbie Brady celebrate Brady’s goal in a 1-0 win over Italy. The victory sends Ireland through to the knockout round of a major tournament for the first time since the 2002 World Cup.

“This was an insane match. Three times we were going home,” said Ronaldo, who set an all-time European Championship record of scoring in four different editions. With one more goal when Portugal plays Croatia on Saturday in Lens, Ronaldo will tie Michel Platini’s career scoring record of nine goals at European finals tournaments.

Ronaldo seemed destined for yet another knockout encounter with old rival England until Iceland’s Arnor Ingvi Traustason scored in the last of four added minutes. Now Nice will welcome Iceland to play the English on Monday. If Iceland and its happy fans have become many neutrals’ favorite team at Euro 2016,

they have taken a role Ireland has had at pre- vious major tournaments. Ireland delighted its passionate throng of green-clad fans in Lille when Robbie Brady headed an 85th-minute goal to win 1-0 against Italy, which already was sure to top Group E. Until that moment, Ireland was going home and Turkey was set to get one of the third-pl ace s lots. Ireland’s reward is some unfinished busi- ness with France in Lyon on Sunday. When last they met, in a playoff to qualify for the 2010 World Cup, a notorious handball by France striker Thierry Henry led to the deci- sive goal in extra time at Stade de France. Other round of 16 fixtures slotted into place only when the group-stage was com- pleted Wednesday. Northern Ireland now knows it will play group winner Wales in a British derby match in Paris on Saturday. Two-time defending champion Spain, World Cup holder Germany, host France, Italy and England are all in the same half of the draw.

Round of 16 draw:

Saturday : Switzerland vs. Poland (Saint- Etienne, noon) Wales vs. Northern Ireland (Paris, 3 p.m.), Croatia vs. Portugal (Lens, 6 p.m.) Sunday : France vs. Ireland (Lyon, noon), Germany vs. Slovakia (Lille, 3 p.m.), Hungary vs. Belgium (Toulouse, 6 p.m.) Mo nday : Italy vs. Spain (Saint-Denis, 3p.m.), England vs. Iceland (Nice, 6 p.m.).

Loss shows gap between U.S. and soccer’s elite

By Ronald Blum

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — Minutes after Lionel Messi and Argentina had finished a 4-0 mauling of the United States in the Copa America semi- finals, Jurgen Klinsmann was asked to assess the size of the gap between his team and soccer’s elite and how long it will take to close it. “Oh, that’s a tough one,” the coach said, smiling and chuckling. “I don’t have that answer right now.” Having returned to the World Cup in 1990 after a 40-year absence, the U.S. is among only seven nations to have qualified for the sport’s top tournament the last seven times, joined by Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Italy, South Korea and Spain. During the past four years, the Americans have won at

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016

Jurgen

Klinsmann

Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. But those are exhibi- tions. In matches that matter, the U.S. often remains outmatched. Walking out of the sta- dium after Tuesday

night’s loss, the

Americans looked wide- eyed and shell-shocked.

“We let them dictate the pace of the game. We let them get into a flow, and we weren’t physical enough. I think we respected them a little too much,” defender Geoff Cameron said. “We’ve played big teams before and we seemed to show well against them, but for some reason we didn’t put our best foot forward tonight.” The U.S. has vastly improved over the

last quarter-century, and Americans now are regulars with clubs in England, Germany, France and Mexico. But, as Klinsmann often points out, none of them is a starter with the big clubs who dominate the Champions League. And the high points for the national team over r ecent decades remain the 2002 World Cup second-round

win over Mexico and the 2009

Confederations Cup semifinal victory over European champion Spain. “Today is a good day to judge where we are in program overall,” U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati said outside the lock- er room. “We’re obviously a long way off. We knew that going in. But we knew we were a long way off when we beat Spain in 2009 or Germany or Holland last year.” American youth teams have not made great steps forward and have lagged behind

other nations in rate of improvement. The U.S. under-23 team has failed to qualify for consecutive Olympics. The U-20 team has been a World Cup quarterfinalist just twice since 1993 and the U-17s haven’t reached the quarterfinals since 2005. Other than defenders DeAndre Yedlin and John Brooks, and midfielder Gyadi Zardes, all the American starters against Argentina will be 29 or older when the 2018 World Cup begins. Klinsmann says younger players need to be given a chance to fail and improve, yet in the Copa America he went with the strongest roster to win games now. “We need more. We struggle,” he said. “Here in the U.S., you call a younger player a rookie at the age of the 22. Well, 22 in

See SOCCER, Page 15

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 13 Portugal, Ireland, Iceland fuel Euro 2016
  • 14 Thursday June 23, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52 years

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Following a parade choked to a crawl by a massive crowd, after procla- mations, speeches and fanfare, Cleveland watched a symbolic passing of the trophy — and the torch. When Browns Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown handed the Larry O’Brien Trophy to Cavaliers superstar LeBron James, the city’s long wait was officially over. After 52 long years, this was a title town again. Cheered for hours by a sea of adoring fans who first engulfed the downtown streets and then the Cavs, James and the newly crowned NBA champions were honored Wednesday with a parade and a once-in-a-generation party. The Cavs chased down history by overcom- ing a 3-1 deficit to beat Golden State in a wild

seven-game NBA Finals, a comeback that

ended the city’s 52-year championship drought stretching back to Brown leading the Browns to a win over the Baltimore Colts in the NFL championship in 1964. But on a sun-kissed summer day in this football-crazed town, everyone was a Cavaliers fan and Cleveland wrapped its arms around a team that came together and defied the odds to win it all. “It still hasn’t hit me that this has hap- pened,” said James, who delivered on his promise to bring a championship to his home state with a magnificent playoff per- formance. He said he’ll be back with the Cavs next season. “It’s so surreal. For some crazy reason, I feel like I’m gonna wake up and it’s going to be Game 4 again.” Moments later, James cradled the shiny, golden trophy in his arms like a newborn. This was his baby — and Cleveland’s.

