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Curriculum Guide - Math 4

Introduction
Grade 4 Curriculum Guide - 2016-2017
This year our curriculum is organized in Modules. These modules will break into closely related Topic Sets which will drill down to
specific lessons that cohesively develop the Tennessee Math performance standards. Date ranges of modules may have been
adjusted to accommodate a 176 day school year.
Mathematical Practice standards are expected to be integrated into every mathematics lesson for all students grades K-12.
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Content Standards Key : CC-Counting and Cardinality, OA-Operations & Algebraic Thinking, NBT- Numbers and Operations in BaseTen, MD Measurement & Data, G- Geometry

Comments
Eureka Math Grade 4 is the primary resource for this grade level. Additional resources may be included at the teacher's discretion.
This pacing guide is based on the tentative date of April 10, 2017 as the beginning of the TCAP testing window. Please be aware that
any adjustment to the testing window will affect the number of days available for each module. Updates will be posted on the CMCSS
Curriculum page.
If you become more than two weeks behind in pacing, use the tab named Consolidation or Omissions.
Last updated on 5.18.16
Support for Teachers
Eureka Grade 4 Math Resources
Free registration required:
Electronic Versions of Eureka Materials

Math CCT

CMCSS

Updated 5.5.16

Assessments
Task
Benchmark 1
Benchmark 2

October
December
March

Assessment dates are tentative at this time.

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence
2016-2017

Module 1

Module 1 Topics A-H


August 19-Octover 21, 2016
40 Days

Module 2

Module 2 Topics A-C


October 24-November 10, 2016
13 Days

Module 3

Module 4

Module 3
November 14, 2016-January 24, 2017
36 Days

Module 4
January 25-March 24, 2017
42 Days

Topic C Numbers
Topic B
Topic D
Topic A
to 5 in Different
Topic E Working Topic F
Classify to Make
The Concept of
Attributes of Two
Configurations,
with Numbers 6- Working with
Categories and
Zero and working
Related Objects
Math Drawings,
8
Numbers 9-10
Count
with 0-5
and Expressions

Topic H
One Less with
numbers 0-10

Topic H
Clarification of
Measureable
Attributes

Topic C
Two-Dimensional
and ThreeDimensional
Shapes

Topic B
Topic A
ThreeTwo-Dimensional
Dimensional
Flat Shapes
Solid Shapes

Topic A
Comparison of
Length and
Height

Topic B
Comparison of Topic C
Length, Height of Comparison of
Linking Cube
Weight
Sticks Within 10

Topic A
Compositions
and
Decompositions
of 2, 3, 4, and 5

Topic B
Topic C Addition Topic D
Decompositions
with Totals of 6, Subtraction from
of 6, 7, and 8 into
7, and 8
Numbers to 8
Number Pairs

Module 5

Module 5 Topics A-E


April 3-May 10, 2017
27 Days

Topic B
Compose
Numbers 11-20
Topic A Count 10
from 10 Ones
Ones and Some
and Some Ones;
Ones
Represent and
Write Teen
Numbers

Module 6

Module 6 Topics A-B


May 11-April 10, 2017
10 Days

Topic B
Topic A Building
Composing and
and Drawing Flat
Decomposing
and Solid Shapes
Shapes

Bonus Module

April 10-May 24, 2017

Math CCT

Topic G
One More with
Numbers 0-10

Topic C
Decompose
Numbers 11-20
and Count to
Answer "How
Many?"

Topic D
Comparison of
Volume

Topic E Are
There Enough

Topic F
Comaprison of
Sets Within 10

Topic G
Comparison of
Numerals

Topic E
Decompositions
of 9 and 10 into
Number Pairs

Topic F
Addition with
Totals of 9 and
10

Topic G
Topic H Patterns
Subtraction from Adding 0 and 1
9 and 10
and Making 10

Topic E
Represent and
Topic D Extend
Apply
and Say Ten and
Compositions
Regular count
and
Sequence to 100
Decompositions
of Teen Numbers

Reengage students in lessons and activities from the areas you may have consolidations or omissions throughout the school year.

CMCSS

Revised: 5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.OA.A.1

4.OA.A.2

4.OA.A.3

4.OA.B.4

Math CCT

Interpret a multiplication equation as a


comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 7 as a
statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7
times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements
of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication
equations.
Multiply or divide to solve word problems
involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using
drawings and equations with a symbol for the
unknown number to represent the problem,
distinguishing multiplicative comparison from
additive comparison.
Solve multistep word problems posed with whole
numbers and having whole-number answers
using the four operations, including problems in
which remainders must be interpreted. Represent
these problems using equations with a letter
standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the
reasonableness of answers using mental
computation and estimation strategies including
rounding.
Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the
range 1100. Recognize that a whole number is a
multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether
a given whole number in the range 1100 is a
multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine
whether a given whole number in the range
1100 is prime or composite.

