Day

2

Wednesday
May 26, 2010
Publishers Weekly’s Show Daily is produced each day during the 2010 BookExpo in New York.
The Show Daily press office is in room 1C02. PW’s booth is #4841.

A L L

T H E

B U Z Z

O N

B O O K E X P O

A M E R I C A

The Agency Model Gets Mixed Grades
By Calvin Reid
Digital Book 2010, the International Digital Publishing
Forum’s annual conference
on e-book publishing,
picked a “hot day for a hot
subject,” according to ebook retailer Bob LiVolsi,
referring to the impact,
back in April, of the agency
model, a new business
model for selling e-books,
on small and independent
retailers and their customers. The founder of the ebook retailer Books on
Board, LiVolsi is always outspoken, and he used his
time on the podium to criticize publishers for the
rushed implementation of
the new model while praising the work of wholesalers
like Ingram and OverDrive,
who he said worked tirelessly to make sure small
retailers would be ready for
the changes.
LiVolsi was critical of
aspects of the agency
model, delivering a comprehensive (and sometimes
amusing) critique of its
impact on his business and
on his customers’ spending
habits, as well as speculating on the viability of brickand-mortar bookstores in
the future. His presentation
capped off a morning of discussion about the “e-book
revolution,” in the words of
OverDrive CEO Steve Potash, who moderated Digital
Book 2010, the first time the
annual event has been held
in conjunction with BEA.
Indeed, the session
before the agency model
panel focused on success
stories from “The Global
Digital Community,” featuring presentations from

LibreDigital’s Tyler Ruse,
Daihei Shiohama from ebook developer Voyager
Japan, and Michael Tamblyn of e-book retailer Kobo.
Ruse outlined the wellknown successes of
romance publishers Harlequin and its Mills & Boon
imprint, and the effective
use of embeddable book
widgets that allow readers
to preview M&B titles. Shiohama outlined a Japanese
e-book market with 300,000
titles that had $600 million
in sales in 2009. He said 80%
of the Japanese e-book
market was via mobile
phones and aimed at young
women in their 20s. Digital
manga, and Japanese comics of all kinds, “offer a

larger potential as e-books
than textbooks,” Shiohama
believes. “Text is limited,
but it’s possible to make
manga available globally.”
Tamblyn had a long list of
international e-book
accomplishments (one day
Kobo sold books in 174 different countries) and a wish
list for the category going
forward: simpler territorial
rights, simultaneous global
release of print and ebooks, more EPub in more
places, and global metadata with multiterritorial
pricing and rights data.
LiVolsi’s presentation was
the heart of the morning
event. He followed very
capable presentations by
continued on page 5

© Steve Kagan.com

Some rue its complications, others welcome the stability

“The Value of the Book” was a hotly debated topic at yesterday morning’s
CEO Panel, moderated by FSG’s Jonathan Galassi. See our story on page 4.

ABA Partners with Google
Ever since Winter Institute,
there has been much buzz
about a possible partnership between ABA and
Google. Yesterday the two
made it official at a session
on Google Editions during
the ABA Day of Education

The Road Through Wonderland
Surviving John Holmes
by Dawn Schiller
A young girl, caught up in a lifestyle of drugs
and insanity, who overcame her past and
ultimately became a powerful example of the
g and resiliencyy of the human spirit.
p
courage

Signing within
Medallion Press Booth
today at 10:30A.M.
Medallion Press is located
within IPG Booth #2723

MOTIV8N’ U by Staci Boyer
Weight loss shouldn’t be your only fitness
goal. MOTIV8N’ U helps you strengthen
8 major components of life essential for
true health and fitness.

Signing within Medallion
Press Booth today at
3:00P.M.

m e d a l l i o n p r e s s . c o m

Medallion Press
is located within
IPG Booth #2723

with ABA COO Len Vlahos
and Tom Turvey, director of
strategic partnerships for
Google. Both groups will
partner on digital books
starting with the official
launch of Google Editions
this summer.
“Think of us as Ingram.
We’re wholesaling that digital book and providing that
book to you,” explained
Turvey, who anticipates
having 400,000 books—
trade, STM, and professional—at the launch. The
books will be compatible
with all e-readers except
for Amazon’s Kindle and
can be read offline using
Google Gear, which allows
for caching in the browser.
Currently, ABA offers ebooks on the IndieBound.
com Web site through
Ingram and will continue to
do so. The Google arrangement is not exclusive.
Google will not be selling
print titles, but its system
will support print books
bundled with the digital
edition. Further down the
line, Google and ABA will
allow bookstores to geoaffiliate, so that bookstores
will share in the sale when
a customer downloads a
continued on page 5

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

IN-BOOTH
AUTHOR SIGNINGS
Today at Medallion Press Booth
#2723 meet two women who
overcame violence and tragedy to
become an inspiration to others.

LURED INTO A DARK AND ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP
WITH THE KING OF PORN, A YOUNG GIRL ESCAPES
WITH HER LIFE . . . AND HER INSPIRING TRUE STORY.

Dawn Schiller
THE ROAD THROUGH WONDERLAND
SURVIVING JOHN HOLMES

10:30A.M.

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

HIGHLIGHTS
OF THE DAY

MEETINGS AND EVENTS
8–9:30 a.m. Children’s Book & Author Breakfast. Speakers: Cory Doctorow,
Mitali Perkins, Richard Peck; Master of Ceremonies, Sarah Ferguson,
the duchess of York (Special Events Hall)
8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. “Big Ideas at BEA” Conference. Panels include “How the
Digital Cloud Works for Publishers and Users”; “Rights, Royalties &
Retailers: What Works?”; “Writing Sex: 3 Granta Writers about Intimacy
on the Page”; “Who’s Reading E-books?”; “The New Landscape of
Collab oration: Where Do Book Producers Fit In?”
9 a.m.–6 p.m. Exhibit Hall, Author Stages, and International Rights &
Business Center open.
10:30 a.m.–noon Speed Dating with Children’s Authors & Illustrators
(this event is for booksellers only, Room 1E15)
2–3:15 p.m. BEA Young Adult Editor’s Buzz. Moderator, Jack Martin,
New York Public Library. Editors: Julie Strauss-Gabel, Dutton; Jennifer
Weis, St. Martin’s Press; Cindy Eagan, Poppy; Farrin Jacobs, Harper Teen;
Arthur Levine, Arthur A. Levine Books (Room 1E15).
3–4 p.m. Town Hall (Room 1E10)
4–5 p.m. Annual Membership Meeting (Room 1E10)

AUTOGRAPHS
More than 750 authors autographing; here are just a few names: Michael,
Koryta, Adriana Trigiani, Oscar Hijuelos, Karin Slaughter, Dorothea Benton
Frank, Lisa Gardner, Rosemary Wells, Michael Lister, Michele Lang, Karen
Kingsbury, Ridley Pearson, Jack Owens, Bruce Lansky, Ed Briant, John
Moody, Mary Higgins Clark, Scott Spencer, Steve Berry.

THROUGH HER PERSONAL LIFE STORIES OF
STRUGGLES AND SUCCESSES STACI WILL SHOW
YOU HOW TO RESTRUCTURE YOUR BELIEFS AND
BEHAVIORS AND POINT YOU TOWARD A BETTER LIFE

Staci Boyer
MOTIV8N’ U

3:00P.M.

© Steve Kagan.com

2

Kris Kringle, the Musical, based on a book by Maria
Ciampi, drew nice crowds throughout the day Tuesday,
with 15-minute perfomances at the top of the hour.
Meanwhile, the temperature outdoors rose into the upper
80s, with hotter weather predicted for today and Thursday.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Daisy Maryles
MANAGING EDITORS Michael Coffey, Sonia Jaffe Robbins
ART DIRECTOR Clive Chiu
PICTURE PRODUCTION EDITOR Igor Tsiperson
PHOTOGRAPHER Steve Kagan

Medallion Press is located
within IPG booth # 2723

STAFF REPORTERS Andrew Albanese, Lynn Andriani, Rachel Deahl, Louisa Ermelino, Lynn
Garrett, Sarah F. Gold, Jim Milliot, Calvin Reid, Diane Roback, Mark Rotella, Jonathan
Segura, Parul Sehgal, John A. Sellers
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Gwenda Bond, Sue Corbett, Lucinda Dyer, Donna Freitas, Karen
Jones, Hilary S. Kayle, Bridget Kinsella, Claire Kirch, Sally Lodge, G. Jeffrey MacDonald,
Suzanne Mantell, Shannon Maughan, Marcia Z. Nelson, Diane Patrick, Karin Pekarchik,

m e d a l l i o n p r e s s . c o m

Karole Riippa, Judith Rosen, Liz Thomson, JoSelle Vanderhooft, Wendy Werris, Leigh-Anne
Williams, Kimberly Winston, Douglas Wolk
PRODUCTION MANAGER Paula Gordon, Kady Francesconi
TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Milan Patel

Wednesday at 10:00 AM, Autographing Table 8
Thursday at 4:00 PM, Random House Booth #4341

A Ballantine Books Hardcover
www.EnterThePassage.com
www.FindSubjectZero.com

PHOTO: © GASPER TRINGALE

Meet JUSTIN CRONIN

4

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

CEOs Debate Piracy, E-books

© Steve Kagan.com

ing piracy an “enorT The opening panel of BEA’s
mous” risk, one that
day of educational programshould be at the foreming, “The Value of the Book,”
front of publishers’
certainly demonstrated that
minds. Speaking to
there is value in the book—but
the rest of the
those who are leading the
panel—which
industry have wildly varying
included Workman
opinions of what that value is,
group publisher Bob
and how best to exploit it.
Miller, ICM execuWithin the first 20 seconds of
tive v-p Esther Newhis introduction, Farrar,
berg, Ingram CEO
Straus, and Giroux president
Skip Prichard, PenJonathan Galassi, who
guin Group CEO
moderated, brought up what
David Shanks, and
Executive action: ABA CEO Oren Teicher, Workman group publisher Bob Miller,
would turn out to be the issue
American Booksellof the morning: how the indus- Authors Guild’s new president Scott Turow, ICM executive v-p Esther Newberg, ers Association CEO
Ingram CEO Skip Prichard, Penguin CEO David Shanks, and FSG president
try should navigate the
Jonathan Galassi, who moderated Tuesday morning’s well-attended CEO Panel. Oren Teicher—
“bumpy landscape” of e-books.
Turow said, “You
That quickly led to a heated debate
Turow—who was recently named
guys have got to do a better job.”
about piracy, with author Scott
president of the Authors Guild—callPrichard, however, noted that most
books that are pirated today are being
scanned in from paper editions, and
that e-books “did not cause piracy.”
Prichard, along with Miller,
seemed to be more pro e-book than
In partnership with the U.K. digital vendor Exact Editions, Publishers
the other panelists, and Teicher
Weekly has launched an iPhone app to coincide with the start of BEA. Readrepeatedly urged publishers to be
ers will be able to download the new PW iPhone app and access PW content
“format neutral” so that booksellers
starting with the April 26 pre-BEA issue on through current issues, includcan serve readers in a number of
ing free daily access to Show Daily content from BEA (the first print issue of
Show Daily was published today with two more editions to come).
The launch of the app comes a day after PW announced deals with Scribd for
a PW-branded Scribd reader and a partnership with Zinio to offer free access to
BEA Show Daily content. Zinio is also offering for-pay online subscriptions to
PW for the iPad as well as for PC and Mac laptops and desktops. PW editors Calvin Reid and Andrew Albanese will be at the Zinio booth (2329) today and
tomorrow, respectively, to demonstrate access to PW content using Zinio’s
iWall, a giant video screen display set up at the Zinio booth.
PW president George Slowik Jr. said the PW/Exact Editions iPhone app
offers a “Freemium” model. Initially, readers will be able to freely access PW
content—from the pre-BEA issue up to the Show Daily—for a 30-day period
before being offered a variety of subscription plans. Those plans will range
from full access to all PW print and online content to selected levels of
access to the specialty newsletters. Details on subscription pricing and
access levels will be announced later.

‘PW’ Launches an iPhone App

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

ways. Galassi and Turow criticized
Amazon for simultaneously releasing print and e-editions of certain
books. “It was a mistake,” said
Galassi, to which Miller responded:
“It’s pretty hard to go back now.” And
when Newberg brought up all the
enhancements that can be made to
e-books, especially on the iPad,
Galassi retorted, “Who has time to
enhance an e-book? [With all the
links to external Web sites], you
could be in an e-book forever.”
Shanks had little to say about ebooks in general, continually noting
that print books still make up “90plus-percent of our business.”
Getting back to the panel’s official
subject—what the value of a book is
in today’s market—Newberg mentioned a new Steve Martin novel that
Grand Central is publishing this fall,
An Object of Beauty. With its vellum
pages and high-quality jacket, Newberg said the book must have cost
Hachette a fortune to produce. Yet
she was confident that “if you make a
beautiful product, they will come.”
Prichard disagreed. “People around
books care [about that sort of thing],
but the vast majority of readers
—Lynn Andriani
don’t.”

The Old-Fashioned Way:
Abrams installed a giant
manual typewriter in its
booth in connection with
Kevin O’Callaghan’s eulogy
to bygone days, Monumental: The Reimagined World
of Kevin O’Callaghan.
Before the platen are (from
right to left) Kerry Liebling,
marketing manager; Andrew
Gardner, publicity; Erica
Kochman, trade sales manager; and Ashley Gillespie
Rich, marketing manager.

People Who Love People

Weird looks: Amy Kaneko, v-p of sales, and Terry Newell, president, at Weldon Owen’s booth donning 3D wear
in connection with their book, 3D Snapshots.

© Steve Kagan.com

He showed up at 8:45 a.m., he said,
assent to that sentiment. They variand staked out a spot on the lower
ously informed this reporter of the
level near the PW Show Daily press
title of Streisand book (My Passion
room. He idled the morning away
for Design), the publisher (Viking),
reading Show Daily. In about an
and even the pub date (November).
hour, Nicholas Pierro, a 20-year-old
Pierro, who just graduated from
actor and writer, was joined by a
acting school in New York, hails
pair of women, then
from Minneapolis—
another man. By
“I saw Barbra in St.
noon, Pierro was at
Paul in 2006 on her
the head of a growing
world tour,” he said
line of BEA attendees
proudly. He is curwaiting for one thing.
rently acting in an
When asked, Pierro
off-Broadway play in
and a few new friends,
Greenwich Village,
said in unison, “We’re
but is also working
here for Gayle King.”
the BEA for his
It’s a joke, it turns out,
father’s publishing
for the object of their
company, Pierro
devoted vigil is none
Enterprises. “We
Nicholas Pierro,first in line, with his publish amateur
other than Barbra
hot ticket to Streisand keynote.
Streisand, who would
poems—by kids and
be interviewed at 6 p.m. by King in
teens and people who don’t have
the Special Events Hall.
the opportunity to be published by
“In truth,” said Pierro earnestly,
big houses,” he said of his father’s
“I’m a huge Streisand fan.” All the
business, which is now in its 17th
others in the line nodded their
year. “But today belongs to Barbra.”

Photos © Steve Kagan.com

“The content and the buzz,” indeed.
BEA show motto was all over the
floor.

Editors at the Buzz Panel: Cary Goldstein, Twelve; Mitzi Angel,
FSG; Susanna Porter, Random House; Chuck Adams, Algonquin; Nan Graham, Scribner; Judy Clain, Little, Brown.

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

NYU/Abu Dhabi Host Training Seminars
The New York University Center for
Publishing today announced that it
will host a series of
professional publishing seminars
beginning this fall
for Arab publishers.
The venture will be
hosted in partnership with KITAB, a
joint venture of the
Abu Dhabi AuthorChambers inspired
by Abu Dhabi visit. ity for Culture and
Heritage and the
Frankfurt Book Fair, and will be conducted by faculty from NYU’s Center
for Publishing and hosted at NYU’s
new campus in Abu Dhabi.
Andrea Chambers, director of the
NYU Center for Publishing, said the
program came about after she visited the Abu Dhabi book fair in
March, met with publishing executives in the region, and was struck by
the opportunities—and difficulties—
for publishing in the Middle East,
which is a relatively nascent industry, Chambers notes, with still largely
untapped market potential.
The first seminar will be held

November 6–11, 2010, with two more
in the works for spring and fall of
2011. The initial participating faculty
members will include Peter Balis
(John Wiley & Sons), Philip Patrick
(Random House), and Mario Pulice
(Little, Brown). The first seminars,
says Chambers, will focus on the
“challenges of developing a targeted
publishing strategy; best practices
for marketing, sales, distribution,
and graphic design; and digital publishing, including social media,
mobile, and the use of digital media.”
Publishing in the Arab world has
made strides in recent years, bolstered by an influx of investment in
both education and in the industry‘s
infrastructure. The region hosts a
number of book fairs, but Arab publishing efforts have been limited by a
range of professional issues.
“Enabling the region’s emerging
publishing industry to compete and
communicate at an international level
relies on building confidence and
competency,” notes Monika Krauss,
general manager of KITAB, which was
chartered to address these very
—Andrew Albanese
issues.

A Collegial Spirit: At
the Nuts and Bolts of
Children’s Bookselling
roundtable, children’s
booksellers swapped
tips and strategies.

Christopher Kenneally, director of business
development for the Copyright Clearance Center, spoke to panel-goers at the “Copyright in
Motion” panel. He strongly urged publishers to
protect copyright on Web pages.

Workwomen at Workman: Janet
Harris and Jodi Weiss hauling
stuff.
Frank Sanchez, head buyer at Kepler’s Books and Magazines,
Menlo Park, Calif., stocks up at the Remainder Pavilion.

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

5

Agency Model continued from page 1

OverDrive’s legal counsel, Erica Lazzaro, and Ingram v-p Andrew Weinstein, who both outlined the agency
model—in which publishers set the
price of books and designate an
“agent” who sells for them—and the
traditional wholesale book model.
They also listed all the problems the
switch-over entails for them—the
distributors—as well as for their
retailer clients. Lazzaro and Weinstein almost seemed wistful about
the passing of the wholesale model, a
business model that was simple in
comparison to the complex changes
and new requirements wrought by
the agency model.
Publishers are responsible for
sales tax, although distributors and
retailers need to collect it—“now
we have to be tax experts, too,”
Weinstein said—often on books that
now may be governed by multiple
contracts. The agency model prohibits any kind of discounting, so
customer loyalty programs and discount coupons are banned, and as
Weinstein said, “We’re still thrash-

ing about on all these issues. There
are no best practices as yet.”
But the rushed implementation
also meant that some retailers, like
Books on Board, simply were not
allowed to sell e-books that did not
have contracts, updated metadata,
or pricing data settled. Books on
Board also had to discard all of its
loyalty programs, and some books
were even removed from customers’ bookshelves, if they had been
purchased but not yet downloaded.
LiVolsi said agency model books
were about 57% of his sales, and he
ended up going seven weeks without any of that revenue because the
books were not ready.
While LiVolsi said the shift to the
agency model likely means more
predictable margins, he is concerned that the model will lead to
“Apple and Amazon destroying
brick-and-mortar bookstores, just
like Apple did to music stores. I
hope we can build a system that can
put books in front of people and
isn’t just about quarterly earnings
and stock prices.”

