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Executive Summary

MINISTRY OF
EDUCATION
MALAYSIA

Malaysia
Education
Blueprint
2015-2025
(Higher Education)

MALAYSIA
EDUCATION
BLUEPRINT
2015-2025
(HIGHER EDUCATION)

Executive Summary
The Malaysian higher education system has grown from strength to strength over
the past few decades. Over the last ten years alone, the system has made significant
gains in student enrolment, risen in global recognition on key dimensions such as
research publications, patents, and institutional quality, as well as become a top
destination for international students. These achievements are a testament to the
drive and innovation of the Malaysian academic community, the support of the
private sector, as well as the deep investment the Government has made.
Nonetheless, the Ministry of Education (the Ministry) recognises that the system
will need to keep evolving to stay abreast with, if not ahead of, global trends. For
example, disruptive technologies such as advanced robotics, the Internet of Things,
and the automationof knowledge work are expected to dramatically reshape
the business and social landscape from what it is today. Preparing Malaysian
youth to thrive in this complex and ever-changing future will require an equally
fundamental transformation of how the higher education system and higher
learning institutions (HLIs) currently operate.
In 2013, the Ministry thus began developing the Malaysia Education Blueprint
20152025 (Higher Education) or the MEB (HE). Over the course of two years,
the Ministry drew on multiple sources of input, from Malaysian and international
education experts, to leaders of Malaysian HLIs and members of the public. The
end product is a blueprint that was developed by Malaysians, for Malaysians, and
that will equip Malaysia for the final leg of its journey towards becoming a highincome nation.

Development approach
The MEB (HE) was developed through a collaborative and
consultative process driven by leading Malaysian thinkers
with over 100 stakeholder groups providing input and
thousands of individuals engaged. The stakeholders engaged
encompassed Malaysian and global education experts, university
administrators, university Boards, the academic community,
unions and associations, Ministry staff, industry bodies and
employers, relevant agencies, parents, students, and members of
the public.
The development process started with a review of the National
Higher Education Strategic Plan, or Pelan Strategik Pengajian
Tinggi Negara (PSPTN). There were three distinct phases:

PHASE 1 - Review of PSPTN (February 2013 to February


2014): The Ministry started with a comprehensive review of
current performance and progress on PSPTN to establish a
robust fact base on its strengths and weaknesses.
PHASE 2 - Conceptualisation of the 10 Shifts (March 2014 to
September 2014): Based on the review teams findings and
in consultation with stakeholders, the Ministry identified
10 Shifts that would be needed to take the Malaysian higher
education system to the next level. The Ministry also carefully
aligned these Shifts with existing national plans, most notably
the Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025 (Preschool to
Post-Secondary Education) or the MEB.
PHASE 3 - Finalisation of the MEB (HE) (October 2014 to
March 2015): The details of these 10 Shifts were finalised
following another extensive round of public consultation and
guidance from the Cabinet.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

MEB (HE) developers

2,300+
2,300+
16
14
1
18
9

survey responses

35

PSPTN review team members

townhall and focus group participants

14

chapter writing teams

international advisors and experts

20

lead authors

Malaysian expert advisors

42

writing team members

HAS

Engaged stakeholders

250+
5+

90+

4,500+
40

25+
50+
140

20+
250+
500+
30+

national survey
townhalls
focus groups

External research

stakeholder representatives
workshops

HLI Chairmen, Vice-Chancellors, and


Chief Executives
HLI staff
industry skills councils and professional
bodies
members of national education councils
senior thought leaders and professors
Parent-Teacher Associations across
school districts
unions and associations
students and alumni
Ministry staff
engagement sessions

Continuous online engagement

In total, more than 10,500


people were engaged over
two years.

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1-3

Current performance
The Ministry has made significant progress in fulfilling its core aspirations for higher education, most notably in broadening access
and expanding overall system and institutional quality.

Malaysia has reached a gross higher education enrolment1


rate of 48% in 2012. This represents a 70% increase in
enrolment over the last decade to reach 1.2 million students
in public and private HLIs comprising public universities,
polytechnics, community colleges, private universities,
private university colleges, and private colleges. Between
1990 and 2010, there has been a sixfold increase in Bachelor
degree enrolment and a tenfold increase in Masters and
PhD enrolment. With this increase, Malaysia now ranks
third2 among ASEAN countries in Masters and PhD
enrolment, behind Singapore and Thailand.

The number of research articles published by Malaysian universities


increased more than threefold between 2007 and 2012, the highest
increase in the world, and the number of citations grew fourfold
from 2005 to 2012. The five Malaysian Research Universities
(MRUs) alone contributed 70% of these publications. Moreover,
from 2007 to 2011, the number of patents filed by Malaysias
universities grew 11% each year, placing Malaysia 28th in the world
for new patents during that period. Malaysian public universities
have also intensified their role as solution providers for industry
and community, generating RM1.25 billion in revenues from 2007
to 2012 from research and consulting services.

10

70%

6x
10x

Substantial Increase in

ACCESS
increase in total higher education
enrolment (2004 to 2014) to 1.2
million students
increase in Bachelor degree
enrolment (1990 to 2010)
increase in Masters and PhD
enrolment (1990 to 2010) now
ranked 3rd in ASEAN behind
Singapore, Thailand

YEARS

Research output and quality


has expanded rapidly

YEARS

Access to higher education


has increased substantially

3.1x
4x
70%
11%
1.25
RM

billion

Rapid improvements in

RESEARCH
increase in publications from 20072012, highest in the world
increase in number of citations from
2005 to 2012
of publications from 2003-12
contributed by 5 MRUs
yearly growth in number of patents from
2007 to 2011 Malaysia was 28th in the
world in 2011
revenues generated from MRUs
as solution provider to industries,
agencies, NGOs (2007-2012)

Tertiary Education refers to programmes with a qualification level of Diploma and above or International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) level 5Diploma, Advanced
Diploma, Postgraduate Diploma, Professional Certificate, Bachelors, Masters, and PhD programmes. higher education is defined as ISCED level 3 and above, and thus
encompasses tertiary-level programmes as well as STPM, Matriculation, Foundation, Pre-diploma, Pre-University, and Post-Secondary non-tertiary programmes.
2
UNESCO