After
TCAP

CMCSS

5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.OA.C.5

4.NBT.A.1

4.NBT.A.2

4.NBT.A.3
4.NBT.B.4

4.NBT.B.5

Math CCT

Generate a number or shape pattern that follows


a given rule. Identify apparent features of the
pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For
example, given the rule Add 3 and the starting
number 1, generate terms in the resulting
sequence and observe that the terms appear to
alternate between odd and even numbers.
Explain informally why the numbers will continue
to alternate in this way.
Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a
digit in one place represents ten times what it
represents in the place to its right. For example,
recognize that 700 70 = 10 by applying concepts
of place value and division.
Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using
base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded
form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on
meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =,
and < symbols to record the results of
comparisons.
Use place value understanding to round multidigit whole numbers to any place.
Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole
numbers using the standard algorithm. FS
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a
one-digit whole number, and multiply two twodigit numbers, using strategies based on place
value and the properties of operations. Illustrate
and explain the calculation by using equations,
rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

After
TCAP

X
X
X
X

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Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.NBT.B.6

4.NF.A.1

4.NF.A.2

4.NF.B.3a

4.NF.B.3b

Math CCT

Find whole-number quotients and remainders


with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit
divisors, using strategies based on place value,
the properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between multiplication and division.
Illustrate and explain the calculation by using
equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area
models.
Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a
fraction (n a)/(n b) by using visual fraction
models, with attention to how the number and
size of the parts differ even though the two
fractions themselves are the same size. Use this
principle to recognize and generate equivalent
fractions.
Compare two fractions with different numerators
and different denominators, e.g., by creating
common denominators or numerators, or by
comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2.
Recognize that comparisons are valid only when
the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record
the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <,
and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual
fraction model.
Understand addition and subtraction of fractions
as joining and separating parts referring to the
same whole.
Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions
with the same denominator in more than one
way, recording each decomposition by an
equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by using a
visual fraction model. Examples: 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 +
1/8 ; 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8 ; 2 1/8 = 1 + 1 + 1/8 = 8/8 +
8/8 + 1/8.

After
TCAP

CMCSS

5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.NF.B.3c

4.NF.B.3d

4.NF.B.4a

4.NF.B.4b

4.NF.B.4c

4.NF.C.5

4.NF.C.6
4.NF.C.7

Math CCT

Add and subtract mixed numbers with like


denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed
number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by
using properties of operations and the
relationship between addition and subtraction.
Directly compare two objects with a measureable
attribute in common, to see which object has
more of/less of the attribute, and describe
the difference. For example, directly compare the
heights of two children and describe one child as
taller/shorter.
Classify objects into given categories; count the
numbers of objects in each category and sort the
categories by count. Limit category counts to less
than or equal to 10.

After
TCAP

Describe objects in the environment using names


of shapes, and describe the relative positions of
these objects using terms such as above, below,
beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

Correctly name shapes regardless of their


orientation or overall size.
Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional
shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using
informal language to describe their similarities,
differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and
vertices) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of
equal length).
Model shapes in the world by building shapes
from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and
drawing shapes.
Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.
For example, can you join these two triangles with
full sides touching to make a rectangle?

X
X

X
X

CMCSS

5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.MD.A.1

4.MD.A.2

4.MD.A.3

4.MD.B.4

Math CCT

Know relative sizes of measurement units within


one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb,
oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of
measurement, express measurements in a larger
unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record
measurement equivalents in a two-column table.
For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as
1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in.
Generate a conversion table for feet and inches
listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), ...
Use the four operations to solve word problems
involving distances, intervals of time, liquid
volumes, masses of objects, and money, including
problems involving simple fractions or decimals,
and problems that require expressing
measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a
smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities
using diagrams such as number line diagrams that
feature a measurement scale.
Apply the area and perimeter formulas for
rectangles in real world and mathematical
problems. For example, find the width of a
rectangular room given the area of the flooring
and the length, by viewing the area formula as a
multiplication equation with an unknown factor.
Make a line plot to display a data set of
measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4,
1/8). Solve problems involving addition and
subtraction of fractions by using information
presented in line plots. For example, from a line
plot find and interpret the difference in length
between the longest and shortest specimens in an
insect collection.