ABA/Google continued from page 1

Google digital book in the store.
“Strategically, I think that puts you
in the mix,” said Turvey.
Although some booksellers, like
Powell’s, have long been using
Google’s book search capabilities,
ABA’s IndieBound will offer it as
well. Vlahos announced the site will
soon offer a more seamless shopping experience across formats
thanks to the ABA board’s recent
decision to substantially upgrade
the site.
Other educational sessions at
the show expanded on ones at
Winter Institute, including a bookbuying survey promised by Jack
McKeown, director of Verso Digital Advertising and co-owner of
Books & Books Westhampton,
which opens in July. The survey,
which was completed at the end of
April, bears out much of Verso
Digital’s two earlier consumer
surveys about 62 million avid book
buyers. The new survey explored
what McKeown called the mind
share/market share problem, the
number of people who say that
they prefer buying at independents and the percentage of people who actually do. McKeown
identified three key factors that
keep people from shopping in
indies: discounted bestsellers,
better selection, and proximity to
home and work. The survey also
looked at customers who browse
independents then shop online or
at chains. That translates into $260
million annually of lost revenue,
said McKeown. The complete
results are available at www.versoadvertising.com/beasurvey/.
At a reprise of a Winter Institute

panel on alternative business models, “The New Reality,” a trio of panelists who have Espresso Book
Machines spoke about a variety of
initiatives. Carole Horne, general
manager of Harvard Book Store in
Cambridge, Mass., said that the
store’s green delivery system was
really part of a three-pronged
approach that includes the book
machine. At the moment, the store
is subsidizing the bicycle delivery
service so that customers pay a flat
rate. The response has been underwhelming, said Horne. She anticipates that it will grow significantly
when the third prong, a revamped
Web site, is up and running and
more customers begin shopping
online.
At Northshire Books in Manchester Center, Vt., general manager
Chris Morrow is looking for ways to
innovate through consignment. Initially, he began with baby clothes
produced by Zunato, a local company, and dedicated 250 sq. ft. in the
children’s section just to them.
Since then he’s added books from
local publisher Chelsea Green and
is considering several other consignment options. “As long as it’s
complementary and synergistic, I’ll
keep doing that. We need to find
ways to support our core business,”
he said.
Chuck Robinson, co-owner of
Village Books in Bellingham,
Wash., has found a way to turn his
marketing budget into a profit
center. Instead of spending 2%, as
most stores do, with the help of
the store’s quarterly 56-page
Chuckanut magazine, it now
spends 1%.
—Judith Rosen

6

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Ah, Yes! He Remembers It Well
This year marks City Lights
head book buyer Paul
Yamazaki’s 40th year working his one job in the book
business. Whether called ABA
or BEA, Yamazaki has seen
his share of book industry
trade shows and says he
would not be the book buyer
he is today without attending
the annual industry extravaganza.
So what are some of his fondest
memories of trade shows past?
Number One: Hanging with the
Barney Rosset and the Grove and
New Directions staffs at a party the

presses cohosted at City
Lights when ABA came to
San Francisco. Now Morgan
Entrekin heads up Grove/
Atlantic, and Yamazaki still
hangs out with that crowd.
What was the best Publisher Group West party?
Simple: Wilson Pickett at
Kilimanjaro in Washington,
D.C.
Of course, what would a national
book trade show be without Yamazaki
strolling the floor with Elliot Bay
book buyer Rick Simonson? In fact,
one of Yamazaki’s fondest ABA

W E E K LY

memories involved crashing a
bookseller dinner in New Orleans
with Simonson and Claremont College Huntley Bookstore’s Craig
Gilmore and wife Ruthie Wilson.
“James Brown was going to play,”
says Yamazaki. (Simonson does not
remember that party; “we crashed
a lot of things together,” he says.)
Even when the trade show was
held in Anaheim, a city Yamazaki,
as a Los Angeles native, is obligated
to loathe, the City Lights book buyer
still values going there. “It’s where I
met Sonny [Mehta],” he explains.
“Rick dragged me over and said,
‘You two should know each other.’”
At another Knopf BEA party

Live Healthy
Eat Clean
Live Healthy

Yamazaki fondly remembers Toni
Morrison bumming a cigarette
from him.
Such meetings are what ABA and
BEA events do best, says Yamazaki.
“It’s where a little guy like me who
was just starting out gets a chance to
meet heads of houses,” he says.
“What happens on the floor is
important, but what happens off the
floor can be more important.”
Book publishing is a people business, after all. But Yamazaki is
known for using up every minute of
the show to search for book treasures on every inch of the floor.
Yamazaki loves the chance to
make book buzz at BEA with some
of his favorite booksellers. In 2003
he remembers how, along with
Simonson and Carla Cohen from
Politics and Prose, they decided
whenever anyone asked about the
hot BEA books they’d name just
one: The Known World by Edward P.
Jones. “By the third day people
were telling me about it,” remembers Yamazaki. (Jones went on to
win the Pulitzer and National Book
Critics Circle awards that year.)
Incidentally, Yamazaki’s 2010
BEA buzz book pick: I Hotel by
Karen Tei Yamashita (Coffee House
Press, June). You heard it here first.
—Bridget Kinsella

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PLEASE VISIT US IN ROOM 1A02

The C-SPAN Civics Bus parked in
the Crystal Palace at Javits will provide the backdrop for drinks and
conversation about the Supreme
Court this afternoon at 4 p.m. Public
Affairs head Peter Osnos will moderate a q&a with C-SPAN president
and co-COO Susan Swain and feature producer Mark Farkas, who
together with founder and chairman Brian Lamb edited a collection
of interviews with all nine sitting
justices of the Supreme Court for
the newly released The Supreme
Court (Public Affairs). In it Justice
Sotomayor reflects on
her first impressions
of the job, and Chief
Justice Roberts talks
about the role of the
court in society.
The bus, which once
served as a mobile
production studio and
has since evolved into
a mobile classroom,
will also serve as C-SPAN’s booth.
The company will give away promotional materials and will film parts
of BEA from the vantage point of
the bus. The new footage will soon
join more than 160,000 hours of
video, which can now be viewed at
the newly relaunched C-SPAN
Video Library (www.c-spanvideo.
org/videoLibrary/). —Judith Rosen

COME MEET OUR AUTHORS at
LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY
BOOTH #3750!
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IE?D=AH?KJJAHHU

will be signing advance
copies of ROOM at our
booth today from 4:00
to 5:00 pm.

will be signing advance
copies of THE REVERSAL
at our booth on Thursday
from 2:00 to 3:00 pm.
The line will begin at 1:00 pm
sharp. Signing is limited to
the first 400 people.

KJA)@=U
H=U@KSJ6
K?PK>AN1pd

“Dazzling….
It’s unlike anything I’ve ever
read before.”

“Connelly is
a master.”
—New York Times
Book Review

ANITA SHREVE,
author of A Change in
Altitude

“ROOM is a book to read in one sitting. When it’s
over you look up: the world looks the same but
you are somehow different and that feeling lingers
AUDREY NIFFENEGGER, author of The Time
for days.”
Traveler’s Wife

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8

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Harding’s Road to the Pulitzer
Paul Harding’s story
sounds like a publishing
fairy tale, something told to
aspiring writers to counteract cruel business realities
and let them sleep at night.
Only this fairy tale really
happened.
Harding worked for years
to complete a draft of Tinkers, a literary novel inspired by his memories of his clock-repairing grandfather, only to collect rejection slips
from every editor and agent he
approached. Disheartened, he put
the manuscript in a drawer and, he

says, “moved on to the next
thing.” Then, during a
night of drinking and commiseration, a poet friend
suggested another place
he might try—that publisher didn’t have a place
for the book, but asked for
permission to pass it on to
an editor at Bellevue Literary Press,
a new publisher attached to the
New York University School of Medicine. Harding said sure, and a week
later he had an offer from Bellevue.
The match has worked out well
for both the publisher and the

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

author—Harding will be coming to
BEA fresh off Monday’s Pulitzer
Prize luncheon, where he’ll accept
the 2010 fiction prize. He’s also the
recipient of a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship and was a finalist for the the
2010 Indies Choice Award for Book
of the Year—Adult Debut.
“The only analogies I can make are
extreme weather. I feel like part of a
tornado,” says Harding. “It still hasn’t
registered—orders of disbelief.”
Harding will make several
appearances today at BEA. He signs
in the ABA Booksellers Lounge
(Room 1E07/08), 10–10:30 a.m., and
will be at the ABA Celebration of
Bookselling lunch at noon. He will
also sign at Bellevue’s booth (4513) in

the Consortium aisle at 3:30 p.m.
Initially published in January
2009 with a printing of around 15,000,
Tinkers recently became Bellevue’s
first national bestseller, and the
publisher has an 80,000-copy reprint
in the works. Bellevue’s editorial
director, Erika Goldman, says that
while the Pulitzer and other awards
are something she couldn’t have
predicted, she is not surprised to
see so much enthusiasm, given early
reception to the book. “The thing
that’s been so gratifying about publishing Paul’s book is the incredible
response from the start,” says Goldman. “While it’s night and day now
that the Pulitzer has hit, it’s been
wonderful to watch the word-ofmouth phenomenon building
momentum all along.”
The novel’s growing number of
fans will also be glad to learn that
his second novel, Enon, focuses on
one of the grandsons of Tinkers’s
protagonist and is set in the same
town. Harding says the book is halfcomplete and will be out from Random House in 2012.
—Gwenda Bond

A Crafty Idea
C&T Publishing,
known for its quilting,
paper, and fiber art
books, launched a
new imprint this
spring called Stash,
which is specifically
aimed at the new generation of craft sewers. “People really
want to get back to basics,” marketing director Lisa Fulmer tells Show
Daily. “They want to get back to a
simpler life—a handmade lifestyle.
Like our tagline says, ‘Fabric art for
a handmade lifestyle.’”
Fulmer points out that every new
generation puts its own spin on recreational hobbies. “There’s a whole
contingent of 20- and 30-somethings
that have rediscovered quilting as if
it were something brand-new.
There’s a great selection of projects
ranging from craft sewing—like,
‘softies,’ and cute little things that sit
on the desk—to quilts, to items for
the home, whether it’s pillows or different kinds of home décor.”
One of the four books featured in
C&T’s spring catalogue is Socks
Appeal, written by former Washington Post editor Brenna Maloney.
Assigned to cover the recession and
housing crisis that was brewing in
2008, Maloney started making sock
animals for her children as a stress
reducer. Maloney found that the
more traumatic her job got, the more
creating a new sock animal each
night seemed to help. Says Fulmer,
“Her wit and candor in how she writes
the instructions is hilarious.” You
can see for yourself today when
Maloney signs copies of her book at
the C&T booth (3777) at 2 p.m.
—Hilary S. Kayle

Junior.indd 1

5/12/2010 9:49:49 AM

MEET

GARY SHTEYNGART
WEDNESDAY AT 10:00AM
AUT

RANDOM HOUSE
BOOTH #4341

RP
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emotional wallop.”

“An ingenious
satire.”
—MARY GAITSKILL

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10

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Memorializing Mockingbird
In 1956, Nelle Harper Lee received a
most unusual Christmas gift. Her
friends Michael and Joy Brown gave
Lee enough money to quit her job as
an airline ticket agent in New York
City and write full-time for one year.
Because of their gift, the Browns
became godparents to one of America’s most revered novels, To Kill a
Mockingbird. Published in 1960—the
summer Elvis returned to civilian
life, Janet Leigh was murdered in the
shower at the Bates motel, and JFK
and Nixon were vying for the presidency—Lee’s novel of honor and
injustice in the Deep South has now
been translated into more than 40
languages and sold more than 30
million copies.
For the staff at HarperCollins,
working on the events surrounding
the novel’s 50th anniversary has
been “a very special experience,”
associate publisher Kathy Schneider
reports. “People from every part of
our company have happily become
part of the team—my intern’s eyes lit
up when I asked if she wanted to join
in. We’ve also reached out to
Hachette, to agent friends, and colleagues at other houses to help
gather authors for our ‘50 Years 50

Events’ promotion. And, of course,
booksellers have been incredible
with their support.”
“50 Years 50 Events” will run
throughout the summer and into the
fall, with events now being scheduled
at bookstores and libraries across
the country. Most will feature a local
author (among those already signed
up are Wally Lamb, Brunonia Barry,
and Mary Kaye Andrews) who will
speak about how the book influenced
them as a writer. Some libraries and
bookstores will screen the classic
film To Kill a Mockingbird, while others are teaming up with local writers’
workshops, universities, and book
clubs to plan events in their communities. For more information on the
anniversary events, visit www.ToKillAMockingbird50Year.com.
The celebration was officially
launched this month with the publication of two new trade paper editions of the novel as well as a special
50th anniversary hardcover edition
that includes the original art work.
And on June 8, Scout, Atticus & Boo:
A Celebration of Fifty Years of ‘To Kill
a Mockingbird’ by Emmy award–winning journalist Mary McDonagh
Murphy will be in stores. Based on

Murphy’s upcoming documentary,
Hey, Boo: To Kill a Mockingbird &
Harper Lee, it includes a collection of
interviews with prominent Americans who share their memories of
the novel and its author. Oprah Winfrey remembers Harper Lee turning
down her request for an interview.
Tom Brokaw describes reading the
book as an impressionable college
student at the start of the civil rights
movement. Anna Quindlen debates
theories that Truman Capote had a
hand in the book, and Alice Lee,
Harper Lee’s sister, talks about their
lives growing up in Monroeville, Ala.
Murphy’s book, says its editor,
Hugh Van Dusen, “makes us realize
the breadth and depth of the passion
people have for this book in a new
and very celebratory way. The
famous names Mary interviewed
weren’t just being nice or doing a job,
they really love this book.” For Murphy, the projects (both book and film)
were journeys filled with the unexpected and the surprising. “As I
headed into my 19th, 20th, and 21st
interviews, I wondered if anything
new could be said about the novel.
But I was struck over and over again
by the variety of responses. I asked

Celebrating 50 years with 50 events.

everyone to read aloud a favorite
passage and there were hardly any
repetitions.” She was also delighted
to be published by HarperCollins. “I
had the benefit of working with people who have a history with the novel,
who know all about its power, influence, and popularity. And Hugh, my
editor, actually knows Harper Lee,
whom he calls Nelle, as do all her
friends. How great is that?”
Events will be going on throughout
BEA at both the HarperCollins booth
(3340) and a special To Kill a Mockingbird booth (3359). At that booth, HC will
be filming attendees reading their
favorite passages and reflecting on
when they read the book. Harper Lee
fans can also show their appreciation
by writing a message to her in a special
leather-bound autograph book. Today
Murphy signs copies of Scout, Atticus
& Boo, 2:30–3:30 p.m., at the HC booth.
—Lucinda Dyer

CONVERSATIONS SELL BOOKS
PLANNED TELEVISION ARTS CAN HELP START THE CONVERSATION ABOUT YOUR BOOK

In this time of fundamental shifts in the media landscape, one thing remains constant: word of mouth
sells books. Planned Television Arts offers a full range of custom media services designed to get the
conversation started. From national print and television campaigns, speaking engagements, and radio
tours to social media marketing, blog tours, and website development, PTA can put together a strategic
media plan that targets your audience and gets people talking.
To reach us during the show call Brian Feinblum at 914-462-2038 or David Hahn at 914-646-6963. After
the show contact Brian at 212-583-2718 feinblumb@plannedtvarts.com.
1_2 hor.indd 1

plannedtvarts.com
a division of Ruder Finn

5/12/2010 6:11:27 PM

COME MEET OUR AUTHORS
T H E R A N D O M H O U S E P U B L I S H I N G G RO U P
BOOTH #4341

WEDNESDAY 5/26

Signing
10:30 AM

Signing
3:30 PM

ON SALE AUGUST 17

Photo © David Henderson

Signing
10 AM

ON SALE NOW

Photo © Sigrid Estrada

ON SALE NOVEMBER 23

Photo © Kelly Campbell

Photo © Brigitte Lacombe

ON SALE JULY 27

Signing
4:30 PM

THURSDAY 5/27

Signing
2:30 PM
Photo © Jerry Bauer

Photo © Nina Subin

Signing
11:30 AM

www.AtRandom.com

ON SALE JUNE 8

Photo © Gasper Tringale

Signing
10 AM
Photo © John Earle

ON SALE SEPTEMBER 7

ON SALE NOW

ON SALE AUGUST 10

Signing
4 PM

12

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Graphic Highlights
The largest nexus of the comics
scene at this year’s BEA will be
graphic novels row (4558), hosted by
Diamond Book Distribution and
featuring exhibitors Dark Horse,
IDW, Dynamite, Paizo, Image/Top
Cow, Japanime, and Marvel.
Dark Horse will be stirring up
interest for Janet and Alex Evanovich and Joëlle Jones’s forthcoming
Troublemaker Book One. Dynamite’s
got giveaways like signed prints by
Dean Koontz and print-signing
appearances by Garth Ennis, L.A.
Banks, and Anne Elizabeth. Marvel
has two signings today: Eric Shanower and Skottie Young for The
Marvelous Land of Oz, 11 a.m.–noon,
and Nancy Butler for Sense and Sensibility, 2–3 p.m. Image will have giveaways of its recent Image First comic
books, and Fractured Fables’ Free
Comic Book Day issue, as well as a
signing by Todd McFarlane.
Abrams (4640) is displaying dummies and blads of a handful of fall
ComicArts titles, including Audrey
Niffenegger’s short graphic novel,
The Night Bookmobile; the Chip
Kidd–designed Shazam! The Golden
Age of the World’s Mightiest Mortal;

N.C. Christopher Couch’s biography,
Jerry Robinson: Ambassador of Comics; the Michael Uslan/Stan Goldberg/Bob Smith collaboration Archie
Marries...; and Krazy Kat and the Art
of George Herriman, an art book
edited by Craig Yoe. On the kids’
side, Abrams will have previews of
Barry Deutsch’s November graphic
novel Hereville: How Mirka Got Her
Sword, about an 11-year-old Orthodox Jewish troll fighter, and a signing
by Diary of a Wimpy Kid’s Jeff Kinney
tomorrow, 11 a.m.–noon.
Speaking of which, over at NBM/
Papercutz’s booth (3141), Stefan
Petrucha and Rick Parker will be
signing copies of their Tales from
the Crypt series, featuring “Diary of
a Stinky Dead Kid.” (Petrucha’s
signing his “Nancy Drew” graphic
novels, too.) NBM is displaying previews of Mark Badger and Gerard
Jones’s privacy-related thriller,
Networked, as well as new volumes
of Miss Don’t Touch Me and Dungeon; Papercutz will have a free
comic book previewing its September launch of a Smurfs series.
Fantagraphics’ booth (3422) features galleys for upcoming books,

W E E K LY

including Joyce
Farmer’s graphic
memoir, Special
Exits, and Moto
Hagio’s manga collection Drunken Dream
and Other Stories, as
well as advance samples of a handful of its
summer books. Pantheon (4341) is
showing off Charles Burns’s longawaited X’ed Out, its only fall graphic
novel release. Orbit Books/Yen
Press will be at the HBG booth (3748)
with giveaways of Mizuki Nomura’s
Book Girl, a prose novel connected to
a manga series launching in July.
Bloomsbury (4051) is pubbing Seymour Chwast’s adaptation of Dante’s
Divine Comedy (Sept.) and Martin
Lemelman’s Two Cents Plain: My
Brooklyn Boyhood (Oct.). Over at
Feral House’s booth is Mel Gordon
and Thomas Andrae’s Siegel and
Shuster’s Funnyman: The First Jewish
Superhero, the history of a lesserknown later character from the creators of Superman. And Steerforth/
Campfire (2265) is starting a line of
several dozen educational graphic
novel titles to be published over the
next year.
There are some notable graphic
novel publisher absences and semi-

tuttle publishing

1_2 hor.indd 1

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

absences from this year’s show floor:
DC isn’t exhibiting this year, and neither are Scholastic, Drawn & Quarterly, or Top Shelf. Archaia won’t
have a booth, but will be talking with
book buyers about its fall and winter
titles; Viz will also be meeting with
retailers in a meeting room, focusing
on such titles as Vampire Knight Fan
Book, Kekkaishi, and the zombiethemed Grand Guignol Orchestra.
First Second will have catalogues as
part of Macmillan’s display, and the
imprint’s editor, Mark Siegel, participated in yesterday’s “Drawing the
Line Between Picture Books and
Graphic Novels” panel. Other BEA
comics panels include “Big Name
Authors with Graphic Novels: How
Will This Change the Market?”
tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. in room 1E14,
and “Hot Fall Graphic Novels for
Libraries” in the same room tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 p.m.
—Douglas Wolk

Booth

5/14/2010 6:07:55 PM

MEET OUR AUTHORS
AT T H E B O O K E X P O A M E R I C A A U T O G R A P H I N G A R E A

ON SALE JUNE 8

ON SALE JULY 13

Signing
10:00 AM,
Table #27

Signing
10:00 AM,
Table #8

Signing
11:00 AM,
Table #2

Photo © Gasper Tringale

ON SALE JUNE 22

Photo © Gasper Tringale

Photo © Alison Rosa

WEDNESDAY 5/26

THURSDAY 5/27

The R andom House

Signing
11:00 AM,
Table #2

ON SALE NOW

Photo © Sigrid Estrada

Signing
11:00 AM,
Table #29

ON SALE NOVEMBER 23

Photo © Kelly Campbell

Photo © Jessica Hills

ON SALE JUne 29

Signing
2:00 PM,
Table #13

Publishing Group

www.AtRandom.com

14

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Sharjah’s
International Goals
In the last few years, each of the West’s major book fairs—Frankfurt, London, and, last year, BEA—has focused on the Arab world. On both sides, initiatives have been launched that help bring all the publishers together—
Kitab, the translation program; the so-called Arab Booker for Arab fiction;
and the Etisalat Prize for Arab Children’s Literature, Bloomsbury Qatar—
and out of the International Book Fair in Sharjah, in particular, have come
moves to formalize and stabilize a once rather ad hoc industry, the challenges of which can deter all but the most determined Western publisher.
The book fairs taking
place across the Middle
East offer local publishers
the chance to sell to bookshops, librarians,
schools—and the public.
And they are now just
beginning to be places
where Anglo-American
and European publishers
also go, selling books and,
little by little, rights. It’s a
complicated market, but
one that is increasingly
open for business to the
Ahmed al Amri is Fair director.
trade as well as to educational publishers, and from which both sides have plenty to gain.
Sharjah, established in 1982 in the United Arab Emirates and now under
the direction of the dynamic Ahmed al Amri, is the region’s oldest fair; last
year it attracted some 750 publishers from 40 countries and more than
400,000 visitors—a hub around which book lovers congregate and exchange
ideas.
The Emirates’ goal is to create “a fully literate community, rich in learning,” values, and cultural pride “rippling out” over the community at large.
Not surprisingly, there is particular emphasis on children and on the importance of reading for pleasure (not merely for education) in Arabic as well as
English, which is becoming “the preferred language” in the multiethnic
Emirates. Sheikha Bodour al Qasimi, founder of children’s publisher Kalimat, also recognizes that for indigenous Arab publishing to flourish, a
young generation of publishing professionals must be nurtured (in Sharjah
and London, a group of 15 attended a course tailor-made by Oxford Brookes
University) and the industry itself put on a professional footing in order that
it be taken seriously at an international level. Thus will Sharjah and its
neighbors build “the knowledge economy.”
Sheikha Bodour is also the driving force behind the Emirates Publishers
Association, of which she is president. Founded in February 2009 and now a
member of the International Publishers Association, it aims to support UAE
publishers and to raise awareness of copyright and intellectual property.
Piracy in the region has long been a major concern for Western publishers,
and the EPA recognizes that Arab publishers need educating on a subject in
which they too have a vested interest. “The association is pushing ahead
with its march toward achieving its target of becoming a platform for all
UAE publishers, and to provide an environment in which educated people
and intellectuals can contribute to enriching the cultural movement with
their creativity,” says Sheikha Bodour. “It will spare no effort in achieving its
aspirations, including enriching this important sector with more expertise,
legislation, services, and facilities, all of which is in line with the vision of the
association’s members and the nation’s intellectuals,” she added.
Among its plans is the establishment of a Copyright Management Centre
in the UAE, a joint initiative of the EPA, the Ministry of Economy, and the
Emirates Writers Union, which would manage copyrights across the media
spectrum and conduct negotiations with universities, schools, and copy
centers on behalf of writers and publishers to ensure the necessary licensing and the prevention of violation. It would also represent the ownership
rights of foreigners in the UAE and, crucially, launch campaigns and coordinate seminars aimed at informing institutions and the public about the
rights of authors.
Together, al Qasimi and al Amri are working hard to bring about all manner of changes in the Arab publishing world. In a little over a year, the EPA
has grown to include some 50 publishers, and its stated aims are to spread
an awareness of and respect for copyright, to nurture the first generation of
publishing professionals with sufficient skills to operate and do business on
an equal footing with their Western counterparts, and to develop a program
of book-related cultural activities. For Western publishers, there’s all to play
—Liz Thomson
for.