14 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52

REUTERS

Streamers engulf the stage as Cleveland celebrates the Cavs’ NBA championship, the first title by any Cleveland team since 1954.

The city’s first championship parade since the Indians won the World Series in 1948 will long be remembered for a crowd that halted the procession, forcing police to use bicycles

and a horseback unit to create enough space for cars, bands and floats to pass. The swarm spilled off the sidewalks, people packed so tightly that fans could reach into the vehicles and high-five their heroes. Cleveland police did not have an immediate estimate on the crowd’s size, but the team and officials at the rally said more than 1 million people attended. Regardless, fans packed in 50 deep in spots along the 2-mile parade route, and snarled traffic badly enough to delay some outgoing flights at Cleveland’s

airport because crews couldn’t make it to their planes. Once he reached the stage and rally, James spent nearly 20 minutes thanking each of his teammates during a sometimes profane speech. He gave his fans even more reason to celebrate by telling reporters he intends to stay in Cleveland and go for another title next season.

COACH

Continued from page 11

chip on her shoulder. Now, the former West Bay Athletic League Most Valuable Player is on a mission to right the wrong as a coach. “My senior year we were a very special group,” Rietmann-Grout said. “So I hope to give the players from Mercy that experience to show them that level of excellence on the softball field.” Rietmann-Grout’s sudden departure from Half Moon Bay came as a shock to both her players and peers. Cougars catcher Riley Donovan, a sophomore starter during the team’s title run this year, was at the meeting when the beloved coach delivered the news. “I was really shocked,” Donovan said. “She

did a lot for us as a team. She brought so much

energy to the

team. ...

She is just looking to

better her career and I can’t fault her for that. But she’s definitely going to be missed.” “Energy” is a word that naturally finds its way into any conversation about Rietmann- Grout. The upbeat 30-year-old softball lifer has imparted that energy on three softball

programs over the past four years.

“She brought a tremendous amount of inten- sity and energy to the (Half Moon Bay) pro- gram and really created great relationships

with each of her athletes,” HMB athletic direc-

tor Justin Ferdinand said.

She started her varsity coaching career at Immaculate Heart High School-Los Angeles in 2010; her four years at the helm culminated in the program’s first Sunshine League cham- pionship in 15 years. She then took over the varsity program at Harvard Westlake-Studio City for two years before returning home to accept her first public school post at Half Moon Bay in 2016.

Ferdinand said he too was shocked by Rietmann-Grout’s departure.

“It did come as a shock but obviously I understand the reasoning behind her moving on,” Ferdinand said. “We’d love to have seen her stay in Half Moon Bay but we completely understand the basis behind her decision.”

Rietmann-Grout earned a bachelor’s degree in sports studies from Towson University- Maryland in 2008 and her master’s degree at Cal State Northridge. She played softball at both schools.

Since moving into a coaching career, she

has aspired to find a post as an athletic direc- tor. Her position at Mercy is a step in that direction, she said.

“One of the main reasons I took the job at Mercy is it’s a fulltime opportunity,” Rietmann-Grout said. “At Half Moon Bay there wasn’t a fulltime opportunity. My goal has always been to be an AD. So this is a step in that direction.”

Rietmann-Grout currently resides in Half Moon Bay, near the high school campus. And she expressed a fond affinity for her Cougars players, and said her work with them is not finished.

“If they need someone to catch for them, I will always be there for [pitchers Grace Garcia or Ally Sarabia],” Rietmann-Grout said. “If they need to hit, I will be there to pitch for them. I will always be there for them. I just won’t be their coach.”

And, yes, Rietmann-Grout plans to be front and center when the Cougars are honored as grand marshals of the Ol’ Fashioned 4th of July Parade in Half Moon Bay.

“It was really fun driving them to the cham- pionship,” Riemann-Grout said. “And 2016 will always be the year of the Cougars in my life.”

14 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52

DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE

Claire Rietmann-Grout, who led Half Moon Bay softball to its first CCS title since 1988, is leaving for a faculty and coaching position at Mercy-Burlingame.

TRADE

Continued from page 11

one of the league’s most dazzling young stars and a seemingly perennial All-Star. “Knowing Derrick as I do makes this trade a hard one,” Bulls Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said. “Everyone knows him as the local kid

who became MVP for his hometown team, but not everyone got to know him like I did. While he is a terrific basketball player, he is an even better person with a tremendous

heart.”

Rose hasn’t been back to the All-Star Game since 2012 and has often had trouble just playing in the real games. He sat out all of the 2012-13 season, made it back for 10 games in 2013-14 and appeared in a little more than half the Bulls’ games in 2014-15.

Still, he could be worth the risk for a Knicks team that has struggled to generate offense. The veteran Calderon and Grant, a first- round pick last year, were on the roster of a team that started well but faltered badly in the second half on the way to a 32-50 sea- son. Rose is expected to be an upgrade as the team transitions from the triangle offense to a quicker attack under Hornacek. Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis

will benefit if Rose can do it, though they could miss Lopez in a frontcourt that was the team’s strength last season.

Lopez averaged 10.3 points and 7.3 rebounds while starting every game in his only season in New York after leaving Portland for the Knicks last summer.

Rose has averaged 19.7 points and 6.2 assists in 406 career games.

14 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52
14 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52
14 Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Cleveland celebrates first championship in 52

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

 

Thursday June 23, 2016

 

15

 

Sports brief

WADA president Craig Reedie, who

               

is also an IOC member, said it sup-

WADA: Russian track

The World Anti-Doping Agency

ported the original move by the

EAST DIVISION

EAST DIVISION

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

sport’s governing body, the IAAF,

 

W

L

Pct

GB

   

W

L

T

Pts GF

GA

athletes should be independent at Games

that cleared the way for a limited number of Russian athletes to com- pete under an independent flag at the Olympics — provided they could

 

Baltimore

Boston

Toronto

New York

41

39

40

35

30

32

34

36

.577

.549

.541

.493

2

2 1/2

6

 

WASHINGTON

New York

Miami

PHILADELPHIA

W

43

38

38

30

L

29

32

34

42

Pct

.597

.543

.528

.417

GB

4

5

13

 

Philadelphia

NEW YORK

New York City FC Montreal Toronto FC

7

7

5

5

5

4

7

5

4

5

5

1

6

5

4

26

22

21

20

19

27

26

25

22

15

22

20

31

20

15

delivered a rebuke to the

show they’ve been subject to dop-

Tampa Bay

31

39

.443

9 1/2

Atlanta

24

47

.338

18 1/2

New England

4

4

7

19

21

26

International Olympic Committee

   

D.C. United

4

6

5

17

14

16

on Wednesday in a statement sup-

ing control outside their country.