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Performance on global rankings is


strong in Asia, with niche areas of
excellence globally

EXHIBIT 1
Overall rankings of Malaysian universities

Malaysian universities QS Global Ranking


1

100

200

Universiti
Malaya

Universiti
Kebangsaan
Malaysia

300

400

500

Universiti
Teknologi
Malaysia

Universiti
Sains
Malaysia

Universiti
Putra
Malaysia

151

259

294

309

376

QS Asia Ranking 32

56

57

66

76

600

700

International
Islamic University
Malaysia

<550

Universiti
Teknologi
MARA

<700

EXHIBIT 2

Malaysian universities ranked in top 200 in several subject areas


Modern Languages
Computer Science & Information Systems
Engineering - Chemical
Engineering - Civil & Structural

IIUM
UTM

UM

UPM

UPM UTP
UM

Engineering - Electrical & Electronics


Engineering Mechanical, A&M1

UM USM
UTM

UM USM

UKM UPM UTM

USM

UKM UPM USM UTM

UM

UKM UPM UTM

UM USM

Agriculture & Forestry


Medicine
Pharmacy & Pharmacology

UPM
UM
UKM UPM

Chemistry
Environmental Sciences

UM

Geography

UKM UM

Materials Science

USM UM

Mathematics
Communication & Media Studies
Economics & Econometrics

UM

USM

USM
USM=28

UPM

UKM
UPM

USM

UKM USM UM

UPM

Education

USM

Law

UPM UKM UM

UKM UM

Politics & International Studies

UKM
Top 151-200

1 Aeronautical & Manufacturing


SOURCE: QS World University Rankings by Subjects 2014

Top 101-150

Top 51-100

Top 50

Top 50 in 1
subject area
51-100 in 10
subject areas
101-150 in 5
subject areas
151-200 in 3
subject areas

Five of Malaysias universities currently rank among


Asias top 100 universities and Universiti Malaya is
included in the top 200 globally (Exhibit 1). Universiti
Malaya is also the leading university among institutions
in Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) countries.
Within specific disciplines, Malaysias universities are
already ranked in the top 200 globally. In 2014, for
example, Universiti Sains Malaysia was ranked 28th in
the QS World University Rankings in the subject area of
environmental sciences. 11 other HLIs had at least one
department placed in the top 100 globally (Exhibit 2).

The Government is deeply committed


to higher education as evidenced by
its investment level relative to peers
As with the basic education sector, the Government is
deeply committed to higher education, and the annual
total expenditure on higher education is equivalent to
7.7% of annual Government expenditure (where the
Ministrys expenditure on higher education alone is 5.5%
of annual Government expenditure). This is, according to
UNESCO benchmarking, the highest among Malaysias
peers developed Asian economies (Hong Kong,
Singapore, South Korea, Japan), ASEAN neighbours
(Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore), and countries with
comparable GDP per capita (Chile, Mexico).

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EXHIBIT 3

Malaysias ranking in the U21 report


Rank out of
50 countries

Malaysia

Asian

Neighbours

Singapore
Thailand
Indonesia
Hong Kong

Global

Benchmarks

South Korea
USA
UK
Australia
TYPE OF
METRICS
USED

1
RESOURCES

ENVIRONMENT CONNECTIVITY

OUTPUT

OVERALL

12

26

35

44

28

9
47
50
19
18

11
30
37
4
39

5
30
25
7
32

19
47
50
23
18

10
42
48
15
21

4
21
16

3
16
8

15
3
8

1
2
6

1
8
9

Government
expenditure,
investments,
R&D

Qualitative
assessment of
policy and
regulatory
environment

Collaboration
globally and
with industry
International
student
enrolment

Research
output
Institution
rankings
Enrolment
Employability

Average

score of the
four categories
Examples for
benchmarking

SOURCE: Annual report by Universitas 21, a global network of research universities for the 21st century with 26 members that enroll over 1.3 million
students and employ over 220,000 staff and faculty. The U21 Index compares national higher education systems for 50 countries

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Malaysias overall performance is


consistent with Malaysias income level

Despite these significant gains,


challenges and concerns remain

In 2014, the Universitas 21 Report ranked Malaysias higher


education system 28th out the 50 countries it assessed. The
Universitas 21 Report ranks higher education in 50 countries
across four categories: resources, environment, connectivity,
and output. However, in view of Malaysias significant
investments in higher education (Malaysia is ranked 12 out of
50 in terms of resources invested, but 44 out of 50 in terms of
outputs), the Ministry believes there is opportunity to further
improve the returns on this investment (see Exhibit 3).

Employers report that graduates lack the critical thinking and


communication skills, and the language proficiency (especially
in English) that are essential for success in the 21st century.
There are opportunities for more productive collaboration
between academia and industry, particularly with regard to
research, development, and commercialisation. Additionally,
budgetary constraints together with the rising costs of higher
education require improvements in productivity and efficiency
of the higher education system as well as of HLIs in order to
enhance the overall financial sustainability of the system.

Box E-1

University rankings
Many different types of world university rankings exist.
The most common ones are the QS World University
Rankings, the Times Higher Education World University
Rankings, and the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World
Universities. These rankings are generally weighted
heavily towards research output (for example, citations
per faculty, number of papers in top journals). The MEB
(HE) uses the QS rankings for reference purposes as it is
the oldest global ranking and a ranking that provides a
broader perspective, thereby providing the Ministry with
a better sense of the systems trajectory.

Rankings can serve as a useful yardstick and benchmark


as to where an education systems strengths lie, and
how it can improve. However, they should not be seen
as the definitive measure of quality. As mentioned above,
current international rankings are weighted heavily
towards research outcomes. This means that critical
factors such as the quality of teaching and learning at
the institution or its ability to support disadvantaged
students are not captured. Accordingly, world university
rankings are but one of many measures the Ministry
monitors as it works with HLIs to raise student and
institutional outcomes.

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1-7

System Aspirations
The MEB (HE) will therefore build on the five aspirations set out in the MEB of access, quality, equity,
unity, and efficiency.

ACCESS

HIGHER
EDUCATION

By 2025, the Ministry aspires to increase access


to and enrolment in higher education. If Malaysia
were to successfully improve tertiary enrolment
rates from 36% currently to 53% (and higher
education enrolment from 48% to 70%), this will
bring Malaysia on par with the highest enrolment
levels in ASEAN today. This growth scenario will
require an additional 1.1 million places by 2025,
mainly through growth in technical and vocational
education and training (TVET), private HLIs and
online learning. The exact pace and nature of
the expansion plan will be determined in close
collaboration with industry to ensure supply
matches demand.