1_2 vertical.indd 1

5/12/2010 6:21:39 PM

Before THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS, there were

THE INFERNAL DEVICES
The prequel series to

C A S S A N D R A C L A R E ’s
New York Times bestsellers begins August 31, 2010!

BEA EXCLUSIVE!
Thursday, May 27th
9:00am SHARP!
Simon & Schuster Booth #3940.
Only 300
Advance Reader’s Copies of
Book One: Clockwork Angel
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First come, first served!

The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Angel
ISBN: 9781416975861
August 31, 2010 LAYDOWN!
Also available on CD and for download from Simon & Schuster Audio

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Margaret K. McElderry Books

16

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

Abu Dhabi Marks the Spot
The Abu Dhabi International Book
that places a premium on literacy
Fair, the second oldest in the Midand education. Indeed, schoolchildle East after Sharjah, has long
dren were a notable presence; 226
been a crucial way stagroups were brought by
tion for Western pubtheir teachers to spend
lishers doing business
the book vouchers they
in the region and, for
received before the fair.
local publishers, a hub
This year, the Internato which booksellers,
tional Publishers Assolibrarians, and the pubciation chose Abu Dhabi
lic flock to browse and
for its Copyright Symbuy. Over the past few
posium, and the gatheryears, the additional
ing of so many distinmuscle provided by
guished international
Kitab, the joint venture
figures just ahead of the
between the Abu Dhabi
book fair—among them
Sheikh Mohammed has
Authority for Culture
authors Ahdaf Soueif
ambitious plans.
and Heritage and the
and Azar Nafisi; MaryFrankfurt Book Fair, has boosted
beth Peters, Register of Copyrights
both the profile and reach of ADIBF,
at the Library of Congress; and
which, in March 2010, attracted 840
Christine de Mazières of the French
visitors from 63 countries, generatPublishers Association—served to
ing about $10 million in business.
underline the growing internaHeld under the patronage of His
tional importance of the event.
Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin
Under the Spotlight on Rights
Zayed Al Nahyan, Abu Dhabi sees
banner, the Kitab rights subsidy iniitself as a fair at which culture and
tiative, a three-year program offercommerce intersect. Held in what
ing a $1,000 subsidy for rights deals
will eventually be the world’s largnegotiated or concluded at the fair,
est exhibition center, it offers a mix
received some 220 applications
of professional programming and
from publishers across Europe
intellectual discourse in a city-state
ranging from children’s fiction and

information titles
to academic
texts. Matchmaking sessions introduced suitable publishers to each
other or to agents and distributors,
a move that proved popular with
Western publishers as it set them
on course for a successful application.
Alongside that there’s the Kalima
translation project, which selects
about 100 books annually to be
translated into Arabic. The initiative, promoted by Sheikh Mohammed, already includes work by Sylvia Plath, Charles Bukowski, and
Langston Hughes, as well as Alan
Greenspan’s The Age of Turbulence
and Barack Obama’s Dreams from
My Father. It aims to make the
translation of new books into Arabic “part of the publishing landscape” while promoting intellectual
property rights “in accordance with
international standards.” Kalima
works with a team of international
advisers under the direction of Dr.
Ali bin Tanim.
At the March fair, American and
British publishers were mostly
present on their national collectives, though those few that have a
presence in the Middle East—Scholastic, Oxford University Press,

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Pearson, for example—exhibited
independently. For these latter
publishers, the prime goal is to publicize their lists, though this year
OUP took an order for 3,000 copies
of its Essential Arabic Dictionary
from a regional bookseller, while
Scholastic sold lots of books to visiting children and their families.
Two major awards evenings also
took place at the fair: the International Prize for Arabic Fiction, supported by the Booker Prize Foundation and thus known as “the Arab
Booker,” was awarded this year to
Spewing Sparks as Big as Castles, a
satire by Abdo Khal, the quietly dissident Saudi novelist, and the
Sheikh Zayed Book Award, which
honors “the most precious assets of
our nation—the thoughts of our
sons.” Collecting a special award as
Cultural Personality of the Year,
Sheikh Sultan bin Mohamed AlQasimi asked that Emiratis perpetuate the visions and values of their
founding father, whom the awards
honor: “I call on everybody—
fathers, mothers, gather your children and with them read and write.
This is what Zayed loved.”
When it comes to book fairs,
that’s as good a call to action as any.
—Liz Thomson

N E W B O OK FROM THE SWED ENBO RG F OU NDAT ION

“The best consideration of God’s role in tragedy from a traditional perspective that I
have ever read.” —Rabbi Harold Kushner author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People
Why Does God Let It Happen?
BRUCE HENDERSON

k

In the wake of life-changing events—whether as global in reach as the terrorist
attacks on September 11 or as personal as the death of a child—the first question
that springs to mind is “Why?” Why do good people suffer pain and loss? Why does
God allow these things to happen?
In this simple, straightforward book, Bruce Henderson tackles some of the most
difficult questions that people of faith face in their lives. Drawing from the wisdom
of visionary Emanuel Swedenborg, who wrestled with these same questions more
than two hundred years ago, Henderson describes a universe in which God allows us
free will and choice, subtly guiding the course of our lives with an insight no mortal
can comprehend. Pain and suffering ultimately lead to good, and as we walk the path,
we draw ever closer to heaven.
112 pages / 5.5 x 8.5 / paperback, 978-0-87785-332-9 / $11.95

Visit us at booth #3163 for an AUTHOR BOOK SIGNING with Bruce Henderson
Wednesday, May 26, 2010 / 11:00 — 2:00 at BOOK EXPO AMERICA
Swedenborg Foundation Publishers ❘ West Chester, Pennsylvania
Orders: call Continental Sales ❘ (847) 381-6530 or Chicago Distribution Center ❘ (800) 621-2736
www.swedenborg.com

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 12:22:33 PM

18

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Harlequin’s New Footprints
It should be tough to miss. At the top
of the stairs going into the main hall
for BEA, fitness and nutrition guru
Tosca Reno’s publisher plans to hang
a 60-foot banner promoting her new
book, Your Best Body Now, and her
appearance and signing time.
Her Eat-Clean Diet series (Robert
Kennedy Publishing) has sold more
than a million copies, but the new book
has a new publisher—Harlequin.
Reno’s book is part of Harlequin’s
new venture into nonfiction, which
began in 2009 and has a full catalogue of 13 titles for 2010. So mingling

among the more than 40 authors
Harlequin is bringing to BEA will be
some of its nonfiction stars, including
Kathy Kinney and Cindy Ratzlaff,
authors of Queen of Your Own Life;
Erin Bolger, author of The Happy
Baker: A Girl’s Guide to Emotional

W E E K LY

Baking; and Dr. Howard Shapiro and
Franklin Becker, who wrote Eat &
Beat Diabetes with Picture Perfect
Weight Loss. And, of course, Reno.
Why did Harlequin decide to step
outside fiction and romance, where
it has such solid success? “At Harlequin, we concentrated on fiction for a
long time for obvious reasons,” says
Harlequin’s Craig Swinwood, executive v-p, retail division. But having
built an “emotional brand relationship” with women over many years,
he says the company asked what else
it could offer them.
The company will also be promoting its new Harlequin Teen imprint.
“We’ve known for a long time that

Sarah Ferguson

See
at the
Children’s Book and Author Breakfast:
Wednesday, May 26, 8AM – 9:30AM,
followed by a book signing at 10AM • TABLE 16

From Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York
BECAUSE EVERY
CHILD CAN USE
A HELPING HAND
All books are $7.95 • 8 x 8 • 24 pages (all in color)

978-1-4027-7393-8

S

978-1-4027-7392-1
978-1-4027-73
392-1

978-1-4027-73
978-1-4027-7391-4

978 1 4027 73
978-1-4027-73
390-7
978-1-4027-7390-7

imple, comforting stories about new experiences for parents and children to share—
along with helpful hints from a leading child psychologist.

MARKETING:

Coming Spring 2011

Coming Fall 2011

• National TV appearances, including the Today show

Molly Makes Friends
978-1-4027-7397-6

Lauren’s Moving Day
978-1-4027-7398-3

Olivia Says Goodbye to Grandpa
978-1-4027-7394-5

Healthy Food for Dylan
978-1-4027-7400-3

Jacob Goes to the Doctor
and Sophie Visits the Dentist
978-1-4027-7396-9

Zach Gets Some Exercise
978-1-4027-7399-0

• Pre-publication buzz campaign, including featured
speaker at ALA conference
• National radio, online, and print media campaign
• National print and online consumer advertising
campaign
• Extensive blogger outreach campaign
• Expanded promotion on social networking
orking sites
such as Facebook and Twitter

Separated
When Katie’s
Katie s Parents
P
978-1-4027-7395-2

Get Well Soon, Adam
978-1-4027-7401-0

• 100,000 first printing
• 20-copy floor display available
(5 copies of each book)

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

our readers start reading Harlequin in their mid to late teens, but
we weren’t creating anything specific for that age group,” Swinwood
says, explaining that the company
didn’t want to market books to
teenagers with content that might
be considered age inappropriate.
Not surprisingly, there is a strong
paranormal theme with books such
as Gena Showalter’s Intertwined
series, about a teenager with four
different souls, and Rachel Vincent’s Soul Screamers series, about
a high school girl who is also a banshee. But there is also the sorority/
fraternity Greek series based on
the ABC Family television series.
Swinwood believes both new
lines will continue to build the Harlequin brand, he says: “We’re for
women, about women, and by
women, for the most part, and that’s
really what these lines are all
—Leigh Anne Williams
about.”

Taking It Off with
Medallion
Show attendees may
remember that at
BEA 2009 Medallion
Press got an early
start on promoting
its December 2010
self-help release,
Motiv8n U by fitness
expert and motivational speaker Staci
Boyer. The company
announced that one
Nuccio lost 50
of its employees was
pounds.
going to walk the
walk: Sam Nuccio, Medallion’s operations director, would undergo a sixmonth training program with Boyer
whose goal was to lose 80 pounds.
A year has passed, and Nuccio’s life
has changed for the better. He’s lost 50
pounds, gotten life insurance to help
out his family financially in case tragedy strikes, opened up an IRA for
retirement, improved his relationships with family members, and
become better organized.
Also Nuccio and his wife are
expecting a baby sometime this
week, or he’d have been here, showing off his svelte new figure and positive attitude.
Boyer will be here, talking up
Motiv8n U, in which she provides the
steps necessary to discover lifetransforming mental and physical
fitness. Boyer will sign copies of
ARCs made exclusively for BEA at
Medallion’s booth (2723), today, 3–4
p.m., and at Table 8 tomorrow, 10–11
a.m.
Medallion is also handing out
Expando-media foldouts to booth
visitors, to inspire them to write
down their own goals as a first step
toward starting out on the path to
overall life fitness/wellness.
—Claire Kirch

• sterlingpublishing.com/kids
g.com/kids

PLEASE VISIT US IN ROOM 1A02

delivering
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42,000 customers in 120 countries.
Stop by
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visit us at booth 3223
to experience the new generation of Baker & Taylor services.
1-908-541-7437 · www.baker-taylor.com · robert.bedford@baker-taylor.com

20

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

HCI Gets Real with Romance

BOBBI BROWN
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR & FAMED MAKE-UP ARTIST

TODAY • 2:00 PM

BOOTH NO. 2641
LEVEL 3

Come by to get your

2010 CHRONICLE
TOTE BAG
Give-aways at
9:00 AM and 12:00 PM
while supplies last!

1_2 vertical.indd 1

precht (aka romance novelist Mallory
Rush, author of Love Game) on board
to help develop the series and over the
next six months.
The True Vows series launches this
October with three books, each with
a first printing of 50,000: Hard to Hold
from USA Today bestselling author Julie
Leto; The Icing on the
Cake from Alison Kent,
the author of No Limits;
and Meet Me in Manhattan from Judith Arnold,
whose novel Love in
Bloom was named one of the best
books in 2002 by PW. A fourth novel
will be out in January, and after that a
new book every other month.
Matrisciani has been “blown away
by the support, creativity, enthusiasm, and fun exhibited by the novelists as well as the romance community as a whole. It’s reawakened a
sense of literary community that I
don’t want to ever let go of.”
You can meet the authors and
pick up a signed galley today, 10–11
a.m., at Table 4 and at the HCI booth
(3577), 2–3 p.m., both today and
tomorrow. And if you have the
afternoon munchies, HCI is serving
wedding cake along with signed
—Lucinda Dyer
galleys.

DeMille’s Here Again!
If you see a middle-aged man walking backwards with a book covering
his badge, that’s most likely Nelson
DeMille, whose fifth novel about
former NYPD homicide detective
John Corey, The Lion (Grand Central), will be published early next
month. DeMille perfected the walk
over the course of 35 years of
attending BEA (or ABA, as it was
originally known). He sneaked into
his first show when it was in two
hotels in New York City in 1975. He
had just begun publishing his novels, under the name Jack Cannon.
As DeMille recalls, his first ABA
was “energizing and eye-opening. It
kind of connected me to the publishing industry.” What draws DeMille to BEA, he says, is that “everyone
in publishing is right there, and you
make some serendipitous meetings.” That’s where he first met then
aspiring writer Michael Connelly.
This BEA marks one of DeMille’s
few appearances for The Lion, the
sequel to The Lion’s Game, which
was published a decade ago. For
him, continuing the story of Corey,
who is on the Anti-Terrorist Task
Force; his partner, now wife, FBI
agent Kate Mayfield; and Asad
Khalil, or the Lion, has been difficult. Says DeMille, “You really have
to pick up the action [in a sequel]
and tell the backstory the way it
was.” That means rereading the

5/7/2010 12:51:20 PM

first book to make sure both books
match up, while each works as a
stand-alone. What made The Lion,
which is set three years after The
Lion’s Game, particularly tricky was
avoiding anachronisms. “When you
do a novel in the near past you have
to be careful. Did they use cellphones? E-mail?” says DeMille.
He agreed to do a sequel at the
suggestion of readers, some of
whom even sent DeMille outlines
suggesting what he should write.
“The Lion was fan-driven and
reviewer-driven.
People asked for a
sequel because The
Lion’s Game has an
ambivalent ending,
and the publisher
wanted another
John Corey book,”
he says, adding that
DeMille has been
this will be his last
here 35 times.
sequel. His only
other sequel, The Gate House, is a
follow-up to The Gold Coast. Next is
Captain, another book about an airline disaster. In 2004, he wrote about
TWA flight 800 in Night Fall.
Today DeMille will appear in conversation with audiobook narrator
Scott Brick at 10 a.m. at the Soundstage Get Caught Listening. He will
sign afterward at Table 30 at 11 a.m.
Then at 3 p.m. he signs at the GCP
—Judith Rosen
booth (3740).

© Sandy DeMille

MEET

When Veronica Blake, a young sales
assistant at HCI, suggested to publisher Peter Vegso that the house
consider entering the romance market, it might have seemed an
unlikely direction for a publisher
best known for the original Chicken
Soup for the Soul series.
But Vegso and the sales
force decided it would
be an exciting new venture for HCI, and editorial director Michele
Matrisciani was given
the job, in 2009, of “figuring out how to execute this
endeavor.” The first step, Matrisciani
remembers, was for HCI to build a
bridge from the nonfiction to the fiction world “without stepping on toes,
pretending to be something we are
not, competing with the genre’s powerhouses, or reinventing the wheel.”
Thus was born a new subgenre of
romance—Reality-Based Romance
books (RB Romance).
Each HCI book in the aptly named
True Vows series would be based on a
real couple’s true-life romance. While
dialogue could be embellished for dramatic effect, the bare bones of the couple’s story would not be altered and
the names of the couple would not be
changed. HCI brought Olivia Rup-

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Save the dates!
15 – 20 March 2011
… NETWORK with Arab and
international publishers
… MEET digital publishing pioneers
… BUY and SELL rights
… EXPAND your horizons
The most professional book fair in the region.
Come visit us at our stand 4429 | Hall 3A at the Book Expo America
Join us for a session on ‘Business Opportunities
for English Language Publishers in the Middle East/The Gulf Region’.
Wednesday, 26 May from 3.30-4.30 pm
Room 1E02, Javits Convention Centre, New York

www.adbookfair.com

Platinum Sponsor

22

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

SPOTLIGHT
ON C H I L DREN

Browsing the Booths, Chapter 2
For children’s booksellers navigating the convention floor, here is the
continuation of our roundup of
books to peruse, goodies to grab,
raffles to enter, and authors to
spot.
Penguin Young Readers Group
(3540) has a quartet of in-booth
author signings scheduled. Today,
Jan Brett autographs copies of The
Three Little Dassies (Putnam), 2:15–
3:15 p.m., and Ally Condie signs
galleys of Matched (Dutton), 3:30–
4:30 p.m. Visiting tomorrow are
Judy Schachner, who will sign copies of the original Skippyjon Jones
book (Dutton), 11:15 a.m.–12:15
p.m., and Kirsten Miller, who’ll
autograph galleys of The Eternal
Ones (Razorbill), 1–2 p.m. Booksellers can pick up tote bags promoting Heather Brewer’s Vlad Todd
YA vampire series and bags featuring art from The Three Little Dassies.

will autograph deluxe hardcover
editions of Reckless, 11:30 a.m.–
12:30 p.m.; and James Patterson
signs ARCs of Witch & Wizard 2:
The Gift, 2–3 p.m. A raffle is being
held for a piece of framed, original
art from Holly Hobbie’s Everything
but the Horse, an October book
based on the author’s childhood
love of horses.
Greeting visitors to the booth
tomorrow is an imposing item promoting Peter Brown’s fall story,
Children Make Terrible Pets: a lifesize standee that riffs on the book’s
title and proclaims, “Booksellers
Make Terrible Pets.” The winner of
tomorrow’s raffle promoting Lisi
Harrison’s Monster High series,
which Poppy launches in September, will take home an iPod Touch.
Giveaways tying into that series
include T-shirts and door clings.
Booksellers can enter a second
raffle tomorrow to win a ghost-

Three in-booth author signings
are taking place at the Bloomsbury
booth (4051). Today, the publisher
hosts Leslie Margolis, who’s autographing ARCs of Girl’s Best
Friend: A Maggie Brooklyn Mystery,
11 a.m.–noon. Simone Elkeles will
sign copies of Rules of Attraction
tomorrow, 9:30–10:30 a.m., after
which Ivy Devlin autographs ARCs
of Low Red Moon, 11 a.m.–noon.
The publisher is holding a raffle to
promote Chick ’n’ Pug, the first in a
picture-book series by Jennifer
Sattler centering on odd-couple
animal friends. Those dropping off
business cards at the booth today
and tomorrow will have a chance to
win a piece of original art from the
book; the winning card will be
drawn tomorrow at 2 p.m.
Little, Brown Books for Young
Readers welcomes a pair of
authors to booth 3751 today for
ticketed signings. Cornelia Funke

hunting kit touting Ghost Hunt:
Chilling Tales of the Unknown by
Jason Hawes and Grant Wilson.
Also on hand are T-shirts promoting a Poppy series that ties into
TV’s Glee, debuting in September,
and tote bags filled with offerings
from the Little, Brown list. And
those with a sweet tooth can pick
up a candy bar promoting Wendy
Mass’s novel, The Candymakers.
At booth 2559, Twin Sisters Productions is offering a 55% discount
on all orders placed during BEA.
Featured at this booth are the Sesame Street Lap Books and ReadAlong CD series, available in
August, and Sesame Street Elmo
Handlebox Set, due in June, which
includes six storybooks introducing concepts as well as a readalong CD.
Non-squeamish booksellers will
want to head to the Chronicle
booth (2641), where a contest is

W E E K LY

underway promoting
The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Gross Junior
Edition by David Borgenicht, Nathaniel
Marunas, and Robin
Epstein, which
focuses on all things
“utterly disgusting.”
Booksellers can
select three “gross
ingredients” on an
entry form available at the booth,
and the winner will
be selected after
BEA. A video will
then be made of
series creator Borgenicht combining—
and consuming—the
ingredients on the
winning entry. The
winning bookseller’s
store will be mentioned in the
video and will receive a display
filled with eight copies of the book.
Chronicle is also giving away
branded CFL light bulbs to promote Ivy and Bean: What’s the Big
Idea? by Annie Barrows and
Sophie Blackall, in which the heroines participate in a science fair
with a global-warming theme.
Random House Children’s
Books’ booth (4341) will be buzzing
with authors during the show.
Today, James
Dashner signs
chapter samplers
from The Scorch
Trials, 9–10 a.m.;
Paul O. Zelinsky
autographs f&gs
of Dust Devil,
12:30–1:30 p.m.;
and Lauren Kate
signs ARCs of Torment, 3–4 p.m.
Tomorrow, Sarah
Mlynowski will
sign copies of Gimme a Call, 9–10
a.m.; Jennifer Donnelly autographs
ARCs of Revolution, 1:30–2:30 p.m.;
and Elise Primavera signs f&gs of
Thumb Love, 3:30–4:30 p.m.
At booth 2526, Long River Press
is featuring its new picture book,
Buzaak Chinie: The Porcelain
Goat, a traditional Afghan folktale
that has never appeared in print in
English. Asma Salehi, who wrote
and illustrated the story, will be at
the booth today, 2–3:30 p.m., to
meet booksellers. The publisher is
giving away posters promoting the
book.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (4441)
is commemorating the 70th birthday of one iconic mischievous
monkey. To celebrate, the publisher is publishing The Complete
Adventures of Curious George: 70th
Anniversary Edition by Margret
and H.A. Rey, with an introduction
by Leonard S. Marcus, a “publish-

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

er’s perspective”
by Anita Silvey, a
retrospective essay
by Dee Jones, and
two CDs featuring
readings of each
story. The book will
be released in
August, as will a
paperback reprint of
The Journey That
Saved Curious George:
The True Wartime
Escape of Margret and
H.A. Rey by Louise
Borden, illus. by Allen
Drummond. Due in
September is Curious
George Christmas
Carols Book & CD,
with musical notations and art by H.A.
Rey. HMH has designated September 25
“Curiosity Day,” and booksellers can register to receive
event kits to stage their own anniversary celebrations. Authors visiting the booth today are Brian
Lies, who will sign Bats at the Ballgame, a September title, 11 a.m.–
noon, and three-time Caldecott
winner David Wiesner, who will
sign copies of Flotsam and posters
based on his October picture book,
Art and Max, 2–3 p.m. The publisher is giving out baseball hats
promoting Lies’s book.
Fans of Ian Falconer’s Olivia can
greet a costumed version of this
precocious piglet today at the
Simon & Schuster Books for Young
Readers booth (3940), where tote
bags promoting Olivia Goes to Venice, a September Atheneum
release, will be given out today and
tomorrow at noon. Scheduled for
an in-booth signing today is Tony
DiTerlizzi, who’ll autograph The
Search for WondLa, a September
novel from S&S, 10–11 a.m. Tomorrow, Laurie Halse Anderson will
sign bound manuscripts of Forge,
due in October from Atheneum, at
11:30 a.m. Visitors to the booth can
enter two raffles, one promoting
The Search for WondLa and the
other promoting Romero Britto’s
My Alphabet Playbook, a June title
from Little Simon.
At booths 2458–2459, American
Girl is introducing Innerstar University, a contemporary book line
that lets readers select from multiple story paths leading to 20 endings. The line debuts in September
with four titles, including Braving
the Lake, copies of which author
Erin Falligant will autograph in the
booth tomorrow, 11 a.m.–noon.
Also scheduled for in-booth signings are Jane Kurtz (Lanie) today,
11 a.m.–noon, and Jacqueline
Dembar Greene (Secrets at Camp
Nokomis) tomorrow, 1–2 p.m. The
winner of a raffle featured at the
booth will take home an American
—Sally Lodge
Girl doll.