 

CENTRAL DIVISION

 

CENTRAL DIVISION

Chicago

St. Louis

47

23

.671

Orlando City

3

3

8

17

25

23

porting track and field’s decision to

But on Tuesday, the IOC said any

Cleveland

Kansas City

Detroit

41

38

37

30

33

35

.577

.535

.514

3

4 1/2

 

38

33

.535

9 1/2

Columbus Chicago

3

2

5

7

6

5

15

11

18

14

21

20

bar Russian athletes from compet-

Russians allowed to compete would

Pittsburgh

34

38

.472

14

 

Milwaukee

32

40

.444

16

WESTERN CONFERENCE

W

L

 

ing under their own flag at the Summer Games.

do so for their country — a decision

Chicago

MINNESOTA

36

22

36

48

.500

.314

5 1/2

18 1/2

Cincinnati

28

44

.389

20

T

Pts GF

GA

that puts the IOC at odds with the

   

COLORADO

9

2

4

31

19

11

The statement, delivered by

IAAF decision.

 

WEST DIVISION

FC Dallas

8

5

4

28

24

24

   

WEST DIVISION

Giants

46

27

.630

REAL SALT LAKE

7

4

3

24

25

23

SOCCER

But he is a rarity. There are not

 

Texas

47

26

.644

LOS ANGELES

40

33

.548

6

Sporting KC

6

8

3

21

16

18

Houston

37

36

.507

10

Colorado

34

37

.479

11

Vancouver

6

7

3

21

24

27

enough Americans making similar

Seattle

36

36

.500

10 1/2

Arizona

34

40

.459

12 1/2

LOS ANGELES

5

3

6

21

27

17

progressions. Yedlin’s career bene-

Angels

31

41

.431

15 1/2

San Diego

30

43

.411

16

Earthquakes

5

4

6

21

18

18

Continued from page 13

fited from his 2015 transfer from

A’s

29

42

.408

17

 

Portland

5

6

5

20

25

27

Seattle to Tottenham, which in turn

   

Wednesday’s Games

 

Seattle

5

8

1

16

13

17

 

loaned him last season to

“I’m not saying that the MLS was-

For all the good nights U.S. soc-

 

Wednesday’s Games

 

Miami 3, Atlanta 0

 

Houston

3

7

5

14

20

22

Europe, if you’re not broken through yet, you’re done. They

Sunderland. He was forced to grow

N.Y. Yankees 9, Colorado 8 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 3

N.Y. Yankees 9, Colorado 8 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 3

NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ———

move you down to the third or fourth

on and off the field.

Houston 3, L.A. Angels 2 Milwaukee 4, Oakland 2

St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs 2 Milwaukee 4, Oakland 2

Wednesday, June 22

Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3

 

level.” At soccer’s top level, players

n’t challenging for me. I’m saying

Toronto 5, Arizona 2 Baltimore 7, San Diego 2

Toronto 5, Arizona 2 Baltimore 7, San Diego 2

NEW YORK AT REAL SALT LAKE, LATE COLORADO AT LOS ANGELES, LATE

 

train as many as 49 weeks a year.

that in Seattle I was comfortable

Chicago White Sox 8, Boston 6

 

Saturday, June 25

Klinsmann has pushed Major League Soccer to extend its season,

where I was,” he explained. “I was around my friends. I was around my

Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 5, Seattle 1

San Francisco 7, Pittsburgh 6 Texas 6, Cincinnati 4

PHILADELPHIA AT MINNESOTA, LATE WASHINGTON AT L.A. DODGERS, LATE

 

New York City FC at Seattle, 5 p.m. New England at D.C. United, 7 p.m.

 

and the league’s top teams now play

family. If I needed anything, I could

Texas 6, Cincinnati 4

Thursday’s Games

Vancouver at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.

always go to my mom’s house, you

PHILADELPHIA AT MINNESOTA, LATE

 

Giants (Suarez 2-1) at Pitt (Niese 6-4), 9:35 a.m.

 

from early March until the champi- onship at the start of December. He urges young talents to push them- selves to better and bigger clubs,

know what I mean?”

cer has experienced — four straight

Thursday’s Games

Phils (Eickhoff 4-9) at Twins (Milone 0-1), 10:10 a.m. M’s (Sampson 0-1) at Tigers (Norris 0-0), 10:10 a.m. CWS (Shields 2-9) at Boston (Porcello 8-2), 10:35 a.m.

 

Phils (Eickhoff 4-9) at Twins (Milone 0-1), 10:10 a.m. Cubs (Lester 9-3) at Miami (Chen 4-2), 4:10 p.m. Mets (Harvey 4-9) at Atlanta (Wisler 3-7), 4:10 p.m. Padres(Friedrich 3-2) at Reds (Lamb 1-4), 4:10 p.m.

New York at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.

Toronto FC at Orlando City, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 10 p.m.

Sunday, June 26

 

pointing out that starting for

2-0 wins over Mexico in home

“There will be always a step back-

 

A’s (Graveman 2-6) at Angels (Lincecum 1-0), 7:05 p.m.

Arizona (Greinke 10-3) at Rox (Butler 2-4), 5:40 p.m.

Houston at Portland, 6 p.m.

