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Your Local Hometown Newspaper

50

Tri-City Times
Wednesday, June 29, 2016

142nd Volume - Issue No. 26

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Almont
police
chief
resigns

Photo courtesy of MDOT

Pat Nael steps down


at meeting on June 21
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT Longtime law enforcement officer Pat Nael resigned his post as
Almont Police Chief at Tuesdays (June
21) village council meeting.
Village Manager Sarah Moyer-Cale
said the council had been planning to discuss a new one-year employment agreement with Nael, whose current contract
was expiring.
Instead, Nael opted to tender his resignation effective immediately, ending his
tenure with the Almont department that

State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Gov. Rick Snyder and TARDEC Director Dr.
Paul Rogers at last weeks press conference regarding vehicle testing along I-69 between Capac and Imlay City.

High tech convoy

Vehicle communications technology tested on I-69


By Catherine Minolli

Former Almont Police Chief Pat


Nael presents MADD award to
Sgt. Andrew Martin. Martin will
serve as the departments interim
chief.
began in March of 2008.
Moyer-Cale said Nael did not specify
his reasons for resigning, other than to
note that retirement had been in the former chiefs purview.
I have the highest respect for Chief
Nael, said Moyer-Cale. Im grateful to
have worked with him and for his years
of service to the village.
He has had a long, successful
career, she said, and deserves to spend
more time with his family and to enjoy
retirement.
While accepting Naels resignation,
the council agreed to provide him benefits to include compensation equal to sixmonths salary, and any unused paid time
off. Moyer-Cale said preparations for
undertaking a search for Naels successor
are underway.
In the meantime, Almont Police Sgt.
Andrew Martin will assume the responsibility of overseeing the departments dayto-day operations.
Moyer-Cale said Naels departure
provides the village an opportunity to reevaluate the police department as a whole
and the specific role of the police chief.
That has not been updated in some
time, she said. We want to ensure that
the job posting and position description
adequately informs potential candidates
of the job requirements and expectations.
We hope to have information about
the application process available for
interested applicants as soon as we can,
she said.
Under the terms of Naels most recent
contract with the Village of Almont, he
was being compensated at the rate of
$60,000 per year and not receiving health
benefits.

Photo by Tom Wearing

TRI-CITY AREA All of the


goings-on near the rest stop on I-69
between Capac and Imlay City last week
created quite a buzz around the area.
People were quite curious about the
camera crews and MDOT workers in
bright green vests who swarmed the site
Wednesday and Thursday.
Last month, officials from the state
Department of Transportation and U.S.
Army Tank Automotive Research
Development Center announced the site
would be a testing and demonstration
ground for Army line-haul vehicles.
In an earlier interview, TARDEC
Public Affairs Officer Doug Halleaux said
the tests were integral to the evolution and
eventual implementation of driverless
and connected vehicles.

Halleaux delivered his comments during a May 23rd visit to Imlay City to
explain the upcoming event. Last
Thursdays test date was kept under

Convoy of Army and MDOT test vehicles make way to Capac area rest
stop after technology communications testing on I-69 last Thursday.
wraps, but officials made the visit so area
residents would be informed, and therefore wouldnt be alarmed by the sight of
military vehicles traveling down I-69.
While the media had prior awareness

of the test date, it was somewhat of a lastminute surprise to everyone involved that
Governor Rick Snyder would pay a visit
Convoy page 14-A

Work begins on Almont Ave.

Targeted completion date is Labor Day weekend

city for its consideration.


City Manager Tom Youatt said the
and is expected to be completed by Labor project will include the removal of old
By Tom Wearing
Day weekend in early September.
septic tanks in the area, along with the
Tri-City Times Staff Writer
Rowe Professional Services conducted construction of new storm drains, curbs,
IMLAYCITY Spot excavation has the design and engineering phases of the
gutters, sidewalks, driveway approaches
been taking place in advance of the sched- project, which officially kicked off on
and inclusion of a one-foot lane for bicyuled Almont Avenue infrastructure project. Monday, June 27.
cles.
The $903,000 project will involve the Doing the construction will be
Youatt noted that money for septic
section of Almont Avenue from Fourth
Diponio Contracting of Shelby Township, tank removal will come from the citys
Street north to Capac Road (old M-21)
whose bid was the lowest submitted to the water and sewer fund.
This is a great project for our city and
were looking forward to getting this
done, said Youatt. Almont Avenue is a
major north-south artery and the improvements are much-needed.
Anyone who drives there knows that
section is in poor condition, he continued. Once its completed, our residents
and visitors will realize a major improvement.
Youatt said residents living along the
affected section of Almont Avenue will
continue to have access to their homes.
Affected residents will be advised of
any brief periods during which access to
their homes might be affected.
Streets remain focus
Citywide street improvements will
continue to be a priority for at least the
next five years at least.
Motorist finds way around construction vehicles and orange barrels as

work begins on Almont Avenue from 4th Street to Old-M21 on Monday,
June 27.
Work page 14-A
Photo by Catherine Minolli

File photo

Tri-City Times Editor

Busload of fun

Helena re-opens

Lapeer County VA hosts bus


trip for area veterans,
...see page 3-A

Agricultural supply company


opens doors at new location,

...see page 5-A

CERTIFIED PRE-OWNEDCERTIFIED PRE-OWNED

PAGE 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

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2012 Explorer XLT

2013 Taurus SHO

2014 Taurus

mooNroof, leather

all Wheel drive. mooNroof

leather, mooN, Nav

2013 Escape

2014 Escape

2011 Flex

all Wheel drive

all Wheel drive,


10,395 miles

$20,983

$13,995

2009 Lincoln MKS

2005 f-350 lariat

2012 Explorer

2007 Chevy Aveo LT

2008 Taurus X Limited

all Wheel drive

$25,995

$18,995

$18,995

2013 Fiesta

2013 FusioN

y
C
a
i
l
t
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m
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2011 Focus

2015 Chevy Silverado LT

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2012 Jeep WraNgler Sport

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5.0

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diesel

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v-6,l
eather2014 FORD TAURUS BLACK.................................. $19,983
dvd
s, s
to &F-350
go,BLUE........................................
Nav
2005
FORD
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2007 CHEVROLET AVEO BLACK..............................$5,500 2014 FORD F-150 WHITE........................................$27,983
71,500 miles
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2013
FORD FIESTA BLUE ........................................$8,995
2013 FORD F-150 BLACK......................................$28,983
2008 CHEVROLET COBALT WHITE...........................$7,500
2008 FORD TAURUS X GREEN$25,995
................................$9,500
2014
ocus ST
Taurus
2013 Taurus2016
SHO
2012
xplorer
XLT
Edge
2012EFORD
FLEX BLACK.......................................$24,983
2007 FORD F-150
SILVERF.......................................$9,995
2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 15002015
WHITE..........$37,500
FORD TRANSIT CARGO2014
VAN WHITE.............$26,983
2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY BEIGE.......... $19,983 2015 FORD F-150 GREEN......................................$29,500 2011 FORD FLEX WHITE........................................ $13,983 2008 GMC SIERRA GREY...................................... $19,983
2014 ODDGE CHARGER GREY...............................$22,983 2012 FORD F-150 BLACK......................................$29,983 2010 FORD FOCUS BLUE FLAME............................$6,995 2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE BLACK............................$7,995
FORD FOCUS
GREEN......................................$3,000
2012 FORD F-150 WHITE.......................................$26,983 2002
2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SILVER................
all Wheel drive. mooNroof
leather
, mooN, Nav
mooNroof
, leather
2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
SILVER...................$9,995
all Wheel d$15,983
rive
FORD FOCUS BLACK....................................
$18,983 2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE$19,900
BLACK......................................$25,983 2014
2013 FORD EDGE WHITE SUEDE...........................
$16,500 2013 FORD F-150$18,995
$21,500
$18,995
$25,995
SILVER.................$22,983
2013 FORDEFOCUS
BLUE.......................................
$12,983
2015 FORD EDGE GREY.........................................$26,983
2011 Flex $2,700
2013 Fiesta 2012 FORD F-150 BLACK......................................$25,983
2013 FusioN
2013
scape
2014
Escape
2004 JEEP LIBERTY SILVER...................................
2015 FORD EDGE RED...........................................$29,500 2014 FORD F-150 RED .........................................$30, 983 2013 FORD FOCUS WHITE..................................... $12,983
2012 JEEP WRANGLER ORANGE..........................$26,500
2009 FORD ESCAPE BLACK....................................$6,995 2011 FORD F-150 RED...........................................$29,983 2014 FORD FOCUS WHITE .................................... $12,983
2009 LINCOLN MKS BLACK...................................$11,983
all Wheel drive,
2013 FORD ESCAPE WHITE....................................$17,500 2007 FORD F-150 RED.......................................... $13,983 2014 FORD FOCUS RUBY RED................................$11,983
10,395 miles
all Wheel drive
2010 MERCURY MARINER BLUE........................... $14,983
2016 FORD ESCAPE SILVER..................................$25,983 2013 FORD F-150 GREY........................................$24,983 2011 FORD FOCUS BLACK......................................$8,995
$13,995
$13,500
$17,500
$20,983
$8,995
2007 MERCURY MONTEGO RED.............................$4,995
2014 FORD ESCAPE GREY ....................................$20,983 2015 FORD F-150 WHITE ......................................$43,983 2013 FORD FUSION BORDEAUX RED.................... $13,500
SCION TC GREY..............................................$3,996
2015
hevy Silverado LT
2011 Focus
2009
Lincoln
2005 $15,983
f-350 2007
lariat
2012 Explorer
2014 FORD
FUSIONMKS
WHITE ...................................
2013 FORD
F-150CGREY.........................................$27,983
2013 FORD ESCAPE WHITE....................................$17,983
2005 TOYOTA SIENNA BROWN...............................$6,995
2013 FORD ESCAPE RUBY RED.............................$20,483 2009 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW WHITE................ $12,983 2014 FORD FUSION WHITE ................................... $16,983
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diesel
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60 SECOND
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2012 FORD EXPLORER BLACK..............................
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1994 BUICK REGAL RED ......................................... $2,500 2013 FORD F-150 BLACK......................................$23,983
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2007 CHEVROLET AVEO BLACK.............................. $5,500 2014 FORD F-150 WHITE........................................$27,983
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Preowned &
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Imlay City Ford e
as
Le
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ll YourCHARGER GREY...............................$22,983 2012 FORD F-150 BLACK......................................$29,983
n PuODDGE
Ca
ead up to 5 mo.
Ah
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st CARAVAN SILVER................ $15,983 2012 FORD F-150 WHITE.......................................$26,983
Early at No Co
u!*
Yo
to
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2011 FORD FLEX WHITE........................................ $13,983 2008 GMC SIERRA GREY ...................................... $19,983
2010 FORD FOCUS BLUE FLAME............................ $6,995 2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE BLACK............................$7,995
2002 FORD FOCUS GREEN...................................... $3,000 2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE SILVER................... $9,995
2014 FORD FOCUS BLACK.................................... $18,983
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2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE SILVER.................$22,983
2013 FORD FOCUS BLUE....................................... $12,983
2004 JEEP LIBERTY SILVER................................... $2,700
2013 FORD FOCUS WHITE..................................... $12,983
2012 JEEP WRANGLER ORANGE ..........................$26,500

PAGE 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Trip a busload of
fun for veterans

Noffert
Dental
2034 S. ALMONT AVE
IMLAY CITY

BE SURE TO GET YOUR REFERRALS IN

Lapeer County Veterans Affairs hosts Flag Day tour

for a chance to win a Bar-B-Que Grill & Accessories

By Tom Wearing

VA Director Ed Ronders (back row) is joined by some of those who took a road
trip to the Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly on June 14. More than 50
veterans and spouses participated in the VAs Lunch and Learn program.
Great Lakes cemetery
began burial operations in
October 2005, to include casketed and cremated remains.
The cemetery currently aver-

sentation of flag to the next


of kin, and the playing of
Taps.
She added that gun-salute
teams may be requested, but
are subject to the availability
of volunteers. Honor guards
will include a minimum of
two people.
For those interested, the
cemetery also features a
memorial area and scatter
garden for the dispersement
of ashes.
Great Lakes is a terrific
and viable option for veterans and their families who
are making end-of-life decisions and planning a burial,
said Giannetti.
Visitation at Great Lakes
is allowed from sun-up to
Lapeer
County
VA sundown and living flowers
Director Ed Ronders may be left at the loved ones
addresses
attendees gravesite.
aboard the tour bus.
However, to ensure the
sanctity of the grounds, artiages about 20 burials per
ficial flowers, potted plants,
day.
glass or plastic items and
Thus far, said Giannetti, pets are not allowed on the
about 30,000 veterans and
property.
spouses have made Great
Nor are public gatherings
Lakes their final resting
of a partisan nature allowed.
Additionally, sports or recreational activities are not permitted on the grounds,
including: bicycle riding,
jogging, picnicking, rollerblading, walking of pets,
fishing or hunting.
Great Lakes National
Cemetery is also subject to
VAregulations that prohibit
the carrying of firearms

CALL TODAY

AND SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT

(810) 683-5516
We are accepting new patients!

(openly or concealed), except


for the purpose of military
funeral honors.
For questions or more
information about burial or
interment at Great Lakes
National Cemetery, call tollfree 1-866-348-8603.
Or visit the website at:
http://www.cem.va.gov.

e
b
i
r
c
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b
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Photo by Tom Wearing

LAPEERCOUNTY
Lapeer County Veterans
Affairs Director Ed Ronders
has been running full-tilt
since assuming the position
about a year ago.
On Tuesday, June 14,
Ronders hosted a Flag Day
road trip for veterans to the
Great Lakes National
Cemetery in Holly.
The tour was part of the
Lapeer VAs new Lunch and
Learn workshop series
designed to educate and
inform local veterans of
available programs and services.
More than 50 local veterans, spouses and other interested parties assembled at
Lapeer American Legion
Post #16 early, before boarding a bus destined for the
544-acre burial site situated a
short distance from I-75.
Ronders noted that the
trip was funded through a
generous donation from the
United Way of Lapeer
County.
He added that box lunches provided the travelers on
the return trip to Lapeer,
were provided by American
Legion Post 16 Auxiliary
members.
Also aboard the bus were
Lapeer County
Commissioner Linda Jarvis,
who commended Ronders
and his VAstaff for organizing the trip; and Lapeer
Attorney and veteran Bernard
A. Jokuns, who discussed
various end-of-life matters,
including the importance of
having a will and establish-

Photo by Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Ed Ronders with World War II veteran John


Wearing, who was a tailgunner on B-17 5 Grand.
ing a Durable Power of
Attorney in the event of
ones death.
While the trip dealt
directly with end-of-life
issues, Ronders alluded to
the abundant smiles and stories shared among the participating veterans, spouses and
others aboard the bus.
It seemed like everyone
was having a really good
time, while learning about
the benefits and services
available to them as veterans, said Ronders. There
were lots of smiles and I
think it turned out great.
Administrative welcome
Upon the groups arrival
at Great Lakes, they were
greeted by the cemeterys
Chief Administrator,
MaryBeth Giannetti, who
served as the mobile tour
guide.
Giannetti, a retired U.S.
Marine, informed the visitors
of Great Lakes mission to
respectfully provide veterans and their immediate families with the assistance and
services they deserve.
She briefly discussed the
cemeterys origin and history; noting that the property
was purchased in late 2002
for $6.2 million from the
Horton family.

place.
Despite the obvious
advantages and cost benefits,
Giannetti said only about 10
percent of eligible veterans
choose to be buried or
interred in dedicated cemeteries like the one in Holly,
or other National Cemeteries
nationwide.
Eligibility for burial is
that the veteran provide his/
her DD-214, their discharge
papers, and have been discharged under honorable
conditions.
Giannetti noted that all
eligible veterans will be provided burial benefits at no
cost, including: a burial
plot; opening and closing of
the gravesite; a government
graveliner; a marble headstone or marker with inscription; burial flag; Presidential
Memorial Certificate; and
perpetual care of the
gravesite. Funeral director
services are not covered.
Military honors can usually be provided by volunteer
honor guards comprised of
members of the VFW,
American Legion or other
approved military service
organizations.
Giannetti said a typical
30-minute ceremony will
include a flag-folding, pre-

Kids Night

Thursday, June 30th 6pm to 8pm

Stop by and see


our friend from
Paw Patrol!
Join us for dinner also!

Kids buffet featuring Hot Dogs,


Hamburgers, Spaghetti and lots more!

Imlay City Big Boy


1949 S. Cedar & I-69
810-724-3664

www.bigboy.com for more information

4.99 includes beverage

Adults $12.99 includes Endless Soup, Salad and Fruit Buffet.


Kids night will now be the 2nd and 4th Thursday of Every Month

PAGE 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Editors note: The following is a compilation of activity and reports from area
police and fire departments.

Dog hoarders
face charges
ST. CLAIR COUNTY
A Cottrellville Township
couple was arraigned Friday
on charges related to a dog
hoarding case. Michael
Higgins and Lynn Higgins
have been charged with abandoning/cruelty to 10 or more

animals, a four year felony.


Earlier this month, 99 dogs
and three cats were removed
from the Higgins home.
Some were given up by the
Higgins to rescue groups and
the Sheriffs Office but investigators were required to
obtain a search warrant before
removing the others.
The couple is currently
free on bond but conditions of
that bond state the Higgins
are not to own or care for any
animals and are not to leave
the state.

Portable meth lab


found at public park
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

ST. CLAIR COUNTY


Last week the countys
Drug Task Force located a
portable methamphetamine
laboratory on one of the
countys public trails.
According to the Sheriffs
Department, members of the
force were conducting a
selective enforcement related
to earlier investigations when
they found a one pot vessel,

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along with the necessary


ingredients to process meth in
Kimball Twp. Along the
Wadhams to Avoca Trail. The
items were taken to a containment unit located at the
Sheriffs Office. No suspects
were located at the scene of
the meth lab.
We are requesting that
anyone who sees suspicious
activity on the Wadhams to
Avoca Trail, or anywhere
else, to contact the Sheriffs
Office at (810) 985-8115,
said Sheriff Donnellon.
We want to keep the
trails and parks free from this
kind of criminal activity and
need the publics help to do
so.
Donnellon also warned
residents to not handle any
plastic bottles they may find
that appear to contain a milky
type liquid as it could be meth
lab residue that could explode
if moved.
This is the second time in
less than a month that a meth
lab was found on the
Wadhams to Avoca Trail. The
first was located on June 2.

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Imlay City
Lube Center
1824 South Cedar Street
(M-53) Imlay City
724-7777

Coupon Required 629

NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY

NEW HOURS:

Monday-Friday 8:30am-6:15pm & Saturday 8:30am-3:15pm

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Domestic and Foreign

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Van Dyke at 29 Mile


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586-752-5500
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Monday through Friday 7:30 am to 6:00 pm


Saturday 8:00 am to 12:00 noon

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8434 N. Brockway Road


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13355 Burt Road Riley Twp.

Includes air, oil, fuel,


trans or cooler alt.

Automotive

AUTO-TRUCK

COMPLETE AUTO & LIGHT TRUCK REPAIR

Pressure test
sealed system. Add
1 lb freon (134) and
dye. Inspect belts,
hoses & drains.

Dozens of area residents line up for free ice


cream during the Imlay City DDA/CSB Bank Ice
Cream Social last Tuesday, June 21. Along with
free ice cream dished up by CSB employees,
visitors were treated to the magic of The
Amazing Clark as he performed for the DDAs
Summer Concert Series. Young musicians in the
3rd Degree Burns band will perform at the July
5th concert beginning at 7 p.m. at Lamb Steele
Park. There is no charge to attend, all are welcome. For more information about this and other
Imlay City DDA happenings, visit www.icdda.
com or call 810-724-2135.

CHRIS S. WAGNER

$ 00

Imlay City

Waiting for a scoop

Life Home Car Business

NOW OPEN MONDAYS

Imlay City
Lube Center, Inc.

Photo by Nick Pugliese

Police and fire briefs . . .

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Tires Brakes Alignments Tune Ups Diesel Repairs
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Quality Personal Service Since 1992

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5525 Main Street DRYDEN
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810-796-3223
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4485 Imlay City Road, Attica, MI 48412 810-721-1001

PAGE 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Helena opens at new location


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

The M-53 corridor is the


place to be, Brandt said.
We have customers in
Lapeer, Genesee, St. Clair,
Macomb and a portion of
Sanilac County. We go all
over the place.
They are now only one of
two full-service agricultural
companies in Lapeer County.