...
In a world where freedom
has all but disappeared…
Where music, reading, and creativity
of any kind are severely punished…
Where even children are kidnapped and
imprisoned by the government…

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There is only one hope left.

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24

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

SPOTLIGHT
Kids’ Galleys ON
CHILDREN
To Grab
There will be plenty of options for
fans of the supernatural and dystopian at BEA this year, as well as
highly anticipated books from Cornelia Funke, Cassandra Clare, Ally
Condie, and many more. Here we
gather a selection of the many middle-grade and YA galleys that publishers are offering during the
show.

Favorite Authors, New
Projects
Clockwork Angel by Cassandra
Clare (S&S/McElderry) launches
the Infernal Devices trilogy, which
will be a prequel series to the Mortal Instruments books.
Delirium by Lauren Oliver
(Harper) is a dystopian novel from
the author of Before I Fall, in which
love is considered a disease.
I Am Number Four by Pittacus
Lore (Harper) is first in an SF series,
pseudonymously coauthored by
James Frey, about alien teenagers
hiding on earth; optioned by Steven
Spielberg for DreamWorks.

The Magnificent Twelve: The Call
by Michael Grant (HarperCollins/
Tegen) kicks off a humorous fantasy
series from the author of the Gone
series.
On the Blue Comet by Rosemary
Wells, illus. by Bagram Ibatoulline
(Candlewick). A boy’s adventures
involve trains and time travel.
Reckless by Cornelia Funke (Little, Brown) begins a new series, set
in a world inspired by the Brothers
Grimm, in which dark fairy tales
come alive.
Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly
(Delacorte) interweaves the stories
of a girl living in present-day
Brooklyn and one who lived in Paris
200 years earlier.
The Search for WondLa by Tony
DiTerlizzi (S&S). A girl who has
been hiding underground searches
for others like her.
Steps Across the Water by Adam
Gopnik, illus. by Bruce McCall (Disney-Hyperion), is a fantasy in which
a New York City girl discovers a
hidden sister city, U Nork.

cia and Margaret Stohl (Little, Brown) is a sequel to
the bestselling fantasy
Beautiful Creatures.
Clementine: Friend of the
Week by Sara Pennypacker,
illus. by Marla Frazee (Disney-Hyperion). A great
week for Clementine takes
a turn for the worse.
The Exiled Queen: A
Seven Realms Novel by Cinda Williams Chima (Disney-Hyperion) is
the second book in the trilogy that
began with The Demon King.
Judy Moody, Girl Detective by
Megan McDonald, illus. by Peter H.
Reynolds (Candlewick) centers on
a missing puppy.
N.E.R.D.S.: M Is for Mamma’s
Boy by Michael Buckley (Abrams/
Amulet) is the second book in
Buckley’s series about misfit
nerds/spies.
Witch & Wizard: The Gift by James
Patterson (Little, Brown) follows
Patterson’s dystopian adventure
Witch & Wizard.

Sequels and Series

Debuts to Watch

Beautiful Darkness by Kami Gar-

Adios, Nirvana by Conrad Wes-

selhoeft (Houghton Mifflin). A teenager survives the death of his twin
with help from his guitar, Walt
Whitman, and Pearl Jam’s Eddie
Vedder.
Dead Beautiful by Yvonne Woon
(Disney-Hyperion). After her parents’ deaths, 16-year-old Renée is
drawn to a boy at her new boarding
school.
The DUFF (Designated Ugly Fat
Friend) by Kody Keplinger (Poppy).
In this novel, featured at BEA’s YA
Editors Buzz Panel, a teen enters
into a secret relationship with the
school hottie.
The Familiars by Adam Jay
Epstein and Andrew Jacobson
(Harper) is a fantasy adventure
starring a cat; film rights have been

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

dle-grade novel inspired by the life
of Zora Neale Hurston and set in a
turn-of-the-century African-American community.

Fantastic Adventures

optioned by Sony with Sam Raimi
to produce/direct.
Girl Parts by John M. Cusick
(Candlewick). A robot designed to
be a boy’s companion develops a
will of her own.
Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by
Lish McBride (Holt) stars a boy who
discovers he is a necromancer, falls
in love, and must save Seattle.
Hush by Eishes Chayil (Walker).
In this pseudonymously written
novel, a teenager confronts her
memories of and guilt about abuse
she witnessed in her Hasidic community in Brooklyn.
Matched by Ally Condie (Dutton).
This dystopian novel, set in a world
where people are paired with their
ideal mates, is featured in BEA’s YA

Editors Buzz Panel.
Nightshade by Andrea Cremer
(Philomel) is a paranormal
romance in which a shape-shifting
wolf falls for a human boy.
Nightshade City by Hilary Wagner (Holiday House). Three orphan
rats rebel against a subterranean
dictatorship and attempt to create
a new city.
Prisoners in the Palace by
Michaela MacColl (Chronicle). This
historical novel follows a 16-yearold girl who becomes the future
queen’s maid.
Wildthorn by Jane Eagland
(Houghton Mifflin) is a YA romance
set in a Victorian insane asylum.
Zora and Me by Victoria Bond and
T.R. Simon (Candlewick) is a mid-

Annexed by Sharon Dogar
(Houghton Mifflin). This fictionalized account follows Peter van Pels
from the attic he shared with Anne
Frank on to Auschwitz.
Draw the Dark by Ilsa J. Bick
(Carolrhoda Lab). A teen whose
drawings may have power from
another world uncovers long-buried secrets about his Wisconsin
town.
Firelight by Sophie Jordan
(Harper). First in a trilogy, this
novel about a girl who can change
into a dragon is featured in BEA’s
YA Editors Buzz Panel.
Halo by Alexandra Adornetto
(Feiwel and Friends) is the story of a
teenage angel who falls in love with
a human boy.
Hunger by Jackie Morse Kessler
(HMH/Graphia). In Kessler’s first
book for teens, an anorexic teenager becomes one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse.
Low Red Moon by Ivy Devlin
(Bloomsbury). In this paranormal
mystery, pseudonymously written

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

by Elizabeth Scott, Avery connects
with a new boy who could be
involved in her parents’ mysterious
deaths.
Tyger, Tyger: A Goblin Wars Book
by Kersten Hamilton (Clarion). Teagan’s life is on track until the arrival
of Finn Mac Cumhaill.

Middle-Grade Magic
Ask Amy Greene: Boy Trouble by
Sarah Webb (Candlewick). The
niece of an advice columnist struggles with her own questions about
romance.
Ghost Hunt: Chilling Tales of the
Search for the Unseen by Jason
Hawes and Grant Wilson (Little,
Brown). The stars of the SyFy
Channel’s Ghost Hunters offer a
collection of paranormal investigations.
Girl’s Best Friend: A Maggie
Brooklyn Mystery by Leslie Margolis (Bloomsbury) kicks off a middlegrade mystery series starring a
young sleuth with a secret dogwalking business.
Misty Gordon and the Mystery of
the Ghost Pirates by Kim Kennedy
(Abrams/Amulet) follows a girl
who uses special glasses to see the
past and the future.
—John A. Sellers

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26

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

YA Authors on Stage
Authors of young adult and middlegrade books will be front and center
on Javits stages today and tomorrow. Conventiongoers interested in
listening in on conversations about
popular publishing trends and
hearing authors discuss their works
should put the following programs—a sampling of what’s being
offered—on their agendas.
Dystopian Fiction, today,
10:30–11:30 a.m., Uptown Stage.
Authors Ally Condie, Lesley
Hauge, and Adam Dunn will
discuss the dystopian fiction
genre and their forthcoming
additions to it. Condie’s
Matched (Dutton), acquired at
an auction that included seven
publishers, is a futuristic YA novel
about a teen who falls in love with
someone else after “the Society”
has selected her ideal mate.
Hauge’s Nomansland (Holt) is set
on an island populated solely by
women, including a group of teenage “Trackers” entrusted with the
task of protecting their shores from
the enemy: men. Debut novelist
Dunn’s Rivers of Gold (Bloomsbury)
is an adult thriller set in 2012 New

W E E K LY

SPOTLIGHT

for the panel. She is
aware that many
adults read her YA
novels and expects
that her teen fans will reach for
Graveminder, her first novel for
adults, when it pubs next winter.
“The fact that teens are reading
adult books and its impact on what
authors are willing to tackle in their
books presents an interesting problem,” she says. “As a writer, a
mother of a teen, and a
feminist, I am trying to
juggle many considerations and be responsible.”
Paranormal Fiction for
Teens: From Vampires to
Werewolves to Zombies
and Shape-Shifters,
today, 11 a.m.–noon,
Downtown Stage.
Panelist Richelle Mead, whose
fifth Vampire Diaries novel, Spirit
Diaries, is just out from Razorbill,
notes that one of the biggest challenges in writing any type of paranormal fiction is that “you have to
be consistent with your world, its
details, and its rules as you flesh out
the fantasy elements. I find that my
audience—especially teens—know
this world I’ve created better than I
do, and if I slip up and there’s an

ON CHILDREN

York, a
city plagued by massive unemployment, rampant crime, a worthless
currency, and broken government.
Asked about the current boom in
dystopian fiction, Dunn replies,
“There are specific years in which
cultural malaise and mass neurasthenia are visibly manifest, when

the common perception of the
future is dread rather than hope—
2010 is one such year.”
YA Authors Crossing Over, today,
11–11:50 a.m., Midtown Stage.
Elissa Petruzzi of Romantic Times
hosts a panel of authors who will
address issues they face as writers
of both YA and adult novels. Melissa
Marr, author of the Wicked Lovely
series (HarperCollins) and Graveminder (Morrow), proposed the idea

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

inconsistency, they spot it.” She
observes that a key to the popularity of vampire tales today is their
balance “between fantasy and the
real world.”
Guys of Guys Read, tomorrow, 1–
1:50 p.m., Downtown Stage.
A group of guys whose books
have encouraged many younger
guys to read will get together with
moderator Jordan Brown, editor,
HarperCollins Children’s Books, to
talk about reaching that often elusive boy audience. Panelists
include Jon Scieszka, the Time
Warp Trio series (Puffin); Jeff Kinney, Diary of a Wimpy Kid series
(Abrams/Amulet), Adam Rex, Fat
Vampire (HarperCollins/Balzer +
Bray); David Lubar, Nathan Abercrombie: Accidental Zombie series
(Starscape); and Mac Barnett, Oh
No! (Or How My Science Project
Destroyed the World) (Hyperion).
Brown oversees editorially the
Guys Read Library, a series edited
by Scieszka that grew out of his 15year-old Guys Read literacy organization. The line debuts in September with Guys Read: Funny Business from the newly launched
Walden Pond Press. All the panelists are contributors to this humor
—Sally Lodge
anthology.

Have you met

yet?
Meet author & illustrator

Lincoln Peirce
NOVEMBER
2010

Don’t miss the next adventure of the New York Times bestselling
mischief maker in BIG NATE STRIKES AGAIN

Signing TODAY!

May 26th, 2 p.m.-3 p.m. at table 19

Get an EXCLUSIVE excerpt of BIG NATE STRIKES AGAIN!
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© UFS
5/7/2010 5:49:45 PM

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BOOKSELLERS –
Don’t miss your chance to meet Cornelia Funke on Wednesday, May 26th!
Cornelia will be signing exclusive hardcover Limited-Edition ARCs of Reckless
in booth 3751 starting at 11:30 am. The line will begin at 11:00 am sharp.
Signing limited to the first 250 people.

Also Happening in

10:00 am:

4:00 pm:
BLAD giveaway from
DC Superheroes: The
Ultimate Pop-Up Book
and raffle to win an
exclusive pop!

Booth 3751

All Day!
Limited edition ARC
giveaways of Beautiful
Darkness, the sequel
to Beautiful Creatures.
Say “Some loves are
cursed,” to claim
your copy!

Enter to win a piece
of gorgeous art
from Holly Hobbie’s
latest picture book,
Everything But
the Horse!

Wednesday, May 26
All items available while supplies last!

Looking for resources for your store? Visit www.LBYR-Booksellers.com!

28

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Cartoonists Galore

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

SPOTLIGHT

Choppy Socky
Blues marks a
return to his
true calling in
life.
“When I have time, I write,” Briant explains. But while he enjoys
creating a comic strip featuring
adults that’s for adults, he has no
interest at all in writing books for
adults. “I write from my own experience,” he says, “The most impor-

Times, rather
hopes there
won’t be too
much overlap
between her Violet Days fans and
readers of her illustrated children’s
books. With two Lerner children’s
books, Monkey with a Tool Belt
(2008) and Monkey with a Tool Belt
and the Noisy Problem (2009), as
well as a compilation of cartoons,
Ultra-Violet: 10 Years of Violet Days
(X-Communication, 2004), Monroe
has had ample opportunity to have
encounter both sets of fans.
Monroe draws from personal
experience in creating both her
comic strip and her children’s
books, and readily admits that
being a cartoonist influences her
writing process, although the content of her children’s books is
“toned down” from her sometimes
salty cartoons. “I keep it simple
and easy to read,” she says, disclosing that “just to pull it off,” she
writes her books initially on storyboards in a cartoon format.
All three cartoonists are signing
finished books in the formal autographing area: Monroe at Table 25,
2–2:30 p.m.; Pierce at Table 19, 2–3
p.m.,;and Briant at Table 12, 3:30–
4:30 p.m.
—Claire Kirch

ON CHILDREN

Cartoonists are everywhere—
Himself.
including three who are here proWhile insisting that writing
moting their new releases for chilprose and drawing cartoons “each
dren and YA readers. Lincoln
have their charms,” Peirce enjoys
Peirce’s new book, Big Nate: In a
combining the two, as it provides
Class by Himself (HarperCollins,
an opportunity to tell longer stoMar.) expands upon his Big Nate
ries. Peirce plans on writing five
comic strip. Ed Briant (Tales from
more books in the Big Nate series.
the Slush Pile) and Chris Monroe
Ed Briant’s comic strip, Tales
(Violet Days), whose comics are
intended for adult readers, have
leapt into the children’s book
market—Briant for the first time
with Choppy Socky Blues (Flux,
Apr.) and Monroe for the third
time, with Sneaky Sheep (Lerner,
Sept.).
Peirce’s comic strip Big Nate,
about the ongoing misadventures
of its sixth-grade hero, is syndicated in 200 newspapers nationwide and featured as an island on
a children’s Web site, Poptropica.
Cartoonists at work for kids: three different artists are signing today.
While two compilations of Big
Nate comic strips have been published, Add More Babes! Awesome
from the Slush Pile, is well-known
tant part of my life is my first 18
Big Nate Comics (Paros, 1992),
in the industry, as it’s carried
years.”
and I Smell a Pop Quiz (United
exclusively in the PW Children’s
Chris Monroe, whose comic strip,
Media, 2009), Peirce uses both
Bookshelf newsletter. While Briant
Violet Days, is carried in Minnesonarrative and cartoons for the
has been creating Tales from the
ta’s two largest newspapers and in
first time in Big Nate: In a Class by
Slush Pile for the past five years,
the nationally distributed Funny

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1_2 hor.indd 1

5/14/2010 11:22:49 AM

L E A R N H OW P E R M A N E N T PA P E R P R E S E R V E S T H E W R I T T E N WO R D AT B O OT H 3 6 3 1 .

30

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

A ‘Thriller’ Exclusive
In 1983, Life magazine sent photographer Douglas Kirkland and journalist Nancy Griffin to the set of
Michael Jackson’s new video for
the song “Thriller,” the only members of the media allowed. The
result was a short article in the
magazine—until now.
Filipacchi Publishing v-p/publisher Dorothee Walliser discovered Kirkland’s treasure trove of
never-before-seen photos from the
assignment while talking with a
mutual friend shortly after the singer’s death. The result is October’s
Michael Jackson: The Making of
“Thriller,” a heavily illustrated tribute to the pop icon.
“These photos are candid. They’re
not posed because he was working,”
says Walliser, describing shots like
the singer sipping coffee with a straw
in full werewolf makeup. “You can
see him at the best of his craft and in
control of his life.”
Acclaimed photographer Kirkland will be at the Filipacchi booth
(3759) today, 3–4 p.m., to sign limited edition collectible prints of a
photo from the book for the first 100

famous subjects and done behindthe-scenes work on more than 100
motion pictures.
show attendees in line.
While the main
He will also sign blads of
attraction of the book
the book once the prints
is the 200 exclusive
are exhausted. Kirkland
photographs, it also
began photographing
includes a q&a with
for Look and Life magaKirkland and Griffin
zines in the ’60s and
and newly collected
’70s, first earning fame
interviews and quotes
for his photos of Marilyn
from a host of musiMonroe. He has since
cians and celebrities
All photos are candid.
shot a multitude of
about Jackson—and

“Thriller” ’s—influence on them. It
will also include quotes from his family. The cover will be holographic,
transforming from the artist to his
zombie character depending on the
angle of view.
Filipacchi currently plans a conservative 35,000 first printing, but
Walliser says early interest from
overseas has been strong and that
number could rise. “We’ll see how
reaction is at Book Expo,” she says.
“We may have to increase that.”

A Combo of Moxie & Good Taste

publisher for the
15 years I’ve
been doing this,”
Goldman says.
“In the ’90s I had
offices and 10
people on staff,
and we did our
own fulfillment,
distribution, and
sales. We signed on with IPG at the
end of the ’90s, and it’s been fantastic.”
Print runs for most of the press’s
books are in the 5,000 to 10,000
range. “I have always been conservative in my print runs so as not to
—Suzanne Mantell
get killed.”

Conservative, careful publishing is
how Jeffrey Goldman, the heart,
soul, and chief honcho of the independent Santa Monica Press,
explains how he gathered the
moxie to jump into the waters of
big-time publishing with hefty,
glossy, hardcover books printed in
full color on coated stock and, at
times, better suited to a coffee table
than a bookshelf.
“Obviously, as a small independent press, we have to tread carefully in these expensive waters, but
so far so good,” he says. He is espe-

Meet

Melissa Marr

cially enthusiastic about three fall
projects: The Art and Design of
Contemporary Wine Labels by
Tanya Scholes, with a foreword by
Michael Mondavi ($45), John Van
Hamersveld: Post-Future by John
Van Hamersveld, with a foreword
by artist Shepard Fairey ($49.95),
and MGM: Hollywood’s Greatest
Backlot by Steven Bingen, Stephen
X. Sylvester, and Michael Troyan
($34.95). Blads of all three are viewable at the Santa Monica Press
booth (2722)
“I have been fairly cautious as

—Gwenda Bond

Santa Monica Press
Booth #2723

author of the New York Times bestselling
Wicked Lovely series
Young Adult Authors Crossing Over
Wednesday, May 26
11:00 a.m.
Midtown Stage

Melissa will be
signing copies of
her latest novel,

RADIANT
SHADOWS,

$49.95 U Hardcover
ISBN: 9781595800541 U 288 pages
9 = 12 U Hundreds of Color Photos
and Illustrations U September 2010
Foreword by Shepard Fairey

$45.00 U Hardcover
ISBN: 9781595800466 U 240 pages
8½ = 11 U Hundreds of Color
Illustrations U August 2010
Foreword by Michael Mondavi

Drop Off Your Business Card
for a Chance to Win a Signed
Jimi Hendrix Poster from
John Van Hamersveld

Drop Off Your Business Card
for a Chance to Win 4 Bottles
of The Michael Mondavi
Family’s Emblem Wines

at 4:00 p.m. at
Table 18 in the
autographing area.

www.harperteen.com/melissamarr
1_4 vertical.indd 1

www.santamonicapress.com
1_4 vertical.indd 1
5/7/2010 5:26:15 PM

5/13/2010 1:08:40 PM

Photo Credit: Nina Subin

Celebrating
Ten Years of
Cedar Cove
Stories.
Meet Debbie today
10-10:45 a.m.
Harlequin Booth #3922

All on sale
September 2010.