 
 

Everton and Stoke is not nearly the same as starring for Barcelona and

World Cup qualifiers, the 1-0 victory over Algeria at the 2010 World Cup,

   

Bayern Munich. “We always tell them talent is not even 50 percent of what you’ve got to do,” he said. “The other 50 per- cent are more important than your

the opening victory win Ghana at the 2014 tournament — there have been disappointments of equal or greater magnitude. The 1-0 defeat to Germany and the 2-1 extra-time loss

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Recalled LHP Ashur Tol- liver from Norfolk (IL). Placed LHP Brian Duensing on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 20. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Claimed RHP Juan Mi-

 

on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 21. Recalled RHP Luke Jackson from Round Rock (PCL). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Reinstated RHP Michael Lorenzen from the 60-day DL. Placed RHP Alfredo Simon on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 16. Re-

 

RHP Kevin Gowdy, SS Cole Stobbe, LHP JoJo Romero and OF Josh Stephen on minor league contracts. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Recalled LHP Kyle Lob- stein from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned RHP Alfredo Boscan to Indianapolis.

talent, is what you make out of it.”

to Belgium in Brazil two years ago

naya off waivers from Houston and assigned him

instated INF Jordan Pacheco from the 15-day DL

NBA

Christian Pulisic, a 17-year-old midfielder from Hershey, Pennsylvania, made his Bundesliga

displayed the gap Messi exploited.

wards, and then we will go two more

to Charlotte (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP Forrest Whitley on a minor league contract. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Tom Wilhelmsen on a one-year contract. Acquired

and sent him outright to Louisville (IL). Pacheco re- fused the outright assignment and elected to become a free agent. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Claimed RHP Layne Somsen from the New York Yankees. Transferred

NEW YORK KNICKS — Acquired G Derrick Rose, G Justin Holiday and a 2017 second-round draft pick from Chicago for C Robin Lopez and Gs Jose Calderon and Jerian Grant.

NHL

debut for Borussia Dortmund this year, scored twice and earned a Copa America roster spot. He played the second half against Argentina.

forward. That is a part of our process,” Klinsmann said. “So I told the guys, heads up and just swallow it.”

LHP Wade LeBlanc from Toronto for cash or a player to be named. Transferred LHP Charlie Furbush to the 60-day DL. Optioned RHP Jonathan Aro to Tacoma (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS — Placed LHP Derek Holland

RHP Chin-hui Tsao to the 60-day DL. NEW YORK METS — Recalled RHP Logan Verrett from Las Vegas (PCL). Optioned INF Ty Kelly to Las Vegas. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with

NHL — Announced the league will expand to Las Vegas for the 2017-18 season after awarding its 31st franchise to Bill Foley. ARIZONA COYOTES — Signed D Alex Goligoski to a five-year contract.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Thursday • June 23, 2016 15 Sports brief WADA president Craig Reedie,
  • 16 Thursday June 23, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sports brief

McIlroy out of Olympics over Zika concerns

DUBLIN — Golfer Rory McIlroy became one of the most high-profile sports stars to opt out of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics because of con- cerns about the Zika virus, saying Wednesday it

Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Sports brief McIlroy out of Olympics

Rory McIlroy

is “a risk I am unwilling to

take.” “After speaking with those closest to me, I’ve come to realize that my health and my family’s health comes before any- thing else,” the four-time major winner said in a

statement released by his

management company.

The fourth-ranked McIlroy was scheduled to play for Ireland as golf makes its return to the Olympics for the first time since 1904. The 27-year-old McIlroy said this month that he and his fiancee, Erica Stoll, may consider starting a family “in the next couple of years.” Adam Scott, Louis Oosthuizen, Charl Schwartzel and Vijay Singh have also said they won’t compete at Rio, mostly due to scheduling commitments.

LINS

Continued from page 11

“Sometimes we fight. We fight less. We feel like we’ve matured a little more,” said Raeka, who will be a sophomore this com- ing school year. “I think we really want to

play doubles together (now). It might be easier for us. … It’s hard to find partners that have the (same) skills to play with us.”

South City coach Valerie Chin said as good as the Lin sisters are as singles play- ers, they take it to a different level when paired together.

“When they’re in doubles, their strengths

really come out,” Chin said. “Raeka has a little more control (of her shots). Jakin can cover the court, hit smashes. They really complement each other well.”

The Lins kicked off their postseason run by winning eight straight matches in two PAL tournaments. Both the Bay and Lake divisions hold its own tournament first, fol- lowed by an all-around PAL championship tournament. The Lins won four matches in each tournament, beating Carlmont’s Niko Bardin and Helen Ye four times along the way — in both the Bay Division and all-

around semifinals and finals of the double- elimination tournaments.

And the Lins did so without dropping a set.

They went into the CCS girls’ doubles tournament as the No. 2 seed, behind Cupertino’s Joyce Li and Edith Lai, but that duo was not strong enough to get past Carlmont’s Bardin and Ye, who were unseed- ed and beat the Cupertino duo in the second round. If not for the Lins, Bardin and Ye could be the tandem that captured all the postseason gold.

But they ended up facing the Lins again in the CCS championship match and, like the PAL tournaments, the Lins again came out on top. Jakin Lin said having played the Carlmont team four times previous to see- ing them in the CCS final helped them beat the Scots for the fifth straight time.

“We kind of figured out what their weak- nesses were,” Jakin Lin said.

The Lins swept four more matches in straight sets at CCS to run their postseason record to 12-0 and had won every one of 24 sets played to that point.

They opened the Nor Cal tournament by eliminating a pair of North Coast Section squads in straight sets to move into the win- ners’ bracket semifinals. The Lins were handed their first set loss against Carleen Li

and Mina Dong, from Mission San Jose- Fremont and another NCS squad. The Lins won the first set 21-18, but Li and Dong rebounded to win the second 17-21. Jakin and Raeka closed them out in the third, 21- 16, to move into the winners’ bracket final.

Another duo from MSJ, Danica Long and Melody Lin, which knocked Carlmont’s Bardin and Ye into the consolation bracket, met the Lins in the winners’ bracket final. The Lins were again pushed to three sets, and again pulled out a 21-17, 13-21, 21-17 victory to move into the championship round.