Photo by Maria Brown

GOODLAND TWP.
On Thursday, customers had
the chance to see Helena
Chemical Companys new
Lapeer County facilities at
Shaw Road and M-53 when
the company hosted an open

house.
Staff have occupied the
site since December but the
brand new dry and liquid fertilizer buildings were completed this spring.
Depot Manager Craig
Brandt said theyre pleased
with their new site and location.

Employee Coy Hansen transports a pallet of seed from Helenas new liquid
fertilizer facility in Goodland Township last week.

The project, which began in


the fall, saw crews from
Midwest
Commercial
Construction began the
remodel of an existing building to create the 2,000 square
feet office and the construction of the two fertilizer storage facilities. The new site
features 25,000 square feet
altogether plus an on-site soybean plot. The company
maintains their Helena Acre
corn plot on Imlay City Road
in Imlay Twp. near their former location.
Last fall, the business
temporarily operated out of
the former Lapeer Grain location in Lapeer.
The company announced
their intentions to expand
their services in early 2015
and build a new facility to
meet demand after Lapeer
Grain was forced to shutter its
doors.
Brandt said the 2016
planting season went well and
growers are optimistic that a
good crop year is in store.
Things are just starting

Photo by Maria Brown

Full service ag company officials say M-53 corridor is the place to be

Depot Manager Craig Brandt stands in the control


room of Helenas new liquid fertilizer building
where fertilizers and herbicides are precisely
mixed.
to taper off now but were
still busy with applying nitrogen and herbicides, he said.
The company sells seed,
crop protection products and
fertilizer and offers financial
and precision application ser-

vices.
Headquartered
in
Collierville,
Tennessee,
Helena has more than 4,000
employees that work in about
450 branch locations nationwide.

Imlay commission tackles multiple items at meeting


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY While
magic and ice cream were
being dispersed outside at the
adjacent Lamb-Steele Park
last Tuesday, June 21, city
commissioners were busy
conducting business inside
the city hall.
Lifeguard raises floated
Among the matters being
discussed was a request from
the citys Parks and Recreation
Board to establish a new 2016
pay structure for lifeguards at
the Alvin Norlin Memorial
Swimming Pool.
Under the terms of the
request, newly-hired lifeguards age 18 and older
would be paid at the rate of
$8.50 per hour; while new
hires under age 18 would be
paid $7.40 an hour.

IN HOUSE
JEWELRY
REPAIR
Over 26 Years
Experience
Gem &Diamond
Specialist
Downtown Imlay City
810-724-RUBY
Tues.-Fri. 10:30- 5:30
Sat. 10:30 - 3:00

The request also recommended incremental (40 cents


per hour per year) increases in
lifeguards wages in both
2017 and 2018.
City Manager Tom Youatt
said the new pay structure
reflects an increase in the
minimum wage.
Right now were only
looking at approval for 2016,
said Youatt. An increase in
the following years should be
looked at the parks and recs
next committee meeting in
July.
While the new pay structure for 2016 was approved
by a 5-0 vote, Mayor Walt
Bargen expressed concern
about proposed increases for
2017 and 2018.
The request was for three
years, Bargen said. This is
for just one year. We have to
ensure that we are able to
address our budget. We cant
continue to increase expenses.
Resident Stu Davis, who
sits on the Parks and

Recreation Board, suggested


that the rate increases are
minimal.
We need to pay that
rate, Davis said. If something were to happen over
there...Its only a $500 issue
for this year.
Commissioner
Al
Ramirez pointed out that the
community pool provides the
city and its residents a valuable recreational resource,
Theres really not that
much for kids to do around
here, said Ramirez. I think
the pool is great for the kids
and the community.
Unions come to terms
Youatt informed commissioners that the citys TPOAM
(DPWand office personnel)
and POAM (police officers)
unions had ratified tentative
agreements with the City of
Imlay City.
The two-year agreements,
which include 2.5% and 2.0%
wage increases during the
next two years, will run
through June 30, 2018. Both

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Imlay City, MI 48444
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Tri-City Times
Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:
594 N. Almont Ave. P.O. Box 278, Imlay City,
MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry
application pending.
Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St.
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Periodicals paid at Imlay City.
Postmaster please send address changes to
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unions also agreed to contribute 3% of their wages to their


pensions.
Both agreements were
approved by city commissioners by a vote of 5-0, with
commissioners Amy Planck
and Mike Romine absent.
Turkelson makes case
Lapeer County Prosecutor
Tim Turkelson was on hand
to remind commissioners and
visitors of his candidacy in
the August 2 Republican
Primary election for prosecutor.
Turkelson is facing challenges in the August primary
from Lapeer Attorney Michael
Sharkey and former 82nd
District Rep. Todd Courser.
Should he win the primary, Turkelson would run
against Democratic challenger, Phil Fulks, in the November
general election.
If elected, Turkelson said
he would work to cut back on
the cost and time associated
with court cases, and will
continue to take a hard line on
child abuse, sexual predators
and adults who use the internet and social media to interact with underage victims.

Cases are taking too


long, an average of two
years, said Turkelson.
Were making a concerted
effort to shorten that process
to about nine months.
There are thousands of
people in Lapeer County
exchanging child pornographic material right now,
Turkelson said. We also have
many senior citizens and vulnerable adults being abused
and taken advantage of;
sometimes even by family
members.

STADIUM SEATING
For Showtimes &
Ticket Information
www.ncgmovies.com
or call

810-667-7469
1650 DeMille
Tuesday $5.00 All Day
For Most Movies

ADMISSION
PRICES

PG

Wednesday, June 29 thru Tuesday, July 05,


1:00, 4:00, 7:00 & 9:30pm

PG-13

Wednesday, June 29 thru Tuesday, July 05,


1:00, 4:00, 6:45 & 9:30pm

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BEFORE 6PM
All Seats Are $6.00
AFTER 6PM
Adults $8.00
Children 12
& under
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$6.00
Students with
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$7.00

www.RomeoTheatre.com SAVE $$$ GET COUPONS!

HOTLINE
ROMEO THEATRE MOVIE
586-752-3455
66120 Van Dyke In the Village Shopping Center

Summer Concert Series

Join us Tuesday, July 5 th, 7 pm at the


Lamb Steele Park (rain location Heritage Church) for

3rd Degree Burns


Farmers' Market Every Thursday, 1 pm to 6 pm
Shop the market
this Thursday to find fresh
produce and other products!
More information can be found at: www.icdda.com or www.facebook.com/downtownimlaycity

COOKS
OPEN JULY 4TH
9-5 pm
3903 VAN DYKE ALMONT
(at corner of Dryden Rd.)

OPEN DAILY! Mon.-Sat. 8am-8pm; Sunday 9am-6pm

810-798-2525

www.americantreeinc.com

APPLY ONLINE . . .

by going to bigboy.com
When applying, select the
IMLAY CITY LOCATION.

Page 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Our Opinion

Put safety first


this Fourth of July

he Fourth of July is upon us, and as we


prepare to celebrate our independence
with picnics and fireworks displays, we
want to remind area residents to put safety first
and avoid potential mishaps with the following
reminders:
Buy legal fireworks from reliable sellers.
Read and follow all label instructions and
warnings.
Always have an adult present. An adult
should light the fireworks.
Never allow children to ignite fireworks or
play with them.
Use fireworks outdoors only. Choose a
smooth, flat surface away from people, pets,
houses, and flammable materials (like dry
leaves).
All pets should be indoors during a fireworks
display. Pets can become scared of the loud
noises, and they could be injured or wander
off and become lost.
Never throw or point fireworks at other
people. Be sure that people are out of range
before lighting fireworks.
Always have water handy. A garden hose and
a bucket should be in easy reach. After a
firework has burned out, pour water on it.
Soak it completely.
Never take fireworks apart, mix their contents
with anything else, or attempt to make your
own fireworks.
Always wear eye protection when lighting
fireworks. Never have any part of your body
over the fireworks.
Light only 1 firework at a time. Move away
quickly once it is lit.
Never re-light a dud firework. Wait 20
minutes, then soak the dud firework in a
bucket of water.
Never carry fireworks in your pocket.
Never shoot fireworks from metal or glass
containers.
Dispose of fireworks by soaking them in
water. After, put them in a fireproof container
that has a cover.
Store unused fireworks in a cool, dry place.
After a fireworks display, do not let your
child pick up the firework pieces that are on
the ground. These pieces could explode.
Put safety first this Fourth of July, and
enjoy the celebration!

Opinion Page
Letters from our readers...

Sentiments reflected in Trump support

Nationalism or internationalism? That is a question


answered quite definitively by
the British voters when they
elected to leave the European
Union. It is a question that
also needs to be answered in
this country.
For years the liberal/progressive view, most recently
espoused by Barack Obama,
Hillary Clinton and John
Kerry, has strongly supported
international
agreements
(trade deals and global warming as examples) that by their
terms give up a degree of sovereignty to some international
commission or the United
Nations resulting in decisions
binding on U.S. citizens being
made by persons from other
countries over which we have
no say or control.
In part the push for this
stems from the belief that all
nations are really alike and
that our nation is no better or
worse than any other. This
being the case it is unfair for
the United States to have so
much more than other countries. Fairness dictates equali-

ty irrespective of how that


may lower our living standard.
Internationalism is now
under siege throughout
Europe and I suspect it has
contributed to the popularity
of Donald Trump here at
home. An analysis of the basis
for the British vote is uncomplicated. It was the desire to
control their own country as
opposed to being ruled from
Brussels. Another way of
describing it is nationalism.
Related is the open border
policy of the EU finally
caused the voters of Great
Britain to say enough.
There are parts of London
where only Middle Eastern
languages are spoken. They
are Islamic/Muslim enclaves
and essentially under Sharia
law. The mayor of London is
Muslim and one of his first
acts was to order removal of
all advertising in the subway
system that showed scantily
clad women.
Also contributing to the
electoral result was British
citizens looking askance at

ell, were not talking


about transgendered
restrooms any more, are we?
Funny how the senseless
but preventable massacre of
49 innocent individuals who
were out having a good time
at a Florida nightclub will
change it up, right?
Now we get to see our
elected officials posture and
bluster, point fingers and lay
blame, invoke fear and shoot
hateful words at each other
about our countrys love
affair with guns, and how all
things will collapse and go
straight to darkness and
chaos if someone dare initiate a discussion that actually
ends with a viable solution
when it comes limiting
access to certain firearms.
Words, while they can
sting like a BB shot, dont
kill, so the Senators and
Congressmen and women
are safe in their little Capitol
Hill bubblefunded solely
by usto stand by and bluster and posture and point
fingers and invoke fear.
I wonder if the 49 clubgoers were scared that gun
control would rob them of
their Constitutional rights.
I wonder if the 20 little
kids sitting at their little elementary school desks inside
Newtown, Connecticuts
Sandy Hook schooland

six of
their dedicated
teachers
were
afraid of
weapons
of war
being regulated.
I won-

der if the
14 municipal
employees at the San
Bernadino Health
Department were frightened
that gun rights might be
altered. Wonder if they had
time to think about it in the
seconds it took for the semiautomatic AR-15s to rip
holes in their bodies and rob
them of life.
Maybe the 12 Batman
fans who stood in line to see
midnight screening of The
Dark Night Rises at the
movie theater in Aurora,
Colorado worried about our
country limiting access to
firearms, and what would
happen if stricter regulations
were put in place.
I will have to perpetually
wonder as not one of them is
now capable of providing an
answer.
We know from the families of the victims of mass
shootings that there is an

contributing their money to


support nations (such as
Greece and Italy) whose
workers work less time and
whose national finances are a
mess.
In the past few weeks I
have had several conversations with citizens here in
Germany. Those I have spoken with have similar concerns about Germany. They
are fearful their country has
been permanently changed
and not for the better. The
government policy of welcoming refugees from northern Africa, Syria, Turkey and
other similar nations has
placed an unsustainable burden on the social welfare system as well as the impact of
the treatment of German
women by men from those
countries where the treatment
of women is less than enlightened.
Nations are different.
They have different cultures;
different traditions and people
dont like those things
changed when they have no
say in how or the manner of

the change. They simply want


a voice in how their country is
run. But, elitists throughout
the rest of the western world,
as in the United States, are
convinced that they alone
have the answer as to how
countries and societies must
function. A crude way of putting it is the average person is
too damn dumb to know what
is good for him/her and their
betters need to make the
decision for them.
However we now see
movements in the Netherlands,
Germany and France to put
the issue of remaining in the
European Union to a vote.
Sentiments that prevailed in
Great Britain and are on the
march in other countries
which is reflected in the support for Donald Trump in the
U.S. As Bob Dylan poignantly wrote so many years ago
the old road is rapidly agin;
Please get out of the new one
if you cant lend your hand.
For the times they are a-changin.
John Lengemann
Imlay City

Robotics Team #4961 thanks 5K sponsors

Shock and Awe-sum


FIRSTRobotics Team #4961
would like to thank their generous sponsors for supporting
the Heritage Festival 5K Run/
Walk.
Saturday proved to be a
beautiful day for all the outdoor activities which were
made possible by our signatures sponsors: L & L Products,
CST Custom Painting, First
Independent Insurance, Gear

Masters, Jocilyn Kennel &


Grooming, Noffert Dental,
also Pauls Collision &
Towing.
We would also like to
thank the donors who provided
prizes and items for the events:
American Gymnastics, Anchor
Bay Powder Coating, Armada
Fair, Art & Jakes, Buffalo
Wild Wings, Chilis, Country
Smoke House, CSB Bank,
Culligan, Emagine Theatre,

GNC, Great Wolf Lodge,


Green Barn Winery, Hansons
Running Shop, Health Plus/
HAP, Hideaway Lanes, Holly
Meadows Golf, Humara,
Huntington Bank, Imlay Ford,
Mark Ridleys Comedy Castle,
McDonalds, Meijer, Milnes
Chevrolet, Milnes Inc., Natural
Awakening Magazine, NCG
Lapeer Cinemas, Romeo
Theatre, Sams Club, The
Robot Garage, Village Winery,

Walmart, Youngers Irish


Tavern.
It is with the unwavering
support of our community and
these gracious businesses that
the Almont Robotics program
is thriving. We look forward to
great success in our upcoming
year!
Sincerely,
Shock and Awe-sum
Team #4961
Almont

Praise for Lapeer Relay for Life sponsors


Lapeer County Relay for
Life, 2016, was a great celebration of survivors and
remembrance of those lives
lost to cancer. We now want
to praise our sponsors who
helped us come so close to
our goal of $80,000 to continue the hard work and programs of the American Cancer
Society.
These are the companies
and individuals, Signature
level and above, who committed their support prior to
the event on June 11. Thank
you, everyone, especially
those we may have neglected
to mention:
McDonalds Lapeer &
Imlay City, Ray Cs Cycle &
Sports, Milnes Auto Group,

RayCs Harley-Davidson of
Lapeer, Tri-County Bank,
Imlay City Rotary, Team
Weingartz Warriors, Eastern
Michigan
Fairgrounds,
Lapeer Community Schools,
Louies Sports Tavern, Polar
Palace Arena Complex, Cars
108, Tri-City Times, WNEM.
com, Albar
Industries,
Bluewater Bluejays, Bryans
Supermarket, Castle Creek
Golf
Club,
Centofanti
Chiropractic, Cooperative
Elevator Co., CSB Bank,
Family of Nancy Crabtree,
Genesys Hurlely Cancer
Institute, Hawaiian Dreamers,
John L. Lengemann Attorney,
Lapeer
County
Fire
Association, Lapeer Plating
& Plastics, McLaren Lapeer

Conversation changes, things stay the same

www.tricitytimes-online.com

outcry to ban semi-automatic weapons like those used


in each of the foregoing
murders. We know those
families arent afraid that the
country will disintegrate if
our elected leaders had the
guts to actually take a stand
on the issue. Those families
are too busy grieving the
senseless, inexplicable, brutal deaths of human beings
they created, were related to,
and loved. Theyre too busy
advocating for stricter gun
laws to spare their brothers
and sisters in the human
family that were all members of from suffering their
totally arbitrary, random
fate.
And were too busy
thinking theres a difference
between them and us; that
theres some magic wall surrounding ourselves and our
own loved ones that will
prevent something horrifically similar from happening
to us. That way, we can all
argue and point fingers, and
posture and bluster and
invoke fear about guns being
taken away; about guns
falling into the wrong
hands, as if that hasnt
already happened a zillion
times, and about the progressive socialist liberals
bent on revoking all that our
Founding Fathers held

sacred because, well, who


knows as those damn libs
are just so progressive and
socialist and whatnot.
Our esteemed leaders in
the House and Senate continue to wave the flag of
impotency on the issue by
failing at every turn to prove
with their actions, not their
words, that they put the lives
of innocents before their
obvious desire to hang onto
their well paid positions.
Jobs we hired them to do,
and have stood by as they
have accomplished the epitome of the phrase next to
nothing for the past eight
years.
Math has never been my
strong suit but thats 12.82
innocent lives per year
theyve failed to protect in
their zeal to make sure
next to nothing gets
done while Barack Obama
is president.
I imagine well be onto
transgendered bathrooms
again sometime soon, what
with the gay marriage thing
pretty much exhausted.
Theres still a lot of life left
in those pressing issues.
Too bad I cant say the same
for the 101 people who were
massacred by semi-automatic rifle fire.
Email Catherine at
cminolli@pageone-inc.com.

Regional Hospital, Midwest Weston Elementary Relay


Commercial Construction, Recess.
LLC, Muir Bros. Funeral
Sincerely,
Home-Imlay City, NolinYvonne Wilson
Capman families, North
Promotional Lead
Lapeer Counseling Center,
Lapeer County
Sidetracks Bar & Grill,
Relay for Life 2016
Talmer Bank-Imlay City,
Imlay City

Ice cream draws 200


The Imlay City DDA
wishes to extend its deepest
appreciation to CSB Bank
and their volunteers who
made the Tuesday, June 21st
Ice Cream Social a resounding success. Free ice cream
and entertainment were provided to nearly 200 people of
all ages, and it was all made
possible by the people who
volunteered their time
and resources to our community.
The wonderful employees at CSB Bank served over
18 gallons of ice cream at the
event and inflated dozens of
balloons for very happy kids.
The annual ice cream social
event simply would not be

possible without the efforts of


CSB Bank and its employees. The Imlay City DDA
would also like to thank the
Mulefoot Gastropub, Heidi
VanKersen, and Gwynn
Hintz. Also, thank you to the
Michigan Council for Arts
and Cultural Affairs and the
Greater Flint Arts Council for
their generous support of the
2016 Concert Series. We at
the IC DDA are already looking forward to next years ice
cream social!
Regards,
Dana Walker
Director
Downtown Development
Authority
Imlay City

Sheriff worth keeping

Lapeer County Sheriff


Ron Kalanquin has my admiration and gratitude for the
and strong ethical administration of his duties Sheriff.
Over the years I have
worked with other leaders in
public safety in Genesee,
Shiawassee and Lapeer
County. A few of those leaders had so-called special
deputies that were political
appointees or friends that
were not trained as officers.
Yet, these special officers
were provided with a badge
and allowed to carry a weapon and operate as a public
safety officer. Sheriff Ron,
Kalanquin from the beginning of his term of office and
continuing today has never
allowed anyone to have a special status in return for political favors. He also will not
intervene when someone has
broken the law.
As a former Lapeer
County Commissioner representing District 1 and as a
former Columbiaville Village
Trustee and in my capacity in

the past as emergency medical services coordinator for


Lapeer County through
Lapeer General Hospital, I
have worked with the Sheriff
and found hes willing to
work with people outside of
the police community regarding public safety. He worked
with the village council in
Columbiaville to establish a
neighborhood watch group.
He worked with various EMS
groups in Lapeer County to
facilitate cooperation between
his deputies and other EMS
units regarding motor vehicle
accidents. During my tenure
as a County Commissioner he
vigorously fought for funding
to make our community safe.
He continues in that mode
in his position as Sheriff to
initiate and coordinate programs that enhances our communities safety. For example,
statistics show that we average about two drug overdoses
per week that require emergency intervention. Since
Letters page 7-A

Page 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

he Civil War is an ongoing source of amazing


stories of the heroism and
courage of men from the
local area. After the column
about Thomas H. Sheppard,
the Almont man who kept the
American flag hidden safely
during more than 500 days of
captivity in Confederate prisons, my friend, Tom Edwards
(AHS Class of 1964) sent me
an email.
In it he said, I heard a
story a long, long time ago
that Jeb Stuart was shot off
his horse and killed by a
Hough from Almont. But the
name was spelled HUFF. Is
that true?
James Ewell Brown
Jeb Stuart of Virginia was
one of the most famous
Confederate Generals.
Wikipedia says, Stuart was a
cavalry
commander known
for his
mastery of
reconnaissance and
the use of
cavalry in
Rick Liblong support of
offensive
operations.
While he cultivated a cavalier
image (red-lined gray cape,
yellow sash, hat cocked to
the side with an ostrich
plume, red flower in his
lapel, often sporting cologne),
his serious work made him
the trusted eyes and ears of
Robert E. Lees army and
inspired Southern morale.
Stuarts cavalry figured
prominently in the Battles of
Bull Run, Fredericksburg,
Chancellorsville and
Gettysburg.
At Gettysburg, Stuart was
ordered to sweep around the
rear of the Union lines and
attack at the same time as
Gen. George Pickett was
attacking from the front. But
Stuart was intercepted by the
First Michigan Cavalry under
Gen. George Armstrong
Custer. Custer and his
Wolverines actions forced

Gen. J.E.B. Stuart is fatally wounded by Pvt. John


A. Huff (in foreground with Colt pistol) of Armada,
Michigan.
Gen. Robert E. Lee to withdraw from Gettysburg and
retreat back to Virginia. It
was during this battle, you
will recall, that Almonter
Sheppard was captured but
preserved his American flag.
But the war was not over.
Stuart and his men fought on
in the Overland Campaign
against Union forces under
the command of Lt. Gen.
Ulysses S. Grant including
the U.S. Cavalry under Gen.
Philip Sheridan.
The Battle of Yellow
Tavern, according to
Wikipedia, occurred May
11, 1864 at an abandoned inn
located six miles north of
Richmond. The Confederates
tenaciously resisted from the
low ridgeline bordering the
road to Richmond, fighting
for over three hours.
A countercharge by the
1st Virginia Cavalry pushed
the advancing Union troops
back from the hilltop as
Stuart, on horseback, shouted
encouragement while firing
his revolver at the Union
troopers.

