P. 1
PHI105 / PHI 105 / CheckPoint: Argument and Logic

PHI105 / PHI 105 / CheckPoint: Argument and Logic

|Views: 2,634|Likes:
Published by Number1Tutor
CheckPoint: Argument and Logic
 Due Day 3 [Individual forum]
 Resource: Ch. 2-5 in Philosophy: The Power of Ideas.
 Review the Argument section on p. 9 in Philosophy: The Power of Ideas.
 Choose one of the text excerpts below.
o Chapter 2, p. 28: On Rabbits and Motion
o Chapter 2, p. 33: Free Will versus Determinism
o Chapter 4, p. 72: Aristotle and Plato on Forms
o Chapter 5, p. 83: Augustine on God and Time
 Write a 350- to 700-word response describing the use of argument and logic in the excerpt that you chose. Complete the following in your response:
o Summarize the excerpt.
o How are argument and logic used in the readings?
o Describe the strengths or weaknesses you found.
CheckPoint: Argument and Logic
 Due Day 3 [Individual forum]
 Resource: Ch. 2-5 in Philosophy: The Power of Ideas.
 Review the Argument section on p. 9 in Philosophy: The Power of Ideas.
 Choose one of the text excerpts below.
o Chapter 2, p. 28: On Rabbits and Motion
o Chapter 2, p. 33: Free Will versus Determinism
o Chapter 4, p. 72: Aristotle and Plato on Forms
o Chapter 5, p. 83: Augustine on God and Time
 Write a 350- to 700-word response describing the use of argument and logic in the excerpt that you chose. Complete the following in your response:
o Summarize the excerpt.
o How are argument and logic used in the readings?
o Describe the strengths or weaknesses you found.

More info:

Published by: Number1Tutor on May 20, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved
List Price: $3.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

03/25/2013

$3.99

USD

pdf

text

original

Checkpoint: Argument and Logic On Rabbits and Motion The text's portion about rabbits and motion uses

the example of the famous partisan Zeno and his belief in anti-motion to frame the hypothesis that “reality is one.” Zeno first argues that a rabbit would need to use an immeasurable about of both movement and time to move itself, so movement cannot actually exist. He argues next that, had a rabbit moved, it must have taken up the same amount of space as its length with its every motion. Zeno then contradicts his last statement, which undermines all of his arguments. He continues, saying that if a rabbit occupied the same amount of space as its length, it would then be at rest, which means that a rabbit cannot move. Argument and Logic Zeno first makes the point about rabbits that they cannot possibly move, because he requires that they use an infinite amount of time and space to allow themselves to move. Zeno's reasoning and logic for his theory is clear in both of the excepts, but the problem is that his reasoning does not back up his conclusion. Zeno's second argument saying that a rabbit takes up the same amount of space as its length with its every movement makes sense. His conclusion, though, that the rabbit is not moving because it takes up the same amount of space as its length, thus becoming immobile, contradicts his statement that the rabbit was moving in the first place. Strengths and Weaknesses The first excerpt has the obvious strength that it is clear that the rabbit must get to each point that it travels to in order to pass tot he next point, and each of these points would take a given amount of time to get to. The first excerpt reveals its weaknesses in the first sentence, though, where is says that the rabbit moves from hole to hole. How far are the holes from each other. The distance matters because Zeno says that to get from one location to the next will require both an infinite amount of time and an infinite number of points. If the holes are just two feet apart and it only takes three jumps and thirty seconds, this is impossible. How is it that movement's very possibility, via any amount of time or points, means that movement cannot occur? The second excerpt gets it right, that the rabbit will occupy a space equal to its length every time it moves. Clearly, a rabbit or anything else will always occupy a space that is equal to its length. Zeno then asserts that, if a rabbit is occupying space equal to its length than it must be at rest, meaning that it is not-moveable. Wouldn't a rabbit keep occupying the same space as its length, whether or not it is moving? Again, the first line comes up, that the rabbit is moving from holeto-hole. How can the rabbit be moving from hole-to-hole if a rest factor makes it incapable of moving int the first place? His argument is weak, a rabbit is either moving or it's not, not both at once.

B.). N.Reference: Moore. Philosophy: The power of ideas (7th Ed. . (2008). K. Bruder. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education..

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd