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Gilad Hekselman on Nobody Else But Me

Transcription and Analysis


by Jeff McGregor

www.smallslive.com
www.jeffmcgregormusic.com

Gilad Hekselman on "Nobody Else But Me"

D min7

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33

C maj7

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D min7

C min7

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41

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44

A min7

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48

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C maj

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52

D min7

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56

F maj7

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60

C maj7

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64

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Gilad Hekselman on "Nobody Else But Me"

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Gilad Hekselman on "Nobody Else But Me"

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Gilad Hekselman on "Nobody Else But Me"

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Below are alternate notations for instances where the exact placement of notes could
be interpreted differently. For these sections, it is possible to think of Hekselman either
playing off the second triplet or simply laying back on the beat. The final version of the
solo favored the latter option, which made it more readable and inline with typical
notation conventions. However, the alternate versions sometimes place the notes more
accurately. Any musician studying this solo should (as always) constantly refer to the
recording to best grasp these rhythmic nuances.

4
m. 34-36 & 4
6

9
6

12

14

12

16
1214

21

14

16

26
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16

27

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26
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m. 39-40
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Melody References
in Gilad7 Hekselmans
solo on Nobody
Else But Me
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F7
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of Gilad Hekselmanssolo onJerome


Kerns Nobody Else But Me
One of the many strengths
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to the melody of the song. The following


examines
J
&his creativeand inventive references
is
3
3 how it functions in the overall
instances where Hekselman references
the melody and
considers
3
development
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37


Analysis

&
D min

41

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3
Melody references bring back a part of the melody, often varied from how
it was first played.
These references can range from recalling just a single note to an entire section of the melody.
In Example 1, Hekselman ends his line with a reference to the first note of the melody:

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Example 1
45

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49

4
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4
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b

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Example

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Example 3 refers tom.
29-32
the
melody.
Hekselman
emphasizes
notes
from

.
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(the F #in the second
measure

phrase
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structure and melodic contour of the melody. Both the melody and Hekselmans solo use a pair
of two-measure phrases, and in both instances the second phrase seems to answer the first.
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complex reference
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10
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Example 2 provides a similar instance:

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www.jeffmcgregormusic.com
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In order to best understand these examples, the reader should have ja lead sheet of the melody for reference.

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Example 4

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at a rhythmic variation of the melody based
Example 5 starts the reference earlier and
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entirely
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Example 5

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Examples 4 and 5 both recall m. 33-36 of the melody although they do so in different ways. This
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3
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JeffMcGregorMusic
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C7

These six examples illustrate the variety of ways a soloist can connect back to the melody; they
also illustrate the different possible functions of melody references. Short returns like Examples
1 and 2 function to briefly recall something familiar within the development of something new.
Examples 3 and 4 do the same thing, but in a more extended and deliberate way. Example 5 is
best understood by considering what comes before it. The preceding section to Example 5 is
the solos highest point of rhythmic and melodic tension. The reference to the melody functions
to release this tension and create a moment of stability. The long reference in Example 6
functions to signal the conclusion of the solo as Hekselman begins to wind down his last chorus.
All in all, the melody consistently proves to be a strong and flexible musical resource.

Application
There are no hard and fast rules about how to refer to a melody and Hekselmans solo
demonstrates some of the variety these references can take. Nevertheless, all good references
begin with a deep and secure knowledge of the melody. Here are a few ways to help develop
your knowledge of a melody:
Be able to sing the melody.
Try to be familiar with the lyrics.
Learn the melody in different keys.
Find recordings by singers.
Notice the different ways different singers and instrumentalists phrase the melody.
Find different ways to play the same phrase.
The more you study the melody, the more you will be able to use it when you improvise. One of
the most important things is to not forget about the melody once you get to your solo.
Hekselman could easily just improvise over the changes without any reference to the melody.
However, as his solo illustrates, the melody is a powerful improvisational springboard. It propels
his solo forward and functions to create a more compelling and cohesive musical statement.

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