Photo provided

All the Liblong day..

Painting by Jackson Walker

John A. Huff house still stands in Armada.

Flamboyant Confederate
General J.E.B. Stuart.

Historical marker at site


of Stuarts mortal wound
by John Huff.
As the Fifth Michigan
Cavalry streamed in retreat
past Stuart, a dismounted
Union private, 48-year-old
John A. Huff, turned and shot
Stuart with his .44-caliber
revolver from a distance of
10-30 yards.
Huffs bullet struck
Stuart in the left side. It then
sliced through his stomach
and exited his back, one inch
to the right of his spine.
Stuart suffered great pain as
an ambulance took him to
Richmond to await his wifes
arrival at the home of Dr.
Charles Brewer, his brotherin-law. Stuart ordered his

sword and spurs be given to


his son.
His last whispered
words were: I am resigned;
Gods will be done. He died
at 7:38 p.m. on May 12, the
following day, before Flora
Stuart, his wife, reached his
side. He was 31-years old.
Stuart was buried in
Richmonds Hollywood
Cemetery. Upon learning of
Stuarts death, General Lee
is reported to have said that
he could hardly keep from
weeping at the mere mention
of Stuarts name and that
Stuart had never given him a
bad piece of information.
Pvt. John A. Huff was
from Armada, Michigan, not
Almont. Huff, a carpenter by
trade, was 42-years-old when
he enlisted in the Army in
October 1861. He was married to Abigail Culver and
had six children. Huff stood
5 8 tall with brown hair
and blue eyes and was
assigned to Company B of
the Second U.S.
Sharpshooters. This unit was
a very elite group of marksmen using the new Sharps
rifle.
Huff was discharged on
January 27, 1863 due to
heart disease. But a year
later, he enlisted again, this
time in the Fifth Michigan
Cavalry, part of the
Michigan Brigade under the
command of Gen. George
Armstrong Custer of
Monroe, Michigan. It was
during this enlistment that he
killed Stuart.
Unfortunately, on May
28, 1864, Huff was shot in
the head during battle at
Hawes Shop, in Hanover
County, Virginia, seven
miles east of Yellow Tavern.
After several weeks in a military hospital, he was sent
home by train. He died on
June 23, 1864 and is interred
in Willow Grove Cemetery
in Armada.
With his killing of J.E.B
Stuart, John A. Huff earned
his place in American history.
Authors note: Regarding
last weeks column about the
Wharton Center, Jaime
Spataro, of Baylin Artists
Management, sent me an
email asking me to update
The Art of Time performers
coming to the Wharton.
Steven Page (founder and
former lead of the iconic
band Barenaked Ladies) and
Wesley Stace (AKA John
Wesley Harding) join singers
Andy Maize (Skydiggers)
and Craig Northey (The
Odds). Sorry for the mix-up.
Email Rick at
rick.liblong@cox.net.

Howell supports balanced budgets

TRI-CITY AREA
State Rep. Gary Howell
voted last week in support of
the General Fund and School
Aid Fund budgets for fiscal
year 2017, sending the bills
to the governor for consideration.
Howell, R-North Branch,
said the budget invests in
areas important to Michigan
families, including education,

public safety, and fixing


roads and bridges.
Just like families in
Michigan, the state government must budget carefully
and live within its means,
Howell said. We went line
by line through the budget to
make sure we were getting
the most from every dollar
entrusted to the state. We
have come up with a fiscally

responsible blueprint that has


real solutions for the issues
facing Michigan.
Howell said education is
a priority, and K-12 funding
is at an all-time high. The
budget includes a $120 perstudent increase for all Lapeer
County school districts.
Career and technical education also received a boost in
funding for the coming fiscal

year.
We are working hard to
make sure our children and
grandchildren can get the
education that best fits them,
Howell said. For some that
means going to college for a
profession, while for others it
could mean learning a trade
and entering the workforce.
The bills now go to the
governor for consideration.

Letters from our readers...


from page 6-A
2013 twenty Lapeer County
residents have died from opiate drug overdoses according
to the press reports. To combat this problem Sheriff Ron
Kalanquin reached out to
other Sheriff departments
that have similar problems to
find ways to combat this danger to our community. He
met with the Macomb County
Sheriff Department and was
introduced to a process to
prevent drug overdose deaths
in our County from opiate
overdose through the use of

Narcan kits. He had our


Sheriff Deputies trained in
the emergency use of these
kits and worked with the
Lapeer County Board of
Commissioners to get funding to purchase 50 Narcan
kits that deputies from the
Lapeer County Sheriff
Department now carry to use
when called to a drug overdose situation.
Sheriff Kalanquin also
has been working with local
school officials to find ways
to protect children in our
schools. For example he

Literacy Center gets $300

The Family Literacy on October 8th this year.


Center would like to thank Thank you so much to 40 et
the Lapeer County Voiture 8.
1536, 40 et 8 for their donaMary Bond
tion of $300 to our organiProgram Specialist
zation. We are proud to be a
Family Literacy Center
part of the Fantasy Forest
Lapeer

instructed his deputies when


they are near a Lapeer County
School to stop in unannounced and walk through
the school as a way to
improve school security and
also help the students see the
police in a more positive
manner. He also worked with
a number of Lapeer County
schools to improve school
security and emergency
response where someone is
threatening school children.
As a former paramedic I
witnessed many Sheriff deputies involved with horrific
automobile accidents, or in
instances where somebody
was murdered or badly
injured, risk their own lives
to save others in the community. In many of those
instances some of these deputies were exposed to situations where they may have,
or could of, developed post

traumatic stress disorder


(PTSD). Our Sheriff recognizes that and has a procedure in place to prevent burn
out.
Our Lapeer County
Sheriff Ron Kalanquin has
proven over the years he is
dedicated to the safety of
Lapeer County residents and
his employees. Since there is
no Democratic nominee running for the Sheriff position
in the August primary, it
important for Democrats,
Independents
and
Republicans to recognize the
primary is the election that
will determine who represents Lapeer County as
Sheriff.
I am voting for Sheriff
Ron Kalanquin and encourage others to also vote for
him.
Jeff Fulton
Columbiaville

Photo provided

Did Almont man kill Confederate general?

The Song of the Lark painting.

A portraits
saving power

first stood before the


painting titled The Song
of the Lark sometime after I
reluctantly drove my youngest daughter to Chicago.
Mom, I have to do this,
she said in defiance to the
9/11 terrorist attacks.
In retrospect, letting her
go led me
to the Art
Institute of
Chicago.
There, a
large
painting of
a young
peasant
woman

standing
in an open
field at
sunrise,
caught my eye. Shes heard
the larks song and paused
mid-stride with her mouth
parted, face uplifted.
I found another kindred
spirit, pondered the artists
meaning of the larks song
and sickle in her hand. As
years passed, this stunning
work of art became mine,
clear and true, a prophetic
image of who I was becoming. When I walked into my
lavender fields to weed and
harvest, I paused in awe of
the new day and birdsong.
Long before my discovery of Jules Bretons beautiful work, Willa Cather, one
of Americas foremost
female authors, experienced
a similar kinship with the
portrait. Many readers consider The Song of the Lark
Ms. Cathers most autobiographical novel, the story of
a young artists awakening
against the backdrop of the
western landscape.
We see and hear again
the theme of the larks song.
Thea Kronborg, the protagonist, arises from her inextricable connection to the
land with strength to
become what she meant to
bean opera singer.
If the influence of
Bretons barefooted peasant
seems limited to writers,
think of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Honest Living . . .

In 1934, admiringly, she


announced The Song of the
Lark Americas most popular painting. The Chicago
Daily News sponsored the
nationwide contest.
No one has to convince
me of the paintings worth.
Although, this past March
while visiting again
Chicagos art museum, I
was surprised to find Bill
Murrays testimonial on the
wall beside my farmer
friend. The actor claimed,
The painting saved my
life.
Early in his career while
residing in Chicago, overwhelmed with failure and
despair, Murray determined
to drown himself in Lake
Michigan. I realized Id
walked in the wrong direction, not just the wrong
direction to where I live,
butin terms of the desire
to stay alive.
Unawares, he wandered
to the art institute, walked
in and found Bretons peasant before the sunrise. Ive
always loved this paintingand thought, Well
theres a girl who doesnt
have a whole lot of prospects, but the suns coming
up anyway and shes got
another chance. So I think
that gave me some sort of
feeling that I too am a person and I get another chance
everyday the sun comes
up.
Dear Reader, my husband and I drove our daughter home from Chicago one
starlit night a year after I
left her there. She wandered
a long season before she
found her place. Meanwhile,
the sun arose each morningalways, our foremost,
faithful prospect in the
cloud of misery.
Hope. I believe Jules
Breton understood this saving power of Gods light. A
man who knew suffering
and loved his native French
countryside, he heard the
lark sing.
Email Iris at
irisleeu@sbcglobal.net.

One day we should


all embrace freedom

s we approach the day


our country celebrates
its birthday, the day we
declared our independence,
we pause.
None of
us sees
the complete picture. We
all have
our biases.
We see
from different

vantage

points;
therefore
we have
individual perspectives.

Thats just the way it is.


Often that leads to dis-unity.
A birthday party day,
though, is the one day we
should all embrace the freedom and wealth we have in
this country as compared to
countless other countries.
And while it sounds clich
and somewhat presumptuous
to say God Bless America
in that weve tried unsuccessfully to put Him in a box
and told him to stay there,
Im going to use my constitutional freedom anyway to
implore Him to do just that.
GOD BLESS AMERICA.
Email Willene at
willenetanis@aol.com.

Page 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Music, ribbon cutting will coincide on July 7


Double Play to perform in concert at Almont park
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT There will


be no concert at Almont
Community
Park
on
Thursday evening, June 30,
due to the upcoming Fourth
of July holiday.
However, when Almonts
2016 Music in the Park
concert series returns on

Thursday, July 7, it will be


with considerable hoopla
and celebration.
Upgrades to pavilion
Not only will popular
local band Double Play be
performing, the Almont Park
Board will mark the completion of recent renovations to
the parks pavilion.
The ribbon cutting ceremony will start at 6:30 p.m.

Early deadline for July 6 issue


TRI-CITY AREA In observance of the Fourth of
July holiday, the Tri-City Times office will be closed on
Monday, July 4. All advertisements, letters, guest columns, articles and items for publication in the July 6,
2016 issue are due by 4 p.m. this Friday, July 1. The
Times office will reopen for business at 8 a.m. on
Tuesday, July 5. For more information or clarification,
call Catherine at 810-724-2615 or email cminolli@
pageone-inc.com.

Anything Blueberry winners


IMLAY CITY Entries have been sampled and
winners in the Anything Blueberry recipe contest have
been crowned. The contest, which took place June 23, had
cooks and bakers submitting their original blueberry recipes to the Mulefoot Gastropub restaurant where staff
selected the best creations. The contest was held in conjunction with the upcoming Imlay City Chamber of
Commerces Blueberry Festival slated for next month.
Taking first place with a Blueberry Buckle Pie was
Sue Wagner of Coldwater; second place went to Heidi
VanKersen of Imlay City for her Grilled Pork Loin with
Blueberry reduction sauce and coming in third was
Hannah VanKersen of Imlay City for Blueberry/
Strawberry Cheesecake Fluff.
The winners receive gift certificates to the Mulefoot
Gastropub.

Wednesday, June 29th

Wednesday, July 6th

Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to


3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.

Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to


3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.
Dryden Historical Society meets 1:00
p.m. at Dryden Township Hall.

Friday, July 1st

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Saturday, July 2nd

Imlay City VFW Auxiliary 2492 will


meet 2:00 p.m. at the Post Hall (behind
Tri-City Times)

Tuesday, July 5th

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

Lapeer Area Citizens Against

Thursday, July 7th

Imlay City VFW Post 2492 will meet


7:00 p.m. at the Post Hall (behind the
Tri-City Times)

Friday, July 8th

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Tuesday, July 12th

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open 4:30
p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

How to use our Community Calendar

The Tri-City Times Community Calendar is a weekly schedule


of events for churches, clubs, local meetings, and civic
organizations. If you have an item for the Community
Calendar call our office at 810-724-2615. Deadline for all
calendar items is noon Monday prior to publication date.

AFFORDABLE INDEPENDENT LIVING APARTMENTS WITH:

3 Nutritious Meals Daily


Compimentary Satellite TV
Life-enriching Activities

Light Housekeeping
Health Services
Available

www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org

Dentistry and the Almont


Area Chamber of Commerce.
July 21: Wayward Wind,
featuring the talented Salsido
Brothers, will perform, sponsored by Mobil X.
July 28: Rock of Ages
will return to the park stage
for an evening of big band
and swing music, sponsored
by the Law Offices of Steve
Schneider & Associates.
Aug. 4: The Hackwells
will take listeners back to
their roots with a variety of
folk and bluegrass music,
sponsored by Yarbrough
Insurance Agency and the

Almont
Chamber
of
Commerce.
Aug. 11: The 2016
Music in the Park series concludes with another lively
performance from Third
Degree Burns, sponsored by
Gear Master.
For questions or more
information about the concert series, call the Almont
Village Offices at 810-7988528.
The concert series is
coordinated by Almont Park
Board Chairman Gary
Peltier, who also serves on
the Almont Village Council.

Solar park takes shape in Lapeer

DTE installing panels for project

LAPEER DTE Energy has


installed the first of nearly
200,000 total solar panels to
be located at the companys
two solar projects in Lapeer,
Michigan. The solar parks,
capable of providing enough
clean energy to power more
than 9,000 homes, demonstrate DTEs commitment to
bring more clean energy to
Michigan.
DTEs Lapeer solar projects will create approximately
150 temporary jobs during
construction and more than
five permanent jobs once the
projects are operational. The
projects are expected to be

completed by the end of 2016.


DTE
Energy
is
Michigans leading provider
of solar energy, and the Lapeer
solar projects further our commitment to clean energy.
Through the development of
renewable energy projects,
like solar, we are building a
more sustainable future for
Michigan and providing
affordable, reliable, safe and
clean energy to our customers, said Irene Dimitry, vice
president of Business Planning
and Development for DTE
Energy.
The larger of DTEs
Lapeer solar projects, located

on approximately 150 acres


off Demille Road, is one of the
largest utility-owned solar
arrays east of the Mississippi
River and more than 15 times
larger than any other solar
installation in Michigan. The
second project is located off
Turrill Road on 100 acres of
land. All of the power generated by these facilities will be
fed into the energy grid and
distributed to those who need
it.
The City of Lapeer is
honored to join DTE in celebrating this milestone, said
William Sprague, mayor of
the City of Lapeer.
We are proud of Lapeers
contribution to bringing more

green energy to Michigan and


to creating a cleaner environment for our community and
for the state.
DTE has three other solar
projects currently under development in Ypsilanti, at the GM
Warren Transmission plant
and in Detroit. By the end of
the year, DTE will have 31
solar parks in operation capable of generating enough clean
energy to power more than
14,000 homes.
The addition of these five
solar projects will position
DTE Energy to exceed a state
mandate requiring electric
utilities to supply 10 percent
of their electricity from renewable energy sources.

Downey steps down as principal in Dryden


By Maria Brown

Community Calendar

Lapeer Area Citizens Against

and include Park Board


members, along with representatives from Mid-Thumb
Contracting Group, Partners
in Architecture, and the
Michigan Dept. of Natural
Resources, which funded the
recent park improvement
project.
Double Plays performance is being sponsored by
Aristo-Cast. This year marks
the first time the band has
played at the park.
Attendees are encouraged to bring along their own

blankets and lawn chairs to


enjoy the entertainment.
Refreshments, including
soft drinks and hot dogs, will
be available for purchase in
support of the Almont Lions
Club.
In the event of heavy
winds or rain, the concert
will be moved inside the
adjacent Almont Lions Hall
on Water Street, east of Van
Dyke.
Future
concerts
include:
July 14: The Lapeer
Symphony Orchestra, sponsored by Almont Downtown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

DRYDEN A new principal will greet elementary


students when they return to
classes in September. Robert
Downey, Dryden Elementary
principal since 2012, has
taken a new
job
with
L a p e e r
Community
Schools.
It was
for a combination
of
personal and
Robert
professional
Downey
reasons that
I found the
opportunity in Lapeer to be
the right choice for me,
Downey said.
Earlier this month he was
named principal of Turrill

Elementary. Its a homecoming of sorts as Downey is a


1984 graduate of Lapeer East.
He said he views it as a
chance to give back to the
district that gave him so
much.
Ive heard a lot of positive comments about Lapeer
Schools and the changes that
the district has undergone,
Downey said.
Of course Ill miss the
staff and students at Dryden.
The people there are second
to none, but I am looking forward to the next challenge
and helping LCS to continue
to grow in a positive direction.
Downey spent 17 years as
a teacher in Dryden before
becoming elementary principal four years ago. He also
had stints as interim principal
and dean of students.

I was blessed to
work with dedicated and passionate educators in Dryden
and look forward to working
with a great team in Lapeer,
he added.

Applications
for
Downeys former position are
being taken now by the MidMichigan Area Public Schools
Consortium through July 6 or
until the position is filled.

Send us your announcements


TRI-CITY AREA Do you or a family member
have a recent accomplishment or milestone youd like to
share and celebrate with the community?Then send us
the details and we will gladly help you share the news on
our Announcements page.
Engagements, weddings, anniversaries, special birthdays, births, promotions, graduations or other educational achievements, success in competitionwe post
these and other announcements in our pages free of
charge. We encourage you to include photos when possible.
Send submissions to tct@pageone-inc.com or TriCity Times, P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.
Have questions? Contact us at (810) 724-2615.

Obituaries
~ Richard Michael Frammolino, 73 ~
Richard Michael
Frammolino, 73, of Ray
Township, passed away
Thursday, June 16, 2016, at
Henry Ford Macomb
Hospital.
He was born in Detroit,
August 28,1942, the son of
the late Antillo and Margaret
(Zelenek) Frammolino.
Dick found love again
in 2002 when he met Carol
Shore. The couple enjoyed
their 14 years together until
his passing.
Dick served his country
with the United States
Marines honorably for four
years.
Dick attended St.
Augustine Catholic School
before joining the Marines
and earned his G.E.D. during his service. He had

attended St. Augustine


Catholic Church. Dicks life
after the Marine Corps led
him to become a mechanic
and a heavy equipment operator. He was a dedicated
hardworking man. With his
knowledge and mechanical

abilities he could fix anything. He was always willing


to help his family and
friends. If you needed help,
he never said no.
Dick enjoyed cutting
wood, riding his Harley
Davidson motorcycle, fixing
items in his pole barn, planting his vegetable garden and
especially loved spending
time with his grandchildren.
Surviving in addition to
his love, Carol Shore, are
three daughters, LaDonna
(David) Thibodeau of
Memphis, Lisa (Todd) Bont
of New Baltimore and
Nicole (Sean) Kriesch of
Emmett Township; nine
grandchildren; his extended
family of Matt and Debbie
Burns, David and Michelle
Shore, Steve and Sherry

Shore, and six grandchildren; three siblings, Karen


(John) Knapp of Richmond,
Martha King of Casco, and
Gregory (Susan)
Frammolino of Emmett; a
Brother-in-law, Tom
OConnell, as well as several nieces, nephews and many
friends.
He is preceded in death
by two siblings, Nicholas
Frammolino, and Paulette
OConnell.
The family honors the
memory of Richard with a
private memorial gathering.
Arrangements provided by
Kaatz Funeral Directors,
Richmond.
Memorials are suggested
to Wishes of the Family.
For information and Guest
Book, kaatzfunerals.com.