They had a rematch with MSJ’s Li and Dong in the first game of the championship series, who handed the South City duo their first postseason loss, beating them 21-15, 15-21, 21-19 to force the winner-take-all finale in the double elimination tourna- ment.

This time, the Lins turned the tables, win- ning 21-17, 22-24, 21-16 to take the Nor Cal crown. That capped a 16-1 postseason run during which they won 33 of 38 sets.

“We were nervous (at the Nor Cal tourna- ment). There are so many great players out there.” Jakin Lin said. “We thought we would have trouble getting past CCS.”

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

be shut out as it is to score 15 runs — as they did Tuesday — the Giants have just found a way to get it done. They are 16-8 in one-run games this season (second-best in all of baseball behind Texas’ 17-4 mark) which can only help their confidence when they get into the stretch run and possibly the playoffs, where scoring differentials are usually minuscule.

And that June Swoon that has plagued San Francisco the last several years? Nowhere to be found in 2016. Going into

Wednesday’s game, the Giants were 12-7 in the month of June, with series against Philadelphia and Oakland — which are sec- ond-to-last and last, respectively, in their

divisions — rounding out the schedule for

the month. The Giants may just have that eight- game lead before you know it. *** Well, the NBA offseason has gotten off to a rousing start. The confetti has just stopped falling in Cleveland following the Cavaliers’ championship parade before they were all but knocked off the front page of sports sections around the country with two big trades that went down Wednesday afternoon. First, league sources indicate that the

Thursday • June 23, 2016 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL Sports brief McIlroy out of Olympics

Chicago Bulls had traded former MVP point guard Derrick Rose to the New York Knicks — who, regardless of record, still make the NBA’s needle move. That trade was fol- lowed by a three-team swap involving the Atlanta Hawks, Indiana Pacers and Utah Jazz getting together to make a deal.

The NBA draft is held today and free agency begins shortly thereafter in what is almost assuredly to be a wild and exciting offseason for NBA teams and their fans.

The biggest off-season story, though, is expected to be the huge increase in the salary cap for teams, which is poised to jump from $70 million to more than $90 million for the 2016-17 season. That’s why players such as Golden State’s Harrison Barnes and Festus Ezeli, who did

not help their free-agent causes during abysmal playoff performances, are still expected to reap windfalls from teams hop- ing to capture some of the Warriors’ magic. Big names are expected to be moving this summer and the Warriors figure to be a major player as they attempt to salve the wounds left from losing the NBA champi- onship. So if you’re still nursing a Warriors-los- ing hangover, buck up. There should be plenty of NBA action over the next four months to take your mind off of it.

Nathan

Mollat

can

be

reached

by email:

nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-

5200

ext.

117. You

can follow

him

on Twitter

@CheckkThissOutt.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SUBURBAN LIVING

Thursday June 23, 2016

17

Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge

By Lee Reich

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

My delphiniums are now in all their stately glory, the 5-foot, blue spires reaching for the sky as they guard the gate to my vegetable garden.

I have to admit that besides their beauty, I also enjoy growing delphiniums to show off. On the one hand, they are not hard to start from seed, and seedlings bloom quickly, often in their first season if started early enough. On the other hand, growing del- phiniums to perfection is one barometer of a gardener’s skill.

Years ago, when I first grew delphiniums from seed, I went through all the machina- tions suggested in gardening books for ensuring good germination. Fresh seed was said to be a must.

The seed was also said to have a cold requirement before it would sprout, and the suggestion usually offered was to make ice cubes with the seeds in them, then leave the cubes in the freezer for a few weeks. This directive always struck me as odd b ecause it is

THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge

Don’t try to keep delphiniums cool by putting their heads in too much shade; they tolerate some shade but generally like full sun best.

refrigerator temperatures, not freezer temper- atures, that generally snap seeds out of dor- mancy. Still, I followed the directions and wound up with a bevy of delphinium seedlings that grew into a forest of blue spires.

GOOD SOIL IS A MUST

Delphiniums thrive only in soil that is

very fertile, very moist and very well- drained. You can’t just sprinkle some 10-10- 10 on the ground and expect bragging rights for your delphiniums. The best way to get that very rich, moist and well-drained soil is to use compost, and plenty of it. My best delphiniums grew where one of my compost bins had been for the previous seven years.

Compost does only so much as far as retaining moisture, though. In a dry sum- mer, delphiniums in any soil need regular watering. Unlike perennials such as cone- flower, liatrus and coreopsis, which thrive in lean, dry soils, delphiniums need cod- dling. My delphiniums drink water from the drip irrigation line in the vegetable garden on the other side of the fence.

A PERENNIAL NOT FOREVER

Even with coddling, delphiniums are usu- ally short-lived for perennials. No matter how well you treat them, they lose steam after a few years. How long depends on how well you treat them, which you can control, and on the weather, which you can’t con- trol. Hot summer nights favor their demise, and wet winters sometimes cause them to rot. That’s why delphiniums thrive in British gardens and, in America, in northern regions and along the Northwest and Northeast coasts.

If you really love delphiniums, have some replacement plants ready for when older ones expire.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
 
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 17 Delphiniums are a worthwhile challenge
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  • 18 Thursday June 23, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SHIFT

Continued from page 1

rent at-large method under a pending August vote. The transition discussion comes in the wake the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund sending a letter to the district threatening to force the change to by-district elections through filing a lawsuit under the state Voting Rights Act. Considering the momentum gaining across the state and nation toward by-district elections, Sarver said high school district officials are well prepared to consider the merits of the system under which trustees are elected according to where they live. “Looking at the trends all over the state, it seems very likely that this is the direction everyone is going,” said Sarver. Currently board seats are awarded to those who receive the most votes in a districtwide election. But under the proposed method, trustees would be assigned a region according to the community where they live, and win- ners of the vote in each subdivision of the district would join the board. Advocates for the by-district method claims the system is superior, as it ensures

disadvantaged communities are represented on elected boards. State law disallows the subjugation of minority groups through the voting process, which critics of the at-large

system use to fortify their arguments.