100%
ENROLMENT

PRESCHOOL
TO POSTSECONDARY
EDUCATION

Across all levels from preschool


to upper secondary by 2020

QUALITY
The Ministrys aspiration covers three aspects:
quality of graduates, quality of institutions, and
quality of the overall system. On quality of graduates,
the Ministry aspires to increase the current 75%
graduate employability rate to more than 80% in
2025. On quality of institutions, only one of Malaysias
universities is currently in the Top 200 QS global
rankings. By 2025, the Ministry aims to place one
university in Asias Top 25, two in the Global Top 100,
and four in the Global Top 200. Finally, on quality of
the overall system, the Ministry aspires to raise its
U21 ranking for research output from 36th out of 50
countries to the top 25, and to increase the number of
international students in HLIs from 108,000 today to
250,000 students in HLIs and schools by 2025.

TOP

3rd

OF COUNTRIES

In international assessments such


as PISA and TIMSS in 15 years

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

EQUITY
Although there is currently a lack of
comprehensive data to effectively
assess equity in the system, the
Ministry aims to ensure that all
Malaysians have the opportunity
to fulfil their potential regardless
of background. For example,
the Ministry is committed to
improving the enrolment rate and
completion rate of students from
socio-economically disadvantaged
backgrounds and communities.

50%

REDUCTION

In achievement gaps
(urban-rural, socioeconomic, and gender)
by 2020

UNITY
Similarly, while there is no widely
accepted method yet to measure
unity, the Ministry is committed
to ensuring that enrolment in HLIs
reflects the mix of Malaysias
ethnicities. The aim is to create an
education system that provides
students with shared values,
shared experiences, and common
aspirations by embracing diversity.

SHARED
VALUES AND
EXPERIENCES

An education system that


gives children shared
values and experiences
by embracing diversity

EFFICIENCY
In terms of efficiency, the Ministry aims
to maximise the return on investment
in higher education and to maintain
the current levels of Government
expenditure per student across public
institutions. Malaysia also aspires to
rise from 44th out of the 50 countries
in the U21 output ranking that covers
research, enrolment, and employability
to be in the top 25 by 2025.

MAXIMISES
STUDENT
OUTCOMES

A system which
maximises student
outcomes within
current budget

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1-9

Student
Aspirations
The Ministry of Education will continue to use
the National Education Philosophys vision
of a balanced education as its foundation for
individual student aspirations. The preschool,
primary, secondary, and higher education
systems share a vision of what the outcome of
a Malaysian education should look like, and
what that means for individual students. The
Ministry emphasises the balance between both
knowledge and skills (ilmu) as well as ethics
and morality (akhlak). The student aspirations
in the MEB are built around six primary
attributes: ethics and spirituality, leadership
skills, national identity, language proficiency,
thinking skills, and knowledge. These are the
same six attributes for students that the higher
education system is anchored on.

HIGHER
EDUCATION

PRESCHOOL
TO POSTSECONDARY
EDUCATION

Ethics &
Spirituality

Leadership
Skills

Ethically and
morally upright,
spiritually grounded,
compassionate and
caring; appreciates
sustainable
development and a
healthy lifestyle.

Is an effective
communicator,
emotionally intelligent
and able to work
across cultures; is
socially responsible,
competitive, resilient,
and confident.

Possesses solid
moral foundation
and courage
to make right
decisions.

Has strong
communication skills,
is entrepreneurial,
resilient, can lead and
work in teams.

AKHLAK
(Ethics and Morality)

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

National
Identity

Language
Proficiency

Thinking
Skills

Has pride in Malaysia


and an understanding
of Malaysia in relation
to the world.

Proficient in Bahasa
Melayu and English,
and encouraged to
learn one additional
global language.

Appreciates diverse
views, is able to
think critically and be
innovative, has problemsolving initiative, and an
entrepreneurial mindset.

Has mastery of own


disciplines, is able to
harness, connect and
apply knowledge learnt,
and has an appreciation
of culture, arts, and
Science, Technology,
Engineering and
Mathematics (STEM).

Proudly identifies
as Malaysian and
embraces diversity.

Operationally proficient
in at least Bahasa
Melayu and English.

Is inquisitive and
innovative, can apply,
create, and connect
knowledge to provide
solutions.

Has mastery of core


subjects and general
knowledge about
the world.

BALANCE

ILMU
(Knowledge and Skills)

Knowledge

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The new higher education system


Accordingly, the Ministrys overriding aspiration is to create a
higher education system that ranks among the worlds leading
education systems and that enables Malaysia to compete in
the global economy. The MEB (HE) builds on the systems
achievements to date and proposes major changes in the way the
Ministry and system will operate in order to realise this goal (see
Exhibit 6). Specifically, the Ministry aspires to:

Focus on outcomes over inputs and to actively pursue


technologies and innovations that address students needs and
enable greater personalisation of the learning experience;

Instil an entrepreneurial mindset throughout Malaysias higher


education system and create a system that produces graduates
with a drive to create jobs, rather than to only seek jobs;

Ensure the financial sustainability of the higher education


system by reducing HLIs reliance on government resources
and asking all stakeholders that directly benefit from it to
contribute as well.

Construct a system that is less focused on traditional, academic


pathways and that places an equal value on much-needed
technical and vocational training;

Harmonise how private and public institutions are regulated,


and to transition from the current, highly-centralised
governance system for HLIs to a model based on earned
autonomy within the regulatory framework; and

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Job

seekers

on government
resources

inputs

Focus on

Highly

university

centralised

education.

Separation of

Reliance

Focus on

private and
public
institutions

Mass
production
delivery model

From
To
Academic and
TVET pathways

earned
autonomy

equally valued and


cultivated

Job creators and


balanced citizens with

entrepreneurial
mindset

Technologyenabled
innovations

A model of

for institutions

Focus on

outcomes

to deliver and tailor

education for all


students

All stakeholders
have shared

responsibility

for higher education


resources

Harmonised
HLIs

The MEB (HE) will generate major shifts in the way the higher education system operates

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1-13

What would it take for higher education


enrolment to be among the highest in ASEAN?
The Ministry aims to expand higher
education enrolment over the
course of the next decade. The
exact nature of the expansion in
terms of both quantity of seats
and profile of programmes will be
determined in close collaboration
with industry to ensure that supply
matches demand

455 K

2012

Current level of 36%


tertiary enrolment

1.4M students3
48% higher education

Private
HLIs

Public
Universities

545K

ANNUAL GROWTH

TVET
Institutions

Other
Ministry
Institutions4

114K
MOE

134K

172K

Non-MOE

5.1%

2.6%

7.8%

764

301K

1.4%

2025

Projected level of 53%


tertiary enrolment

2.5M students3
70% higher education

Includes foreign students in


Malaysian HLIs (97,000 in 2012 and
250,000 in 2025)