To share one of these obituaries with a friend or a loved-one


VISIT US ONLINE AT:

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Entrepreneurs in the making

Your Local Agent

Lapeer County Ed Tech class creates future CEOs & CFOs

- for -

Auto
or
Home

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo provided

Insurance

With help from the Digital Media Arts program, the Top Thrill management
team was able to create a Wall Street-worthy group photos.
gram, the companies bought
and sold from the 5,000 plus
other schools from around the
world with virtual businesses.
We do everything we
can to emulate a real business, Smith said, referring to
things like month-end and
annual reports that must be
completed.
Student employees also
create and share professional
development presentations
weekly to ensure that they all
learn the various aspects of
marketing, problem solving
and interpersonal skills.
They even attend trade
shows where they distribute
marketing materials, sell
products and build customer
relationships.
Smith said the opportunities available through VEI
have
transformed
the

Photo by Carrie Smith

Editors note: The following is part of an ongoing


series highlighting programs
at the Lapeer County Ed Tech
Center and how those programs have changed and
evolved over the years to meet
the needs of students and the
local, state and world economy.
ATTICA Often it
takes lots of schooling and
decades of work experience
before someone in the business world earns an impressive title but Carrie Smiths
Marketing
and
Entrepreneurship class at the
Lapeer County Ed Tech
Center is full of CEOs, CFOs
and human resource executives who are still on their
way toward getting their high
school diploma. Thats
because these students, who
aspire to become business
leaders, are tasked with creating and operating their own
virtual businesses.
Using the resources provided by Virtual Enterprises
International (VEI), Smith
has her students build a company from the ground up,
starting with job interviews
and drafting a business plan.
Students that wish to be
Chief Executive Officer
interview with the superintendent
of
the
Lapeer
Intermediate School District,
Steven Zott and those pursuing Chief Financial Officer
interview with Cheryl Porter,
Director of Finance and
Technology,Smith said.
The top candidates are

Imagineers executives took part in a virtual business trade show as part of their class requirements.
given the executive positions
and then they interview all
other student employees and
place them into an appropriate department within the
firms. (See officer list at end
of story)
In the 2015-16 school
year, students in the morning
session operated Imagineers,
a utilities company, and students in the afternoon session
marketed cars and gasoline
through their company, Top
Thrill. Through the VEI pro-

Marketing
and
Entrepreneurship Program
from what had been a traditional textbook and projectbased curriculum into something interactive.
Now were that hands
on, true lab program, she
said.
When students are having fun they will retain information and buy in to what
were teaching.
In addition to running
their virtual businesses, stu-

By Maria Brown

vious comments that this


property purchase was the
perfect scenario for the
DDA. If the village didnt
act on the opportunity to buy
the land before it heads to the
tax foreclosure auction later
this year it would continue to
be an eyesore.
The downtown business
was deemed structurally
unsound after a tanker, making a delivery to the station,
struck the building several
years ago. The owners walked
away from the property and
havent paid the taxes since
2013. According to the St.
Clair County Treasurers

dents operate the Ed Tech


Centers on-site store, The
Bodega, where apparel, gift
shop and food items are sold
to students, staff and school
guests. Running the cash register and stocking shelves
proves to be good experience
when teens look for jobs in
the retail sector.
All students are members
of DECA (Association of
Marketing students) and get
the chance to attend leadership conferences and compete
in district, state and international contests.
The Bodega has received
gold level certification from
national DECA, Smith said.
Sam Waldorf, CEO for
Top Thrill, earned the emerging leader award from
National DECA this year.
Marketing
and
Entrepreneurship students
also coordinate a special
Fashion Show each year,
teaming up with the special
education Rock Team. Local
businesses donated prom
dresses and tuxedos and cosmetology students help models look their finest.
Job prospects for high
school graduates in business
are good right now, Smith
said, whether they want to
work for themselves or someone else.
Smith said there are many
organizations, including government agencies, reaching
out and helping entrepreneurs
and many colleges now offer
classes for future business
owners.
Jobs in finance and
accounting are always among
the top ten careers for
growth,she noted.
No matter what direction
they feel called, Smith said
that a traditional four-year
degree is ideal but developing
an independent spirit is
important too.
In this field, you need to
step out and stand out a little
bit to get noticed, she said.
Some of her former students have landed jobs like
selling cars at local dealer-

Village purchases property


Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

CAPAC Council
members voted unanimously
at their June 6 meeting to purchase 201 N. Main Street, the
abandoned Citgo gas station,
now in tax foreclosure.
Members passed a motion
to spend up to $10,000 for the
property for which theyll be
reimbursed by the Downtown
Development Authority. The
DDA is leading efforts to
clean up and rehabilitate the
site.
DDA President Greg
McConnell reiterated his pre-

Join Tri-City Times on Facebook


TRI-CITY AREA Were
on Facebook! Navigate your way to
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posting frequent news updates, photos and event reminders.
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Have any suggestions for what youd like to see? Post
your thoughts while logged on or send us an email at tct@
pageone-inc.com.

office, more than $9,752 is


taxes and fees are owed.

Acquiring property in
disrepair was the original
intent of the DDA when
it was established more than
25 years ago, McConnell
noted.
He said theyve budgeted
$70,000 for the project and
preliminary estimates have
put the cost at $62,000 so far,
although McConnell stressed
that additional fees usually
crop up as site mitigation gets
underway.
Theyve received a
$39,387 quote from Oscar
W. Larson Company to
properly clear the site.
Work would include demolition of the building and canopy; removal and disposal of
two underground tanks and
related equipment and backfilling tank excavation and
building demolition sites with
sand. Theyll work with an
owner-supplied geologist to
collect the necessary soil
samples.
The quote does not
include removal or disposal
of soils from the site.

ships, doing marketing for


Chrysler Fiat and starting
their own companies in
Lapeer County.

The Top Thrill car dealership


officers were: (1st
Semester/2nd Semester)
CEO: Isabelle Downey /
Sam Waldorf
CFO: Jasmine Barragan /
Ricki King
VP Accounting: Amanda
Gravat / Jasmine Barragan
VP Sales: Sam Waldorf /
Cole Martin
VP Design: DJ Rumsey /
Claudia Zarate
VP Admin: Claudia
Zarate / Kelly Martinez
VP HR: Ricki King /
Isabelle Downey
Imagineers officers were:
CEO: Jacob Humphries
CFO: Darren Hunt
VP Accounting: Max
Kage
VP Sales: Zoe Spencer
VP Design: Cristina
Benitez
VP
Admin:
Tessa
Haasnoot
VP HR: Ian Latiluppe

GASS-BECKER INSURANCE
ALMONT

CAPAC

METAMORA

LOCATED IN IMLAY CITY

Dr Jerry E Zayid
Foot Specialist/Surgeon

Medical & Surgical


Foot Specialist
Medicare Diabetic Shoe Provider

MOST FOOT PROBLEMS


CAN BE TREATED IN OFFICE
Diabetic Foot Care
Heel Pain/Orthotics
Bunions, Warts, Corns
Ingrown & Fungus Nails, Calluses

Most Insurances Accepted


House Calls Available

810-724-8030

1795-A
S. Cedar

(in Kroger Plaza)

Come take a tour and be prepared


Home is where
the
is

Page 10-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

A look back at the...

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

...Almont Heritage Festival

Youngsters try their hand at a colorful game during Almont Heritage Festival on Saturday.

Runners take off during Heritage Festival 5K in Almont Saturday morning.

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Adalynn, 3,
of Almont,
fishes for a
treasure at
Heritage
Festival on
Saturday.

Adam holds 3-year-old daughter Stella her siblings Taylor, 6, and Spencer,
9 visit with Almont Police Officer Laura Mohr at Almont Heritage Fest on
Sat.

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Members of Almonts Shock and Awe-sum FIRST Robotics Team show off
their robots during Heritage Festival on Saturday.

Rhianna, 8, braves the


climbing wall at Almont
Heritage Fest on Sat.

Visitors check out the cool cars in the hot sunshine on Saturday at Heritage Festival in Almont.

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Photo by Nicholas Pugliese

Miraya Dison, 3, of Armada, enjoys spin around


the pony ring at Almont Heritage Festival.

Klara Olmsted, 6, hopes to score a prize at


Almont Heritage Festival game.

Page 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Hannah Miles makes


a fashion statement

Dryden writers
share patriotism

Junior high essayists excel during


most recent writing competitions

Almont High School junior earns spot in prestigious design program


By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT If 17-yearold Hannah Miles fulfills her


dreams, future fashionistas
could one day be wearing her
creations.
The Almont High School
junior is one of just 20 young
artists and designers invited
to take part in the Savannah
College of Art (SCAD) and
Designs Rising Star program.
As a result, Hannah will
spend five weeks of her
upcoming summer vacation
in Georgia, studying and preparing for a career in the fashion industry.
Hannah has been awarded
an academic and achievement
scholarship from SCAD and
is already enrolled in the colleges Fashion Technology
and Sewing Technology for
Accessory Design programs.
Rising Star is described as
a challenging five-week program that awards college
credit to rising high school
seniors who are ready for the
university experience at
Savannah College of Art and
Design.
These classes are normally
completed
by
SCADstudents in 10 weeks,
said Hannah, but Rising Star
students must complete their
classes in five weeks.
A quote from Hannahs
acceptance
letter
from
Savannah College of Art and
Design reads as follows.
As a SCADRising Star
student, you will join an elite
group of artists and designers
who are on their way to leading
successful
college
careers.
While learning to design

Rising Star Hannah


Miles, an Almont High
School junior.
clothing is of the highest priority for Hannah, her talents
and interests are diverse.
She is president of Almont
High Schools National
Honor Society, is the student
council vice president, serves
as a member of the schools
Rachels Challenge group,
and is a member of the varsity
dance team.
She is also a competitive
dancer with the Dream Team
Company, where she teaches
dance to children ages 2-5.
Fashion, dance mix
Hannah says her interest
in dance coincides perfectly
with her greater goal of creating and designing clothes.
Ive been interested in
fashion for as long as I can
remember, Hannah recalls.
Ive never pictured myself
doing anything else.
Ican remember drawing
shoes in my coloring books
during my brothers sporting
eventswhen I was probably
younger than five.
Ive been influenced by
my experiences with dance,
Hannah continues, altering

many dance costumes and


learning how garments need
to be able to withstand movement.
Hannah credits her high
school art teacher, Lisa
Wright, for inspiring and
encouraging her creative pursuits, when others may have
been less supportive.
My most recent inspiration, she says, is Zuhair
Murad; a designer who uses
intricate beading, and is worn
by many celebrities on the red
carpet.
Always receptive to new
and fresh ideas, Hannah
describes her personal fashion style as evolving and
ever-changing.
My personal style changes as much as I do, she
admits. I think its something that will help me in the
fashion industry, by allowing
me to design for more than
one specific group.
Ultimately,
says
Hannah, I think I would love
to become a costume designer
for ballet companies, or to
design one-of-a-kind pieces
for special events.
Hannah is the daughter of
John and Laura Miles of
Almont. Her older brother,
Jack, is an Almont High
School graduate who now
attends Lake Superior State
University.
She also has a younger
sister, Madison, 15, who is a
freshman at Almont High
School.

SCAD ranks high
As a matter of note, the
London-based The Business
of Fashion ranks SCADs
graduate fashion programs as
Number 1 overall in the
United States.

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

One of Hannah Miles


original designs.

Party dress designed by


Hannah Miles.
Editors note: Founded in
2007 by Imran Amed, a fashion business advisor, writer
and digital entrepreneur, The
Business of Fashion began as
a project of passion, aiming
to fill the void for an informed,
analytical and opinionated
point of view on the fashion
business.
Today, the website has
grown to leverage a network
of savvy writers and fashion
insiders in the worlds style
capitals, delivering fashion
business intelligence on
emerging designers, disruptive technologies and global
brands that are making their
mark on the industry at a time
of unprecedented change.

DRYDEN Dryden
Junior High School students
swept all awards at a June 1
patriotic writing contest
coordinated by the Lapeer
Area Elks.
English teacher Sheryl
Czerwinski reported that
Dryden students earned the
only cash prizes in the annual
Elks Americanism Essay
Contest.
The participating writers
were required to respond to
the following question:
What I Can do to promote
Americanism and Love of
Country.
Judging of the maximum
200-word essays was based
on originality, development
of the theme, and mechanics
and neatness.
Taking first-place honors
was Kylie DeVlaminck, who
was awarded a $25 cash prize
for her efforts. Fellow student Kaitlyn Carters essay
earned her second-place honors.

America & Me
Also awarded were the
top three essays in the Farm
Bureau Insurance America
& Me essay contest.

The essays were written
on the topic, My Personal
Michigan Hero.
Czerwinski said the top
ten Dryden 8th grade essays
were submitted for judging in
the fall, with the top three
being announced this spring.
First place in the America &
Me competition was awarded

to Hannah Peyerk, whose


essay represented Dryden in
the state competition and
whose name will appear on a
plaque on permanent display
at the school.
Second and third places were
awarded to Drydens Teagan
Norman
and
Natalie
Morehouse, respectively.
All of Dryden Junior
High School's eighth-grade
students displayed dedication, perseverance and enthusiasm throughout the essay
process, said Czerwinski.
Their awards were welldeserved and congratulations
to these top Dryden writers.
History of essay contests
The America & Me Essay
Contest was founded by Farm
Bureau Insurance in 1968, to
encourage Michigan youth to
explore their roles in
Americas future.
Since its inception, more
than a half-million Michigan
eighth graders have participated in the contest.
The student essays for
this, the 47th annual contest,
were based on the topic, My
Personal Michigan Hero.
The final ranking of the top
ten winners was determined
by a panel of judges made up
of Farm Bureau Insurances
CEO Jim Robinson; Contest
Founder Jack Stucko; and a
teacher of a top ten statewide
winner from the 2014-2015
contest year.
As sponsor of the contest,
Farm Bureau Insurance has
earned 11 national awards
from
the
Freedoms
Foundation at Valley Forge.

Road commission receives DEQ grant


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

LAPEER COUNTY
The Lapeer County Road
Commission has received a
$92,810 grant from the
Michigan Department of
Environmental
Quality
(DEQ) to use recycled scrap
tire material for road projects.
The state handed out
more than $2.9 million in
grant funds to help develop

new uses for old vehicle tires.


According to a press
release from the DEQ, the
grant program supports Gov.
Rick Snyders initiative to
double the states residential
recycling rate to 30 percent.
Grant monies can be used
for road projects that utilize
rubber-modified
asphalt,
something Lapeer County
has done in the past.
Rubber-modified asphalt
produces a pavement that

lasts longer and provides for


noise reduction and better
skid control and visibility in
rain and snow, DEQ officials note.
Scrap tires used in these
construction projects must
come from Michigan sources.
Funding is also provided
for research projects that seek
new and better ways to use
tire rubber in asphalt, concrete and other items like

floor tiles and footwear.


Rick Pearson, Lapeer
County Road Commission
Director, said they will use
the funds to resurface
Bronson Lake Road in
Oregon Twp. with whats
referred to as crumb rubber
tire asphalt. Last year, they
were able to use the same
product in a MillingtonRoad
project and, Pearson said,
they were pleased with the
results.

Registration deadline nears for August election

Musicians sought for Market


IMLAYCITY The Imlay City Downtown
Development Authority and the Imlay City Farmers
Market are on the lookout for musicians willing to provide entertainment to the shoppers at the Farmers Market
on Thursdays. The Imlay City Farmers Market is a growing enterprise featuring more than a dozen vendors and
crafters and hundreds of shoppers every Thursday from
1-6 p.m. now through October. Musician John Jaques will
be making an appearance at the Market on July 14, with
other dates currently available. Musicians can play for as
long as they wish and are welcome to collect tips.
Interested musicians can contact Market Manager
Nicholas Pugliese at 810-338-3740 or via email at
ddapromotions@imlaycity.org for more information.
Tri-City Times

Classifieds Work!
810-724-2615

tricitytimes-online.com

Those who wish to


receive an absentee ballot by
mail must submit the application by 2 p.m. Saturday, July
30.

Voters will be asked to


provide identification when
they visit the polls on Election
Day. They will be asked to
present valid photo ID, such
as a Michigan drivers license

or identification card.
Anyone who does not
have an acceptable form of
photo ID or failed to bring it
with them to the polls still
may vote. The person will be
required to sign a brief affidavit stating that he or she is
not in possession of photo
ID. The ballot will be included with all others and counted on Election Day.

TRI-CITY AREA
Tractor Supply Company
(TSC), in partnership with
National 4-H Council, recently announced the recordbreaking fundraising results
of its spring 2016 Paper
Clover Campaign.
TSC and Dels Feed and
Farm Supply, the largest retail
farm and ranch supply store
chain in the United States,
raised
an
astounding
$935,351 during the 12-day
national in-store fundraiser.
Over the course of the sevenyear partnership, Tractor
Supply has raised more than
$9.2 million for 4-H programs across the country
through
Paper
Clover
Campaigns in both the fall
and spring season.
It is extremely gratifying
to witness the significant and
consistent growth in the

Paper Clover Campaign,


said Jennifer Sirangelo, president & CEO, National 4-H
Council. We are proud of
this important partnership
with
Tractor
Supply
Company, which raises
resources to help support 4-H
positive youth development
programs in local communities across the United States.
Seventy percent of the
funds raised benefit state and
local 4-H youth development
program activities, such as
local camps and after-school
programs, and granted scholarships for 4-H youth in the
communities where TSC and
Dels stores are located.
Thirty percent of the total
funds are donated to National
4-H Council to help connect
more young people across Teagan Norman, Hannah Peyerk, and Natalie
America to high-quality 4-H Morehouse earned top spots in the America & Me
youth development programs. essay contest hosted by Farm Bureau.

Photo by Sheryl Czerwinski

ballot. As a registered voter,


you may obtain an absentee
ballot if you are:
Age 60 or older.
Physically unable to
attend the polls without the
assistance of another.
Expecting to be absent
from the community in which
you are registered for the
entire time the polls will be
open on Election Day.
In jail awaiting arraignment or trial.
Unable to attend the
polls due to religious reasons.
Appointed to work as an
election inspector in a precinct outside of your precinct
of residence.

Kylie DeVlaminck and Kaitlyn Carter took first and


second places respectively in Elks Americanism
Essay Contest.

Clover campaign
a success at TSC

Photo by Sheryl Czerwinski

TRI-CITY AREA All


cities and townships across
Michigan will vote on
Tuesday, Aug. 2. People who
arent registered to vote have
until Tuesday, July 5 to register at any Secretary of State
office, or at their county or
local clerks office.
Check your registration
status at the Michigan Voter
Information Center at www.
Michigan.gov/vote.
You also can view your
sample ballot if your community is holding an election
as well as find your polling
location and track your
absentee ballot.
Voters who qualify may
choose to cast an absentee

Page 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Town Talk
Editors note: Due to space
constraints announcements
will be posted one week in
advance of the event. Notices
must be received in writing
by noon Monday prior to the
publication date.

For Senior Citizens


Gentle yoga, Wednesdays
from 1-2 p.m. at the Imlay
City Senior Center. Practice
led by Dina Miramonti,
RYT.
Dinner and an evening of
card playing with friends,
50/50 raffle and prizes of
high and low for each table
every 3rd Monday at the
Washington Senior Center,
57880
Van
Dyke,
Washington Township, MI
48094, from 4-8 p.m. Call
the center for further
details, 586-752-6543.
Swing Dance Lessons
offered at the Port Huron
Senior Center, 600 Grand
Avenue in Port Huron,
every Tuesday from 7:30-9
p.m. and the 1st and 3rd
Thursday of the month
from 7:30-9 p.m. with
instructors Lyle Malaski &
Kristina Morton. Call 810984-5061 for more information.
Council
on
Aging
Membership is open to individuals 18 and older. The
Capac Senior Center is
open 8:30-4:30 weekdays.
We offer a variety of activities such as fitness and craft
classes, a book review
group, cards and bus trips.
Call Lori at 395-7889 for
Get a little extra
exposure with an
ad in Town Talk.
Its easy and inexpensive
to advertise your event in
one of the Tri-City Times
most widely read columns!