A Unique Collaboration Between Publisher and Author

Join us at booth #4225...
for these
author
signings!

Y!
A
W
A
GIVE
D
V
D
W d d M
Wednesday,
May 2
26th
at 4:00 pm

Naked Fitness
Andrea Metcalf
The revolutionary new body wellness
program from NBC’s fitness expert

Thursday, May 27th
at 11:00 am

The Watchman’s
Rattle
Thinking Our Way Out of Extinction

Rebecca D. Costa
A game-changing book about society’s
complexity, collapse, and renewal

Thursday, May 27th
at 3:00 pm

Christmas at
The Mysterious
Bookshop
Otto Penzler
Stories of Mistletoe and Mayhem
from 17 Masters of Suspense

www.vanguardpressbooks.com

THE PERSEUS BOOKS GROUP

Meet Our Authors at Booth #4225
WEDNESDAY, MAY 26TH

THURSDAY, MAY 27TH

10 AM

Half Baked
by Alexa Stevenson

11 AM

RUNNING PRESS

Alex and
the Ironic
Gentleman

Galley & Chapbook
Giveaway
Songs of Blood
and Sword
by Fatima Bhutto
NATION BOOKS

&

11 AM

Timothy at the
Dragon’s Gate

Empire of
Illusion

by Adrienne Kress

by Chris Hedges

WEINSTEIN BOOKS

NATION BOOKS

Kiss Me Deadly
Edited by
Trisha Telep
RUNNING PRESS

2 PM

Party
Animals
by Kathie Lee
Gifford
RUNNING PRESS

I’m With Fatty

1 PM

by Edward Ugel

All Things
at Once

WEINSTEIN BOOKS

by
Mika Brzezinski
WEINSTEIN BOOKS

3 PM

Heart of
the City

The Envoy

by Ariel Sabar

2 PM

by Alex Kershaw

DA CAPO PRESS

Viva Vegan!

DA CAPO PRESS

by Terry Romero
DA CAPO PRESS

Get
a Boozy
Cupcake!

4 PM

And

The Boozy
Baker

don’t forget to ask about

by Lucy Baker

60th Anniversary
Show Special!

RUNNING PRESS

BASIC’S

34

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Taylor’s Tailored Tale
Bernie Ilson is no stranger to
show was so successful. SulBEA, having promoted more
livan brought ‘drops of culthan 100 books for the clients
ture’ to America—in every
of his public relations comshow there was at least one
pany since 1963. But at this
classical artist.”
year’s show he’s supporting
The book, which contains a
his own book, Sundays with
number of photos, is out now in
Sullivan: How the Ed Sullivan
hardback and will be released
Show Brought Elvis, the Beain paperback this November.
tles, and Culture to America Sullivan: “And now,
Ilson will sign copies at the
(Taylor Trade), which offers an here they are, the
Taylor Trade booth (3777)
Beatles!”
insider’s view of his very first
tomorrow at noon.
client’s famous TV variety show.
Taylor Trade has several titles it’s
“The stories in the book have never
excited to talk about at BEA. The
been anywhere else,” says Ilson. “I
publisher’s parent company, Rowhave personal insights into why the
man & Littlefield, was recently able

W E E K LY

to reacquire the rights to perennial
bestseller The Millionaire Next Door
by Thomas J. Stanley, and Taylor will
release a new edition in November
featuring the first new foreword
since it debuted in 1996. The book
has sold more than two million copies, including 40,000 in 2009 alone.
And Carmela LaVigna Coyle is
back with her first new Princesses
book in four years, for the publisher’s
Rising Moon children’s imprint.
Illustrated by Mike and Carl Gordon,
Do Princesses Have Best Friends Forever? (Dec.) celebrates friendship by
depicting two girls doing a variety of
activities together, from dressup to
playing in the mud. The Princesses

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

line is aimed at “parents looking to
counter mainstream princess messaging.” The series’ first title—Do
Princesses Wear Hiking Boots?—has
sold more than 100,000 copies since
its 2003 publication.
The publisher’s other in-booth
signings include Art Ortenberg, for
Liz Claiborne: The Legend, the
Woman (Apr.) today at 2:30 p.m.;
Joanna Martine Woolfolk, for the
hot-selling The Only Astrology Book
You’ll Ever Need, today, at 3:30 p.m.,
and Andy Piascik, for both the Gridiron Gauntlet: The Story of the Men
Who Integrated Pro Football, in Their
Own Words (Oct. 2009) and The Best
Show in Football: The 1946–1955
Cleveland Browns (paperback, Oct.),
tomorrow at noon.
—Gwenda Bond

Calling Franken’s
Vote
In our nation’s history, there have been
a few nail-bitingly
close elections, with
results that are still
hotly disputed by
historians and politiIt’s time for a BEA
cos. There was the
vote.
presidential election
in 2000, when the U.S. Supreme
Court halted a ballot recount in Florida and declared George W. Bush the
winner over Al Gore. And there was
the 2008 U.S. Senate race in Minnesota, which sparked eight long and
bizarre months of recounts and lawsuits that captivated more than one
late-night TV comedian. It was an
election that, in retrospect, is almost
reminiscent of a Saturday Night Live
skit—featuring, coincidentally, SNL’s
own satirist and author, Al Franken.
On June 30, 2009, after a campaign
that cost $20 million, Franken was
declared the winner over Norm
Coleman by 312 votes. But though
Senator Franken was sworn in on
July 7, 2009, this election really isn’t
over until the booksellers weigh in.
Thus, the University of Minnesota
Press is conducting a poll today and
tomorrow at booth 4153, asking show
attendees if they believe Franken is
good enough, smart enough, and,
doggone it, whether voters liked him
enough to have won the election fair
and square over Coleman.
While booksellers are pondering
who to vote for, they might want to
check out the sample readers the
press is giving out, containing the
introduction and first few chapters of
This Is Not Florida by journalist Jay
Weiner, which the press is releasing
with a 7,000-copy print run this fall.
This Is Not Florida is a behind-thescenes look at every surreal twist
and turn in the longest, most expensive election recount in American
—Claire Kirch
history.

10:00-11:00am
TABLE 4

11:00am

Hard to Hold
Julie Leto
Meet Me
in Manhattan
Judith Arnold
The Icing on the Cake
Alison Kent

Girlology’s There’s Something New About You
Dr. Melisa Holmes and Dr. Patricia Hutchinson
Boys Lie Dr. Belisa Vranich

12:00pm
Gourmet Meals in Crappy Little Kitchens Jennifer Schaertl

11:00-11:30am
TABLE 16

Chow Hounds Dr. Ernie Ward

Diary of a Beverly Hills
Matchmaker
Marla Martenson
Bettie Youngs Books

1:00pm

1:00-1:30pm

The Tiger Woods Syndrome
Dr. J.R. Bruns and Dr. R.A. Richards II

TABLE 4

Unstoppable in
Stilettos
Lauren Ruotolo

Unplugged Ryan Van Cleave
Regaining Yourself Dr. Ira Sacker

1:00-1:30pm

2:00pm

TABLE 6

INTRODUCING

Girlology’s
There’s Something
New About You
Dr. Melisa Holmes
and
Dr. Patricia
Hutchinson
1:30-2:00pm

Join Us for
Wedding Cake
as We Celebrate
the Launch of The First
Reality-Based RomanceTM
Series

TABLE 6

Hard to Hold
Julie Leto

Meet Me
in Manhattan
Judith Arnold

The Icing on the Cake
Alison Kent

Sex for Grownups Dr. Dorree Lynn
Stop Calling Him Honey and Start Having Sex
Julienne Davis and Maggie Arana

Gourmet Meals in
Crappy Little Kitchens
Jennifer Schaertl
3:00-3:30pm
TABLE 5

Unplugged
Ryan Van Cleave

Live
Performance
by Ky-Mani
Marley!
Dear Dad
Ky-Mani Marley

3:00-3:30pm
TABLE 4

3:00pm

4:00pm

Boys Lie
Dr. Belisa Vranich

Diary of a Beverly Hills Matchmaker
Marla Martenson
Bettie Youngs Books

Leave the Light On Jennifer Storm

3:30-4:00pm
TABLE 4

Chow Hounds
Dr. Ernie Ward

Central Recovery Press

3:30-4:00pm

Farrah Gray Publishing
Bettie Youngs Books, Central Recovery Press and Farrah Gray Publishing Books are distributed by Health Communications, Inc.

TABLE 5

Regaining Yourself
Dr. Ira Sacker

36

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Educational
Snacking
Workman’s done it again, offering
Potato Chip Science by A. Kurzweil
& Son. Charmingly packaged in a
potato chip bag, complete with
“Nutrition Facts” (servings per container: 29; calories from fat: none;
calories from facts: all) on the back
and a “Quality Guarantee,” the
book claims to “explore major
branches of science” and warns
that it is “High in Saturated Facts!”
Potato Chip Science starts off
expounding on all things potato:
bags, chips (dimensional characteristics of crinkle, regular, kettle,
baked, saddle), lids, scientific classification, potato diseases (hopperburn and corky ring spot, among
others), weird uses (shoe polish and
spinning yarn), and more before
chipping away at the 29 “snactivities.” It’s a slim workbook, but
packed with offbeat stuff, from a
faux newspaper (The Chipping
News) to four pages on “The Life
Cycle of the Potato Chip.” The
“snactivities” fall into five scientific
categories—astronomy, biology,
chemistry, earth science, physics—

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Full Circle in 10 Years

with analogous, nononsense
chip categories (bags, chips, lids,
spuds, tubes).
Zany, silly, madcap, this is the
irresistible fare at which Workman
excels. Unusual packaging, slick
design, silly yet educational experiments—it’s a combination guaranteed to delight all ages, though
technically aimed at ages 8 and up.
Kurzweil will be at the Workman
booth (4259) today, where he will be
performing different chip experiments, 2–3 p.m. —Karin Pekarchik

Carl R. Sams II, the Michigan publisher of four children’s books, three board
books, and four movies
inspired by photos taken of
animals in their natural settings, is celebrating a decade
exhibiting at BEA by presenting each
visitor to booth 3058 with a memento
(as long as supplies last).
There’s a lot to see at the booth:
Carl R. Sams II will unveil the new
lenticular cover for the 10th anniversary collector’s edition of the company’s first book for children, Stranger
in the Woods. The book, billed as a
“photographic fantasy,” featuring
wildlife shots taken by publisher/
professional photographer Carl
Sams, was first published in fall 1999

Chinese Spoken Here
“For years I had been thinking
about how to develop a new kind of
Chinese learning program,” says
Chinese publisher Rex How,
founder of Locus Publishing in Taiwan. He recently spun off Chinese
Cubes Co. Ltd. to develop and sell
Chinese Cubes, the Web-based

learning system he invented.
For him, the key to learning
Chinese is block characters,
which are integral to Chinese
Cubes. Each Chinese character
has its own definition, and when
characters are combined they form
complex words and sentences. Put-

and has to date sold 1.6 million
copies. Booth visitors may also
view the trailer for the new
movie, First Snow in the
Woods, inspired by the 2007
release. The movie will be
released this fall as a DVD.
Bridget Llewellyn will
also be in the booth today
signing copies of her children’s book
about conservation, One Child, One
Planet, 3–4 p.m.
Reflecting upon the past 10 years,
Sams recalled that the first year he
attended BEA, Stranger in the
Woods won a Benjamin Franklin
award for best illustrated children’s
book. “This year, One Child, One
Planet is one of three finalists in the
children’s illustrated book category,” he says. “I feel we’ve come
full circle.” —Claire Kirch

ting together character blocks
for “good” and “to eat,” for
example, creates the word
“delicious.”
At BEA, the company is
giving demos at booth
3571, near the Midtown
Stage. A final version will
be released in the U.S. market
later this fall.
—Judith Rosen

Since 1986 National Book Network has consistently provided
sales, marketing and distribution services to independent publishers in the US, Canada and the UK. In this rapidly changing
industry we customize our many services to meet your needs.

WHAT OUR PUBLISHING CLIENTS HAVE
TO SAY ABOUT NBN
“We are very excited about broadening our library and academic markets through the marketing efforts of
NBN and Rowman & Littlefield.”
—John Groton, Sales Director North America, Nicholas Brealey LTD
“NBN’s FUSION Program offers many well-priced options for eBook and short run book publishing.”
—Jeff Cox, Publisher, Snow Lion Publications
“As the publishing industry continues to rediscover its identity, both with innovations in digital and in the midst
of difficult economic circumstances, I am deeply heartened by the crucial support that NBN provides.”
—Bruce Shaw, President, Harvard Common Press
“The NBN sales, marketing and executive team members have been extremely responsive during our transition and have shown their passion for our product and for working together as a team.”
—Liz Plotnick, Publisher, Gooseberry Patch
“NBN’s world class operations, facility and staff give us confidence that our “brand” is in the right hands.”
—Eileen Osteen, Director of Sales, Michelin Travel & Lifestyle
“The smart, talented, and aggressive staff of NBN is launching Blood Moon into the 21st century.What’s
their chief talent? The NBN staff knows how to sell books—and that’s what it’s all about.”
—Danforth Prince, President, Blood Moon Productions

Interested in joining this exceptional family of publishers?
Contact Gail Kump,VP Business Development at 212-529-3888 ext. 310 or
GKump@nbnbooks.com or stop by booth # 3777

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 4:03:45 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

Feminist Press Pushes 40
The Feminist Press plans to
nist Press is cohosting a
mark its 40th anniversary at
BEA Bash with City Lights,
BEA with champagne, a
Alyson Books, and St.
party, and by promoting a
Mark’s Bookshop at the
hot slate of new releases
Happy Ending Lounge on
that showcase the diversity
the Lower East Side, 6–8
of its offerings.
p.m. In a nod to publishing
The press invites show
tradition, the publishers
attendees to drop by its
will be serving two for one
A big fall book for a
booth (4514a) at 4:30 p.m.
gimlets.
resurgent small press.
today for a champagne
Editorial director Amy
toast and to meet current and forthScholder says the celebration is not
coming authors Karen Finley, Elizaonly about honoring the past sucbeth Streb, Josh MacPhee, Reiko
cesses of the Feminist Press but
Rizzuto, Taslima Nasrin, among
where it’s headed in the future. “As
others. Following the toast, Femiwe enter our 40th year, we’ve trans-

Getting the Inside Scoop
Barricade Books hopes readers
who like getting the inside scoop on
real-life intrigue will flock to two
major October titles it’s promoting
at BEA—Mordecai “Morty” Dzikansky’s Terrorist Cop and Sean Patrick Griffin’s Gaming the Game.
“We are a small, independent
publisher and what I always look
for is a book that is unique—both
these books could only be done by
these authors,” says Carole Stuart,

publisher at
Barricade.
Dzikansky’s book, written with Bob Slater,
chronicles his career as an Orthodox
Jew in the NYPD who became known
as the “go-to Jewish cop,” working
cases that included busting the
thieves of stolen Torahs. After September 11, Dzikansky was dispatched to Israel by police commissioner Ray Kelly to learn as much as
he could about suicide bombers and
effective counterterrorism efforts. .
Dzikansky will sign galleys at Bar-

formed the press yet
again,” says Scholder.
“With a new logo/design, the
launch of a vibrant Web site, and a
new mission statement, we are
publishing feminist books with an
activist spirit.”
The Feminist Press was founded
in 1970 with a focus on books written by women for women, which
brought titles like Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English’s
Witches, Midwives, and Nurses and
Charlotte Perkins’s The Yellow
Wall-Paper into college classrooms
for the first time. The focus began to
shift to bringing books by women
from around the world to North

ricade’s booth (3782) at 11 a.m. today.
Barricade’s other hot title divulges
details so secret that galleys won’t be
available at BEA—instead, author
Griffin will be on hand in the publisher’s booth tomorrow to meet show
attendees and answer questions.
Gaming the Game gives the real
story behind the referee betting
scandal that broke in 2007, rocking
the NBA and resulting in jail time for
referee Tim Donaghy. Jimmy “Baba”
Battista, providing new revelations
about what happened.
“I’ve never had such excitement

37

American readers. And, Scholder
says, by the 1990s, the publisher’s
offerings began to diversify again,
with the press bringing out books
targeted not only for the classroom
but a more general readership.
Among the books the publisher
will be promoting at BEA are such
offerings as American Book
Award–winner Rizzuto’s memoir
Hiroshima in the Morning (Sept.),
about the author’s revelatory journey to Hiroshima to explore her
heritage, and Courtney Young’s
From Madea to Michelle (Aug.), a
critical examination of how women
are portrayed in African-American
—Gwenda Bond
pop culture.

Barricade is betting on these two.

for a title,” says Stuart, noting that
Griffin garnered applause in a
recent sales conference appearance in support of the title.
—Gwenda Bond

THE ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHING GROUP, INC.
is one of the largest and fastest growing independent publishers in
North America. Consisting of many imprints, the company publishes
in virtually all fields in the humanities and social sciences.
While celebrating our 35th anniversary in 2010, we will publish over 1,500 new

Celebrating 35 years in publishing!

general interest, academic, and reference books, as well as several journals.

Stop by booth #3883 for these hot titles and more!

IMPRINTS INCLUDE:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Sheed & Ward
Taylor Trade Publishing
Ivan R. Dee
AltaMira Press
Bernan Press
Government Institutes
Jason Aronson
Lexington Books
Rowman & Littlefield Education
The Scarecrow Press

Surviving Your Doctors
by Richard Klein

Dust
by Paul Lioy

Lox, Stocks, and
Backstage Broadway
by Nancy Groce

Sundance-Newbridge

The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is located in booth #3883 within NBN booth #3777

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 12:21:12 PM

38

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

It’s Reigning Babies
Last fall, Sellers pubpublisher interested
lisher Ronnie Sellers
in securing the rights
caught an interview
to a book by Raver
on the Today Show
and Ryden, and he
with twin sisters Tracy
spent the day making
Raver and Kelley
his best case for the
Ryden, photogratwins signing with
phers best known for
Sellers Publishing.
their innovative porThat evening, he went
traits of sleeping new- Twin sisters’ portraits of babies.
to dinner with Raver
born babies. “The images stopped
and her attorney husband. “The first
me in my tracks,” says Sellers. “I’d
question he asked,” remembers Sellnever seen photographs that capers, “wasn’t about contracts, it was
tured the essence of babies as purely
whether I was a Yankee, Red Sox, or
and as organically as those taken by
Mets fan.” He wisely decided that
Tracy and Kelley. I knew immedihonesty was the best policy and
ately that I wanted to be their pubadmitted to being an ardent Red Sox
lisher.” Sellers tried e-mailing Raver,
fan. “Right answer,” smiled Raver’s
but a deluge of e-mails following
husband. And the deal was done that
their Today Show appearance had
very evening.
crashed her server. He tried calling,
Published in April, Sleeping Beaubut her voice mail was full. There was
ties: Newborns in Dreamland got an
only one option left to a publisher
immediate response from buyers—
this determined—he’d have to fly
“we sold out the first print run before
from Portland, Maine, to the twins’
it arrived in the warehouse, and it
home in Omaha.
quickly became Amazon’s #1 art and
Sellers got up at 3 a.m. to catch the
photography book.” As for media
first flight out of Portland, connected
requests, “it’s been a struggle for our
through Chicago, and by 11:30 that
PR department to keep up with it
morning, he was knocking on the
all.” There’s been a return visit to
door of the twins’ studio in Omaha.
Today, an appearance on the SaturNot surprisingly, he wasn’t the only
day edition of CBS’s Early Show and

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

features in People and InTouch
Weekly. So what accounts for the success of this unlikely bestseller? “It
evokes the same reaction from teenagers as it does from mothers,
fathers, and grandmothers,” Sellers
believes. “Everyone is entranced by
these images.”

Tracy Raver and Kelley Ryden
will be in the Sellers booth (3585–
3686) today, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. A tip for
locating the booth on the crowded
BEA floor—look for a large overhead hanging sign featuring the
book’s cover of a sleeping newborn.
—Lucinda Dyer

Clubbing in a Box
Who says you can’t shrink a book
club into a box? Eight years ago,
teacher, librarian, and book club
leader Marilyn Herbert moved her
book club discussions online and
launched bookclubinabox.com.
From there, she says, “the concept
has rippled out.” Today she and her
staff have created 45 Bookclub-in-aBox Guides, approximately 80 pages
long, on novels ranging from Like
Water for Elephants to
The Memory Keeper’s
Daughter. “We take the
story, the characters,
and the focus points,”
says Herbert, “so people
can see why the book
works. We’re not competing with publishers’
readers’ guide, we’re
complementing them.”

This year Bookclub will up the number of guides it publishes from six to
between eight and 10, including some
PDF-only Novel Notes. In February it
opened Bookclub-in-a-Box TALKS!— a
community center in Toronto—where
the company is based, which offers writing, art, and drama classes, as well as
book clubs. Last month it launched a
new Web site that enables readers to
connect in a virtual book club.
At BEA, booksellers
can pick up sample
guides at the Bookclub
booth (5058), where they
can also see two 15-minute book club presentations on Lawrence Hill’s
Someone Knows My
Name at 2:30 p.m. today
and 11:30 a.m. tomorrow.

Online worked for Herbert.

—Judith Rosen

Tosca Reno will be signing
her most recent book,
The Eat-Clean Diet ® Recharged,
on

Wednesday May 26
and

Thursday May 27
from

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
at

Robert Kennedy Publishing
Booth #3776.
At the age of 40, Tosca Reno reinvented herself, leaving a destructive
marriage, losing her excess weight, solving her health problems and
becoming the woman she had always wanted to be. She now lives a
fulfilled, meaningful life, and through her appearances and best-selling
series of books she has inspired millions of other women to do the same.