Includes Malaysia Institute of


Teacher Education (IPGM) and
Matriculation

867K

MOE

355K
TVET enrolment

Non-MOE

205K

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

The 10 Shifts
Transformed
HE Delivery

10

Globalised
Online Learning

ab l e r s
En

Innovation
Ecosystem

Talent
Excellence

es

Learned
Values-Driven
Talent

t c om

Ou

Global
Prominence

Holistic, Entrepreneurial
and Balanced Graduates

7
6
Empowered
Governance

Financial
Sustainability

Nation of
Lifelong
Learners

Quality TVET
Graduates

To achieve these system and


student aspirations, the MEB (HE)
outlines 10 Shifts that will spur
continued excellence in the higher
education system. All 10 Shifts
address key performance issues in
the system, particularly with regard
to quality and efficiency, as well as
global trends that are disrupting
the higher education landscape.
The first four Shifts focus on
outcomes for key stakeholders
in the higher education system,
including students in academic
and TVET pathways, the
academic community, as well
as all Malaysians participating
in lifelong learning. The other
six Shifts focus on enablers for
the higher education ecosystem,
covering critical components such
as funding, governance, innovation,
internationalisation, online
learning, and delivery.

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1
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

Holistic, Entrepreneurial
and Balanced
Graduates

There is a mismatch in the supply and demand of


graduates, with employers reporting that graduates
lack the requisite knowledge, skills and attitudes. This
mismatch is only expected to get tougher to resolve
as technological disruptions reshape industries and
alter the types of jobs available. Preparing Malaysian

youth to navigate this uncertain future not only


requires imbuing them with transferrable skills and
sound ethical foundations, but also the resilience
and enterprising spirit to forge new opportunities for
themselves and others. It is important to move from a
world of job seekers to a world of job creators.

Every graduate will have the relevant disciplinary


knowledge and skills (ilmu), ethics and morality
(akhlak), as well as the appropriate behaviours,
mindsets, cultural, and civilisational literacy
(beradab) to advance them to a high level of
personal well-being. They will be global citizens
with a strong Malaysian identity, ready and willing

to contribute to the harmony and betterment of


the family, society, nation, and global community.
Such holistic, entrepreneurial, and balanced
graduates are a natural extension of the goal of
the Malaysian basic education system to develop
values-driven Malaysians.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry and HLIs


will focus on developing more holistic and integrated
curricula and enhancing the ecosystem for student
development. Key initiatives include:

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Enhancing the student learning experience


by expanding industry collaboration in the design
and delivery of programmes; increasing the use of
experiential and service learning to develop 21st
century skills, and leveraging technology-enabled
models to enable more personalised learning;
Devising an integrated cumulative grade
point average (CGPA) system to assess students
holistic, entrepreneurial, and balanced development.

This new system will not only assess knowledge and


thinking skills (as is the current practice) but also the
other primary attributes that comprise Malaysias
student aspirations: ethics and spirituality,
leadership skills, national identity, and language
proficiency; and
Creating opportunities for students and
academic staff to acquire entrepreneurial
skills and pursue their own enterprises through
sabbaticals, industry secondments, business
incubators, and green lane policies that support
student-owned businesses.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

2
Why
Does It
Matter
What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Talent Excellence

The quality of Malaysias HLIs, and therefore the


higher education system, can only be good as the
quality of its academic community, from educators,
researchers, institutional leaders, practitioners, to
academic support staff. At present, however, rigid
career development pathways restrict the degree to
which HLIs are able to attract, recruit, and retain the

best talent. There is also insufficient specialisation


based on HLIs strengths and focus areas. The higher
education system needs to move from a one-sizefits-all world, to one where HLIs have diversified
career pathways and different models of institutional
excellence.

HLIs will be able to attract, develop, and retain


excellent talent through specialised pathways
for educators, researchers, leaders, and
practitioners. The academic community will
also benefit from a conducive, supportive, and
meritocratic environment with better continuous

professional development programmes that


enable them to meet changing responsibilities
and expectations. Malaysias talent will be
respected, referred, and relevant, both locally and
internationally.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will


encourage HLIs to pursue different forms of
institutional excellence, diversify career pathways,
and introduce systematic mechanisms for talent
recruitment and development. Key initiatives include:

Enabling HLIs to develop multi-track career


pathways for inspiring educators, accomplished
researchers, experienced practitioners, and
transformational institutional leaders; and

Positioning HLIs according to their


recognised areas of institutional excellence,
namely excellence in overall research, excellence in
niche areas of research, and excellence in teaching
and instruction. Both public and private HLIs will
be encouraged and incentivised to aspire for these
different forms of excellence and to continuously
improve their performance in their areas of
specialisation and focus;

Providing best practice guidelines to support


both public and private HLIs in developing stronger
end-to-end talent development strategies for
both local and international talent, using the New
Academia talent framework covering the resourcing,
recruiting, rewarding, and retention of talent.

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3
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Nation of Lifelong
Learners

Lifelong learning (LLL) enables Malaysians to meet


the changing skill needs of a high-income economy
and maximises the potential of individuals who are
currently outside the workforce through reskilling
and upskilling opportunities. It also enables the
development of personal interests and talents for

a more fulfilled life. Malaysia needs to move from


a world where education is seen as something that
happens only during ones youth, to a world where
Malaysians of all ages constantly seek out learning
opportunities to enrich themselves.

Lifelong learning will become a way of life for all


Malaysians. There will be high quality formal,
non-formal, and informal programmes in a
wide range of disciplines and topics to support
both professional and personal development.

There will be learning communities in every


organisation, with formal mechanisms to
recognise prior experience and learning.
Everyone will have access to these opportunities,
regardless of income level or background.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will increase


public awareness of the benefits of LLL, raise the
quality of existing programmes and introduce more
innovative programmes to broaden the appeal of LLL.
Key initiatives within this Shift include:

Launching stakeholder engagement


programmes (for example, MyCC loyalty
programme, 1Family Multiple Skills Programme)
that incentivise participation, and improving the
existing marketing infrastructure (for example,
smartphone applications) to make it easier for
the public to search for information on available
programmes; and

Creating a framework for recognising prior


learning, including the establishment of clear
pathways for re-entry into the education system,
establishing a national credit system to enable
accumulation of modular credits over time, and
stipulating clear criteria for recognising prior
experience;

Continuing to provide financial support


to disadvantaged groups and tax reduction
incentive schemes to companies, and to work with
financial institutions to create financial assistance
programmes for all groups.