Call the
Tri-City Times
TODAY!
810-724-2615
or email to:

more information.

For more information is now enrolling for Fall.


please call 810-724-0690 or Call
810-724-5695
to
Almont and Dryden area visit www.atticaumc.org.
inquire. We serve students
senior citizens meet the 2nd
from Junior Kindergarten
Tuesday of the month at 12 The Attica Food Bank at through the 8th grade with
p.m. at the Almont Lions the Attica United Methodist a Christ centered, quality
Hall, 222 Water St., for a Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is education. All inquiries are
potluck and program. Call open from 2-4 p.m. the 2nd welcomed.
798-8210 for more informa- and 4th Monday of each
tion.
month. Proof of residency Ready, Set, Go! Workshop.
and need required.
This is a FREE workshop
Adults 55 and over are
for 3-5 year olds & parents/
invited to Berlin Twp. The Capac Community caregivers! Enjoy fun projSenior Center to play cards Food Pantry, 114 S. Main ects that will develop your
from noon-3 p.m. the 2nd Street, is open each childs skills and prepare
Wednesday of every month. Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. them for school! Children
Bring a sack lunch, bever- Please call LOVE, INC. at also enjoy a snack, story
ages provided. Senior 810-245-2414 in advance to time, and a free book! Call
stretch exercise on Tuesdays ensure your food voucher the Family Literacy Center
10-11 a.m. Potluck lun- will be received before you today to reserve your seat at
cheons will be served the stop in to shop. Any ques- 810-664-2737 and for more
4th Tuesday of every month tions, please call Sherrie information on dates and
at noon. Call 810-395-4518 Cramton at 810-395-1905.
times.
for details.
The Capac Kitchen serves Play groups available. Free
Ryan Smith, a certified free meals every Tuesday 6 week sessions. At these
alcohol and drug counselor from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion FREE 90 minute playgroups
will be available at the United Methodist Church.
children will participate in a
Imlay City Seniors Center
storytime, developmentally
on the 4th Thursday of Free meals for people in appropriate games and
every month from 9 a.m.-12 need are offered at the crafts, learn new skills, and
North Branch Senior Center
p.m.
on Monday and Thursday enjoy a snack and social
evenings from 5:30-7 p.m. time with other children.
Call 810-441-0322 for more Parents will have the chance
to talk to other adults with
information.
same-age children. Register
St. Pauls Lutheran Church Orchards Cupboard Food now for the next session!
Food for Families kitchen Pantry is open the 3rd Numerous locations and
is open to the public for Saturday of every month 9 dates available. For more
free, hot meals every a.m.-noon. Food distributed information and to sign up
Monday and Wednesday at 74903 McKay Rd., Bruce call the Family Literacy
from 4-5:30 p.m.
Twp., 586-336-4673. www. Center at 810-664-2737.
orchardsonline.org
This Heart Loves Food
Pantry is open the 1st
Saturday of each month
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at
FOR WIDOWED MEN &
Gateway Assembly Church, The Capac Historical WOMEN. Lunch-Cards2796 S. Van Dyke Rd., Imlay Society is now open to visi- Friendship. Join us every
City.
tors daily from 1-3 p.m. and 3rd Tuesday of each month
Dryden Area Food For 1-4 p.m. on Sundays. Call from 11:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m. at
Families free dinner is 810-395-2859 for more Cavis Pioneer Restaurant,
5600 Lapeer Rd. in Kimball
served on the 2nd Tuesday information.
of each month from 4:30- The Imlay City Historical Twp. 48074 (located approx.
6:00 p.m. at St. Cornelius Museum is now open for the 15 Miles S.W. of Port Huron.
Church, 3834 Mill Street 2016 season on Saturdays No RSVP necessary. For
(north of the light in from 1 to 4 p.m. Stop by and more information call
Dryden). No proof of income view new exhibits and learn Joanne K. at 810-324-2304.
is required. Come and enjoy more about Imlay Citys This activity is sponsored by
a home cooked meal with wonderful history. For more Widowed Friends, a peer
us.
information call 810-724- support group www.widowedfriends.org.
The Attica United Methodist 1904.
Widowed Friends invites all
Church will be holding a
widowed to join us for
free community meal on the
breakfast and friendship in
2nd and 4th Tuesday of each
month from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Imlay City Christian School a safe setting every 2nd and

Free Meals, Food

Support Groups

Museums

Youth Events

tct@pageone-inc.com

4th Monday of the month at


9 a.m. at Seros, 925 Gratiot
in Marysville. For more
information about our Lapeer County Health
group, call Julie at 810-388- Department, 1800 Imlay
0868.
City Rd., Lapeer - Regular
Lapeer County Families Immunization Clinic Hours:
Against Narcotics group (held in 2nd floor clinic
meets the second Tuesday of area) Mondays 1-3:30 p.m.
the month at Faith Christian Walk-In, Wednesdays 8:30
p.m.
By
Fellowship, 69 W. Nepessing a.m.-11:30
Appointment
Only,
St. in Lapeer. Call 810-6670119 for more information Thursdays 1-3:45 p.m. By
Only.
or email faithchrist09@aol. Appointment
Additional
Immunization
com.
Clinics Offered: Tuesdays
TOPS 620 Lapeer weight- (July 19-Sep. 13) 8:30-11:30
loss group meets Tuesday a.m. & 1:30-4 p.m. By
nights at the Hunters Creek Appointment Only (held in
Mobile Home Park Club 2nd floor clinic area),
House, 725 DeMille Rd. in Mondays (Aug. 22 & Aug.
Lapeer. Weigh-in from 29) 8:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-4
6-6:30 p.m., meeting from p.m. Walk-In (held in lower
6:30-7:30 p.m. For more level). For additional inforinformation, call 810-664- mation, to check if we accept
7579.
your insurance, or to schedule an appointment please
TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds call 810-667-0448.
Sensibly) meets Wednesdays
at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in Babycare Class Wed., June
Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30 29 from 6-8 p.m. at the
a.m., 9:30 a.m. meeting. Pregnancy Resource Center
Call Linda at 810-245-3955 of Lapeer, 1715 Imlay City
or Phyllis 810-395-7035 for Rd. Lapeer. Class is taught
more information.
by a registered nurse with
over 25 years experience.
For those that have experi- For additional information
enced the death of a loved call 810-667-0055. Class is
one, a support group is free but donations are sugavailable facilitated by a gested.
trained United Hospice
Service (UHS) bereavement Free tutor training for peovolunteer. Marlette Regional ple who would like to help
Hospital, 2770 Main Street others in our community
in Marlette, hosts this sup- improve English skills.
port group the 1st Friday of Volunteer basis. Please call
each month at 10 a.m. in the for orientation before trainAdministration Conference ing at 810-664-2737.
Room. For more information, call 800-635-7490 or Free hearing and vision
visit www.marletteregional- screens for children of preschool age are available at
hospital.org
the Lapeer County Health
Department. To schedule an
appointment please call
810-667-0448 or 810-245The Imlay City Christian 5549.
School is holding a fund- Volunteer for the Habitat
raiser for TAFFY (Tuition for Humanity of Lapeer
Assistance Fundraising For County at the office.
Youth). Come join us for Interested parties can call
euchre the 2nd Saturday of 810-664-7111 and speak to
each month at 7 p.m. at the Carolyn, Cheryl or Pete at
Imlay City Christian School, 810-660-7823.
7197 E. Imlay City Rd. in
Imlay City. For more infor- Capac Pharmacy is teaming
mation, call 810-724-5695. with Support Million Hearts
by offering in-pharmacy
blood pressure screenings,
136 North Main St. in
Capac, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.- 6
p.m. Everyone is invited to
come and have their blood
pressure read for free.

Other

Fundraisers

AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES
27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI

(810) 724-0690

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m


Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
15

Dryden
U.M.C.
810-796-3341

15

West Berlin
U.M.C.

810-724-2702

810-724-1200
Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Pastor Alan Casillas

15

Church 810-395-2112

Sunday School - 9:15 am - All Ages


Sunday Service: 10:30 am
Junior Church and Nursery Available
Bible Studies Every
Monday and Tuesday Evenings
Tuesday Morning
16

15

15

15

700 Maple Vista, Imlay City

810-724-1135

586.336.4673

M-T-Thurs-Fri 8 am Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am

Weekend Masses

Sat. 5 pm
Sun. 9 am - English
11 am - Spanish
Reconciliation 1/2 hr. before each Mass &4pm Sat.

Father Paul Ward

15

COME WORSHIP WITH US!

John Barker, Minister

15

Family of
Christ
Lutheran Church Missouri Synod
7191 Imlay City Road
Imlay City
Educational Hour - 9:15 am
Worship Time - 10:30 am

Phone 810-724-2620

16

PASTOR KEN RENARD

6835 Weyer Road Imlay City, MI48444

Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm

firstapostolichome.com

15

Sunday Mornings
10:30 am

Wayne Boyd, Pastor

881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888


Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am
Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday all worship services
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont 15
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God

GATEWAY
ASSEMBLY

COME & MAKE A


DIFFERENCE WITH US! 15

2720 Winslow Road


Imlay City, MI 48444

1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass


Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Wednesday Prayer & Praise 7:30 pm

Phone: 810-724-6999

15

(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court Capac, MI

(810) 395-7557

Phone: 810-724-8110
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist

15

ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH

Supervised child care during all services

Adult & Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Children's Church during service.

810-417-0265 cbcimlay.org
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Service 10:45 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm

Light of Christ
Community
Church

Almont
First Baptist Church

2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City


Morning Worship - 8:55 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night - 6:45 p.m.

74903 McKay Rd., Romeo

Weekday Masses

810-724-3306

15

Come Grow With Us!

Sacred Heart
Catholic Church

670 N. Van Dyke


Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm

810-395-2409

Imlay City
C.R.C.

810-724-4315

Come as you are - everyone is welcome!

810-724-0687

email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastor Tim Martin
Sunday 10 a.m. Service 15

395 N. Cedar (M-53)


www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Mens & Womens
Bible Studies

14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac

Imlay City
U.M.C.

859 N. Van Dyke Road


Imlay City, Michigan 48444

4411 Newark Road


Attica, MI 48412

Imlay City
Church of Christ

905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI


Corner of Almont Road
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Curtis Clarke

200 North Cedar (M-53)


Imlay City, MI

Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.


(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Rev. Marcel Allen Lamb

5394 Main Street - Dryden


Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME!

(ELCA)

Capac
U.M.C.

Attica
U.M.C.

Club News

St. Pauls
Lutheran Church

15

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Sunday 10:00 a.m.


Sunday School
9:00 a.m. September thru May
Staffed Nursery During Worship 15

Christ Evangelical First Congregational Church


Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.

275 Bancroft - Imlay City


(Corner of 5th Street)

810-724-7855

810-724-6207

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.

Pastor

Ralph O. Stuebs
Cell-(567) 674-0438

Come to the WELS

St. Nicholas
Catholic Church
4331 Capac Road
Capac, MI 48014

810-395-7572

www.stnicholascapac.com

15

Sunday School &Morning Adult Group 9:30 a.m.


Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
No matter who you are or where you are
on lifes journey, you are welcome here!15

Holy Redeemer
Lutheran Church
4538 Dryden Rd. Dryden, MI

810-796-3951
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred

8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS


Weekday Masses:
9:30 am - WORSHIP
Wednesday & Friday 8:30 a.m. 11:00 am - SUNDAY SCHOOL & BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
ALL WELCOME!!!
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Steven Helms
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15
Christian Preschool Available
15

201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI


810-798-8855
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley

Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.


Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sundays 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesdays 6-7:30pm
Pre-School - 5th grade
15

St. John The


Evangelist
Catholic Church
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002

810-395-7074

www.stjohnsallenton.com

Weekday Masses:
Thursday & Friday 8:30 a.m.
Weekend Masses:
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

The Imlay City American


Legion Post 135 meets the
2nd and last Wednesdays
of the month at 7:30 p.m.
The post is located at 212
E. Third Street. Contact
them at 724-1450 or americanlegionpost135@frontier.com.
The Evening Star Quilt
Guild meets the last
Wednesday of each month
at the Davison Senior
Center, 10135 Lapeer Rd.
in Davison. Meetings start
at 6:30 p.m. and doors
open at 6:00 p.m. For more
information, call Lisa, 810358-7294.

Markets
Attention Cottage Food
Vendors - The Market
Lexington is currently
looking for Cottage Food
Vendors for the 2016 market season. Contact Kristen
Kaatz, 810-404-7570 for
stall space and pricing.
The Flea Market held each
Sunday at the Lapeer
Center Building, 425
County Center Rd. in
Lapeer, will be open from 8
a.m.-3 p.m. Up to 50 booths
inside and outside sell a
huge variety of items. This
event is sponsored by the
Lapeer Center Building,
and there is no admission
charge. For info on space
rentals, contact Logan at
810-347-7915. For general
information on the Flea
Market or food service by
Peacock Alley Catering
call 810-664-2109 or email
lapeercenter@charter.net.

PAGE 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Rural Lifestyles
t doesnt seem like there
are many magic bullets
when it comes to gardening. After digging old soaker
hoses out of storage recently,
I was certain Id found a
quick and easy solution for
keeping the plants in my
raised beds from getting so
parched. The pea, lettuce and
chard seeds I stuck in the soil
this spring have struggled
since day one and weve had
a sparse strawberry crop due
to the dry conditions.
Besides, any kind of drip irrigation is superior to overhead
watering for a variety of reasons. Some 20 to 50 percent
of water sprayed in plants is
lost through evaporation and
water on leaf surfaces can
contribute to fungal diseases
and other health issues.
Concentrating the water
where its needed prevents
unwanted weeds from popping up elsewhere in the garden too.

Weaving the hoses


through the plants was an
exercise
and hauling more
to connect
those to
the faucet
took some
time. I
thought I
gave both
a
beds
very thor ough
watering
that might
last more than 24 hours but
no. Droopy pepper and tomato plants greeted me on my
next trip out to the garden.
Time to do a bit of research,
I guess. It turns out there are
few things I can do to make
my system more effective.
Cover it up: Drip irrigation, whether theyre soaker
hoses or drip emitters, work
better if theyre covered

either by soil or with a mulch


of some kind. Sinking them
in the ground a couple of
inches protects those from
breaking down under the
suns rays, according to a
Colorado State Extension
bulletin. Mulch does the
same, plus holds moisture in
the soil longer.
Crunch some numbers: There are lots of figures to consider when it
comes to determining the
right placement and how
long and how often the drip
irrigation should run. Here
are some facts to consider.
According to the City
of Bellevue Utilities
(Washington), water spreads
only six inches from a soaker
hose in sandy soil but double
that (one foot or more) in
clay soil. They also note that
most plants need only 50
percent of their root area to
be moist.
Opinions differ on just

Photo by Maria Brown

A drip by drip solution?


I
Garden Variety

A mulch of some kind, like straw, helps retain soil moisture in all kinds of
watering systems, including drip irrigation.
how much water plants use.
Annuals and perennials
require three-quarters to one
inch of water per week, the
Bellevue officials note. If
using a soaker hose, plan to
use it a total of 45 to 60 minutes per week, either at 25 to
30 minute intervals twice a
week or 15 to 20 minutes

Ride off-road safely, legally this summer

TRI-CITY AREA
With summer now in full
swing, conservation officers
at the Michigan Department
of Natural Resources remind
off-road vehicle riders to follow ORV safety rules and
land-use regulations, riding
only where ORVs legally are
permitted.
To ensure everyones
safety and the protection of
our natural resources, ORV
riders are cautioned to only
ride their machines where its
legal to operate them, said
Cpl. John Morey, DNR ORV
and snowmobile coordinator.
ORV restrictions are in place
to protect Michigans natural
resources and minimize user

Weather
almanac
Lapeer station
Minimum temp.
44.4 on Friday, 24th
Maximum temp.
89.8 on Monday, 27th
Rainfall
0 inches
Growing Degree Days
for corn development:
Current: 1,017
Forecast: 1,131

conflict with other outdoor


recreation enthusiasts.
ORV trail system
It is illegal to operate an
ORV on public lands in the
Lower Peninsula unless they
are operating on the DNR
designated ORV trail system.
Michigans ORV trail system
has three basic types of trails,
including:
Motorcycle-only trails
maintained at a 28-inch width
50-inch-wide trails open
to ORVs that are 50 inches
wide or less
ORV routes maintained
at a width of 72 inches
ORV use on designated
trails is limited depending on
the type of designated ORV

For the week of


June 21-27
Emmett station
Minimum temp.
50.8 on Friday, 24th
Maximum temp.
91.1 on Monday, 27th
Rainfall
0 inches
Growing Degree Days
for corn development:
Current: 969
Forecast: 1,063

Growing degree days are accumulated from


March 1 and forecast through July 4.
Weather data courtesy of Enviro-weather,
www.enviroweather.msu.edu

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Town Name (810)


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trail and the ORV width. Offtrail or off-route ORV operation outside of a designated
trail is prohibited, except for
licensed hunters removing
deer, bear or elk and operating an ORV at speeds of 5
miles per hour or less and
traveling to the harvested
game using the shortest possible route.
In the Lower Peninsula,
the ORV trail/route system is
the only legal place to ride
non-Secretary of Statelicensed ORVs on public
lands other than frozen
waters.
State parks and national
forests
ORVs generally are prohibited on state game areas or
state parks and recreation
areas.
In all national forests,
motor vehicles can be used
only on roads, trails or areas
that are designated as open on
motor vehicle use maps. For
more information, contact the
local national forest headquarters.
Public roads
Roads, streets and highways maintained for yearround automobile travel
(including the shoulder and
the right-of-way) are closed
to ORV operation unless designated open to ORV use by
local ordinance. ORV operators should check with that
countys sheriff, road commission or clerk for local
ordinances.
In Lapeer County, ORV
use is allowed on nearly 90
percent of the countys roads.
City and village streets and a
portion of high traffic primary roads are off limits.
Per the countys ordinance, ORVs may be operated
on the far right of the roadway at no more than 25 miles
per hour. Vehicles must travel
single file and all occupants
must wear a helmet and protective eyewear unless the
vehicle is equipped with an
appropriate roof and seat
belts.
It is illegal to operate
ORVs on state and federal
highways, including the
shoulders and rights of way.
Private land
Private land is closed to
ORV operation except by the
landowner and the landowners invited guests.
Caring for the environment
An ORV may not be operated in a manner that creates
an
erosive
condition.
Michigans soils and shorelines are fragile, and ORV
operation in these areas and
along stream banks and other
waterways is prohibited. It is
unlawful to operate any ORV
in or on the waters of any
stream, river, marsh, bog,
wetland or quagmire.
For more information
about ORV regulations and
safe operation, see the
Handbook of Michigan OffRoad Vehicle Laws.

three days per week.


The Colorado Extension
experts say vegetables specifically use one-quarter inch
of water per day, meaning
one inch would need to be
applied more often-every
four days.
Michigans own Yardener
experts, at gardening.yardener.com, say one of inch of

water is needed in the spring


and two inches are required
in the summer. Placing a tuna
fish can under a soaker hose
and noting how long it takes
to fill the can, equaling about
one inch, is a precise way to
know how long to run your
hose each time.
Contact Maria at
mbrown@pageone-inc.com.

Rain stats from local Enviroweather Stations


Emmett

Lapeer

6.59 inches

5.96 inches

Rainfall to date since


April 1

Rainfall to date since


April 1

Four-year average to
date

Five-year average to
date

9.37 inches

10.93 inches

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A Lapeer County ordinance, put in place in


2014, allows for ORV use
on a majority of public
roads.

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PAGE 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Teacher layoffs approved in Capac


By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

CAPAC The school


board voted to layoff three
teachers at their June 23 meeting. The move is expected to
save the district nearly
$300,000 in the coming
school year, according to

Supt. Steve Bigelow.


Those receiving layoff
notices were BillLengemann,
Angel Misner and Lori
Caughel. All three were educators in the high school.
Bigelow said his original proposal called for the layoff
of four but one staff
member secured a job in

another district.
Tomorrow, June 30, the
board is due to vote on amendments to the current years
budget and approve the proposed 2016-17 general fund
budget.
The 2015-16 budget
came in right where we
expected and the 2016-17

budget is looking favorable as


well due to the restructuring
plan, Bigelow said.
That plan, approved by
the board in April, calls for
moving sixth through eighth
grades out of the Capac
Middle School and using one
wing of the building to house
the districts Virtual Program.