After
TCAP

CMCSS

5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Modules where content standards are taught:

4.MD.C.5a

4.MD.C.5b
4.MD.C.6

4.MD.C.7

4.G.A.1

4.G.A.2

4.G.A.3

Math CCT

An angle is measured with reference to a circle


with its center at the common endpoint of the
rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc
between the points where the two rays intersect
the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a
circle is called a one-degree angle, and can be
used to measure angles.
An angle that turns through n one-degree angles
is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.
Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a
protractor. Sketch angles of specified measure.

After
TCAP

Recognize angle measure as additive. When an


angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts,
the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the
angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and
subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a
diagram in real world and mathematical
problems, e.g., by using an equation with a
symbol for the unknown angle measure.
Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles
(right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and
parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional
figures.
Classify two-dimensional figures based on the
presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular
lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a
specified size. Recognize right triangles as a
category, and identify right triangles.
Recognize a line of symmetry for a twodimensional figure as a line across the figure such
that the figure can be folded along the line into
matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures
and draw lines of symmetry.

CMCSS

5.5.16

Grade 4 Math
Scope and Sequence 2016-2017
Major Work
Additional
Supporting

Math CCT

CMCSS

5.5.16

Suggestions for Consolidation


or Omissions

Module 1
If pacing is a challenge, consider omitting Lesson 17 since multi-step problems are taught in Lesson 18. Instead, embed problems from
Lesson 17 into Module 2 or 3 as extensions. Since multi-step problems are taught in Lesson 18, Lesson 19 could also be omitted.

Module 2
Although composed of just five lessons, Module 2 has great importance in the Grade 4 sequence of modules. Module 2, along with Module
1, is paramount in setting the foundation for developing fluency with the manipulation of place value units, a skill upon which Module 3
greatly depends. Teachers who have taught Module 2 prior to Module 3 have reportedly moved through Module 3 more efficiently than
colleagues who have omitted it. Module 2 also sets the foundation for work with fractions and mixed numbers in Module 5. Therefore, it is
not recommended to omit any lessons from Module 2.
To help with the pacing of Module 3s Topic A, consider replacing the Convert Units fluencies in Module 2, Lessons 13, with area and
perimeter fluencies. Also, consider incorporating Problem 1 from Module 3, Lesson 1, into the fluency component of Module 2, Lessons 4
and 5.

Module 3
Within this module, if pacing is a challenge, consider the following omissions. In Lesson 1, omit Problems 1 and 4 of the Concept
Development. Problem 1 could have been embedded into Module 2. Problem 4 can be used for a center activity. In Lesson 8, omit the
drawing of models in Problems 2 and 4 of the Concept Development and in Problem 2 of the Problem Set. Instead, have students think
about and visualize what they would draw. Omit Lesson 10 because the objective for Lesson 10 is the same as that for Lesson 9.
Omit Lesson 19, and instead, embed discussions of interpreting remainders into other division lessons. Omit Lesson 21 because students
solve division problems using the area model in Lesson 20. Using the area model to solve division problems with remainders is not
specified in the Progressions documents. Omit Lesson 31, and instead, embed analysis of division situations throughout later lessons. Omit
Lesson 33, and embed into Lesson 30 the discussion of the connection between division using the area model and division using the
algorithm.
Look ahead to the Pacing Suggestions for Module 4. Consider partnering with the art teacher to teach Module 4s Topic A simultaneously
with Module 3.

Math CCT

CMCSS

Updated 5.5.16

Suggestions for Consolidation


or Omissions
Topic A could be taught simultaneously with Module 3 during an art class.
Module 4
Topics B and C could be taught directly following Module 3, prior to Module 5, since they offer excellent scaffolding for the
fraction work of Module 5. Topic D could be taught simultaneously with Module 5, 6, or 7 during an art class when students are
served well with hands-on, rigorous experiences.
Keep in mind that Topics B and C of this module are foundational to Grade 7s missing angle problems.

Those from outside New York State may want to teach Module 4 after Module 6 and truncate the lessons using the Preparing a Lesson
protocol (see the Module Overview, just before the Assessment Overview).
This would change the order of the modules to the following: Modules 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 4, and 7.
Those from New York State might apply the following suggestions and truncate Module 4s lessons using the Preparing a Lesson protocol.
Topic A could be taught simultaneously with Module 3 during an art class.
Topics B and C could be taught directly following Module 3, prior to Module 5, since they offer excellent scaffolding for the fraction work of
Module 5. Topic D could be taught simultaneously with Module 5, 6, or 7 during an art class when students are served well with hands-on,
rigorous experiences.
Keep in mind that Topics B and C of this module are foundational to Grade 7s missing angle problems.