4
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Quality Technical and


Vocational Education
and Training (TVET)
Graduates

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Under the Economic Transformation Programme


(ETP), Malaysia will require a 2.5-fold increase in
TVET enrolment by 2025. At present, however,
there is an undersupply of TVET workers in 10 of
the 12 National Key Economic Area (NKEA) sectors.
Further, TVET is seen as a less attractive pathway than
university education, thereby limiting the number of

students, particularly high-performing ones, who apply


for such courses. Malaysia needs to move from a higher
education system with a primary focus on university
education as the sole pathway to success, to one where
academic and TVET pathways are equally valued and
cultivated.

The Ministry through its community colleges,


vocational colleges, and polytechnics will be
a premier higher education TVET provider that
develops skilled talent to meet the growing and
changing demands of industry, and promotes

individual opportunities for career development.


Enrolment in TVET programmes will expand
significantly, through extensive partnerships with
industry, to ensure supply matches demand.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will intensify


industry involvement and partnerships, streamline
qualifications, improve coordination across the
Ministrys TVET providers and enhance branding
efforts. Key initiatives include:

Enhancing coordination across the


Ministrys various TVET providers to eliminate
duplication of programmes and resources, enable
greater specialisation in areas of expertise, and
improve cost efficiency; and

Enabling industry to lead curriculum


design and delivery through new partnership
models and lifting the quality of delivery through
increased apprenticeship, hands-on training, reallife simulations, and specialised employer training
programmes;

Coordinating with other ministries and


agencies offering TVET programmes to streamline
the national qualification framework, ensure
alignment with major industry associations, and
pursue international accreditations for TVET
programmes.

1-18

1-19

5
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Financial
Sustainability

Over the next decade, as costs continue to rise, Malaysia


will need to deliver quality higher education to almost
twice as many students if it is to reach the highest
enrolment levels among ASEAN nations. The challenge
is that total Government expenditure on higher
education has been rising at a rate of 14% per annum,
driven largely by subsidies to public HLIs, where 90% of
their expenditure is Government funded. Additionally,

current student loan repayment rates for the National


Higher Education Fund Corporation or Perbadanan
Tabung Pendidikan Tinggi Nasional (PTPTN) need
to be significantly improved. Malaysia needs to move
from a system that is highly dependent on Government
resources and focused on inputs to one that is focused
on outcomes and where all stakeholders contribute,
proportionate to their means.

There will be continued Government investment


of a large portion of the national budget and
GDP in the higher education system. Return on
investment will, however, improve significantly to
match that of peer countries. Public and private
HLIs will draw on diverse sources of funding to
allow continuous improvement in the quality

of their programmes, and more prudent and


innovative use of their resources. There will be
more targeted support for socio-economically
disadvantaged students to make enrolment more
affordable and accessible to everyone who is
eligible.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will link


government funding to performance, reform existing
student financing mechanisms, and encourage HLIs to
diversify funding sources. Key initiatives include:

Enhancing PTPTN performance and


sustainability by improving repayment rates,
shifting to income-contingent loans, and linking
access to student loans with the performance and
quality standards of HLIs; and

Improving the funding formulae for public


HLIs by replacing block grants with performancelinked and per student funding, implementing five
year performance contracts (3+2), and targeting
government investment in priority areas;

Incentivising creation of endowment and


waqf funds, as well as encouraging contributions
to higher education, for example, through the
provision of matching grants for HLIs during the
initial fund-raising period.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

6
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

Empowered
Governance

Good governance is essential for the efficient


functioning of any organisation and for building
great institutions. In Malaysia, many decision rights
are still concentrated at the Ministry level rather
than at HLIs, creating supervisory burden and
potential inefficiencies. These constraints also make
it difficult for HLIs to move quickly in response to

global and local trends. Malaysia needs to move from


a higher education system where the Ministry is a
tight controller, to one where the Ministry is focused
primarily on its role as policymaker and regulator, and
where HLIs are empowered to steer their own journey
of growth.

The Ministry will have a portfolio of fullyautonomous and semi-autonomous HLIs based
on their readiness and capacity for decisionmaking. These HLIs will operate freely within
the regulatory framework established by the

Government with strong governance structures,


clear decision rights, and effective stakeholder
management. These enhanced freedoms will be
balanced by the right internal capabilities and with
appropriate accountability mechanisms.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will focus on


its role as a regulator and policymaker, and give HLIs
greater decision-making power in return for clear
accountability against a set of pre-agreed outcomes.
Key initiatives include:

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Defining five-year (3+2) outcome-based


performance contracts between the Ministry and
HLIs, with public HLI funding at risk if performance
goals are not met, and incentives for exceeding
targets;
Strengthening quality assurance in the
private sector, by requiring private HLIs to
participate in enhanced national quality assurance

frameworks (for example, SETARA and MyQuest)


for continued access to government funding (for
example, research grants and PTPTN student
loans). The degree of access will be linked to their
participation and level of performance against these
frameworks and standards; and
Moving decision rights from the Ministry
to the leadership of public universities,
improving the governance effectiveness of HLIs, and
building the capacity and capabilities of University
Boards and institutional leaders to take on these
increased responsibilities.

1-20

1-21

7
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Innovation
Ecosystem

Malaysia aspires to make innovation a major driver


of national economic growth. While research output
is improving Malaysia ranked 23rd for number
of publications in 2013, up 11 places from 34th in
2009 more can still be done. For example, Malaysia
ranks 43rd out of 110 countries on number of patents,
and engagement levels with industry and community

are still not as intensive or widespread as desired.


Malaysia needs to move from academia operating
in insolation, to the quadruple helix of academia,
industry, government, and local communities
coming together in partnership for the incubation,
development, and commercialisation of ideas.

The Ministry will facilitate the development of


innovation ecosystems in selected strategic
areas that are critical to the nations economic
growth. These ecosystems will support both
university-driven and demand-driven research,
development, and commercialisation models,

with significant improvements on a wide range


of research measures. HLIs, in particular, will
intensify their role as a solution provider for
other stakeholders, and as a developer of skilled
research talent.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will


elevate a few priority research areas critical to
Malaysias growth, catalyse private sector and
industry involvement, as well as create a supportive
environment to facilitate the commercialisation of
ideas. Key initiatives include:

Playing a catalytic role in securing


investments, particularly through matching
schemes like the Private-Public Research Network
(PPRN), and redesigning existing financing criteria
and grant review processes for greater transparency
and accountability; and

Focusing on creating scale and growth in a few


strategic research areas which are linked to national
priorities for economic growth, and where Malaysia
has distinctive capabilities;

Incentivising HLIs to establish supporting


systems for the commercialisation of ideas,
such as technology transfer offices, mechanisms
for the co-utilisation of infrastructure, enhanced
data monitoring systems, and talent development
programmes.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

8
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Global
Prominence

Malaysias higher education system is already a major


source of income for the country, given Malaysias
status as a top 10 destination for international
students. Increasing competition from other education
hubs will, however, require the strengthening of
Malaysias higher education value proposition,
capacity, and capabilities, in order to enhance the

appeal and competitiveness in the region and beyond.