Bigelow said items are


being moved out of the original section of the building
with the intent to cut off utilities before winter for a cost
savings.
The restructuring plan
will have positive impacts
in the classroom too, he
said.

We actually were able to


add a number of courses that
we werent able to do before.
Those include more
Advanced Placement offerings, an expansion of the ag
science and music programs,
creation of a robotics class
and new art offerings at the
elementary level.

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

Photo by Maria Brown

IMLAY CITY Various


staff changes were approved
at Mondays school board
meeting.
Dr. Dina Tallis was named
Imlay City Schools Director
of Elementary Education and
Student Support Services. In
her new role, Tallis will oversee a new Multi-Tiered
System of Support (MTSS)
program as well as elementary curriculum and instruction
and state and federal programming.
The MTSS programs aim
is to have all students attain
grade level literacy by the
third grade, and to continue
significant and individualized interventions for all of
our students K-12, Dr. Stu

Cameron, executive director


of curriculum and instruction,
explained at the meeting.
Stepping in to fill Tallis
current position as Borland
Elementary principal is
Megan Cottone, a third grade
teacher at the school.
She is dedicated, knowledgeable, and highly respected by her peers, her students,
and their families for her
work in the classroom and her
leadership at the building
level, Cameron said.
Tallis has been principal
at Borland Elementary since
2014. She recently attained
her doctoral degree in educational
leadership
from
Michigan State University.
Previously she served as
Weston Elementary principal
for four years and was a
Kindergarten, first and sec-

Effective August 1, Megan Cottone will become


Borland Elementary principal and Dr. Dina Tallis
assumes a new title, Director of Elementary
Education and Student Support Services.

Exceptional
Receptions

ond grade teacher there as


well as part of her 16-year
career in Imlay City. Her husband and daughter were on
hand Monday for the
announcement.
I believe that Imlay City
Schools has teachers who are
passionate, enthusiastic, dedicated and genuinely want
nothing but the absolute best
for our students. I admire
their perseverance towards
helping our students succeed
and I am eager to support and
facilitate that process, Tallis
said.
Cottone is a 13-year district employeeone year as a
Kindergarten and 12 as a third
grade teacher. She earned a
bachelors degree from
Albion College in 2003 and
received a masters degree in
Educational Leadership from
Saginaw
Valley
State
University in 2007.
Cottone resides in Port
Huron with her husband and
two sons but says she considers Imlay City her second
home.
I truly feel blessed to be
a part of such a wonderful,
caring community and Im
excited to be able to approach
student learning from a different lens, Cottone said.
The board also took
action on Monday to layoff
two teachers at Venture High
School, Susan Allen and Scott
Powers. Per the 2016-17
general fund budget, the district plans to increase two
teaching positionsone at
the high and elementary levels each.

Every Bite
Every Sip
Every Moment
Every Memory

MDOT Senior Communications Specialist Robert Morosi interviews Dr. Paul


Rogers, director of TARDEC at vehicle testing site on I-69.

Convoy: High tech testing along I-69


from pag 1-A
for the event.
During a press conference at the rest stop site,
Snyder said the tests are part
of the future of the mobility
business, reinforcing the
connection between
Michigan and the automotive
industry.
This is something we
are going to stay on the gas
to make sure were a leader
in mobility, and to do it right
here is so exciting, Snyder
said.
The tests were aimed at
studying the communication
between vehicles, sending
data back and forth vehicleto-vehicle and also vehicleto-infrastructure.
The freeway remained
open to traffic throughout
the four-hour testing period,
and the four-vehicle convoy
traveled the test route at
posted speeds. Each vehicle
was manned by an individual
driver.
According to state officials, the goal is to provide

Photo by Tom Wearing

By Maria Brown

Photo by Tom Wearing

Administrative changes
get nod by Imlay board

Interior of Army vehicle involved in vehicle-tovehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure testing.


capabilities for one driver to
man a convoy of vehicles,
something that has been
researched in Europe for the
past several years.
Thursdays tests were
considered groundbreaking
in the state, and possibly the
country, for that particular
technology.

From a military perspective, the move to driverless

vehicles and/or a single


manned convoy is a direct
result of the serious injuries
and casualties sustained by
U.S. troops from roadside
bombs during the Iraq War.
A video of last
Thursdays testing is available on the MDOT YouTube
channel at www.youtube.
com/
watch?v=wWysktpvYc4.

Work: Almont Ave. project underway


from page 1-A
Last November, Imlay
City residents approved a
2.5-mill levy designated for
street and sidewalk maintenance over the next five
years.
The measure passed by a
vote of 262 in favor to 198
opposed.
The millage is expected

to raise about $266,000


annually, or about $1.3 billion for streets and sidewalk
repairs over the course of the
levy.
In 2015, Rowe conducted a needs assessment to
determine which of the citys
streets needed the most
immediate attention.
The prioritized streets,
none of which currently

require infrastructure
upgrades, included: Calkins,
Pine, Dirgo, Hunt, East
Second, Cheney, Melanie,
Marilyn, Shirley and Maple
Vista.
Youatt has noted that
the city will attempt to
find grant money to help
fund street projects that do
require infrastructure
improvements.

4-H grants and awards are available


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TRI-CITY AREA
The Michigan 4-H Foundation
has announced grant and
award opportunities of up to
$1,000 to support local 4-H
clubs and county programs.
4-H volunteer leaders, members and staff members may
apply for these funds. All
grant and award applications
are due June 1, 2016.
The following funding
opportunities are available for
the 2016-17 program year:
1. Michigan
4-H
Legacy Grantstwo grants
of $1,000 each available.
Grants are intended to
support development of a
new program or initiative, or
to strengthen, enhance or
expand a current program that
is making a difference.
Funded by the Michigan 4-H
Legacy Fund Endowment.
2. 4-H
On-Target
Grantstwo grants of $500
each available.
Support 4-H Shooting
Sports programs to enhance
existing programs, develop a
new program or offer a special experience related to 4-H
shooting sports. Funded with
support from the Thomas H.
Cobb 4-H Shooting Sports
Endowment Fund.
3. The Collins 4-H

Youth Horticulture Grant


one $350 grant available.
This grant opportunity is
for 4-H youth clubs only to
advance club work in plant
science and horticulture
activities locally. This grant is
made possible by the William
J. and Ruth D. Collins
Endowment Fund to advance
4-H youth horticulture and
gardening programs.
4. 4-H
Educational
Garden Grantstwo grants
of $1,000 each available.
Support the creation of
local 4-H educational gardens
in Michigan. Funded by the
Albert
A.
Albright
Endowment for support of
4-H plant science and gardening education.
5. Nominate a 4-H volunteer for the Michigan Farm
Bureau 4-H Excellence in
Agriculture Awardthree
grant awards of $1,000 each.
The Michigan Farm
Bureau
(MFB)
4-H
Excellence in Agriculture
Award honors and recognizes
outstanding achievements of
Michigan 4-H volunteers or
groups that have exhibited
excellence in 4-H youth education and leadership development in the areas of beef
cattle, dairy cattle, goats,

horses, poultry, rabbits, sheep,


swine, veterinary science,
and/or horticulture, crops and
soils. Honorees choose where
their $1,000 recognition program grant will go to advance
Michigan 4-H agriculture
programs-4-H
volunteer
training, purchasing supplies
and curriculum materials, or
enhancing 4-H agricultural
programming locally or statewide.
6. Michigan
4-H
Outbound
International
Travel Scholarship Awards
four travel scholarships of
$1,000 are available for travel
experiences.
These scholarships are
awarded to 4-H youth who
have applied and been accepted to travel as part of a
Michigan 4-H-sponsored outbound international travel
experience such as LABO,
IFYE, Poland, Belize or other
Michigan
4-H-sponsored
international travel opportunities. Applications to the
State 4-H Office must be
postmarked by June 1, 2016.
To apply for a grant,
download the grant application online at mi4hfdtn.org or
contact
the
Michigan
4-H Foundation at 517-3536692.

PAGE 15-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Remembering Our Heroes


4th of July

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Imlay City

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Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am-8pm; Sat. 9-5; Closed Sun.

w w w. g ro n d i n s . c o m

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Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am-8pm; Sat. 9-5;

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Providing Insurance and Financial Service

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810-395-1152
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PHARMACY HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm; Sat. 9am-2pm; Closed Sun.

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Visit us online at www.tri-countybank.com

Fronney's Family Foods


Capac810-395-8113

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810-724-9000

1935 S. Cedar Imlay City, MI

Muir Brothers Funeral Home

A Family Tradition Serving All of Lapeer County

Robert G. Muir, Funeral Director - Manager

1-810-724-8285

225 N. MAIN ST., IMLAY CITY

The UPS Store

Life Home Car Business

243 East Third Street


Imlay City,
Michigan 48444

810-724-6218

Churchill Insurance Agency

CHRIS S. WAGNER

535 N. Cedar Imlay City 810-724-2300

SILVER GRILL

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810-798-2525

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2050 S. Cedar St. (M53)
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store5191@theupsstore.com
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FOR ALL YOUR REAL


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www.BarbaraYockeyLaw.com byockey@barbarayockeylaw.com

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Health Center

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Dr. Loren DeCarlo and


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Residential Automobile


810-395-2602

Mon. Thurs. 7:30-8:00;


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SERVICE HOURS

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Mon. Thurs. 7:30-8:00;


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FIDUCIAL
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4855 Capac Rd. Capac, MI 48014 810-395-4653

M-53

PAGE 16-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Sports

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Lesniak
among
states
best

Austin
Kosinski, an
Almont graduate, pressures
the opposing
quarterback at
the East-West
All-Star
Football Game.

By Kevin Kissane

Kosinski scores in All-Star game

Photo provided

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont gridiron


standout Austin Kosinski gave a good
account of himself, contributing to the
Easts 20-13 victory over the West in
the East-West All-Star Football Game
last Saturday.
The contest, sponsored by the
Michigan High School Football
Coaches Association unfolded at
Saginaw Valley State University.
It marked the first time the matchup was played at that venue.
In Saturdays confrontation, the
East side took a 6-0 edge after one
quarter was complete.
Their lead would soon increase to
12-0 just over three minutes later
when Kosinski, who will play at
Michigan Tech next season, converted a turnover for a six-point outcome.
Not a bad accomplishment to say
the least.
The quarterback went back to
pass so I went into my pass zone coverage, Kosinski said. Our defensive
lineman got a good pass rush so the
quarterback started to scramble, he

got his hands on him, stripped the


ball, so I ran up, picked it up and ran
10 yards for the score, he noted.
The East side would then add the
extra point, pushing their lead to 13-0
at the time.
Just before halftime the East
would add seven more points to their
total. That staked them to a commanding 20-0 advantage at the time.
When play resumed, the West
bounced back with a 6-0 third quarter
edge. That trimmed their deficit to
20-6 with one quarter remaining.
The West then outscored the East
7-0 from that point on, only to drop a
20-13 verdict at games end.
Kosinski, who also registered five
tackles that day, said he wont soon
forget his final high school contest.
It was an extreme honor to be
selected for the game, Kosinski said.
Just to be able to play with some of
the best football players in Michigan
is a humbling experience and I am so
happy I got this opportunity, he
noted.
Saturdays victory, the fourth in
the last five years, left the East with a Almonts Austin Kosinski poses with the trophy his team won
at the East-West All-Star Football Game last Saturday.
19-15 series lead.

Photo provided

Almont standout scoops up loose football for a


defensive touchdown as East holds off West, 20-13

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City senior pitcher Jacob
Lesniak earned a spot on the
second team of the Michigan
High
School
Baseball
Coaches Association AllState lineup which was
announced recently.
Lesniak, a hard-throwing
righthander whose pitches
have been clocked in the low
90s, posted a 9-2 mark with a
0.58 ERA during the 2016
campaign.
In 84 innings of work,
Lesniak
allowed 22
hits, struck
out 165 and
issued
15
walks.
He
also registered
two
saves.
Lesniak
Lesniak
was an AllBlue Water Area Conference,
All-District and All-Region
selection.
He is joined on the squad
by:
First team
Pitcher - Mike Mokma,
Holland Christian; Jack
Shore, Linden; Andrew
Malick, Orchard Lake St.
Marys; Colton Harris, TriCounty; and Daniel Bullard,
Dearborn Divine Child.
Infield - Brady Wood,
Frankenmuth, Donovan Tarn,
Dewitt; Brendan Spangler,
Coldwater; Gehrig Anglin,
St. Clair; Will Krushena,
Country
Day;
Frankie
Lucska, Dearborn Divine
Child; Alec Overbeek,
Hamilton; and Landin
Mitchell, Goodrich.
Outfield - Steve Mann,
Country Day; Dylan Kemp,
Lake Odessa Lakewood;
Lesniak page 2-B

Times names All-Area softball team


By Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Div. 2 All-State first team pick Cameron Katkic, of Imlay


City. connects on a pitch during a game.

TRI-CITY AREA From the


opening pitch to the final out, these
players set the standard for excellence.
Here is a look at who made the
2016 edition of The Tri-City Times
All-Area softball lineup and the numbers they amassed en route:
Veronica Watson
School: Almont
Year: Junior
Years on varsity: Three
Position: Pitcher
Throws: Righthanded
Record: Watson wound up with a
22-10 record, featuring a 1.69 ERA,
this past spring.
In 207 innings of work, Watson
gave up 184 hits, struck out 218 and
issued 39 walks.
Batting average: Watson generat-

ed a .444 average, thanks to 37 singles, 11 doubles and four triples


among 117 at bats. Her level of plate
proficiency was second best on the
Almont ballclub fifth out of those
who attained Tri-City Times All-Area
first team status.
She also amassed her teams third
highest RBI total (27), notched her
teams fourth best run output (31) and
drew her teams seventh highest walk
total (10).
Watson struck out just nine times.
Postseason honors: Watson
wrapped up her third season on
Almonts varsity as an All-Blue
Water Area Conference first team
selection, a Division 2 All-District
choice and a Division 2 All-Region
pick.
Rebecca Rodriguez
School: Imlay City
Year: Senior
Years on varsity: Three

Position: Pitcher
Throws: Righthanded
Record: Rodriguez posted a 11-7
mark, including a 1.17 ERA, during
the 2016 campaign.
In 126 innings, Rodriguez
allowed 99 hits, retired 100 on strikes
and 18 walks.
Batting average: Rodriguez
pulled up third on the Imlay City
ballclub and and ninth among TriCity Times All-Area first team honorees with a .418 average.

She had 29 singles, 10 doubles,
five triples and two home runs among
110 at bats.
Rodriguez also waited out a
team-high 13 walks, furnished her
squads second best RBI output (35),
amassed her teams fifth highest run
total (20) and registered her squads
sixth best steal output (three).

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All-Area page 2-B

PAGE 2-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Watson

Rodriguez

Whitsett

DeLand

Creech

Sliman

Medrano

Kaufman

Katkic

Marrone

Houghton

Loridon

All-Area: Times names areas best softball players, coaches

She struck out just nine


times.
She struck out just eight Postseason
honors:
times.
DeLand concluded her first
Postseason
honors: campaign on Drydens varsiRodriguez, who has signed a ty as an All-North Central
letter of intent with Albion Thumb League first team
College, ended her third cam- pick.
paign on Imlay Citys varsity Kaleigh Creech
as an All-Blue Water Area School: Almont
Conference first team selec- Year: Senior
tion and Division 2 All- Years on varsity: Four
District choice.
Position: Third base
She was also named the Batting average: Creech
recipient of her squads amassed a .459 average,
Offensive MVP Award.
thanks to 27 singles, 18 dou Madison Whitsett
bles, five triples and one
School: Imlay City
home run among 111 at bats.
Year: Senior
Her level of plate proficiency
Years on varsity: Three
was best on the Almont ball Position: Catcher
club and third out of those
Batting average: Whitsett who attained Tri-City Times
furnished a .302 average, All-Area first team status.
thanks to 18 singles, six dou- She also registered a
bles among 86 at bats. Her team-high 41 runs supplied
level of plate proficiency was her squads second best RBI
fifth best on the Imlay City (28) and walk (19) outputs.
ballclub and 12th out of those Postseason
honors:
who attained Tri-City Times Creech, who has signed a
All-Area first team status.
national letter of intent with
She also provided her Lawrence Tech, ended her
squads fourth highest RBI fourth season on Almonts
output (22), drew her teams squad as an All-Blue Water
seventh best walk total (five) Area Conference pick, a
and shared her squads sev- Division 2 All-District first
enth highest RBI output (12). team selection, a Division 2
Postseason
honors: All-Region choice and a
Whitsett finished her third Division 2 All-State honorseason on Imlay Citys squad able mention pick.
as an All-Blue Water Area Mia Sliman
Conference first team choice School: Dryden
and a Division 2 All-District Year: Junior
selection.
Years on varsity: Two
She also was the recipi- Position: Shortstop
ent of her teams Coaches Batting average: Sliman
Award.
ranked second on the Dryden
Claudya DeLand
ballclub and among Tri-City
School: Dryden
Times All-Area first team
Year: Junior
honorees with a 528 average.
Years on varsity: One
She contributed 30 sin Position: Catcher
gles, five doubles and three
Batting average: DeLand triples among 72 at bats.
ranked first on the Dryden Sliman also supplied her
ballclub and among Tri-City teams highest steal (12) and
Times All-Area first team walk (11) outputs plus generhonorees with a .556 aver- ated her squads second highage.
est RBI total (17).
She had 30 singles, nine She struck out just nine
doubles and one triples times.
among 72 at bats.
Postseason
honors:
DeLand also paced her Sliman wrapped up her secteam with 23 RBI and drew ond campaign on Drydens
six walks.
varsity as an All-North
from page 1-B

Athlete of the Week


Almont senior Austin
Kosinski made five tackles and recovered a fumble for a touchdown in
the East-West All-Star
Football Game.
For his effort, Kosinski
claims our Boys Athlete
of the Week honor.

Almont senior softball


standout Kaleigh Creech
was named to the honorable mention portion of
the Div. 2 All-State team
this past week.
For her effort, Creech
earns our Girls Athlete
of the Week honor.

Be sure to pick up your t-shirt at the Tri-City Times office.

Central Thumb League second team pick.


Haley Medrano
School: Imlay City
Year: Sophomore
Years on varsity: One
Position: Third base
Batting average: Medrano
generated a .357 average,
thanks to 34 singles, six doubles and one single among
115 at bats. Her level of plate
proficiency was fourth best
on the Imlay City ballclub
and 10th out of those who
attained Tri-City Times AllArea first team status.
She also accumulated her
teams third highest RBI(24)
and run (25) outputs, tied for
her squads third best walk
total (six) and contributed her
teams fourth highest steal
output (six).
Postseason
honors:
Medrano concluded her second season on Imlay Citys
squad as an All-District and
All-Region selection as a
utility player.
Kenady Kaufman
School: Imlay City
Year: Junior
Years on varsity: Two
Position: Shortstop
Batting
average:
Kaufman ranked second on
the Imlay City ballclub and
seventh among Tri-City
Times All-Area first team
honorees with a .421 average.
She supplied 33 singles,
12 doubles, three triples and
one home run among 121 at
bats.
Kaufman also amassed a
team-high 36 RBI, notched
her squads second highest
run (32) and steal (14) totals
and drew one walk.
She struck out just six
times.
Postseason
honors:
Kaufman completed her second season on Imlay Citys
varsity as an All-Blue Water
Area Conference honorable
mention selection.
Cameron Katkic
School: Imlay City
Year: Senior
Years on varsity: Three
Position: Second base
Batting average: Katkic
notched a .457 average,
thanks to 55 singles, one double and two triples among
127 at bats. Her level of
plate proficiency was best on
the Imlay City ballclub and
fourth out of those who
attained Tri-City Times AllArea first team status.
She also contributed her
teams best run (46) and steal
(22) outputs plus registered
her squads sixth highest
RBItotal (13).
Katkic struck out just
nine times.
Postseason
honors:
Katkic completed her third
campaign on Imlay Citys
varsity as an All-Blue Water
Area Conference first team
pick, a Division 2 All-District
selection, a Division 2 AllRegion choice and a Division
2 All-State first team pick.
In addition to that, Katkic
earned the Blue Water Area

Conferences Most Valuable


Player Award and was the
recipient of her teams
Defensive MVP Award.
Sydney Marrone
School: Almont
Year: Sophomore
Years on varsity: Two
Position: First base
Batting average: Marrone
ranked fourth on the Almont
ballclub and 11th among TriCity Times All-Area first
team honorees with a .310
average.
She managed 19 singles
and 12 doubles in 100 at bats.
Marrone also tied for her
teams fifth best RBI output
(22). tied for her squads seventh highest run total (16)
and stole one base.
Postseason
honors:
Marrone finished her second
season on Almonts varsity as
an All-Blue Water Area
Conference and All-District
choice.
Stacy Houghton
School: Almont
Year: Senior
Years on varsity: Three
Position: Leftfield
Batting
average:
Houghton wound up with a
.430 average, thanks to 33
singles, 13 doubles, five triples and four home runs
among 128 at bats. Her level
of plate proficiency was third
best on the Almont ballclub
and sixth out of those who
attained Tri-City Times AllArea first team status.
She also contributed a
team-high 42 RBI, generated
her squads second highest
RBI output (35) and drew her
teams ninth most walks
(seven).
She concluded her third
campaign on Almonts squad
as an All-Blue Water Area
Conference, a Division 2 AllDistrict and All-Region pick
as well as an Division 2 AllState honorable mention
choice.
Cassidy Loridon
School: Capac
Year: Senior
Years on varsity: Three
Position: Centerfield
Batting average: Loridon
managed a .419 average,
thanks to 33 singles, five
doubles and one triple among
93 at bats. Her level of plate
proficiency was best on the
Capac ballclub and eighth
out of those who attained TriCity Times All-Area first
team status.
She also contributed her
teams highest RBI output
(30), drew 11 walks and
scored seven runs.
Postseason
honors:
Loridon concluded her third
campaign on Capacs varsity
as an All-Blue Water Area
Conference first team pick.
Cassie Malhado
School: Imlay City
Year: Senior
Years on varsity: Three
Position: Centerfield

Batting
average:
Malhado ranked sixth on the
Imlay City ballclub and 13th
among Tri-City Times AllArea first team honorees with

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649 N. Van Dyke - P.O. Box 157 - Imlay City

Photo by Kevin Kissane

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Johnson

Bannister
M i r a n d a
Parisot, Capac, first base;
MaryRose Clark, Dryden,
leftfield; Aubree Smith,
Capac, leftfield; Tyler Kautz,
Almont, centerfield; and
Trace Ashmore, Dryden, centerfield.
Coach of the Year - For
directing Imlay City to an
11-3 Blue Water Area
Conference standing and a
24-10 overall mark, Jean
Bannister earns Tri-City
Times All-Area Coach of the
Year accolades.
She shares that honor
with Almonts Erik Johnson,
who directed his team to a
27-11 overall record, a
Division 2 district title and a
regional semifinal appearance.