The board for the district which serves Belmont, San Carlos, Redwood City, Menlo Park, Woodside, East Palo Alto and much of the southern portion of the county is com- prised entirely of white members. Laura and Olivia Martinez, both Latinas, split a term under the previous iteration of the board, but Laura Martinez was replaced by trustee Georgia Jack in the fall election. Roughly 30 percent of the district’s voting population is Latino, according to the report, but the lack of a Latino board member is a function of the unfair election system. “We are asking Sequoia Union High School District to implement elections that make sure that all communities, including the Latino community, have an opportunity to elect candidates of their choice,” said Matthew Barragan, an attorney with the group in a prepared statement. “It is critical for the governance of our public schools to be inclusive and representative.”

The

San

Mateo

County

Board

of

Supervisors switched to by-district elections in 2013, after a lawsuit was filed. The county was the last set of supervisors in the state to

make the leap.

No local school district has implemented the by-district system, but it has been con- sidered recently by some such as the South San Francisco Unified School District and the San Mateo County Community College District. The advocacy group threatening the law- suit is a national organization which has taken similar action in communities across the United States. The group claims in a press release it turned attention to the local high school district after hearing from residents feeling their interest was inadequately repre- sented on the school board. Though Sarver said he understood the by- district system can be advantageous in ensur- ing minority perspectives are recognized by the board, he felt high school officials have traditionally made a concerted effort to con- sider the views of all communities in the dis- trict. “We don’t have a historical, clear record of suppressing a strong minority group in our district, but we certainty have no interest in inhibiting the public’s voice,” he said. “We want to embrace the public’s voice, so at this point, we are taking a strong look at it.” The by-district election method, though increasingly popular, is not without flaws, noted Sarver. He said allowing trustees to join the board based on the community where they live

could open the door to conflict, as some may only attempt to serve their neighborhood school constituents, rather the entire dis- trict. “There are a huge number of tradeoffs,” said Sarver. “We want to make sure that we are not actively pitting subcommunities against each other, and we don’t want one ethnic group fighting for their special interest above another. We want to have voices heard, but we want to have consensus gov- ernment and public education is an environ- ment where you really need to be focused on best meeting the needs of the greatest num- ber of people.” Should officials elect to move forward with the by-district system, Sarver said there would be an interest in subdividing commu- nities in a fashion which poses the least threat for potential dissension. “I would anticipate that going through the process, we will end up looking at many potential ways to divide the district into subdistricts and balance the positive and negative of each scenario to ensure voices are heard in a non-adversarial way,” he said. Sarver said he looked forward to a more comprehensive discussion of the issue at the next board meeting Wednesday, June 29. “It’s an interesting time. It’s a great topic to have in front of us and a great opportunity to really engage the community,” he said.

CALTRAIN

Continued from page 1

built for the money to be ready to be spent,” he said. Seamus Murphy, a spokesman for the San Mateo County Transit District, said officials are poised next month to approve the first portion of the approximately $2

billion Caltrain electrification project to speed up travel times and train frequency and want to get financing in pl ace. He said the state’s share of the cost would be about

$713 million.

“We want to make sure we’re putting everything in pl ace to ensure that we can access those funds,” he said Wednesday. “This is a critical improvement for Caltrain service. We’re experiencing a capacity crisis.”

The project will include electrification of a 55-mile corridor of track from south of San Jose to San Francisco. High-speed rail authority spokeswoman Lisa Marie Alley said officials are review- ing the bill language but had no further comment. Voters approved nearly $10 billion in high-speed rail funding in 2008 but sup- port for the project has since softened. The state treasurer’s office initially sold about $1.1 billion in high-speed rail bonds but

the bonds have since been encumbered as the project was tied up in court for years. The plaintiffs in the biggest case lost their challenge and opted last month not to appeal, potentially freeing up the financ- ing. Marc Lifsher, a spokesman for state Treasurer John Chiang, said his office has not received any requests to sell the high- speed rail bonds, which are sold twice a year in spring and fall as part of the state’s general obligation bond sales.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SUBURBAN LIVING

Thursday June 23, 2016

19

Wallpapers that take you on a trip

By Kim Cook

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wallpaper goes in and out of fashion. Right now, it’s enjoying an “in” moment.

There are wildly creative designs coming out of studios all over the world. Some of the best take us on a journey to far-flung places both real and imagined. Londoner Nina Campbell’s new Fontibre collection for Osborne & Little is inspired by the travels of of her great uncle, water- colorist Robert Hello Hutchinson Keightley. Her design Keightley’s Folio is a gallery of his small landscape paintings, punctuated by little rosettes. Barbary Toile depicts a troupe of mischievous monkeys gamboling around the Rock of Gibraltar. (www.osborneandlittle.com) Matthew Williamson, also of London, found inspiration for his new collections in pre-revolutionary Cuba and the Amazon. Tropical motifs meet lush colors in wallpa- pers that are vibrant and evocative. Flamingo Club has a retro feel, with pale pink flamingos strutting among orchids and ferns against a turquoise background. A summer trip to Costa Rica led to the cre- ation of Williamson’s Arici paper, on which playful parrots perch and swoop, their brightly hued wings brushed with gold. Slinky big cats prowl through a for- est of peacock feathers on Leopardo, a print with a ’70s vibe. “I usually reference leopards when I’m looking to create a print that feels power- ful, dynamic and full of energy,” Williamson says. “The print is a little bit

wild

just

like

the

animal

itself.”

(www.matthewwilliamson.com)

THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on

Flamingo Club wallpaper has a retro feel, with pale pink flamingos strutting among orchids and ferns against a turquoise background.