Malaysia needs to raise the nations higher education
brand even further, from an attractive destination
known for good value for money and quality of life, to
one that is also recognised, referred to, and respected
internationally for its academic and research expertise.

Malaysia will be known as an international


education hub with a difference, one that provides
values-driven and globally relevant education,
and is recognised by students for its balance
of quality and affordability, good quality of life,
and rich cultural experiences. Malaysia will
expand enrolment to reach 250,000 international

students by 2025, and reach new markets through


more innovative programmes and partnerships.
Above all, Malaysia will be a globally-connected
higher education player that is renowned for its
academic and research expertise, particularly in
niche areas like Islamic banking and finance, or
tropical related science and technology.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will enhance


the end-to-end international student experience,
increase brand visibility, and strengthen existing and
new markets for international students. Key initiatives
include:

Increasing the proportion of postgraduate


international students and students from
high priority markets such as ASEAN nations,
by diversifying and raising the quality of niche
programmes; and

Collaborating with other ministries and


agencies to improve and streamline immigration
procedures and processes to match international
best practices, for example, through the introduction
of multiple year student visas and the provision of
an accelerate green lane approach for students
from HLIs that have consistently demonstrated high
quality standards;

Strengthening the promotion and


marketing of Malaysias higher education
system through targeted measures such as hosting
major international education conferences and
strengthening MyAlumni.

1-22

1-23

9
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Globalised Online
Learning

Internet penetration in Malaysia currently stands at


67% the seventh highest penetration rate across
Asia. This puts Malaysia in a good position to harness
the power of online learning to widen access to good
quality content, enhance the quality of teaching
and learning, lower the cost of delivery, and bring
Malaysian expertise to the global community. There
are significant opportunities to achieve the desired

outcomes first set forth in the National e-learning


Policy (Dasar e-Pembelajaran Negara or DePAN).
Malaysia needs to move from a mass production
delivery model to one where technology-enabled
innovations are harnessed to democratise access
to education and offer more personalised learning
experiences to all students.

Blended learning models will become a staple


pedagogical approach in all HLIs. Students will
benefit from robust cyber infrastructure that
can support the use of technologies like videoconferencing, live streaming and Massive Open

Online Courses (MOOCs). Malaysian HLIs will also


develop MOOCs in their niche areas of expertise,
while participating in international MOOC
consortiums and building the Malaysia education
brand globally.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will work


with HLIs to build the capabilities of the academic
community, and explore the establishment of a
national e-learning platform to co-ordinate and
spearhead content development. Key initiatives
include:

Making online learning an integral


component of higher education and lifelong
learning, starting with the conversion of common
undergraduate courses into MOOCs, and requiring
up to 70% of programmes to use blended learning
models; and

Launching MOOCs in subjects of


distinctiveness for Malaysia such as Islamic
banking and finance, in partnership with highprofile international MOOC consortiums like EdX
and Coursera, so as to build Malaysias global brand;

Establishing the required cyber


infrastructure (physical network infrastructure,
info structure, platform, devices and equipment)
and strengthening the capabilities of the academic
community to deliver online learning at scale.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

10
Why
Does It
Matter

What
Will
Success
Look
Like

How
Will We
Achieve
This

Transformed
Higher Education
Delivery

The Ministry recognises that a well-conceived strategy


or plan is only the starting point. The MEB (HE)
will not succeed without effective implementation,
as well as commitment and collaboration across
the Ministry, HLIs, the academic community, and
relevant stakeholders. Change must begin at the
Ministry, including role modelling the ability to learn,
relearn, and unlearn existing processes, skills, and

behaviours. Avoiding the common pitfalls of largescale transformation programmes will require the
adoption of new ways of working internally and with
other stakeholders. Malaysia needs to move from a
system focused on inputs and a separation of private
and public institutions, to a harmonised higher
education system focused on delivery, accountability,
transparency, and outcomes.

The Ministry will catalyse transformation among


private and public HLIs, and lead the way in civil
service transformation, by first transforming
itself. The Ministry will break down operating silos
across departments, forge stronger partnerships
with HLIs, industry, and community, and improve

its efficiency and effectiveness in its role as a


regulator and policymaker. HLIs will embark on
their own tailored transformation journeys, with a
vanguard of public and private HLIs spearheading
the reforms and serving as role models for other
institutions.

To achieve these outcomes, the Ministry will redefine


the roles, organisation, and operating model of the
Ministry, enhance delivery capabilities within the
Ministry, and harmonise across public and private
institutions. Key initiatives include:

Restructuring the Ministry organisation


to focus on core functions, create stronger links
between HLIs, the community, and industry,
and promote greater efficiency in operations,
particularly for key frontline services like student
admissions and international student services; and

Launching the University Transformation


Programme by working in close partnership
with pilot HLIs, including identifying, codifying,
piloting best practices and tools, and disseminating
playbooks (buku panduan) to all HLIs on critical
improvement areas;

Create greater consistency in performance


standards and regulations across public and
private HLIs, by enhancing MQA processes and
quality assurance frameworks, and eliminating
unnecessary red tape.

1-24

What impact will this transformation


journey have?
Students will

As with the reform


of the preschool
to post-secondary
education system
outlined in the MEB,
the transformation
of the higher
education system will
lead to a collective
set of desirable
benefits, rights,
and corresponding
responsibilities for each
stakeholder group.

enjoy higher quality programmes that use


experiential and technology-enabled learning
models to offer more personalised and engaging
learning experiences that push the limits of their
potential;
. graduate with a balance of akhlak and ilmu
that better prepares them for employability in
todays global economy, and for grappling with
the complexities and new challenges of the 21st
century;
have more and better choices through new
models of learning such as Massive Open Online
Courses (MOOCs), greater competition across
HLIs, and better guidance on educational pathways
and career options;
receive financial support that is
commensurate with their needs to ensure that
affordability does not become a barrier for any
eligible student. Further, students receiving student
loans will only need to pay back if they eventually
benefit from their education; and
be able to re-enter the world of learning at
any time in their life through formal, non-formal,
and informal pathways, in order to pursue their
passions and ongoing professional development.
leadership development programmes;

In return, students will be asked to honour


the investment being made in their future by
fully embracing the opportunities afforded
to develop them as holistic, entrepreneurial,
and balanced individuals, upholding financial
commitments such as loan repayments, and
paying it forward by finding ways, big and small,
to serve the community, nation, and world.