Katkic, Creech,
Houghton earn
spots on Div. 2
All-State squad
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
The Tri-City Area was well
represented on the Michigan
High School Softball Coaches
Association Division 2 AllState lineup which was
announced recently.
Imlay City standout
Cameron Katkic headlined
the group of players recognized. The senior earned first
team All-State accolades.
This spring she finished
with a .457 average, thanks to
55 singles, one double and a
two triples among 127 at
bats. Her level of plate proficiency was best on the Imlay
City ballclub.
She also provided her
teams best run (46) and steal
(22) outputs plus amassed
her squads sixth highest RBI
total.
Katkic struck out just
nine times.
Those numbers paved the
way to an array of postseason
honors. She concluded her
fourth season on Imlay Citys
varsity as a Tri-City Times
All-Area, All-Blue Water
Area Conference, All-District
and All-Region first team
choice.
Katkic also claimed the
Blue Water Area Conference
Most Valuable Player Award
and was the recipient of her
teams Defensive MVP
Award.
Almont senior third baseman Kaleigh Creech attained

All-State honorable mention


status.
She produced a .459
average, collecting 27 singles, 18 doubles, five triples
and one home run among 111
at bats. Her level of plate proficiency was highest on the
Almont ballclub.
She also logged a teamhigh 41 runs plus supplied
her squads second best RBI
(28) and walk (19) outputs.
Creech wrapped up her
fourth season on Almonts
squad as a Tri-City Times
All-Area and All-Blue Water
Area Conference first team
pick as well as a Division 2
All-District and All-Region
selection.
Stacy Houghton garnered
a spot on the honorable mention portion of the Division 2
All-State lineup as well.
The senior left fielder
wound up with a .430 average, thanks to 33 singles, 13
doubles, five triples and four
home runs among 128 at bats.
Her level of plate proficiency
was third best on the Almont
ballclub.
She also contributed a
team-high 42 RBI, generated
her squads second best run
output (35) and drew her
teams ninth most walks
(seven).
Houghton capped her
third season on Almonts
squad as a Tri-City Times
All-Area, All-Blue Water
Area Conference, All-District
and All-Region first team
pick.

Lesniak: Imlay standout


named to All-State team

Writing For Many Major


Insurance Companies

(810) 724-0254

a .282 average.
She collected
27
singles and
four doubles
in 110 at Malhado
bats.
Malhado also registered
her teams fourth highest run
output (21) and furnished her
squads fifth highest RBI
total (14).
Postseason
honors:
Malhado concluded her third
season on Imlay Citys squad
as an All-Blue Water Area
Conference honorable mention selection.
Second team - Ali
Harper, Imlay City, pitcher;
Cassidy Loridon, Capac,
pitcher; Alexys Anderson,
Capac, pitcher; Amanda
Lemke, Dryden, pitcher/
shortstop/second
base;
Katelyn Proper, Almont,
catcher; Megan Rinke,
Dryden, second base; Megan
Orlando, Capac, second base;

Imlay City pitching ace Jacob Lesniak looks to


deliver a strike to home plate in a game this
spring.

from page 1-B


Zach Stempky, Cheboygan;
Michael Stygles, Dewitt; Jake
Freeman, Gaylord.
Catcher - Cole Brooks,
Bay City John Glenn; Austin
Krzeminski, Coldwater; and
David Williams, Holland
Christian.
Utility - Scott Granzatto,
Gabriel Richard.
Coach of the Year - Jim
Caserta, Holland Christian.
Second team
Pitcher - Brendan Lovell,
Vicksburg; Scott Lobbestael,
Onsted; Sam Benschoter,
Tecumseh;
and
Lucas
Marshall, Linden.
Infield - Dakota Sanders,
Big Rapids; Drew Boyd,

Orchard Lake St. Marys;


Drew Divine, Marshall;
Connor Culhane, Forest Hills
Eastern; Josh Tirey, Onsted;
Daniel Dubois, Whitehall;
and
Hunter
Lamarch,
Escanaba.
First base - John Hardy,
John Glenn; and David
Chavez, Trenton.
Outfield - Logan Everett,
Jackson Northwest; Jordan
Brewer, St. Joseph; Luke
Kleindl, Goodrich; and Zach
Smith, Harper Creek.
Catcher
Jarod
Wierengo, Fruitport; Korey
Knowles, Ida; and Cal
Barrett, Chelsea.
Utility
Connor
Margosian, Richmond.

PAGE 3-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Battanis excel at
Meijer State Games
By Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT The Battani


family, of Almont, notched
six placewinning performances at the Meijer Summer State
Games last Saturday.
Comstock Park High
School is where the action
unfolded.
Evan collected the most
medals that day, bringing
home three. He won the pole
vault (5 feet 6 inches) and
javelin (93 feet) plus logged
the second swiftest hurdle
clocking (11.15 seconds).

Evan competed in the 11-12


age group.
Aubrey claimed a pair of
medal winning efforts. She
took second with a javelin
toss of 72 feet 3 inches and
posted a pole vault clearance
of 9 feet for third. Aubrey
participated in the 15-19 age
group.
Jacob Battani saw to it
that he would medal as well.
He won the pole vault with a
clearance of 14 feet 6 inches,
the top performance overall
for all age groups. Jacob was
competing in the 15-19 age
division.

Cameron Katkic, Cassie Malhado, Rebecca Rodriguez, Madison Whitsett, Cassidy Loridon, Abbey
Johnson, Stacy Houghton and Kaleigh Creech take time out for a photo at the Blue Water Area Senior
All-Star Game.

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Imlay
Citys
Rebecca
Rodriguez, Cameron Katkic,
Cassie Malhado and Madison
Whitsett; Almonts Kaleigh
Creech, Abbey Johnson and
Stacy Houghton plus Capacs
Cassidy Loridon suited up
for the Gold team in a 3-2
setback to the Blue squad at
the Blue Water Area Senior
All-Star Game on Tuesday,
June 21.
Pine Grove Park, in Port
Huron, is where the game
was contested.
In Tuesdays encounter,
the Gold team took a 1-0
advantage after three innings

were done.
The fourth inning would
see the Blue squad collect
one run as did the Gold team.
That left the latter with a 2-1
edge to protect.
The Blue squad then used
a 1-0 fifth inning advantage
to make it a 2-2 ballgame.
Four complete innings
later, the scoreboard count
remained unchanged.
The Blue squad then outscored the Gold during inning
number ten, pulling out a 3-2
victory.
Taylor Blevins (CrosLex), Ally Edgerton (Yale),
Holly Engel (Yale), Nicole
Finazzo (Anchor Bay),
Lindsey Grifka (Deckerville),
Cassie Humble (Peck),

Emma Kerr and Hunter Brandt were match medalists at the SC4 Senior All-Star Golf Tourney.

Brandt, Kerr are


match medalists

TRI-CITY AREA
Almonts Hunter Brandt
withstood a sudden death
playoff to attain medalist
honors at the SC4 Senior AllStar Golf Tournament last
Thursday.
Port Huron Golf Club
served as the tournament
venue.
Brandt and Armadas
Matt Hammer concluded 18
holes with matching rounds
of 74. That meant a tiebreaker would have to be
implemented to determine a

champion.
It was there Brandt made
a birdie on the first playoff
hole and Hammer managed a
par, leaving the former with a
first-place finish to show for
his efforts.
Almonts Josh Sustarich
also competed that day.
Sustarich shot a 99, paving
the way to an eighth.
Emma Kerr, of Capac,
ended the day as the girls
champion. Kerr wrapped up
her 18-hole round with a
102.

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City senior Jacob Lesniak
tested his diamond skills for
the Gold squad in a 10-9 loss
to the Black team at the Bruin
Club All-Star Baseball Game
on Monday, June 20.
Whaley Park, in Flint, is
where the action unfolded.
Lesniak finished the con-

test with a two for two plate


performance. Both of his
basehits were of the triple
variety.
He also pitched two
innings. There he gave up
two hits and struck out six.
For his performance,
Lesniak was named the Gold
squads Most Valuable Player.

Lesniak is Gold teams MVP

All-District softball team is named


TRI-CITY AREA
The following players were
named to the Division 2 AllDistrict 64 squad which was
announced recently:
Outfield
Stacy
Houghton, Almont; Julia
Kropp, North Branch; and
Lauren
Haight,
North
Branch.
Shortstop - Reese
Ruhlman, North Branch.
First base - Sydney
Marrone, Almont.
Second base - Cameron
Katkic, Imlay City.

Third base - Kaleigh


Creech, Almont.
Catcher - Kaylee Martin,
North Branch.
Pitcher - Veronica
Watson,
Almont;
and
Rebecca Rodriguez, Imlay
City.
Utility - Haley Medrano,
Imlay City.
At Large - Emily
Andrews, Armada; and
Madison Whitsett, Imlay
City.
Coach of the Year - Erik
Johnson, Almont.

Cheyenne Johnson (Peck),


Natasha
Kandell
(Carsonville-Port Sanilac),
Olivia Liebler (Brown City),
Hannah Long (Brown City),
Taylor Pitts (Brown City),
Megan Ripenbark (Yale),
Emilee Wilson (Yale) also
appeared on the roster of the
Gold team. They were
coached by Erik Johnson
(Almont) and Jean Bannister
(Imlay City).
Carley
Agostino
(Marysville),
Madison
Kortas (Armada), Emily
Andrews (Armada), Ellie
Florka (Memphis), Jenna
Franzel (Sandusky), Maddy
Gapshes (St. Clair), Allison
Gardner (St. Clair), Kaitlyn
Griffith (Richmond), Lindsey

Hoover (Algonac), Rachel


Leach (Richmond), Sarah
Longuski (St. Clair), Brooke
Mahn (St. Clair), Madison
McConnell (Marine City),
Katie Newman (Port Huron
High), Ruthie Polio (Marine
City),
Jacque
Rogers
(Marysville), Caroline Ross
(Sandusky),
Lindsey
Schweiger
(Richmond),
Samantha
Smith
(Marysville), Ally Swantek
(Richmond),
Madison
Werner (Memphis) and Heidi
Wilson
(Port
Huron
Northern) comprised the
Blue teams roster. They
were coached by Howard
Suart (Richmond), John Almonts (L to R) Evan, Jacob and Aubrey Battani
Foster (Richmond) and pose for a picture with the medals they won at the
Kevin Caperton (Richmond). Meijer Summer State Games.

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Tri-City softball players in All-Star game

Page 4-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Legal Announcements

Business
Directory

REGULAR MEETING
JUNE 8, 2016


Supervisor Lauwers called the
meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. Mike
Lauwers (Supervisor), Sheila McDonald
(Clerk), Marsha Libkie (Treasurer), and
Bruce Downey (Trustee) were present.
Monica Standel (Trustee) was absent.
Motions were passed to: approve the
May 11th minutes as presented, pay the
cost of $990 for 9 porta johns from

2015 Water Quality Report


for Village of Dryden
This report covers the drinking water quality for Village of Dryden
for the calendar year 2015. This information is a snapshot of the
quality of the water that we provided to you in 2015. Included are
details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and
how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and
state standards.
Your water comes from 2 groundwater wells, each over 96 feet
deep. The State performed an assessment of our source water to
determine the susceptibility or the relative potential of contamination. The susceptibility rating is on a seven-tiered scale from
"very-low" to "very-high" based on geologic sensitivity, well construction, water chemistry and contamination sources. The susceptibility of our source is moderate on well #3. There has been
no assessment performed on new well #4 at this time.
There is no significant source of contamination in our water supply
since the start-up of the arsenic removal system in May 2008.
If you would like to know more about the report, please contact
James Honnold at 796-2207.
Contaminants and their presence in water: Drinking
Water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expect
ed to contain at least small amounts of some contami
nants. The presence of contaminants does not necessar
ily indicate that water poses a health risk. More informa
tion about contaminants and potential health effects can
be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).
Vulnerability of sub-populations: Some people may be
more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who
have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or
other immune systems disorders, some elderly, and infants
can be particularly at risk from infections. These people
should seek advice about drinking water from their health
care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means
to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other
microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
Sources of drinking water: The sources of drinking water
(both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. Our water
comes from wells. As water travels over the surface of the

land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring


minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or
from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
T Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
T Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban
stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis
charges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
T Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a
variety of sources such as agriculture and residential uses.
T Radioactive contaminants, which are naturally occurring
or be the result of oil and gas production and mining
activities.
T Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of
industrial processes and petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff,
and septic systems.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes
regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water
provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which
provide the same protection for public health.

Water Quality Data

The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2015 calendar year. The presence of these
contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 December 31, 2015. The State allows us to monitor for certain contaminants
less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.
All of the data is representative of the water quality, but some are more than one year old.
Terms and abbreviations used below:
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or
expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as
close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): means the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is
convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): means the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no
known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
N/A: Not applicable ND: not detectable at testing limit ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter ppm: parts per million
or milligrams per liter pCi/l: picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity).
Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water
system must follow.

STATE OF
MICHIGAN
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR THE
COUNTY OF
LAPEER


File # 16-049859-CH(H)

Smither Family Trust, Plaintiff vs
David Morton Battice, his unknown
heirs, assigns and successors in interest,
Defendants.
John L. Lengemann P 16553
Morrice, Lengemann & Miller P.C
Attorneys for Plaintiff
202 East Third Street
Imlay City, MI 48444
810-724-2565
ORDER TO ANSWER

At a session of Court held in the
Courthouse for the 40th Judicial Circuit.

PRESENT: THE HONORABLE
NICK O. HOLOWKA, CIRCUIT
JUDGE

IT IS ORDERED that the
Defendants, David Morton Battice, his
unknown heirs, assigns, and successors
in interest shall answer, or take such
other action as may be permitted by law,
the Plaintiffs Complaint to Quiet Title
to the following described lands:

Land situated in the Township of
Attica, County of Lapeer, State of
Michigan, described as follows:

Parcel C: A parcel of land located
in and being a part of the Southwest 1/4
of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest
1/4, Section 29, Town 7 North, Range 11
East, Attica Township, Lapeer County,
Michigan, being more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at
the South 1/4 corner of said Section 29;
thence North 89 degrees 44 minutes 00
seconds West 655.00 feet along the
South line of said Section 29, being the
centerline of Hunters Creek Road, to
the point of beginning; thence continuing North 89 degrees 44 minutes 00
seconds West 165.00 feet along the said
south line of Section 29 and centerline
of Hunters Creek Road; thence North
00 degrees 13 minutes 23 seconds West
663.01 feet; thence South 89 degrees 33
minutes 09 seconds East 165.01 feet;
thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes 23
seconds East 662.49 feet to the point of
beginning.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED the
answer or other action shall be filed with
the Circuit Court for the County of
Lapeer at 266 Clay Street, Lapeer, MI
48446 no later than 28 days from the
date of the last publication of this Order
to Answer.

The complaint that has been filed
with this Court seeks to quiet title in the
Plaintiff as a result of the Plaintiffs successor in title having acquired title by
means of a conveyance from the Lapeer
County Treasurer resulting from a forfeiture of the interest of David Morton
Battice for delinquent taxes, penalties,
interest and fees.

Failure to answer the complaint or
take such other action as permitted by
law will result in judgement in favor of
the Plaintiff by default.
Nick O. Holowka
Circuit Court Judge
Order signed: 5/26/16
23-4

Monitoring and Reporting Requirements: The State and EPA require us to test our water on a regular basis to ensure its safety. We
met all the monitoring and reporting requirements for 2015.
We will update this report annually and will keep you informed of any problems that may occur throughout the year, as they happen.
Copies are available at the Village Office, 5602 Main St. Dryden MI. This report will not be sent to you.
We invite public participation in decisions that affect drinking water quality. Regular Village Council meetings are held the first Tuesday
of each month, at the Village Office, at 7:00 p.m. For more information about your water, or the contents of this report, contact James
Honnold at 810-796-2207. For more information about safe drinking water, visit the EPA website at www.epa.gov/safewater/.

26-1

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President Schneider called the
Regular Meeting to order at 7:53 p.m.
Councilmembers present were Dyke,
Lauer, Love, Peltier, Steffler &
Schneider. Councilmember Tobias was
absent.

The Council approved the agenda;
approved the consent agenda; expressed
no objection to the alley closure for
special events; approved Resolution
#16-06-01 adopting millage rates and
garbage collection fees for 2016-17
year; approved Resolution #16-06-02 to
increase and adjust the water rates;
approved Resolution #16-06-03 to
increase and adjust the sewer rates;
approved Resolution #16-06-04 to

1-25-17

Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm,
Saturday &
Evenings By Appt.


President, Betcher called the meeting to order at 10:10 a.m. Council
Members Present: Betcher, Jones,
Roszczewski, and Franz.

The Council approved the June 21,
2016 agenda, approved rescinding the
2016 Millage Levy set at the regular
council meeting on June 7, 2016, and
approved the 2016 Millage Levy as
General Operating at 9.5981 mills and
the Street at 2.2129 Mills.

Complete copies of the minutes are
available in the clerks office during
regular business hours or at www.villageofdryden.com.
Holly A. Shroyer
Village Clerk /Deputy Treasurer
26-1

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REGULAR MEETING
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SYNOPSIS

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Water Quality Report Available:


The water quality report describing the source and quality of your drinking water is available at
www.villageofdryden.com. To receive a paper copy in the mail, contact us at
drydenvillageclerk@airadv.net or 810-796-2291

Lawn Care
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VILLAGE OF
DRYDEN

SPECIAL MEETING
JUNE 21, 2016
SYNOPSIS

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in
drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Village of Dryden
is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.
When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential or lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30
seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have
your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/savewater/lead.