Beastie Boy band member Mike Diamond and designer Vincent Ficarra of the compa- ny Revolver New York collaborated on a

design for Flavor Paper called Brooklyn Toile. It incorporates Diamond’s favorite memories of Brooklyn, featuring vignettes

of Coney

Island,

the elevated subway,

stroller moms and rap artist Notorious

B.I.G. (www.flavorpaper.com)

The Australian company Milton and King’s Funky collection of wallpapers depicts city life around the world, in far from conventional ways. Cheeky, colorful illustrations give us a sky-top view of giant robots battling between Tokyo’s skyscrapers; discos and firemen’s cookouts light up the streets of New York City; imps ride the London Eye. (www.miltonand- king.com)

German designer Katja Behre, based in London, takes us in a different direction: a dream-like journey into surreal worlds. In a color palette that blends moody blues and grays with bronze and starlight, the wall- papers are playful and evocative.

In Les Voyages Fantastiques and La Terre a La Lune, characters in vintage photo- graphs find themselves on faraway worlds, leaping from rocky promontories or boat- ing on celestial seas.

Behre says she and her design team were captivated by Jules Verne’s stories.

“Tales of journeys through space, or deep into the center of the earth. We’re inspired by turn-of-the-century scientific discover-

ies and travels, as well as other worlds and

the

cosmos,”

she

(www.ellipopp.co.uk)

says.

Finally, at Anthropologie, Louisianan artist Rebecca Rebouche brings us into her Enchanted Forest. It’s a whimsical wood where butterflies are the same size as hot air balloons, trees don party hats, and sea- horses have tea on a sunken sailing ship. Wonderland’s Alice would love it on her wall. (www.anthropologie.com)

Exhibit combines Impressionist gardens and paintings

By Katherine Roth

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Many American painters, inspired by French Impressionists at the turn of the 20th century, flocked from East Coast cities to sun-dappled garden havens in pl aces like Appledore, Maine; Old Lyme, Connecticut; and Long Island’s East End. The gardens they sought, known as “grandmother’s gardens,” were utterly unlike the formal Victorian gardens of the time. These were homey, Colonial-era flower gar-

dens, densely packed with bright and abun-

dant blooms — red and orange poppies and

enormous peonies in pastel pinks and pur- ples set against backdrops of towering blue delphinium, digitalis with their tiny bell- shaped white and purple blooms, and yellow sunflowers. The delicate foreground might include violas, calendulas and violet sage. Grandmother’s gardens were designed so that no matter what season, something was always blossoming and bright, with blooms planted close to houses and porch- es to encourage lingering, touching, tin-

kering and inhaling. “Impressionism: American Gardens on Canvas” is a multi-disciplinary show at the New York Botanical Garden, in the Bronx, through Sept. 11. Along with flowers, it includes paintings — 20 Impressionist paintings inspired by such gardens. Most of the artworks will travel next to the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke, Virginia, where they will be on view from Feb. 17 to May 14, 2017. Artists featured in the New York Botanical Garden’s Rotunda gallery include William

Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam and John Singer Sargent among others. Some of them gardened, and all were known for their skill at painting outdoors and for bold, painterly brushstrokes. “The positive reception of Impressionism in the United States coincided with a bur- geoning garden culture, and these interpreta- tions of well-tended residential gardens res- onated with American ideas of the good life,” said guest curator Linda S. Ferber, a senior art historian at the New-York Historical Society.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on
THE DAILY JOURNAL SUBURBAN LIVING Thursday • June 23, 2016 19 Wallpapers that take you on
  • 20 Thursday June 23, 2016

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

RINK

Continued from page 1

$4.5 million, before turning around and apparently selling it to a group called Sapient Real Estate Investments for $5 million, according to public records filed June 17. The prospect of losing another ice skating rink in the county — an ongo- ing battle remains over the shuttered facility at the Bridgepointe Shopping Center in San Mateo — prompted the community to rally and try to preserve the Belmont locale. Sarah Feldman, a representative with the Silicon Valley Ice Skating Association, said she was disappointed by the news. “It was frustrating and surprising to us,” Feldman said. “Our offer was greater than both of these.” Officials with East Bay Iceland previ- ously said the company was under con- tract to negotiate exclusively with an unnamed buyer and could not consider an offer made by the skaters. The sale was first reported by the Silicon Valley Business Journal Monday, which noted the little-known buyers had deeper connections to other Bay Area businesses. MMA Belmont LLC, which was reportedly created less than a month ago, shares a Danville address with Branagh Development. The family-owned construction and devel- opment company builds single-family homes, subdivisions, luxury apart- ments and commercial properties, according to its website. A request for comment at Branagh was not immedi- ately returned. But it appears the ownership was short-lived and Sapient Real Estate

Investments now controls the deed. According to the Business Journal, that company shares an Orinda home address with Emily and Malcolm Fairbairn. The

wife is listed as an agent with Sapient

and the husband is an executive with Ascend Capital in San Francisco. According to litigation filed against the couple by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission before 2001, Malcolm Fairbairn founded the invest- ment company and Emily Fairbairn was at one time employed as a trader. A message left for Malcolm Fairbairn at Ascend Capital was not immediately returned. The city of Belmont has yet to receive any type of proposal to redevelop the rink that officially closed its doors in April after nearly 50 years of service. Community Development Director Carlos de Melo said he hadn’t heard of either company and the timing of when the new owners submit a proposal could affect what they’re allowed to build. The city is in the midst of its Belmont Village Specific Plan, a zoning and planning document seeking to create a more centralized downtown. Currently, the rink property is broadly zoned for housing, commercial or uses such as the existing ice rink, de Melo said. While only a draft has been prepared for the new specific plan, as proposed, the property would fall under the “sta- tion core” area which would allow for small- to medium-scale retail, dining or a mixed-use housing development. Indoor or outdoor community gathering space is required and specialty shops as well as entertainment destinations are encouraged, according to the draft plan. But de Melo emphasized the plan is in draft form, has not gone through the public hearing process and wasn’t like- ly to be approved until the first quarter of 2017.