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/14/2010 3:11:42 PM

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AUTHORS

then it became an obsession. I had to know more about this man that I thought
I knew so well.”
The seasoned reporter, chosen journalist of the year in 2009 by the
National Association of Black Journalists, tracked down some of the officers
who were on the police force at the time of the incident. “I yearned to know
what those police officers’ lives were like, and I ultimately wanted to understand more about the way people tried to participate in that conversation
about race if you were on the other side of the color line.”
Norris has never been to Book Expo before. “We usually send someone
from NPR, and it’s never been me,” she laughs. “I love books! They’ve meant
so much to me through the course of my life—as a child, as a confused teenager, the curious journalist. I still find comfort in books at the end of the day,
so to basically swim in a sea of authors for a couple of days sounds like a sublime experience.”
Norris will be at today’s ALA breakfast and will sign galleys at the Random
—Hilary S. Kayle
House booth (4341), at 2 p.m.

AT THE S H OW

Ian Frazier

© Sigrid Estrada

Enchanted with Siberia
After Ian Frazier’s first trip to Siberia in 1993,
he discussed his impressions of this mysterious
and isolated area of Russia with the late Roger
Straus, who had published Frazier’s first book,
The Great Plains, at FSG. “Roger had an enthusiasm for the subject, and he sent me a book
about Russia to read,” Frazier says. Despite not
having any Russian ancestry, his motivation to
begin writing Travels in Siberia (FSG, Oct.) was
sparked.
Frazier found many parallels between the steppes of Russia and the American plains he’d written about. “The hard red winter wheat that’s one of the
crops of the Great Plains came from Russia. Tumbleweeds—a visual shorthand for the west—came from Russia. Silo missiles that are still on the plains
were aimed at Russia,” the author and New Yorker staff writer notes. “And I
just have a strong affection for Russia that’s hard to explain.” During the
course of 10 subsequent trips to Russia, Frazier spent more than six months
in and around Siberia to research and immerse himself in his next project.
Travels in Siberia is Frazier’s most ambitious book; he devoted 17 years,
intensive language studies, and several trips to Russia, compiling a historical, detailed travelogue scattered with frequent hilarious anecdotes and
impressions typical of his writing. “There’s more of a connection to humor in
the book than might be apparent by the subject matter, which is grimly
funny,” Frazier explains. His Russian-language skills, which one of his tutors
referred to as “hooligan Russian,” were the catalyst for episodes of mayhem
and charming confusion during Frazier’s research trips to Siberia.
One of the most striking cultural differences Frazier found in his travels
was in the way people express themselves visually. “Russians think we’re
crazy for smiling all the time,” says Frazier. “To them, smiling is a sign of submissive behavior, like weakness. In Russia people come up to you extremely
stern-faced, and your first thought is, ‘Have I done something wrong?’ But
then they ask you to come for tea.”
With large communities of Russian immigrants on both the east and west
coasts in the U.S. it’s possible for Frazier to reach a broader audience for
Travels in Siberia than he’s accustomed to. “Russians are really culturally
curious people, and they may like this book,” says Frazier.
Frazier fans can meet the author, who is signing copies of his new book
—Wendy Werris
today at 3 p.m. in the Macmillan booth (3953).

Rick Riordan
Making Learning Fun
You can take the teacher out of the classroom,
but you can’t always take the classroom out of
the teacher. Rick Riordan, who spent 15 years
teaching social studies and history to middleschool students before leaving in 2004 to write
full-time, is still making abstract concepts and
events that happened 3,000 years ago both
interesting and relevant to the lives of middlegrade audiences.
Not content with resting on his laurels after
concluding the Percy Jackson & the Olympians
series, about the adventures of the modern-day
son of Greek god Poseidon, Riordan is working on a spinoff trilogy featuring
a few more young offspring of the Greek gods and goddesses. The Heroes of
Olympus series will debut this fall with the October release of The Lost Hero.
This month, Hyperion launches another new series from the author, the
Kane Chronicles, which features a completely different cast of divine characters. This time, the Egyptian gods and goddesses have invaded the 21st
century to wreak havoc.
In the first installment, The Red Pyramid, Carter Kane and his sister,
Sadie—descended from both the pharaohs and from magicians—try to stay
one step ahead of the gods and goddesses as they crisscross the globe, simultaneously searching for their father and trying to save the world from
destruction.
Although Egyptian myths are not as familiar today as Greek myths, Riordan insists that ancient Egypt “fascinates kids.” It intrigues him as well. He
recalls “reading and reading” about Egypt, delving into subjects he previously knew nothing about, and including what he learned in The Red Pyramid.
“The magic, the spells, the shabti,” he explains, “are all grounded in reality.”
Although adhering to the winning formula of breathing new life into
ancient mythology that has made him a household name with young readers, Riordan mixes it up in The Red Pyramid, with the two siblings taking
turns narrating their story. “It’s very important to me that both genders have
protagonists they can identify with,” the author, ever mindful of his young
charges, says. “And I’ve never done alternating points-of-view before.”
Like any good teacher, Riordan knows he himself has to be actively
engaged if he hopes to successfully immerse readers in his worlds of myth
and magic. “I keep myself interested and entertained by pushing myself to
try something new,” he says. “If I’m having fun, I think the readers will enjoy
the ride, too.”
Riordan will sign copies of The Red Pyramid today, 3–4 p.m., at Table 24.
—Claire Kirch

Michele Norris

© NPR-Stephen Voss

The Accidental Memoir
Barack Obama’s presidential campaign
spurred a type of conversation about race in
this country that prompted Michele Norris, a
co-host of National Public Radio’s All Things
Considered, to expand on an NPR project on
the subject and write her first book, The Grace
of Silence (Pantheon, Sept.). Norris tells Show
Daily, “I was originally going to write a series of
essays where I endeavored to give a voice to
the hidden and robust conversations about
race in America—the conversations you don’t
usually hear.”
In the course of her work, however, she
started hearing stories from her own family
that came as a bit of a shock, and that’s when
the project changed. “When I realized that secrets were spilling out of the
elders in my family, the whole writing process changed, and the book wound
up being a much deeper and more personal examination of my own family
and the things I never knew about the people who raised me.”
Norris learned from an uncle that her father, a WWII veteran, was shot by a
police officer upon his return to his hometown in Birmingham, Ala. Her
father never talked about the incident; in fact, Norris was the one who
informed her mother about it. “This discovery about my dad—first, it was a
surprise, then it was like an itch I couldn’t scratch. Then it was an ache, and

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Mac Barnett
TellsTale of a Rampaging Robot
How off-track can a science project veer? Plenty far, as envisioned by Mac
Barnett, whose new picture book from Disney-Hyperion is Oh No! (Or How
My Science Project Destroyed the World). Illustrated by Dan Santat, this June
title tells of a girl who builds a humongous robot, fully expecting to win first
place in the fair. Instead, her invention wreaks havoc throughout the city as
the girl scrambles to find a solution.
But that is not easy to come by. “She soon realizes her robot has certain
serious design flaws,” Barnett says. “Like maybe giving him a laser eye
wasn’t the greatest idea and maybe giving him ears would have been a good
idea. She comes up with a solution, but even that is full of problems.”

© NPR-Stephen Voss

42

44

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

AUTHORS

PUBL I SHERS

The author’s
experience with
826LA, a nonprofit writing and
tutoring center
in Los Angeles,
helped inspire the story. “I worked with a lot of
kids at the center and came to appreciate their
undersized sense of regret,” he says. “They’d
create huge disasters and be a little bit sorry—
but still couldn’t see the scope of the problem
they’d created.” Barnett shares the memory of
taking kids to visit a police station with century-old plumbing. He recalls watching a girl
who had stuffed paper towels in the toilet and
caused a flood casually leave the bathroom.
“She shrugged, said a simple, ‘Sorry,’ and
walked away, leaving behind a huge nightmare,” he says.
Barnett’s earlier books, all illustrated by
Adam Rex, include a middle-grade novel, The
Brixton Brothers: The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity, and picture books Guess Again! and Billy Twitters and His Blue
Whale Problem. “I try to write a very different book each time,” he says. “I
think there are so many unexplored possibilities in children’s books, and I get
frustrated that the same books seem to get published over and over again.”
Barnett, who gives high praise to Santat’s illustrations for Oh No! (“he did a
fantastic job—he totally blew the story out of the water”), is attending his first
BEA and is pleased at the prospect of spending time with booksellers. “My
first job was working at an independent bookstore in San Francisco,” he
notes. “Even before that, when I was a kid, independent bookstores were
very important to me. And these booksellers have been very supportive of
my books.” Next off press for the author is the second Brixton Brothers novel,
The Ghostwriter Secret, due from S&S in October.
© NPR-Stephen Voss

AT THE S H OW

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Barnett will sign copies of Oh No! today, 2:30–3:30 p.m., at Table 22. He will
also participate in the Guys of Guys Read panel tomorrow, 1–1:50 p.m., on the
—Sally Lodge
Downtown Stage.

Rosemary Wells
Drawn to Write
Rosemary Wells’s considerable fame springs from her irrepressibly drawn
mice, rabbits, kittens, and dogs, so it’s no surprise she has three illustrated
books coming out this fall. But only one of them she illustrated herself. “Phyllis Fogelman once told me, ‘Everything you draw is funny, so don’t try to draw
everything,’ and she was right,” Wells says.
Wells has been a BEA regular “since it was ABA.” This year, she’ll be talking up Max and Ruby’s Bedtime Book (Viking, Sept.), as well as two Candlewick titles for middle graders, each of which had a long and winding path to
publication.
My Havana, due in August, is actually someone else’s story. Years ago,
Wells heard a radio report about Secundino
Fernandez, who as a child in the 1950s lived
under three dictators (Franco, Batista, Castro),
traveling with his family between Cuba and
Spain, before they emigrated to New York.
Intensely homesick for his island, he built a
model of Havana, constructed to scale, in his
bedroom—cardboard buildings, tin foil sea,
fluorescent paint. (Is it any surprise Fernandez
became an architect?)
“What he had done was so particular and
human, so focused and believable,” Wells says.
After she heard the radio story, it took her four
years to find Fernandez, who immediately
agreed to collaborate. Peter Ferguson’s paintings evoke the vibrant Havana of Fernandez’s

AMACOM.
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102745

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

boyhood. “His story is about the resiliency of young people,” Wells remarks.
“I want children to know you can overcome tremendous hardship.”
Wells is also promoting On the Blue Comet, a September historical novel
set in Depression-era Illinois, about a boy, his father, and their love of model
trains. “That’s the book of my heart,” she says. This one took some time, too—
Wells started it 25 years ago.
“I wrote 40 pages, but I couldn’t end it. Then suddenly in 2007, I figured it out.
I gave it to Karen Lotz at Candlewick, who guided me on how to make it work,
because there is a time-travel element, and that can be tricky,” Wells says.
The paintings for this book were done by Bagram Ibatoulline. “I think he’s
done the most beautiful job, illustration at the level of the greats, including
Rockwell,” says Wells. Chris Paul, Candlewick’s creative director, sent her
the paintings as Ibatoulline finished them, and Wells says, “I couldn’t wait for
the next one to come in. I would call the whole family, ‘Come! Look at this
one!’ I wish I could draw like that.”
Today, Wells is signing My Havana ARCs, 11 a.m.–noon at Table 27, and
ARCs of On the Blue Comet, 2:30–3:30 p.m., at the same table. Tomorrow, she
signs copies of Max and Ruby’s Bedtime Book, 10:30–11:30 a.m. at a ticketed
—Sue Corbett
event at Table 10.

Justin Cronin
Dad Meets Daughter’s Challenge
At nearly 800 pages, Justin Cronin’s The Passage (Ballantine, June 8), the
first in a vampire trilogy about a girl who saves the world, could be the
weightiest tome at the show. It’s certainly one of the most talked and tweeted
about. The buzz began building three summers ago when Ballantine purchased the trilogy at auction for $3.75 million. A few weeks later, the unfinished manuscript fetched an additional $1.75 million when Fox 2000 and Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Productions bought film rights.
Comparisons to Stephen King’s The Stand are already starting to pour in.
Barnes & Noble fiction buyer Sessalee Hensley calls it, “World War Z meets
The Stand—with a little Road Warrior thrown in.” The Passage is the #1 Indie

1_2 hor.indd 1

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

AUTHORS

Next pick for
June. Despite
all—even the
badge holder
you’re wearing
probably has
The Passage emblazoned on the front—Cronin is surprisingly down–toearth. He describes himself as a “suburban dad from Texas who wrote in his
garage.” Thanks to the initial $5.5 million, along with the sale of publishing
rights in 25 countries, he now has an office above the garage, where he is finishing volumes two and three, to be published in 2012 and 2014.
Before The Passage, Cronin was best known for literary works like his
debut novel in stories, Mary and O’Neil, which received a PEN/Hemingway
Award, and The Summer Guest, a quiet novel set in a fishing camp in Maine.
By contrast, The Passage is a lot more thrilling, although he didn’t exactly
set out to write a thriller. The book began as a game, explains Cronin. While
he ran alongside his then nine-year-old daughter, Iris, on her bicycle, the
two made up characters and situations, much like a creative writing exercise. “I had zero expectations,” says Cronin, who soon had enough material
from their conversations for a 30-page singlespace document. Another motivation behind
the book was the war in Iraq. “We’d been in the
war for a long time and it troubled me,” says
Cronin. “I wondered what 10 more years of
this was going to do to us. I was worried as hell
as a person and a parent. That was the dark
impulse.”
Cronin will have a full schedule at his first
BEA. He is doing two signings: one today at
Table 8, 10–11 a.m., the other tomorrow, at 4 p.
m., at the Random House booth (4341). He will
also take part in tomorrow’s Author Stage
Panel on Thrillers with Lee Child and Karin
—Judith Rosen
Slaughter at 10:30 a.m.

AT TH E SH OW

© GasperTringalel

46

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

AUTHORS
AT TH E SH OW

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Brunonia Barry
Mapping Salem’s History

“This tale is going to cost you some sleep!”
—Stephen Coonts, New York Times
bestselling author

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Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, must be
fond of the number 13. His darkly funny A
Series of Unfortunate Events series spanned 13
books, and now his latest project, a picture
book illustrated by Maira Kalman, is entitled 13
Words (HarperCollins, Oct.). Snicket and Kalman are signing broadsides of the book today,
2–3 p.m., at Table 16, at a ticketed autographing.
13 Words is an adventure inspired by 13
“essential” words including dog, panache, and
haberdashery. “It begins as a primer, not unlike
a Dick and Jane book,” says the author, “then
goes quite awry, digressive in the manner of
Lemony Snicket and Maira Kalman.”
Snicket already has a couple of picture books
in his oeuvre, including The Latke Who Couldn’t Stop Screaming: A Christmas Story and The Composer Is Dead. Asked why he wanted to write another
picture book at this juncture, he says, “I suppose it has something to do with
the fact that I have a small child, and a wife who is a picture book author [Lisa
Brown]. I grew jealous that my son appreciated her work, but is still immune
to the charms of a bona fide novel.”
Tops on his BEA to-do list is wandering around in search of swag. “Me and
a few independent booksellers form a small, aggressive posse looking for
freebies,” he says. “I make sure my Lemony Snicket name tag is hidden so I
can get as many galleys as possible.”
When he’s not gathering goodies, Snicket will actually have duties to keep
him busy. He’ll be promoting a work for adults called The Hour: A Cocktail
Manifesto by Bernard DeVoto (Tin House, June), for which he’s written an
introduction. “There’s going to be a cocktail gathering in Brooklyn, where I’ll
be signing,” he says. “I know it’s shocking to picture alcohol being served in
the evenings at BEA, but we’re going to break with tradition. The signing
angle insures that it won’t be a drunken party without capitalism—that
would be socialism,” he adds. “And people having a good time with no purpose? We don’t do that in America.”
The author has a few new projects lined up. “I enjoyed Maira Kalman so
much that we’ll be working together again, on a YA novel called Why We
Broke Up,” he says. “It’s about a long letter from a girl to a boy about why they
broke up.” Scheduled by Little, Brown in 2011, that project is part of a larger
deal that includes a new four-book series by Snicket due out in 2012.
—Shannon Maughan

Fans of Brunonia Barry’s bestselling first novel,
The Lace Reader, will remember that the town
of Salem, Mass., was a central character in the
story. What they may not know is how deep Barry’s own roots go in the historic and sometimes
notorious seaport. “On my mother’s side, the
Whitneys came to Massachusetts in the 17th
century, settled south of Boston and came to
Salem fairly soon after. Rebecca Nurse, who
was executed in 1692 as a witch during the
Salem witch trials, is back there somewhere in
my family tree.”
After years working in New York, Chicago,
and Los Angeles, Barry returned home to Massachusetts and soon settled in Salem. She lives with her husband and their
“only child,” a golden retriever named Byzantium, in a historic home built by
one of Salem’s legendary sea captains. “It’s on my radar to find out exactly
who built it and why it doesn’t have the widow’s walk found on almost every
other captain’s house,” she says. As a self-described “writer of contemporary
stories but always with history,” Barry is grateful to live in a place where history is literally just around the corner. “Our home is not far from Chestnut
Street, which Eleanor Roosevelt called the prettiest street in America. Sometimes I think that being in Salem is like living in an Edith Wharton novel.”

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

AUTHORS

The town
makes a return
appearance in
Barry’s second
novel, out this
month, The Map
of True Places (Morrow), a tale of tragedy, secrets, identity, and love, in which
psychotherapist Zee Finch must find the strands of her own life after the suicide of a troubled patient. Ten years separate the stories told in the two novels,
a decade in which, says Barry, “the desires of the town itself have changed.
Salem in the 1990s of The Lace Reader wanted forgiveness for the witch trials.
The Salem of my new book wants to redraw the map and be seen as a cosmopolitan, intellectual community. And it is changing—we’ve been discovered by
Boston commuters and architecture fans, and even the old Salem jail (once
one of the scariest gothic buildings I’ve ever seen) has been turned into luxury
condos.” While the town will continue to appear in her books, promises Barry,
she’s “taking a step away in the third novel that I’m just beginning. But Salem
will be back in my fourth—I won’t leave it for long.”
Barry will be signing copies of The Map of True Places this morning, 9:30–
10:30 a.m., at Table 13, and attending the IndieBound Luncheon at noon.
—Lucinda Dyer

AT TH E SH OW

Judith Viorst
What a Lulu of a Girl
Despite her parents’ naysaying, a strong-willed
girl is determined to acquire a pet dinosaur in
Lulu and the Brontosaurus (Atheneum, Sept.),
an early chapter book by Judith Viorst. Illustrated by Lane Smith, the book first sprang to
life during the author’s storytelling sessions
with grandsons Nathanial and Benjamin, now
six and nine. “We spend time together in Maine
every year, and one rainy day I began making
up stories about a girl named Lulu,” she
explains. “I became quite interested in this girl
and her desire for something impossible, and
the boys, too, were intrigued by her.”
Lulu and the Brontosaurus (which Viorst notes is dedicated to those grandsons, since “if it weren’t for them, it wouldn’t have happened”) marks a
departure for the author. “I’ve never written a book like this, and part of me
kept saying, ‘Where is this coming from?’ ” she says. “The author is in the
story as a character—if I were being pretentious, I’d call it postmodern. In
addition to telling a story with an adventure, as Lulu searches for her brontosaurus, I’m telling a story about telling a story.”
Lulu’s personality, which the author describes as “hardlike,” as distinguished from adorable, cuddly, irresistible characters, is not unfamiliar to
the author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
and its sequels. “Lulu is a pain, kind of like the way Alexander is a pain,”
Viorst says. “They’re ultimately redeemable and lovable, but you have to
work at it. They have an edge to them. I’m very fond of Lulu, and I’d like to
give her more adventures, more opportunities to drive people crazy.”
Viorst’s latest addition to her decades-themed books for adults is Exceedingly Eighty: And Other Adaptations (Free Press, Oct.). “It’s a bit weird to be
coming out with back-to-back books, one for the around-eight set and the
other for the around-80 set,” she says.
A highlight of BEA, remarks Viorst, is meeting Lane Smith in person for
the first time. “I count my blessings that he illustrated this book,” she says.
“I’ve said to him, ‘Don’t think I don’t have high standards, because I do have
high standards. But your art is perfect, just perfect.’ If I were an illustrator,
this is exactly how I would illustrate this book.”
Another big moment will be Alexander’s induction into the Indies Choice
Picture Book Hall of Fame at today’s Celebration of Bookselling Luncheon.
“On the same day as my book signing with Lane! It’s going to be a glamorous
day for me,” she says.
She and Smith sign ARCs of Lulu and the Brontosaurus, 11–11:30 a.m., at
—Sally Lodge
Table 15.

Cara Black
Conjuring Up More Paris Intrigue
Paris may be the perfect place for lovers, but for Cara Black it’s also an ideal
setting for murder. At this year’s BEA, she’s promoting Murder in the Palais
Royal, the 10th installment in her popular Soho Crime series chronicling the
exploits of the stylish half-French, half-American private investigator Aimée
Leduc.