The academic
community will

enjoy more attractive differentiated


career pathways and performancebased rewards that support
specialisations in teaching, research,
institutional leadership, and allow
practitioners and professionals more
flexibility in participating in higher
education and sharing of expertise;
have the support they need to
succeed in their new roles through
targeted professional development
programmes from industry and crossinstitution mobility programmes, to
leadership development programmes;
enjoy greater decision-making rights
in areas such as curriculum, financial
management, and talent management,
so as to enable their institutions to
move with greater agility and speed in
responding to global and local trends; and
benefit from closer integration
with industry as well as local and
international communities, through
innovative partnership models on funding,
teaching and learning, as well as research,
development, and commercialisation.

In return, the academic community


will be asked to stay open to and adopt
these new ways of working, to work
collaboratively with all stakeholders
during this transformation journey, and
to model the holistic, entrepreneurial,
and balanced mindsets, values, and
behaviours expected of students.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

1-26

HLI leaders will...

Industry will

Ministry officers will

be empowered with greater


decision-making rights in public HLIs
which will be devolved to them as and
when they are ready, in order to enhance
their agility in responding to local and
global trends;

be able to secure learned, valuesdriven talent who are better prepared


for work with the right knowledge, skills,
behaviours, attitudes, and mindsets that
industry needs;

be able to focus on the Ministrys role


as policymaker and regulator in higher
education, with a streamlined set of activities
that eliminates bureaucratic red tape and
micro-management of HLIs;

be able to partner more easily with


the Ministry and HLIs to solve its most
pressing challenges and developing
cutting-edge solutions for specific
industry or market needs;

have greater autonomy and


decision-making power to maximise the
effectiveness and efficiency of the Ministrys
functions, particularly in frontline services
with critical stakeholder touchpoints and
interactions such as student admissions and
financial services;

... enjoy more streamlined regulatory


processes that eliminate unnecessary
red tape, harmonise standards and
requirements across public and private
HLIs, and set crystal-clear expectations on
performance;
benefit from a tailored approach
of support, with recognition and
incentives for different forms of
institutional excellence, and guidance on
critical topics such as governance and
talent development via playbooks and
a sharing of international and local best
practices; and
be able to focus on what really
matters through a performance
management and quality assurance
system that focuses on outcomes rather
than inputs and processes.

In return, HLI leaders will be asked to


embrace their role as transformational
change leaders charting visionary
journeys for their institutions, rallying
all stakeholders in the effort to turn
this vision into reality, and modeling
the mindsets, values and behaviours
expected of the HLI community.

benefit from greater support from


HLIs on lifelong learning for their
employees, with more opportunities and
options for reskilling and upskilling so as
to continuously enhance the capabilities
of the existing workforce; and
benefit from enhanced
responsiveness and service quality
from the Ministry and HLIs, especially on
access to qualified graduates who are
better informed about careers and jobs.

In return, industry will be asked to


step forward as active partners in the
transformation journey, contributing
across the entire education and
innovation value chain, from
curriculum design and delivery, to
funding and placements for graduates,
as well as research, development, and
commercialisation.

receive targeted support, professional


development, and resources as they learn,
unlearn, and relearn the skills they will need
to fulfill these new roles and responsibilities;
and
work in a collaborative and transparent
environment. Silos between divisions will be
broken down, and roles and responsibilities
will be clarified and streamlined to eliminate
duplication of functions and activities.

In return, Ministry officers will be asked


to stay responsive to feedback from
HLIs, industry, and the public, to focus on
outcomes, not bureaucratic processes
and inputs, and act as role models and
champions for the changes the system is
about to undergo.

Initiative implementation roadmap


The envisioned 11-year transformation of the higher
education system is broad and complex. To ensure that the
system is not overtaxed and execution fatigue is avoided,
the Ministry has carefully sequenced the strategies and
initiatives of the 10 Shifts across three waves to build
successively on one another as the systems capacity and
capabilities, and the readiness levels of HLIs improve. The
first wave will focus on establishing the building blocks
for the transformation; the second wave will introduce
more structural improvements to accelerate the pace of
change; and finally, the third wave will strengthen the global
prominence of Malaysias higher education system. These
waves have been aligned with that of the MEB:
2015: Secure quick wins to build momentum and lay
foundation
2016-2020: Accelerate system improvement
2021-2025: Move towards excellence with increased
operational flexibility
As with the MEB, the Government and the Ministry are
committed to new ways of working in order to deliver
significant, sustainable, and widespread results, including:
Sustaining leadership commitment and focus at the
top: Top Government and Ministry leadership, including
the Prime Minister and the Ministry of Education senior
leadership, are committed to regularly reviewing

progress, providing guidance, and resolving issues with


regard to the implantation of the MEB (HE). The Ministry
leadership is also committed to identifying, cultivating,
and developing the leadership capabilities of the next
generation of system leaders to ensure continuity and
consistency of the transformation efforts;
Intensifying internal and external performance
management: The Ministry will establish a performance
management system that sets high expectations of
individuals and institutions through clear KPIs. This
system will invest in capability building to help individuals
achieve their targets, reward strong performance, and
address poor performance without creating a culture of
blame. The Ministry will also publish performance results
annually so that the public can track progress on the
implementation of the MEB (HE); and
Engaging and partnering with key stakeholders: As
the MEB (HE) initiatives are rolled out, the Ministry will
continue to solicit feedback from all relevant parties,
particularly HLIs, students, and industry, and will
regularly communicate progress and issues to ensure
that the entire education system is engaged in the
transformation process.

wave

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Build momentum and lay foundation

(2015)

Developing integrated assessment methodology


by HLIs to reflect knowledge and skills (ilmu), ethics and
spirituality (akhlak);

Initiating TVET enhancements with industry-led


curriculum design and delivery, upgrading of teaching staff, and
portfolio of high technology and high value programmes;

Introducing experiential learning, service learning


and entrepreneurial immersion into curriculum, and
new Job Creator framework for creating/growing student
businesses;