Accounting &
Tax Preparation

TFN

MUSSEY
TOWNSHIP

Dons Lil Johns for Capac Days, approve


the building inspectors contract for Mel
McNutt, pay the June bills, approve
Ordinance #36 regarding the keeping of
animals in Mussey Township, accept the
resignation of Linda Kniseley from the
planning commission, accept the treasurers report as presented, have the
zoning enforcer look into a possible
blight violation at 14730 Sullivan Road,
adjourn the meeting at 8:20 p.m. A complete copy of the minutes can be
obtained at the Mussey Township hall
during regular business hours or at
www.musseytownship.org.
Sheila McDonald, Clerk
26-1

8-17-16


Mayor Bargen called the meeting
to order at 7:00 p.m. Commissioners
present were Bargen, Rankin, Kempf,
Ramirez and Tanis. Commissioners
Planck and Romine were absent. Also
present were City Manager Tom Youatt;
DDA Director Dana Walker; Fire
Captain Scott Stone; Lapeer County
Prosecuting Attorney Tim Turkelson;
Ruth Hughes Memorial District Library
Director Tracy Aldrich; Ruth Hughes
Memorial District Library Youth
Services Coordinator Mandy Summers;
five members of the community and two
members of the media. The Commission
approved the agenda as presented. The
Commission approved the Consent
Agenda Items as presented, including
Regular Meeting minutes of June 7,
2016, DDA Meeting minutes of June 13,

future elections in 2016; and approved


the new product proposals from Point &
Pay and proceed with integration of
online credit card payments for summer
and winter taxes. The meeting was
adjourned at 8:08 p.m. Submitted by
Nicole F. Frost, City Clerk. Complete
copies of the minutes are available in the
Clerks office during normal business
hours or at www.imlaycity.org.
26-1

9-14-16

REGULAR COMMISSION
MEETING
JUNE 21, 2016
SYNOPSIS

2016 and Payment of Bills including


Payroll of $74,965.45 and Accounts
Payable and Trust & Agency of
$126,776.67. The Commission approved
the wage increase for City Pool Staff for
2016, as presented; approved SAW
Grant Payment #17 invoice for Spicer
Group in the amount of $10,635.50, as
presented; approved the proclamation
for Hiroko Lee, as presented; accepted
the resignation of WWTP Operator
Michael Kohler, effective June 10, 2016;
approved Resolution 2016-12 to adopt
the annual exemption option as set forth
in 2011 PA 152; approved the Collective
Bargaining Agreement between the City
and the TPOAM Union for the period
July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2018, as
presented; approved the Collective
Bargaining Agreement between the City
and the POAM Union for the period July
1, 2016 through June 30, 2018, as presented; approved Resolution 2016-13
Budget Amendment #2 for FY2015/16,
as presented; appointed Mayor Walt
Bargen and Commissioner Amy Planck
to the Election Commission, for all

8-3-16

CITY OF
IMLAY CITY

10-29-16

MORE LEGALS 5 & 6-B

Commercial & Residential

HEATING & COOLING SPECIALISTS


Service & Install, Financing Licensed & Insured

Yale Location 810-387-4452

Located Between Imlay City


and Almont on M-53
Parts &e
Servic

3620 Van Dyke Almont, MI

810-798-8533 FinE-Zancing
Fax 810-798-3738

Page 5-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

Classif ieds

Tri-City Times Classifieds also


Online! Buy, Sell or Trade at
www.tricitytimes-online.com
810-724-2615

Autos

Wanted

For Rent

1989 LINCOLN TOWN CAR,


showroom condition, stored winters, a beautiful car! $4,200.00
or best offer. Call 810-660-7469.
A-1-CAT
...................................................

WANTED: SMALL VINTAGE


TRAVEL TRAILER. Email rita@
pageone-inc.com or call 810683-4000. W-26-6
...................................................

VFW HALL
IMLAY CITY

16 FT. 1996 SEA RAYDER JET


BOAT, 120 hp $3,200 o.b.o.
Great for tubing holds 4 people.
Call 810-627-3504. B-26-4
...................................................

Hay
8 ACRES OF HAY, ready to cut
and bale - make an offer Dryden area. 248-961-2035.
HA-26-2
...................................................

For Sale
WEED EATER WEED TRIMMER, good condition ready to
work $30.
810-417-2249.
FS-25-6
...................................................
HOOSIERS TIRE END TABLES
$50. Kenmore slide window air
conditioner 12,000 btu $200.
586-634-4678 FS-24-3
...................................................

GARAGE SALE 6/30 7/2;


4401 Valencia Dr, Capac 9:00
5:00 Something for everyone!
Tools, fishing and golf gear, 19
foot Four Winns boat, 6 ft door
wall, sleeping bags, bug zappers
and lots of other things. Willing
to deal. GS-26-1
...................................................
HUGE 3 FAMILY GARAGE
SALE! 13125 Atwell Road,
Emmett. Tools/Power Tools,
Collectibles, Dishes, Books,
Games, Clothes, Dining Set,
Desk, Household Items, Sports
Items, Vinyl Records, Antique
table slot machines, & More!
6/30 - 7/3 Hours 9-3 each day!
Rain or Shine! GS-26-1
...................................................

Want to Rent
WANTED TO RENT - 2 bedroom outside of town on a little
bit of land. Call 586-596-6786.
WR-26-1
...................................................

Professional
Directory
Lapeer County Vision Center

724-EYES

Doctors of Optometry

Craig J. Watson, O.D Jeffrey D. Johnston, O.D.

518 S. Cedar Street, Imlay City


Fax: 724-6644

CAPAC

PHARMACY

BEER WINE LIQUOR LOTTO

Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:00 am to 9:00 pm;


and Sunday 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm
Pharmacy Hours: Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm;
Saturday 9:00 am - 2 pm; Closed Sunday
M O V I E R E N TA L S

136 N. MAIN ST.

810-395-2336

Sniff Out a Great Deal


in the Classifieds.
Shoppers with a nose for
bargains head straight for the
Classifieds. In the Classifieds, you
can track down deals on everything from cars to canine companions. Its easy to place an ad
or find the items you want, and
its used by hundreds of area
shoppers every day.

Apartment For Rent


CAPAC VILLAGE: 2 bedroom
upstairs apt. for 1 or 2 adults,
50+, spacious, lots of storage,
appliances and all utilities,
except AC included, carport, no
pets, security deposit required;
call 810-395-2226 and leave
message. APR-20-17
...................................................

COME HOME TO
HICKORY SQUARE
APARTMENTS
IMLAY CITY

1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS!

1 Bedroom...........Starting at $560

2 Bedrooms.........Starting at $610
3 Bedrooms.........Starting at $815

Call Us Today!

810-724-0266

www.mi-apartments.com

*Some conditions apply. E.H.O.

FR-12-13

Garage Sale

Boats

~Newly Remodeled~
Full & Half-day Rental
810-338-0163/810-724-6102

Real Estate
HOME SALES, DIVISION,
JUST LAND SALES. We are
here to Help! Almont. Brown
City. Capac. Imlay City. Yale.
586-206-0118 RE-24-8
...................................................
VACANT LAND 10 acres in
Capac. $30K - price reduced.
Nice building site. Proceeds will
help elderly lady stay in home.
Call 586-243-7105. RE-23-4
...................................................

COMMERCIAL CLEANERS
PT Postitions avail. to clean
banks at night. Must pass background check & drug screen
aarocompanies.com 586-7593700 HW-26-2
...................................................
SMALL CONSTRUCTION company seeking experienced worker. Carpentry, siding, roofing.
810-724-8060. HW-26-2
...................................................
KENNEL HELP WANTED:
Imlay City area. 8 to 10 hours
weekly. Send resume to
wvjones33@gmail.com HW-262
...................................................
PART-TIME
SHOP/YARD
MANAGER - Mature individual.
On-call schedule, mostly afternoons & evenings. Forklift experience. Apply @ 3821 Van Dyke,
Almont. EOE HW-25-2
...................................................
AFC HOME IN MARLETTE IS
HIRING PART-TIME FOR
2ND/3RD SHIFT. Must be at
least 18 years old, have reliable
transportation, available weekends and holidays, and be able
to pass a criminal background
check and drug screening. If
interested, please contact
Jennifer at (989) 635-3151
Monday-Friday
8am-4pm
HW-24-3
...................................................
ROOFERS AND LABORERS
NEEDED. Work 5 days (7
optional) experienced only. Call
586-651-1010. HW-24-3
...................................................

CAREGIVERS
WANTED
Midnight Shift
Assisted Living in Romeo
Call 586.336.9440
Premium Shift Pay

General Production - Requirements include the ability to keep


up with line speeds, capable of performing repetitive motions,
lifting, and operating orbital sanders and buffers while
maintaining production rates.
Applicants must be able to practice proper safety procedures.
Applicants must be available to work any shift.
We offer competitive wages and medical, dental, and vision benefits.
Interested candidates may apply in person at
Albar Industries Inc.,
780 Whitney Dr., Lapeer, MI 48446,
by fax (810) 667-2197,
online at www.albar.com or by email to hr@albar.com.
For e-mail submissions, please indicate job title
(General Production) in the subject line.
HW-25-3

Go with your instincts and


use the Classifieds today.

810-724-2615

Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Tri-City Times
CLASSIFIEDS

MORE LEGALS 4 & 6-B

decrease the sanitary sewer sewage overflow rate; approved Resolution #16-0605 adopting the 2016-2017 budget;
approved Resolution #16-06-06 updating the official fee schedule; approved
the DDA fiscal year budget; approved
Village of Almont/Township of Almont
Agreement for Law Enforcement
Services; approved payment to Mid
Thumb Contract Group for work at the
park; approved payment to Bodman PLC
for services rendered; held the first reading of Ordinance 197 Noxious Weed and
Overgrown Grass Ordinance; approved
Resolution #16-06-07, establishing a
commissioner of noxious weeds;
approved the closing of Branch St. & E.
St. Clair St. for the Heritage Festival;
approved not to exceed $2,500 for soil
boring testing to a company determined

by the Building Committee; approved


invoice from the Law Offices of Howard
L. Shifman, P.C. & approved to go into
closed session of a collective bargaining
agreement.

Discussion
was
held
on
Clauw properties; burning in the
village; park path & ditch issue on
Westwinds.
The meeting adjourned at10:52
p.m.
Kimberly J. Keesler
Clerk/Treasurer
Steve Schneider
President

A complete copy of the minutes is
available in the Clerks office during
regular business hours or at www.
almontvillage.org.
26-1

NOTICE
BERLIN TOWNSHIP
JULY, 2016 BOARD OF REVIEW

THE JULY BOARD OF REVIEW OF BERLIN TOWNSHIP WILL BE


HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2016 AT 5:00 P.M. THE MEETING WILL
BE HELD AT THE OFFICES OF BERLIN TOWNSHIP OFFICES LOCATED AT 740 CAPAC RD., ALLENTON., MI
THE PURPOSE OF THIS MEETING WILL BE TO CORRECT ERRORS,
OMISSIONS, HARDSHIPS, PRES AND QUALIFIED AG.
WILLIAM (BILL) WINN,
SUPERVISOR
26-2

VILLAGE OF CAPAC
BID PROPOSAL
CLEANING SERVICES FOR
VILLAGE LIBRARY

The Village of Capac is accepting bids for cleaning the Capac Library located at 111 N. Main Street, Capac, MI. Please submit bids to the Village of
Capac Attn: Crystal Potter, Clerk at 131 N Main Street, P.O. Box 218, Capac,
MI 48014 no later than 3:00 p.m. on July 5, 2016. Bids will be opened at the
Village Council meeting at 7:00 p.m. on July 5, 2016. Sealed envelopes to be
marked LIBRARY CLEANING BID.
You may contact the Capac Library at 810-395-7000 to schedule a walkthrough
of the Library prior to submitting a bid.
Scope of services expected:
1.
Library to be cleaned on a weekly basis. Cleaning includes:

a. Clean bathrooms, Kitchenette, meeting room

b. Vacuum throughout

c. Dust/mop floors

d. Clean windows, bookshelves, ceiling fans, light fixtures monthly
The Village reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids.
This institution is an equal opportunity provider
26-1

HW-26-2

Albar Industries, Inc., a Lapeer area leader


in the automotive painting industry is
currently accepting applications for the
following positions:

No phone calls please.

Announcements
continued from 4-B

Help Wanted
FR-1-26

Legal

810-724-2615
tct@pageone-inc.com
tricitytimes-online.com
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CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATE:
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Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI 48444
Advertising Deadlines:
All deadlines apply for ordering new ads, canceling
ads or making corrections - Monday noon.
Cancellation & Corrections:
Must be received by 12:00 noon Monday prior to
publication. Report errors immediately so your ad
will appear corrected in the following weeks paper.
The Tri-City Times is responsible only for the first
weeks incorrect ad. Liability for error shall not
exceed the cost of space in which the error or omission occurred.
Business Directory:
Published every week, 3 months - $7.00 per week,
6 months - $6.50 per week, 1 year - $6.00 per
week. Deadline Monday 12:00 noon, for 1x1 ad.
Abbreviations:
Abbreviations make your ad difficult to read and
hard to understand. We use only the most widely
understood abbreviations in classified ads.
Business Hours:
Monday through Friday,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Closed Saturdays and Sundays

PAGE 6-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JUNE 29, 2016

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MORE LEGALS 4 & 5-B

VILLAGE OF CAPAC

131 North Main Street Capac, MI 48014 (810) 395-4355

2015 Annual
Water Quality Report

KEEPING YOU INFORMED!


The Village of Capac provides your drinking water and is pleased to present you with
this ninth annual water quality report. This report is a snapshot of the quality of water
we provided to you in 2015. Included are details about where your water comes from,
what it contains, and how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and
the Michigan Department of Natural Resources & Environment (MDNRE) standards.
The table on the inside of this report shows the results of our monitoring for the
period of January 1st to December 31st, 2015, unless otherwise noted. The test results
will show that your drinking water met all Federal and State requirements for purity
and safety.
WHERE DOES MY WATER COME FROM?

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Your drinking water is drawn from underground through five different wells.
Disinfection facilities treat the water with sodium hypochlorite prior to distribution.
Sodium hypochlorite is similar to household bleach and helps to inactivate bacteria in
the water.

Almonts David Burkland and Marie Burkland were


the Almont Heritage Festival 5K pacesetters.

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
Almonts David Burkland
and Marie Burkland claimed
male and female pacesetter
honors, respectively, at the
Almont Heritage Festival 5K
last Saturday.
David Burklands winning time was 18:21.
Alec Giles, of Almont,
pulled up second overall that
day. He logged a 19:23 clocking.
Chris Vasseur, of Almont,
rounded out the top-three
male finishers. Vasseur
stopped the watch at 23:52.
Marie Burkland was the
female champion that day. It
took her 22:01 to accomplish
the feat.
Kayla Pia, of Allenton,
claimed a second. Pia posted
a 24:58 time en route.
Jessica Jones, of Almont,
completed the top-three
female finishers. She was
timed in 27:43.
Here is a rundown on
how the competitors fared in
their respective age groups:
Female
14 and Under- 1) Emily
Kwierant, Almont, 32:09; 2)
Madison Ott, Almont, 33:42;
3) Sophia Griffiths, Dryden,
35:33; 4) Maria Griffiths,
Dryden, 47:44; 5) Allison
Laframboise, Dryden, 49:39;
6) Katelyn Smith, Almont,
59:18; and 7) Harper Savage,
Romeo, 1:00:18.
15-19- 1) Kayla Pia,
Almont, 24:58; 2) Hannah
Sydzlowski, Almont, 33:06);
3) Lauren Dempz, Almont,
34:36; 4) Marlee Kinner,
Almont, 35:53; and 5)
Jennifer Aubertin, Imlay
City, 52:46.
20-29- 1) Marie Burkland,
Almont, 22:01; 2) Karla
Kopp, Almont, 32:42; and 3)
Alexis Begley, Lapeer, 37:58.
30-39- 1) Jessica Jones,
Allenton, 27:43; 2) Caitlin
Matz, Macomb, 34:25; 3)
Sandra Waite, Imlay City,
36:45; 4) Lisa Andrews,
Almont, 39:04; 5) Laura
OConnor, Attica, 49:24; 6)

WATER SYSTEM INFORMATION


The Village of Capac has been operating a community owned well and distribution
system for over 80 years to meet the needs of its residents and businesses. Many
improvements to the system have been made over the years to increase capacity and
reliability.
IMPROVING WATER AESTHETICS

Burklands set pace at


Almont Heritage 5K
By Kevin Kissane

The water then goes through the Arsenic Treatment Plant. This finished water is
distributed to customers and excess supplies are stored in an elevated storage tank.

Amy Deskins, Almont, 52:42;


7) Sarah Savage, Romeo,
1:00:23; 8) Alicia Smith,
Capac, 1:00:29; and 9)
Amanda Gottschling, Capac,
1:00:31.
40-49- 1) Michelle
Schrader, Capac, 32:38; 2)
Janet Dempz, Allenton,
36:30; 3) Jennifer Thompson,
Almont, 45:08; 4) Tricia
Dedalis, Almont, 45:54; 5)
Larua Griffiths, Dryden,
47:41; 6) Anita McKinney,
Almont, 49:32; 7) Rachel
Laframboise, Dryden, 50:26;
8) Lori Grubbe, Allenton,
51:26; and 9) Tracy Pringle,
North Branch, 57:23.
50-59- 1) Annette Kinner,
Almont, 33:21; 2) Kim
Bauble, Grosse Pointe, 38:00;
3) Colleen Jewell, Dryden,
41:22; 4) Theresa Justice,
48:37; 5) Lisa Greenman,
Allenton, 51:27; and 6) Cristy
Edie, Almont, 52:44.
60 and Over- 1) Lois
Meek, Almont, 47:39; and 2)
Lorrie Pia, 48:35.
Male
14 and Under- 1) Devin
Frost, Almont, 36:32; 2)
Nathan Champ, Mount
Clemens, 37:16; 3) Gregory
Champ, Mount Clemens,
49:30; and 4) Brady Savage,
Romeo, 1:00:16.
15-19- 1) Alec Giles,
Almont, 19:23; 2) Christian
Frost, Almont, 31:49; 3) Kyle
Brown, 35:07; 4) Jacob
Wedemeyer, Almont, 35:08;
and 5) Aaron Thompson,
Almont, 45:12.
20-291)
David
Burkland, Almont, 18:17; 2)
Chris Vasseur, Almont, 23:52;
and 3) William Radford,
Almont, 24:35.
30-39- 1)James Fleming,
Almont, 25:56; and 2) Ben
Waite, Imlay City, 29:20.
40-49- 1) Mike Giles,
Almont, 25:44; 2) Andrew
Kopp, Imlay City, 30:03; and
Floyd Pringle Jr., North
Branch, 57:23.
50-59- 1) George Jewell,
Dryden, 31:12.
60 and Over- 1) David
Pryce, Romeo, 41:25; and 2)
George Jewell, Dryden,
31:12.

Every spring and fall, your distribution system is flushed to remove deposits. This
improves the taste of the water and helps prevent a cloudy appearance.
HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not
necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking
Water Hotline (800) 426-4791.
The sources of both tap and bottled drinking water include rivers, lakes, streams,
ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or
through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive materials, and can also pick up substances resulting from animal or human
activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from
sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and

wildlife
Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occur
ring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater
discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
Pestisides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as
agriculture, runoff and residential uses.
Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result
of oil and gas production and mining activities.


Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic
chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum
production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and

septic systems.
To ensure that tap water is safe, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount
of certain contaminants in
water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration regulates
established limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Information for People with Special Health Concerns:

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-compromised
persons such as persons undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone
organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some
elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should
seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA-CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other
microbiological contaminants are also available from EPAs Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800) 426-4791.
DEFINITIONS
Parts per million (ppm) and parts per billion (ppb) One ppm can be equated to four
teaspoons of salt in a standard 24 foot backyard pool. One ppb is one teaspoon of salt
in an Olympic-size pool. PPM is equivalent to a milligram per liter milligram =
1/1000 grams. PPB is equivalent to a micro gram per liter micro gram = 1/1000
milligram.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk.
MCLGs provide for a margin of safety.
Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) The MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in the drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs
as feasible, using the best available treatment technology. MCLs are set at very
stringent levels by the State and Federal government.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - The MRDL is the highest level
of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition
of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - The MRDLG is the level
of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to
health.
Picocuries per Liter(pCi/L) a measure of radioactivity.
Action Level (AL) - The concentration of a contaminant which, if expected, triggers
treatment of other required actions a water system must follow.
e.n.d. erosion of natural deposits.
nd - not detectable at testing limit.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
Interested Citizens are welcome to attend Village Council meetings to hear more about Capacs water system issues.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Meetings are held the first and third Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. at the Capac American Legion Hall 115 N. Main St.
Capac, MI.

Competitors are off and running Saturday morning at the Almont Heritage Festival 5K.

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS?
Village Staff works year round to provide quality water to residents and businesses. If you have any questions or comments, or would like to receive more specific information about Capacs water system, please feel free to contact Greg Smith, D.P.W. Supt., at (810) 395-4355 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. weekdays.
IMPORTANT CONTACTS
VILLAGE OFFICES: 810-395-4355
EPA SAFE DRINKING WATER HOTLINE:
800-426-4791
EPA WEBSITE: www.epa.gov/safewater

26-1