“We haven’t been approached by the new property owner with anything related to the site,” de Melo said. “If they were to take a ‘wait and see’ approach with the Belmont Village Specific Plan, they could potentially be operating under different circum- stances.” He couldn’t comment on whether it was unusual for a buyer not to contact the city before a purchase, only noted “some folks do their due diligence, some folks don’t.” But de Melo said the property has been a sensitive topic. Feldman and others have frequently spoke during recent City Council meet- ings and officials formed a council sub- committee before reporting there was little they could do as it is truly private property. But those who once used either the Belmont or San Mateo ice rinks have shown there’s a strong desire in the community to maintain this unique form of recreation. Feldman, who worked with a nonprof- it to build a rink in southern California, said although the prospect of looking to create a new rink isn’t out of the ques- tion, she emphasized they would remain focused on exhausting all options for the Belmont property. “I think the lack of clarity on the site in the future is concerning. If anything we’re going to work harder,” Feldman said. “This one is already fully opera- tional. … At this time, our focus in on the Belmont property.” Feldman noted a “Unite to Keep Ice on the Peninsula” event will be held at the Ice Oasis in Redwood City this weekend and the association is running a T-shirt fundraiser. Visit meetup.com/Unite-To- Keep-Ice-On-The-Peninsula/events and booster.com/svisa for more informa- tion.

MARTIN

Continued from page 1

which served him professionally, but not personally.

“It made me a good football player, but not always a great person,” he said.

Martin said the depression he has long battled made the mistreatment even more difficult to cope with, but later also taught him the value of shar- ing his experience, in hopes of help- ing others feel as if they are not alone.

“You shouldn’t be ashamed to have feelings,” he said to the crowd of ele- mentary students assembled in the church cafeteria.

The struggles Martin had as a child followed him into the NFL, as the abu- sive relationship between his team- mates in Miami became the focus of national attention in 2013.

He abruptly left the team midseason

due to a reported rift with fellow line- men, which grew into an investiga- tion finding a group of players, spear- headed by teammate Richie Incognito,

repeatedly and regularly harassed

Martin.

Incognito was suspended for his behavior, and ultimately cut from the team. Martin left Miami too, and joined the 49ers, where he was reunit- ed with his former college head coach Jim Harbaugh, who he characterized as tough but fair.

He subsequently headed to the Carolina Panthers, but missed an opportunity to join the team on their journey to the Super Bowl due to the career ending injury he suffered while in the weight room.

Now looking to make a career in real estate, Martin said he believes the NFL culture has made inroads to help those struggling with depression and mental health problems, but still has far to go before the stigma related to the issues has been fully addressed.

He said his experience in profes-

sional football has taught him the value of continuing to fight for what he believes is right, and encouraged students to do the same.

“Don’t be afraid to stand up for your- self, and what you believe in,” he said. Following his roughly 20-minute speech, those enrolled in the full-day program designed to prevent summer learning loss for local elementary school students peppered Martin with questions about his career. Though many students were impressed with his opportunity to rub shoulders professionally with super- stars such as Tom Brady and Cam Newton, others found Martin’s jour- ney inspirational and educational. “He was saying good stuff and gave good advice to kids who were going through hard times,” said Edwin Perez, 10, of San Mateo.

Angelina Alvarenga,

10,

said the

lessons Martin shared would influence her behavior going forward. “The things he said will help me by doing better,” she said.

20 Thursday • June 23, 2016 DATEBOOK THE DAILY JOURNAL RINK Continued from page 1 $4.5
20 Thursday • June 23, 2016 DATEBOOK THE DAILY JOURNAL RINK Continued from page 1 $4.5

Calendar

THURSDAY, JUNE 23

Career and Resources Fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 350 Twin Dolphin Drive, Redwood Shores. Meet with over 30 Bay Are employers. There will also be resume critique and career work- shops. For more information call

Singles Night Alive Program. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Church of Highlands, 1900 Monterey Drive, San Bruno. Speaker discussion on a variety of dating topics, traits of safe and unsafe dating and what to look for

Eugene O’Neill’s Anna Christie. 8

574-1766.

when finding that special someone.

RethinkWaste Public Open House Day. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.333 Shoreway Road, San Carlos. The free tours include visiting the Transfer Station, where garbage, food scraps and yard trimmings are handled; outdoor education area, with a demonstration garden and com- posting system, rainwater harvest tank and solar panel display; the Environmental Education Center, which includes museum-quality

Distinguished Speaker Series: Dr.

Snacks and beverages provided. Free. For more information email jomer.deleon@gmail.com.

p.m. 2120 Broadway, Redwood City. Pulitzer Prize-winning play about love and forgiveness, charting one woman’s longing to forget the dark secrets of her past and hope for sal- vation. Tickets are $25 for seniors and students and $30 for adults. For more information jesse@dragonpro- ductions.net.

exhibits, reuse art and a talking robot and more. For more informa-

SATURDAY, JUNE 25

 

tion call 802-3500.

Eric Shapira on the Eight Sacred

Rock Your Coastal Garden. 1 p.m. to

Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. American Legion San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Featuring an omelet bar,

Thursday Book Club. 6 p.m. 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Stop at the front desk to register and get a free copy of the book to read

Principles of Healthy Aging. 1:30 p.m. 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Learn about the latest neuroscience research in gerontology while using his unique style of wit and humor to help you live your golden years to the fullest. For more information call

326-2025.

2:30 p.m. New Leaf Community Market, 150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Learn about ornaments that will strive in your garden. For more information contact patti@bondmarcom.com.

scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or sausage and French toast. $10 per person and $6 for each child under 10.

and participate in discussions. For

Annual

Neighborhood

Garden

more information email valle@plsin-

Show. 1

p.m.

to

5

p.m. 792

fo.org.

Willborough Road, Burlingame. For

more

information

visit

Gen Silent’ Screening . 6:30 p.m. 1670 S. Amphlett Blvd, Suite 300, San Mateo. This intimate, compelling film follows six LGBT seniors at the end of life. Acclaimed director Stu Maddux will be there to discuss the film. For more information and to RSVP visit MissionHospice.eventbrite.com.

burlingamegardenadventure.com.

Senior Caregiving. 2 p.m. 840 W. Orange Ave., South San Francisco. Presentation on caring for seniors and providing support to them. For more information email valle@plsin- fo.org.