Aligning research priorities with other ministries


and agencies and elevating a few research areas critical to
economic growth where Malaysia has a competitive advantage;

Launch new CEO faculty programme for senior industry


or public sector leaders to teach in public HLIs;

Redesigning financing criteria for research grants and


enhancing the grant review and monitoring process;

Enhancing repayment rates on PTPTN student loans,


including incentives and penalties;

Defining clear guidelines for self-accreditation


and co-regulation for private HLIs in consultation with
stakeholders;

Launching of tailored University Transformation


Programmes by pilot HLIs as role models for transformation
programmes of other HLIs;

Reviewing enhancements to Malaysian student


admissions process (applications and matching) and end-toend experience for international students;

Codifying best practices into playbooks on critical


improvement areas for adoption by HLIs:

Remodelling of the coordination body for Malaysian


International Scholarships, and introducing attractive
pathways for top international students and scholars;

Enhancing governance and board effectiveness;


Strengthening performance management;
Improving degree productivity and cost efficiency;
Establishing alternative income sources, including
endowment funds and waqf;
Achieving transparency and accountability in financial
reporting; and
Strengthening career pathways and leadership
development.

Designing flagship MOOCs by HLIs in areas of


distinctiveness for Malaysia, and revising the National
e-Learning Policy; and
Redesigning of Ministry organisation and operating
model to focus on higher education regulator and policymaker
role.

1-28

(2016-2020)

wave

1-29

Accelerate system improvement

(2016-2020)

Intensifying industry and community engagement,


and implementing 3+1 or 2+2 undergraduate
programmes with off-campus or industry-based learning;

Introducing incentives for establishment of


endowment funds or waqf by both private and public HLIs,
including matching grants and tax exemptions;

Enhancing the MPU framework and entrepreneurship


programmes, including more practical components and
incentives for excellence in entrepreneurial learning;

Enhancing empowered governance for public


HLIs focusing on board composition, academic autonomy,
governance effectiveness, human resources, funding, and
procurement autonomy;

Defining criteria and incentives to recognise different


forms of institutional excellence, such as excellence in
research, in niche areas, and in teaching;
Facilitating implementation of talent mobility
programmes and multi-track career pathways by HLIs;
Developing a new Higher Education Talent Roadmap,
including facilitating recruitment of international academic
leaders, and the launch of leadership programmes for HLI
leaders;
Establishing a framework for recognising prior
learning, with clear pathways and a national credit system;
Harmonising the national TVET qualifications
framework with other agencies, and facilitating international
accreditation;
Introducing new funding formulae and performance
contracts for public universities with clear KPIs;
Transforming PTPTN into the Malaysia Education
Fund, with enhanced savings schemes, incentives, and the new
Tabung Siswa investment fund;
Implementing income-contingent loans for students,
and linking access to loans to HLI quality standards and
performance;

Assessing establishment of an integrated Higher


Education Act for all types of HLIs (public and private);
Expanding matching schemes for joint research funding
from industry and community, and improving regulations
and guidelines for commercialisation (in collaboration
with stakeholders);
Accelerating technology transfer by enhancing support
functions by HLIs, and matching stakeholders to promote
infrastructure co-utilisation;
Implementing reforms on international student
management, including streamlining immigration processes,
introducing multi-year visas and green-lane approach for
HLIs with constantly high quality standards;
Enhancing promotion of Malaysias education brand
and strengthening MyAlumni;
Enhancing lifelong learning and online learning
infrastructures, promoting broader adoption, facilitating
credit transfers, and innovating on programmes; and
Enhancing institutional ratings system and improving
MQA quality assurance and approvals (for example, by
simplifying processes).

wave

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Move towards excellence with


increased operational flexibility

(2021-2025)

Reviewing policies and guidelines to facilitate


incorporation of 21st century skills into the HLI curriculum to
better address global trends, disruptions, and challenges;
Completing the transition to multi-year performance
contracts for all public universities;
Completing the transition of all public universities
towards earned autonomy, and full implementation of
enhanced self-regulation and co-regulation for private HLIs;
Achieving financial sustainability of the Malaysia
Education Fund (formerly PTPTN), as well as a sustainable
diversified funding model for public universities with high
productivity levels;
Assessing implementation of greater autonomy for
polytechnics after completing the conversion of Politeknik
Malaysia into a statutory body;
Ongoing enhancements to the quality assurance
and institutional ratings system, benchmarked against
international standards;

Delivering results on University Transformation


Programmes by HLIs, with several HLIs (both public and
private) achieving regional and global prominence in their areas
of focus and specialisation;
Ongoing review on progress of initiatives to enhance
innovation ecosystem efficiency and effectiveness, and
implement new interventions where required;
Continuing diversification of Malaysias international
student population, targeting top sending countries as well
as strategic geographies for Malaysia;
Ongoing review and enhancement of Malaysias global
education brand and international student processes to
match international practices; and
Completing the establishment of international
research laboratories or centres of excellence with
prominent international partners.

Completing the rebranding of TVET to achieve a dualpathway higher education system where academic and TVET
pathways are equally valued;

The higher education transformation will take place over 11 years

1-30

1-31

The transformation of the


higher education system
is a national priority.
The Ministry expects
that the transformation
of both the system and
HLIs will be a medium-to
long-term journey where
full benefits are expected
to be gained over the
long run. Although the
transformation journey
will focus on long-term,
sustainable results, it is
expected that significant
impact and changes will
be visible in the short
term. These changes will
form the foundation for
future results.

Malaysia Education Blueprint 2015 - 2025 (Higher Education)


Executive Summary

Conclusion
The MEB (HE) proposes major reforms to
Malaysias higher education system in order
to accelerate the positive upward trajectory of
the system. It places the needs and interests of
learners at the heart of the system, and reiterates
the Governments longstanding commitment to
providing equitable access to high-quality education
of international standards. It calls for more intensive
and frequent industry and community engagement,
collaboration, and partnerships. The MEB (HE)
also aims to unleash and empower both private and
public HLIs to push the boundaries of innovation
and strive for institutional excellence in all its forms.
Above all, it will only be through the collective efforts
of all stakeholders that the higher education system
can be transformed to prepare Malaysians for the
challenges and opportunities of an ever-changing
world. The future of Malaysian youth and the nation
demands nothing less.

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Ministry of Education Malaysia 2015


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Published by:
Kementerian Pendidikan Malaysia
No. 2, Menara 2, Jalan P5/6, Presint 5
62200 Putrajaya Malaysia
www.moe.gov.my