© Milton Viorst

50

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BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

© Laura Skayhan

Black says she fell in love with the fascinating political and social climate she encountered in Paris during the 1990s, and decided to
pair modern France with classic noir in her
1999 debut novel, Murder in the Marais. She
worked hard to make Leduc a compelling
lead, calling her “a modern French girl with a
penchant for bad boys and vintage couture.”
But Black says it came as a surprise when her
editor asked if the book was the start of a
series and wanted to know where the character was headed next. “I said, ‘Of course!’ ” she
says. She decided to focus each book in one of
Paris’s 20 arrondissements, or municipal
administrative districts.
To highlight the sense of occasion around the 10th novel in the series, Soho
broke with its usual house style, publishing the title in a larger format with a
new cover treatment. Released in March, the book spent five weeks on the

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W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

San Francisco Chronicle bestseller list and has been favorably reviewed by
the New York Times and Boston Globe. Soho will be giving away copies for her
signing at Table 22 today at 10:30 a.m.
The book’s plot finds Leduc falsely implicated in the murder of her business partner, while the title refers to a famed palace and garden located
across from the Louvre. Black points to the link between the first book in the
series and the latest. “This was interesting for me, because it leads back to
the first book. The repercussions come back, with the return of a character
Aimée put in prison,” explains Black.
And with the series’ 11th novel, Murder in Passy, already set for next
March, Black doesn’t see herself running out of topics to explore in the
streets of Paris’s many neighborhoods during the 1990s—a time when France
was confronting issues from its past and looking toward a future in the European Union.
“Every book comes from something real, an issue that was in the news at
the time,” says Black. “You can never get away from the past. I’m fascinated
—Gwenda Bond
with how the past affects the present.”

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5/7/2010 1:45:22 PM

Sylvia
Browne
Helped by Angels
In her new book, Psychic: My Life in
Two Worlds (HarperOne, June), bestselling author Sylvia Browne (Life on
the Other Side, NAL Trade, 2002)
focuses not on public predictions
but much more on personal revelations—her three divorces, her bouts
of depression, her legal
battles, and
her grief over
the loss of her
father and
grandmother,
who shared
Browne’s
belief in
angels, spirits, and other
supernatural
beings.
“I asked my
spirit guide years ago why I have to
go through all of the things that I
have been through,” Browne tells
Show Daily. “She said, if I didn’t go
through them I wouldn’t be able to
help other people. So I wanted this
to be a book about survival. I wanted
to say that after the bad things there
are also good things.”
There were many bad things, as
the book details. Her first marriage
was marred by domestic violence,
and her second ended when she
was bankrupted by her husband’s
investment fraud. “Never before or
since have I been so devastated, so
frightened, and more humiliated,”
Browne writes. Her third marriage,
to a business partner, ended in infidelity (his).
But there were good things as
well—angels she believes rescued
her from near-death experiences,
ghosts she believes she has helped
to “the Other Side,” deep friendships with Montel Williams and
other celebrities, and a fourth marriage to a jewelry salesman that she
describes as happy.
The one constant, as Browne tells
her story, is her belief in her gifts
and her desire to use them to help

© Joan Allen

52

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

AUTHORS

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

53

others. “I know it
is from God,” she
says of what she
sees as her power
to communicate
with ghosts,
angels, doppelgängers and other spirits. “If I did not know it came from God, I
would give it up. He wants us to have an insight into the other side because it
helps us understand what we are here to learn. It gives us hope.”
Browne, considered a psychic and spiritual teacher by many, will sign
—Kimberly Winston
books today, 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., at Table 26.

bit at the offer and began “pounding the pavement,” as he calls it, to sell A
Door in the Woods. “I’m glad I went through it all, making school visits and
doing signings where I sold only two or three books. I worked my tail off,” he
recalls. “Now it’s fun to tell that story at conferences.”
Next up is the third book in the Maze Runner trilogy. Then, Dashner says,
“I already have two or three other ideas. I’ll probably decide around Christmas what to do next.” In the meantime, Dashner and his family are planning
a post-BEA trip to Georgia, where he grew up: “We’ll visit family and relax—
—Shannon Maughan
we’re all looking forward to that.”

James Dashner

Returns to the YA Realm

A Challenging Start

The lives of two teenage girls—one from present-day Brooklyn, the other from
late 19th-century Paris—intersect in Revolution, Jennifer Donnelly’s first YA
novel in more than six years. Her earlier work of fiction for young adults, A
Northern Light, was a Printz Honor book and won the Carnegie Medal in the U.

AT THE S H OW

Jennifer Donnelly

Authors often say that fictional characters have a way of taking on a life and
a voice of their own, inside their creator’s imagination. James Dashner
knows the feeling well. “Unless
you’re a writer, you would think
we’re psycho,” he jokes. Clearly, the
voices of Thomas and the other
“Gladers” who star in Dashner’s
2009 dystopian thriller, The Maze
Runner, still have plenty to say.
IN-BOOTH AUTHOR SIGNING AND GALLEY GIVEAWAYS
Fans will get a taste of what that is
when Dashner signs sneak peek
excerpts from the second in the
Thursday, May 27th
Wednesday, May 26th
Maze Runner trilogy, The Scorch
Trials (Delacorte, Oct.) at the Ran9:00 AM
9:00 AM
Galley Giveaway:
Galley Giveaway:
dom House Children’s Books booth
Carry the Rock, Jay Jennings (Rodale)
The Lost and Forgotten
(431) today, 9–10 a.m.
Languages of Shanghai,
Following that, 11–11:30 a.m., the
9:30 AM
Galley
Giveaway:
author will be at Table 10, signing
Ruiyan Xu (St. Martin’s Press)
Fame, Tom Payne (Picador)
the Aladdin paperback editions of
Galley Giveaway:
the first two books in his 13th RealGalley Giveaway:
Burn, Nevada Barr
ity series, The Journal of Curious
Molly Fox’s Birthday,
(Minotaur Books)
Letters and The Hunt for Infinity.
Deirdre Madden (Picador)
The hardcover edition of book
10:00 AM Galley Giveaway:
three, The Blade of Shattered Hope,
10:00 AM Galley Giveaway:
published by Shadow Mountain, hit
Rogue Island, Bruce deSilva (Forge Books)
The Holy Thief, William Ryan (Minotaur Books)
shelves last month.
Galley Giveaway:
Dashner notes that The Scorch
10:30 AM In-Booth Author Signings:
Still Missing, Chevy Stevens
Trials “picks up just four hours after
Beth Bernobich, Passion Play (Tor Books)
(St. Martin’s Press)
The Maze Runner ends, so it’s a very,
very direct sequel.” In the latest
11:00 AM Galley Giveaway:
10:30 AM In-Booth Author Signings:
adventure, the Gladers are on a
Halo, Alexandra Adornetto (Feiwel & Friends)
Alyson Noël, Radiance (Square Fish)
mission to cross the Scorch, a
Galley
Giveaway:
wasteland filled with people called
Hold Me Closer, Necromancer, Lish McBride
Cranks who have been ravaged by a
11:00 AM Galley Giveaway:
disease that drives those infected
(Henry Holt Books for Young Readers)
By Nightfall, Michael Cunningham
insane. “Readers start to find out
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
why the Gladers are being put
11:30 AM In-Booth Author Signings:
through these trials,” says the
Galley Giveaway:
Paul Auster, Sunset Park (Henry Holt)
author.
City of Tranquil Light,
2:00 PM
Dashner went through some triIn-Booth Author Signings:
Bo Caldwell (Henry Holt)
als of his own on the way to being
Lane Smith, It’s a Book (Roaring Brook Press)
published.
Galley Giveaway:
11:30 AM In-Booth Author Signings:
Roughly 10
Twilight Forever Rising, Lena Meydan
Ntozake Shange, Some Sing, Some Cry
years ago,
(Tor
Books)
(St. Martin’s Press)
when he got
serious about
3:00 PM
In-Booth Author Signings:
In-Booth Author Signings:
2:00 PM
writing,
Ian
Frazier,
Travels
in
Siberia
Dashner says
Deborah Coonts, Wanna Get Lucky?
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
he entered
(Forge Books)
into a conGalley Giveaway:
Galley Giveaway:
tract with a
Mothers & Other Liars, Amy Bourret
Halo, Alexandra Adornetto
small pub(St. Martin’s Griffin)
(Feiwel & Friends)
lisher in his
Galley
Giveaway:
home state of
Galley Giveaway:
A Secret Kept, Tatiana de Rosnay
Utah, to pubHold Me Closer, Necromancer,
(St. Martin’s Press)
lish a fantasy
Lish McBride (Henry Holt Books
novel for kids. The house, Cedar
for Young Readers)
4:00 PM
Galley Giveaway:
Fort, specialized in religion publishing and asked Dashner to pay some
Jews and Money, Abraham H. Foxman
of the costs for producing the book,
(Palgrave Macmillan)
as it was a risky venture for them.
*Please note: Only a limited quantity of galleys are available for signings and giveaways, and will be distributed on a first-come, first serve basis. Author signings will last 30 minutes (or until galleys run out).
Eager to make his mark, Dashner
© Mitchell Reichler

COME VISIT US AT BOOTH #3953

Junior.indd 1

5/12/2010 5:52:43 PM

56

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

MEET Blossom
and Rocky—two very
sneaky sheep and

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

K. Delacorte will publish Revolution in September with a 250,000-copy first printing.
Her new novel was long in the making. Its
genesis dates back a decade, when a New York
Times article grabbed Donnelly’s attention—
and refused to let go. Accompanied by a photo
of a small human heart inside an old, etchedglass urn, the account revealed that DNA tests
had just confirmed that the heart belonged to
the son of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, who after his parents’ executions
remained imprisoned until he eventually went
mad and died at the age of 10.
“The dauphin was heir to the throne and was
considered a huge threat by the revolutionaries,” says the author. “Since Robespierre
couldn’t order him to be executed, he let hunger, neglect, and disease do the
job for him. The article really upset me, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it
and wondering how this awful thing could happen to a fragile, innocent
child—how did the Revolution devolve into such cruelty?”
Though she “recognized that feeling I get when a book is starting up inside
of me,” Donnelly was facing deadlines for other books (she’s also written
adult novels The Tea Rose and The Winter Rose) and time passed. After her
daughter was born six years ago, the cruel treatment of the young dauphin
began to haunt her all the more.
The author reports that Revolution was the most difficult book she’s ever
written. “I struggled on many levels,” she recalls. “Wrapping my head around
the Revolution was very daunting. And the two characters [from the Revolutionary period and today] were warring for control of the book. I finally
stepped back, surrendered, and gave the book to both of them. I discovered
that I could combine both voices into a single cohesive narrative through the
diary of the Revolution-era girl, which the contemporary girl finds.”
Donnelly says, “I can’t wait to reconnect with people in the YA world” at
BEA. She’ll have multiple chances: the author is participating in today’s YA
Authors Crossing Over panel, 11–11:50 a.m. at the Downtown Stage, as well
as signing Revolution ARCs at the Random House Children’s Books booth
(4341), 1:30–2:30 p.m.
—Sally Lodge
© Doug Dundas

STARS of

W E E K LY

coming this fall
from Lerner Publishing Group

MEET Chris
Monroe,
author and
illustrator of

Sneaky Sheep,
today from
2:00-2:30pm in the
autographing area.

Carlos Eire

Meet all of our authors and illustrators

and get

FREE books in the Autographing Area:
• Floyd Cooper,
Coretta Scott King Award-winner and
illustrator of Ruth and the Green Book
Wednesday, May 26, 1:00-1:30pm

• Stacia Deutsch,
author of Hot Pursuit
Wednesday, May 26, 2:00-2:30pm

• Steve Brezenoff,
author of The Absolute Value of -1
Wednesday, May 26, 4:30-5:00pm

• Colleen AF Venable,
author of the Guinea PIG,
Pet Shop Private Eye series
Thursday, May 27, 3:30-4:00pm

Visit us in B

ooth #23
62
and regist
e
r
four sets o to WIN one of
Carolrhoda f ou™r new
The Absolu Lab YA titles—
(signed by te Value of -1
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ar

The Freak

k, and
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www.lernerbooks.com

1_2 vertical.indd 1

It’s been 40 years since Carlos Eire left his Cuban homeland, yet not a day
goes by that this award-winning author and renowned professor says he
does not still feel like an exile.
“Anyone who can’t go back to the place where they were born is definitely
an exile,” Eire tells Show Daily. “If the people who run the place where you
were born declared you an enemy of the state, you are definitely an exile.”
That’s what happened after the publication of Eire’s first memoir, Waiting
for Snow in Havana (Free Press, 2003), which covered his idyllic, pre-Castro
childhood. The book won the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 2003, and
Eire, a professor of history and religious studies at Yale, now continues his
story in Learning to Die in Miami (Free Press, Nov.), which he will autograph
today, 3–4 p.m., at Table 6.
The first book covers the first four years of the young Eire’s life after being
airlifted out of Cuba as part of Operation Pedro Pan, in which 14,000 Cuban
children were relocated to the U.S. Eire details how he went from foster
home to foster home, each move feeling like a death and rebirth as he tried
to remake himself without his parents, who were prevented from leaving
Castro’s Cuba.
Waiting for Snow struck deep with readers, something Eire attributes not
to his own special story but to the power of childhood memories. “That is
something we all share, regardless of our culture,” he says. ‘In childhood, all the big questions come up, about life and love and justice
and suffering. In the book, they are posed as a
child might pose them, but also as a 50-year-old
might reflect on them.”
He continues asking those questions in
Learning to Die in Miami, which takes him to
the cusp of adulthood. “Spiritually, the book is
about the wonders of loss,” Eire says. “Loss is
not all negative. There is much to be gained
from loss. We all have to repeatedly shed part
of ourselves and become new selves, and that is
something that happens repeatedly in adolescence.”
—Kimberly Winston

5/7/2010 12:52:21 PM

© Jerry Bauer

He Can’t Go Home Again

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS
AT THE S H OW

Gary Hart
Past
and Present
It’s quite an understatement when a University
of Colorado professor named Gary Hart
explains that he wrote his memoirs, Thunder
and the Sunshine: Four Seasons in a Burnished
Life (Fulcrum, Sept.) because he considers that
he’s had an “interesting life,” filled with “rare”
and “unique” experiences. Perhaps, he says,
his life-long odyssey through the political
realm may make an “important contribution”
to history. After all, Hart’s story reads almost
like one of the four political thrillers he’s written under a pseudonym: he served as Sen.
George McGovern’s campaign manager in the
1972 presidential campaign, investigated ties between organized crime and
the CIA during the 12 years he served in the U.S. Senate, and ran for president of the United States in 1984 and again in 1988—only to have his campaign derailed by scandal.
While Hart’s name still evokes in most people memories of the 1988 “Monkey Business” affair that essentially destroyed any possibility that he might
ever become president, it’s obvious in Thunder and the Sunshine, as well as
in conversation with Hart, that the dashed hopes of the 1984 presidential
race weigh upon him just as much as, if not more than, the pain and embarrassment of his aborted 1988 campaign.
More than 25 years later, Hart remains surprised that he emerged from
relative obscurity to become the main challenger to former vice-president
Walter Mondale during the 1984 primaries. It was a hotly contested race for
the nomination between the two—the closest in two generations—that went
all the way to the Democratic Party’s national convention in San Francisco.
Insisting to this day that he would have had a better chance of running a
close race against the incumbent—President Ronald Reagan—than his
opponent did, Hart says that he lost the nomination to Mondale because he
failed to persuade “older” Democrats that it was “time to change the direction of the party.”
It was a “generational struggle,” Hart recalls, between the party establishment and “newer” Democrats—much like the hard-fought battle for the
nomination between Sen. Hillary Clinton and then senator Barack Obama in
2008. Comparing his own unsuccessful bid for the nomination to Obama’s
successful campaign, Hart says that Obama succeeded where Hart had
failed because Obama was “a much better candidate” and because the Internet allowed him to raise a lot of money.
Hart will sign galley copies of Thunder and the Sunshine at Table 7 today,
—Claire Kirch
10:30–11:30 am.

Rick Springfield
The Road after Jessie’s Girl
When the pop/rock classic “Jessie’s Girl” rocketed to #1 in the early 1980s, it put singer/songwriter Rick Springfield on the celebrity fast
track. In 1982 he won a Grammy Award for Best
Male Vocal Performance and played the character of Dr. Noah Drake on the hit TV soap
opera General Hospital. Though Springfield
was riding the high of success, he was also battling depression, a condition that had plagued
him since his teenage years.
The good news for loyal Springfield fans, and
there are many, is that he has just written a
memoir titled Late, Late at Night (Touchstone
Fireside, Oct.). A candid look at the highs and
lows of celebrity along with his struggle with depression, Springfield insists
he did not write a depressing book, but instead wanted to share a journey he
believes many can relate to. He says writing the book was “an amazing and
fun experience,” and the book contains a lot of humor and wisdom. “It is
funny and moving.... I think it is a very human story.”
As to the creative process, Springfield says while at school he always
thought he would be a writer “because it’s the only subject I was ever any
good in.” Though his English teachers encouraged him, he eventually chose

W E E K LY

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

57

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

AUTHORS

to write music
instead. Today he
maintains a busy
touring schedule, does acting
guest spots and
even has his own celebrity cruise. “I love what I do and am very happy to still
be working and making productive things, especially when they break new
ground.”
Late, Late at Night (taken from a line in “Jessie’s Girl”) encompasses both
new and old ground for Springfield, who admits it was a “revelation” to rediscover his voice as a writer.
Springfield is making his debut appearance at BEA today, something he
says he has been looking forward to. “I am very excited about the BEA. It is
like going to a record industry event, but this is a whole new thing for me.”
An admitted bibliophile, one of his favorite things to do is to wander into a
bookstore and pick out new books. “Though I was a terrible student, I have
always been an avid reader—that, and traveling, were my education.”
He will be interviewed today by Jim Fusilli, novelist and pop critic for the
Wall Street Journal, on the BEA Stage starting at 10 a.m. He will later be signing a specially designed Late, Late at Night brochure (with a music CD) at the
Simon and Schuster Booth (3940), 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
—Karen Jones

AT THE S H OW

Juan Gómez-Jurado
Beauty, Bullets, Bombs, & More
Expectations for The Moses Expedition, a novel predicated on a search for
the Bible’s lost Ark of the Covenant, can be summed up in two words: summer blockbuster.
Simon & Schuster’s Atria imprint has adjusted its publication plans with
hopes that this thriller from a 32-year-old Spaniard, Juan Gómez-Jurado, will
make a big splash at the beach. Originally planned as a spring paperback,
The Moses Expedition is now slated to go on sale as a hardcover August 3.

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

“Our sales team said, ‘You’re selling this too
short,’ ” said David Brown, deputy director of
publicity at Atria. “ ‘This needs to be hardcover.
This needs to be out during the thriller-reading
time of year. This needs to be on the beach.’ ”
High hopes are based on the author’s previous success. Gómez-Jurado’s first novel, God’s
Spy, has sold more than 1.5 million copies. The
Moses Expedition has already been a bestseller
in Europe. Gómez-Jurado isn’t shy about his
ambition to see the book inspire a suspenseful
Hollywood movie.
“The Moses Expedition is a very powerful
novel from a visual point of view, with chases in
the Jordanian desert or shootings in high-tech
New York buildings,” Gómez-Jurado writes via e-mail in response to a question about whether he has moviemaking goals. “So let’s cross our fingers!”
Gómez-Jurado’s visit to BEA signals his publisher’s big ambitions. While
other authors might sign autographs at a booth for an hour or two, Atria is
making Gómez-Jurado available at booth 3909 for every minute that the
Expo is open. Brochures and advance reading copies will be available.
In The Moses Expedition, a CIA operative and member of the Vatican’s
secret service finds a fragment of an ancient map that points to the Ark and
the original Ten Commandments tablets. This discovery sets off a wild hunt
in the Jordanian desert as clues beckon archeologists, armed guards, a tenacious reporter, and a knockout Israeli doctor. Advance publicity on the book
promises “an explosive, satisfying end.”
Readers interested in religious trappings may find a bit more than beauty,
bullets, and bombs in these pages. “The core question in the book is: how
does your contract with God affect your daily life?” Gómez-Jurado writes in
an e-mail. “For Christians, that can be to attend church on Sunday. For a radical Muslim terrorist, it can be detonate a bomb in a car or crash a plane. In
the book, all [these] perspectives appear together.”
—G. Jeffrey MacDonald
© Katuxa Otero

58

Zen and
the Art of
Maintaining
Your
Nest Egg
“The best investment you can
make today is to buy this book!”
Michael J. Gelb, bestselling author of
How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci
and Innovate Like Edison
Business & Economics/Investing
ISBN 13: 978-1-59079-206-3
240 pages, October 2010
Hardcover, $24.95 US

Part of the Midpoint Trade Books
group at booth #4404

1_2 hor.indd 1

5/13/2010 7:04:07 PM

Over $2,500,000,000
US dollars generated for the publishing industry
U
U
U

19 New York Times bestsellers

Over 100 international bestseller lists

Works translated into over 70 languages
U Distribution
U

in over 150 nations

Four Author Guinness World Records

© 2010 Author Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

60

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

Godine’s First 40 Years
It may not have
seemed like an auspicious start—several recent college
graduates with
some experience in
printing books and a
cow barn in Brookline, Mass. But this
year David R. Godine, Publisher, is
celebrating its first 40 years and still
going strong, or as Godine puts it,
“doing what I’ve always done, which
is screw up.”
Maybe. Godine discovered 2008
Nobel Prize laureate J.M.G. Le
Clézio, as well as John Banville,

Georges Perec, and
Andre Dubus. His children’s list includes
authors and illustraAsk about
tors Mary Azarian,
Godine’s lecture Barbara McClintock,
tour.
and Daniel Beard. And
he published the first photography
books of Sally Mann, Rosamond Purcell, and Arnold Newman. Plus
Godine is one of the few literary
houses known for publishing wellmade books to have one of its books
featured in Playboy, being read by a
Playmate. As a result or in spite of it,
William Gass’s On Being Blue sold

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

nearly 30,000 copies.
“Most interesting,” says Godine,
“that book was really a gift thrown
our way by Bob Gottlieb at Knopf.
Before the days of on-demand publishing, publishers would call us
because they couldn’t print enough
copies or they wanted to retain the
license. So we have all four volumes
of Orwell’s essays from Harcourt
Brace. We did a lot of books with Bantam, which wanted a hardcover publisher for Jorge Amado and for a
wonderful book by Irving Howe
called Short Shorts.”
But the press’s two top-sellers
Godine and his staff found on their
own. Peter Bowler’s The Superior

Person’s Book of Words, which
Godine and George Gibson (now
head of Bloomsbury USA) bought at
Frankfort for $500, has gone on to sell
600,000 copies. Bill Goodman bought
The American Boy’s Handbook for
even less; it was in the public domain.
Although Godine calls it “the ugliest
book on our list,” it has sold close to a
million copies.
As part of the 40th anniversary celebration, booksellers can pick up
40th anniversary buttons and
Godine’s new fall catalogue at the
booth (3734), which has a cover illustration by Glenna Lang of Godine
setting type. One of several books
Godine will be promoting at the
show—the 38th BEA he has attended—
is his own upcoming fall release,
Godine at Forty, a retrospective of
the press’s history from handpress to
—Judith Rosen
offset publisher.