Module 5
For Module 5, consider the following modifications and omissions. Study the objectives and the sequence of problems within Lessons 1, 2,
and 3, and then consolidate the three lessons. Omit Lesson 4. Instead, in Lesson 5, embed the contrast of the decomposition of a fraction
using the tape diagram versus using the area model. Note that the area models cross hatches are used to transition to multiplying to
generate equivalent fractions, add related fractions in Lessons 20 and 21, add decimals in Module 6, add/subtract all fractions in Grade 5s
Module 3, and multiply a fraction by a fraction in Grade 5s Module 4. Omit Lesson 29, and embed estimation within many problems
throughout the module and curriculum. Omit Lesson 40, and embed line plot problems in social studies or science. Be aware, however,
that there is a line plot question on the End-of-Module Assessment.

Module 6

Math CCT

CMCSS

Updated 5.5.16

Suggestions for Consolidation


or Omissions
In Module 6, students explore decimal numbers for the first time by means of the decimal numbers relationship to decimal fractions.
Module 6 builds directly from Module 5 and is foundational to students Grade 5 work with decimal operations. Therefore, it is not
recommended to omit any lessons from Module 6.

Module 7
Module 7 affords students the opportunity to use all that they have learned throughout Grade 4 as they first relate multiplication to the
conversion of measurement units and then explore multiple strategies for solving measurement problems involving unit conversion.
Module 7 ends with practice of the major skills
and concepts of the grade as well as the preparation of a take-home summer folder. Therefore, it is not recommended to omit any lessons
from Module 7.

Math CCT

CMCSS

Updated 5.5.16

State released Blueprints Coming Soon!

Curriculum Guide - Math K


Introduction
The Progressions Documents describe a specific topic or concept across a number of grade bands. These draft learning
progression documents were informed by research on children's cognitive development and by the logical structure of
mathematics.
K-5 Elaborations of the Practice Standards - Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice in kindergarten through grade five
(annotated).
6-8 Elaborations of the Practice Standards - Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice in grades six through eight (annotated).
K-5, Number and Operations in Base Ten This progression focuses on the development of number and the base ten number system.
Kindergarten, Counting and Cardinality; K-5, Operations and Algebraic Thinking This progression deals with early counting and how much is in
a group (cardinality). The progression illustrates the basic operations including the kinds of quantitative relationships they model, and the type
of problems that can be solved.
3-5 Number and Operations Fractions This progression illustrates the concept of fractions from grade three to five. This progression explores
the concept of fraction as number beginning with fractions on a number-line. The Fraction Progression online professional development module
is based upon this progression.
K-5 Progression on Geometric Measurement- This progression focuses on measurement in developing a conceptual framework for connecting
number and geometry.
K-6 Progression on Geometry This progression focuses on the development of geometry from kindergarten through grade six. The overview of
the document indicates that the progression will address three categories essential to elementary geometry: geometric shapes and their
attributes; decomposing and composing shapes; and spatial relations and spatial restructuring.

Math CCT

CMCSS

Updated 5.5.16

Electronic Resources
We believe that if we are to empower students to reach their potential and to graduate from high school college and
career ready, we are obligated to teach and use 21st century tools and skills in our classrooms in a safe and responsible
manner. Integrating technology into the core curriculum, when done effectively, engages students and amplifies learning
by addressing academic standards through the varied and rich learning experiences that digital media and tools can
provide. We strive to provide resources and assistance that will help classroom teachers guide students to grow in the
areas of critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation as well as core
content knowledge.
http://empowerstudents.wikispaces.com/Math+Resources

FrontRowEd - Math Assessment and Instruction with Common Core Domains


https://www.frontrowed.com/ is a site that assists teachers and students in mathematics learning through the new Common Core math
standards. Teachers can create classes to manage students and view reports on student progress. Students login and take a quick
diagnostic test for any of the math domains. When the test is over, students begin where they need learning. Students can also choose a
math standard from the domain after they have completed the diagnostic. While students work, they can have the math questions read to
them, use online scratch paper and virtual manipulatives, and receive instruction on each kind of math question from embedded video
tutorials.

Symbaloo is a visual bookmarking tool that makes it simple and fun to organize the best of the web.
http://tictechknow.wikispaces.com/Edu.Symbaloo+Links
Common Sense Resource - https://www.graphite.org/teacher-center

You can find all of the above information and more at http://empowerstudents.wikispaces.com/
Empowering Students wiki for Instructional Technology (maintained by CMCSS Instructional Technology)