Music, Food & More

Visit us for a
chance to win a
limited edition
signed galley.*

WE WALK AMONG YOU AT BOOTH #3340!
www.iamnumberfourfans.com
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*While supplies last
5/7/2010 6:06:18 PM

The BookMasters Group is featuring
a wide range of books at BEA and has
some special entertainment lined up
to attract attendees to its booth
(3040).
In-booth activities kick off today
with a signing by Sid Phillips at 10 a.m.
promoting his May book, You’ll Be
Sor-ree!—a memoir that tells the personal story that inspired Tom Hanks
and Steven Spielberg’s 2010 HBO
miniseries The Pacific.
Two of the distributor’s biggest
titles bring powerhouse musicians
and their music to the children’s
book scene. This afternoon, legendary songwriter Neil Sedaka will be
on hand to promote his new picture
book, Waking Up Is Hard to Do
(Sept.), a companion to his bestselling children’s CD released last year.
Sedaka will sign copies of an exclusive CD made for BEA featuring new
tunes, 1–3 p.m.
Noel Paul Stookey and Peter Yarrow of the group Peter, Paul, and
Mary will undoubtedly draw a crowd
of their own at the booth tomorrow.
They are at BEA
to support a
new picture
book version of
The Night Before
Christmas
(Oct.), which
comes with an
accompanying
Food & book giveaways.
three-track
musical and narrative that includes
Clement C. Moore’s tale set to the
music of Peter and Noel Paul with a
reading by Mary Travers and the
classic Peter, Paul, and Mary holiday
favorite “A Soalin’.” The book will
ship with a 100,000-copy first printing.
Also tomorrow, Chad Carns, a private chef and author of a debut cookbook, The Gourmet Bachelor, in 2009,
will be on hand to do a cooking demonstration, serving tuna ceviche at
the booth between 3 and 4 p.m.
—Gwenda Bond

62

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

AMP Says, ‘Give ’em Art’
Andrews McMeel is celebrating
its 40th birthday this year. It’s
booksellers, however, who are
getting the presents. Not only is
the press handing out Posh Puzzle books at its booth (3559), but
AMP’s most popular cartoonists
and illustrators—Garry Trudeau
(Doonesbury), Tom Wilson
(Ziggy), and James Gurney (Dinotopia)—will be on hand to give out
more goodies.
Trudeau, who was discovered by
AMP 40 years ago, and became the
house’s first syndicated cartoonist,
will be making a rare public
appearance, dropping in at BEA
this afternoon. He will sign limited
edition lithographs inspired by
AMP’s fall release, 40: A Doonesbury Retrospective, which hits
bookstores October 26. Trudeau
will be signing at Table 15, 1–2 p.m.,
and in AMP’s booth, 2:30–3:30 p.m.
Wilson will sign Ziggy lithographs
featuring the cover of his latest cartoon collection, Ziggy Goes for Broke
(Apr.) today, in the autographing
area, Table 1, 11 a.m.–noon, and in
the AMP booth, 1–2 p.m.
Gurney is coming to BEA to sign

Color and Light posters inspired by his
second art instruction book, Color and
Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter
(Nov.). Gurney, the author and illustrator of the bestselling Dinotopia books,
about a lost world populated by dinosaurs, will sign posters tomorrow at
Table 18, 11–11:30 a.m., and in the booth
(#3559), 1–1:30 p.m.
And for those who would like
cake (because what’s a birthday

Paying It Forward... with Love
Ask booksellers or publishers what
accounts for the vitality of the
romance genre and you’ll get a wide
variety of opinions—the legions of
devoted fans; hardworking, talented
authors; the public’s desire for
escapism in tough times. Bestselling
author Cathy Maxwell offers a more
intriguing reason—generosity of
spirit. “When you come up to a
romance writer and tell them you’re
writing a book, they’ll all take time to
hear your story and answer your
questions. Romance writers believe
in paying it forward.”
For Maxwell, her “pay it forward”
was Kensington author Christine
Dorsey. In 1991, Maxwell went to

hear her speak at a small library in
Midlothian, Va. Afterwards, she
approached Dorsey, confessed her
desire to write romance novels, and
was given a few specific must-dos:
among them, join the RWA and
attend an upcoming conference.
Maxwell promptly signed up for the
conference as well as a workshop in
which Judith French, Kathleen Kirkwood, and Colleen Faulkner would
evaluate 10 pages of manuscript submitted by aspiring writers. “Mine
was set during the Revolutionary
War and probably some of the worst
writing known to man,” laughs Maxwell, “but Kathleen French read my
pages and told the group, ‘this per-

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

party without cake?) you might
score the next best thing from the
good people at AMP: a book about
cakes and other desserts. Booth
visitors can enter a drawing for a
Bon Appétit gift basket, in honor of
the November release of Bon Appétit
Desserts, a collection of 600 delectable recipes compiled by Barbara
Fairchild, editor-in-chief of Bon
—Claire Kirch
Appétit magazine.

son has talent.’ ”
Inspired and
encouraged, Maxwell set to work and
in 1993 sold her first
book, All Things
Beautiful. “Stories
like these,” says
Maxwell, “are so
Maxwell’s helping hands.
common in the
romance genre. You don’t write
romance unless you believe in the
idea of community and relationships.”
Today Maxwell will be signing
copies of The Earl Claims a Wife
(Avon) at the RWA booth (3484), at
9:30, and tomorrow, she signs copies of The Marriage Ring (Avon) at 2
—Lucinda Dyer
p.m., Table 23.

WINNER OF 23 BOOK AWARDS!
What every parent sending a
child to college needs to know

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1_4 vertical.indd 1

5/7/2010 11:17:40 AM
1_4 vertical.indd 1

5/7/2010 1:55:11 PM

Military HISTORY AT ITS FINEST
MEET OUR AUTHORS
978-1-935149-28-6 • $32.95 • Hardback

978-1-935149-22-4 • $32.95 • Hardback

OUR
CO-EXHIBITORS
As well as our own
acclaimed publishing,
Casemate is the
leading US distributor
of history publishers
from around the
world.
This year we are
joined by the
following distribution
client publishers:
Pen and Sword
Books
Britain’s leading
military history
publisher;

Mike Guardia – American Guerrilla
Wednesday, Casemate booth, 3.00–4.00pm

John Sparry – Jump Commander
Thursday, Casemate booth, 11.00–12.00am

Savas Beatie
America’s primary
Civil War publisher;
TAJ Books
Specialist books for
the promotional
market.
Stop by to find what’s
new in the world of
history publishing.
SHOW SPECIAL:
50% DISCOUNT
ON ALL ORDERS
– NO MINIMUMS

978-1-932033-93-9 • $32.95 • Hardback

978-1-935149-24-8 • $32.95 • Hardback

978-1-935149-00-2 • $32.95 • Hardback

VISIT US AT BOOTH 3358
REMEMBER, RESPECT, READ

64

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

A Mutual Admiration Society

1_2 hor.indd 1

© Joanne Chan

Acclaimed writer and physician
Abraham Verghese is receiving the
2010 Indies Choice Award for Best
Adult Fiction Book of the Year at
today’s Celebration of Bookselling
Luncheon for his first novel, Cutting
for Stone (Knopf, Vintage), about a
pair of twins orphaned by their
mother’s death and abandoned by
their surgeon father. The author
began his relationship with booksellers in 1994 during the tour for
his first book, My Own Country, an
autobiographical rendering of his
being a doctor in the heart of an
AIDS epidemic in rural Tennessee.
“I recall that being somewhat of a
lonely book tour—but what I do
remember is the wonderful warmth
of the independent booksellers.”
Russell Perreault, v-p and director
of publicity for Vintage and Anchor
Books, notes that Verghese made a
point of developing relationships with
independent booksellers. “His
paperback bookstore tour was more
like meeting with old friends. In fact,
in some cities, we had to carefully
arrange readings, luncheons, and
teas to accommodate all the booksellers who were eager to see him.”

Francisco’s
Book Passage. The
Verghese attributes
author
the success of his novel
couldn’t
to the kind of word of
imagine who
mouth that can only
would show
come from independent
up at a readbooksellers. He cites
ing on a
Verghese has high praise for booksellers.
Betsy Burton at the
beautiful
King’s English in Salt Lake City and
Saturday afternoon, but the place
her efforts for his paperback tour. “I
was packed. To his surprise, just as
had no idea the kind of crowd she
he was being introduced, a gentlewould generate for the reading.”
man tapped him on the shoulder
Another early champion of his
before he walked on stage and said,
novel was Elaine Petrocelli at San
‘Hi, I’m Michael Ondaatje, and I

Happy 10th to Cedar Cove
Cedar Cove, the small Pacific coast
town created by Debbie Macomber,
is turning 10 this year—that’s 10 in
publishing years. “Like all great fictional towns,” says Harlequin publisher/CEO Donna Hayes, “Cedar
Cove seems as though it’s always
existed. It’s hard to imagine that
Debbie Macomber’s first Cedar
Cove novel, 16 Lighthouse Road,
debuted in 2000.” And while Cedar
Cove’s populace may be small, its
impact on the publishing world has
been anything but modest. “It’s not
only the most successful series of

books in the history of Mira Books
but also in Harlequin Enterprises’
six-plus decades,” reports Hayes.
“The seventh book in the series, 74
Seaside Avenue, was the first Harlequin Enterprises title to top the New
York Times, USA Today, and Publishers Weekly bestseller lists.” The
series has also spawned a restaurant, the bestselling Debbie
Macomber’s Cedar Cove Cookbook,
and a five-day Cedar Cove festival
in Macomber’s hometown of Port
Orchard, Wash., last September.
The newest entry in the Cedar

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

came to listen to you.’”
The busy author continues to juggle demanding careers as a writer,
and as a physician and teacher at
the Stanford University School of
Medicine. “I feel tremendously
privileged to be a physician. It’s
awesome that you can be in this
position where you can be with people at their most dramatic and dangerous moments. If you can’t help
them, you are at least committed to
being there with them on their journey. To me the writing always has
emanated from seeing the world in
—Hilary S. Kayle
this fashion.”

Cove series, 1022
Evergreen Place,
will hit bookstores
in September and
continues the stories of Mary Jo
Wyse and her
infant daughter.
Debbie Macomber will be signing
copies of both 92 Pacific Boulevard
and Debbie Macomber’s Cedar Cove
Cookbook today, 10–10:45 a.m., at
the Harlequin booth (3922). She will
be signing Hannah’s List tomorrow,
10:30–11:30 a.m., at Table 25 in the
autographing area. —Lucinda Dyer

5/12/2010 6:22:40 PM

66

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

What Jane Jacobs Saw
Urban activist and preservationist Jane Jacobs, a
hero to many city dwellers, died in 2006, a month
shy of her 90th birthday,
but her spirit lives on,
especially in New York,
her home of choice for
many years. It’s no exaggeration that Jacobs
would relish the continued vitality of Greenwich Village,
which she is credited with saving from
destruction by highway development;
the High Line, recently reclaimed
from abandoned train tracks up Manhattan’s mid–West Side; the islands of
cafe tables and chairs lining Broadway
in midtown; and the proposed (and
likely) creation of a pedestrian plaza
on 34th Street between Herald Square
and the Empire State Building at Fifth
Avenue.
Jacobs was a fierce champion of
urban livability, and her ideas—the
importance of community involvement, the critical role of public
transportation, the value of “eyes”
on the street—have found ardent
defenders around the world.
“Jane Jacobs had no degrees in
city planning or economics, but her

book, The Death and
Life of Great American
Cities [published in
1961 and never out of
print], has reached
beyond city planning to
influence the spirit of
the times,” says Lynne
Elizabeth, director of
the nonprofit New Village Press and one of
the editors of What We See: Advancing the Observations of Jane Jacobs
(New Village Press, May).
The idea for What We See originated with the Jacobs-oriented

W E E K LY

Center for the Living City as a celebration honoring Jacobs, but the
book took on a different form under
Elizabeth’s guidance. “I thought
Jane would not have wanted a book
about her,” Elizabeth says, noting
that two histories centering on her
and a biography have recently been
published. “Instead, we invited people from diverse fields to write their
own ideas about how things work
and describe the systems they see
operating now and into the future.”
Among the pundits, community
members, and developers who contributed essays is Janette SadikKhan, the commissioner of the New
York City Department of Transporta-

A DNA Test for a Queen?
Could the mummy of a Sumerian
queen discovered at the Royal Tombs
at Ur actually hold evidence that she
was a descendant of alien visitors to
earth? In his new book, There Were
Giants Upon the Earth: Gods, Demigods and Human Ancestry: The Evidence of Alien DNA, Zecharia Sitchin
explains how Anunnaki space travelers, the giants depicted in ancient
Sumerian texts, first inhabited the
Earth and how the Anunnaki created

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

modern man
by combining their own advanced DNA
with that of the primitive hominids inhabiting our planet.
Sitchin believes the bones
of Queen Puabi could reveal
the DNA differences that
represent our genetic “missing link.” But London’s Natural History Museum continues to refuse his
request for DNA testing. Never one
to back down from a challenge, the
now 90-year-old Sitchin has begun a

Wisdom Publications

tion, who writes, “In so many ways,
the intellectual DNA of our work to
create more sustainable streets can
be found in The Death and Life of
Great American Cities.”
To see the townhouse where
Jacobs lived, take a stroll down to
555 Hudson Street (the building
sold in 2009 for $3.3 million); one of
her favorite haunts, the White
Horse Tavern, is nearby, at 567 Hudson Street. And to participate in or
create a Jacobs-inspired Jane’s
Walk, visit the Web site
janeswalkusa.wordpress.com.
What We See will be on exhibit in
the Consortium booth (4510,4513).
—Suzanne Mantell

petition drive that will formally request the museum
to allow a DNA extraction
from the remains of Queen
Puabi.
If you’d like to support
Sitchin in his quest for the
truth, come by the Inner
Traditions/Bear & Co.
booth (2532) and sign his petition.
Sitchin will also be signing copies of
his book today, 11 a.m.–noon, at
Table 8, and 1–2 p.m. at the booth.
—Lucinda Dyer

VISIT US AT BOOTH 4307B

Meet Award-Winning Storyteller and Author Rafe Martin
Today at 2 PM, Booth 4307B
“A sweet and sensitive story
of courage, sacrifice, and
kindness.”
—Dan Millman, author of
The Way of the Peaceful
Warrior

“A marvelous, practical book,
unlike anything else out there—
the ultimate how-to manual for
nurturing kindness and compassion.
The authors’ enthusiasm for
compassion is contagious!”
—Deborah Schoeberlein,
author of Mindful Teaching and
Teaching Mindfulness
Tana Pesso with Penor Rinpoche
Foreword by the Dalai Lama
9780861712854
256 pages | $15.95

Rafe Martin
Illustrated by Richard Wehrman
48 pages | $15.00
9780861716258
Two-color throughout; hardcover
Gift / Inspiration

FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING
HOW TO MEDITATE
“In this precious gem of a book, McDonald shows us how to open our
hearts into deepest solidarity with
others and thereby uncover our
truest selves.”—John Makransky,
author of Awakening Through Love
“Buddha at the Apocalypse is
easygoing, well written, and
solidly reasoned. I am delighted
to greet this important work.”
—from the foreword by Robert
A.F. Thurman, author of Why the
Dalai Lama Matters

“Unlimiting Mind is a rare treat.
Highly recommended.”
—Joseph Goldstein,
author of One Dharma
and A Heart Full of Peace

Kathleen McDonald
168 pages | $15.95
9780861716951

Andrew Olendzki

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200 pages | $15.95
9780861716203

Foreword by Robert A. F. Thurman
192 pages | $16.95
9780861715824

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68

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

No Glass Ceilings Here
The topic of women in the military is
always a hot one, especially with the
U.S. fighting two wars. So it isn’t surprising that David Weber’s Honor
Harrington novels, which follow the
adventures of a female naval officer
in the futuristic Star Kingdom of
Manticore, have appeared regularly
on the New York Times bestseller
lists. Mission of Honor, the 12th book
in the “Honorverse,” will be released
in July from Baen Books. Although
this is Honor’s first stand-alone book
since 2005, she also appears in two
sub-series set within the same uni-

sexes is “a done deal.”
“I’ve always been
bothered by far-future
verse: Saganami and
science fiction in which
Wages of Sin, written with
women face exactly the
Eric Flint.
same challenges they
While Honor is popuface today—where the
lar with female readers
glass ceiling is still in
from all military
place in 3200—because I
branches, Weber said he
think it both undersells
didn’t set out to comour society and women,”
ment on gender and the Weber “honors” Harrington. says Weber. “By Honor
armed forces when he began writHarrington’s time, the question of
ing her first novel, 1992’s On Basiwhether women should be equal to
lisk Station. The character, he says,
men will have all the burning signif“happened to be female” when he
icance Pharaoh’s policy to the Hitbegan writing her. Even so, in her
tites has for us.”
universe, equality between the
Along with a protagonist who

shatters the idea that women have
to, as Weber puts it, “out-testosterone men” to be successful commanders, the “Honorverse” also
shatters the notion that military
science fiction has to be a bloodbath. As a military historian, Weber
says he emphasizes the politics and
consequences of battle as strongly
as the action in star fields. The
result is a universe that bears much
in common with Europe during the
Napoleonic Wars. In fact, Weber has
said that Honor herself has a personality similar to that of British
Vice-Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson,
one of Napoleon’s most powerful
adversaries.
“I have a deep respect for the military and for people who choose that
profession as their calling,” he says.
“If I have a bias, it’s pro-military, not
anti-military. But I think if that
weren’t the case, this probably
wouldn’t be the kind of fiction I’m
writing.”
Weber will be signing Mission of
Honor this morning at 11:20 a.m., at
—JoSelle Vanderhooft
Table 21.

Personalized
Books from
RHYW

1_4 hor.indd 1

5/13/2010 6:36:36 PM

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Two-year-old large print publisher
Read How You Want is readying its
newest format, which enables the
reader to personalize just about an
entire book, from its trim size to its
font and line, word, and character
spacing. In addition, book buyers can
add a personalized dedication. This
new format also marks RHYW’s
entree into the e-book market, since
readers will be able to order personalized books as PDFs or print-ondemand editions. RHYW saves the
settings for future use, or they can be
fine-tuned.
“It’s very exciting,” says director of
publisher relations Maureen Watts.
“You’ll be able to have a book with all
the formatting you need. We have
some great technology, and there’s a
lot we can do with it now.” Although
personalized format books won’t
launch until the third quarter, RHYW
is beta-testing them at the show. The
company is offering five public
domain titles that can be personalized at the booth (3912). Showgoers
will be able to adjust the font size up
to 24 points and line spacing to triple
space. RHYW will then e-mail them a
PDF of the personalized book.
RHYW is also demoing its DAISY
(digital accessible information system) format, which enables readers
to also hear books. It is showcasing
an excerpt from Paul Harding’s
Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Tinkers, throughout BEA.
—Judith Rosen

1_4 hor.indd 1

5/13/2010 5:12:17 PM

PUBL I SHERS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

Penguin Celebrates
75 Years
The bright orange Mini Cooper
in the lobby, aka the Penguin
Books Anniversarymobile, is
just one piece of the celebration
to mark the publisher’s first 75
years. Penguin traces its birth
back to July 30, 1935, when
Allen Lane launched 10 inexpensive paperbacks. In the
midst of the Depression and the Kathryn Court with Penguin’s Mini Cooper.
growing Nazi threat, the press
ing anniversary celebration/road
sold three million copies the first
trip, literacy campaign, and Nature
year.
Conservancy benefit launched at
Today, says Penguin president
and publisher Kathryn Court, “We
may be 75 years old, but we’re
always striving to be true to Allen
Lane’s vision—to be energetic and
innovative.” Arguably, the upcom-

BEA is part of that vision, starting
with the Mini Cooper. “The Mini’s
cute and flippant, and that’s what
a Penguin is,” says v-p, director of
marketing, John Fagan, adding
that they never really considered
anything else.
The Penguinmobile’s first stop
after BEA is Edina, Minn., where
Garrison Keillor will drive it to
the first of a series of anniversary
parties to be held at bookstores
all summer long. The car will
cross the country with an assist
from driver/authors like Michael
Pollan in Berkeley, Calif., and
Nathaniel Philbrick in Nantucket,
Mass. Each will sign the car, and at

69

summer’s end Penguin will auction
the autographed Mini and donate
the proceeds to a literacy group to
be announced.
In addition, Penguin has selected
a set of 75 titles from Penguin’s
backlist that Fagan describes as
“iconic.” The titles range from 60
Seconds and You’re Hired! to Zlata’s
Diary. The names of the books are
being released one by one on a special 75th anniversary Web site. At
each anniversary event, Penguin
will donate a set of all 75 books to a
local library or literacy group and
will also donate sets to U.S. military
bases in Iraq and Afghanistan.
—Judith Rosen

Sterling Goes
Green
Sterling Publishing is teaming up
with Ecosystem to show off its green
spirit at BEA. Show attendees can
stop by Room 1A02 on the lower
level of the Javits Center to preview
samples of Ecosystem sidelines,
which include a range of notebooks
and calendars in bold colors made
of 100% postconsumer recycled
paper.
Sterling and Ecosystem will have
staff available for one-on-one consultations with retailers and members of the
media. Free
notebooks are
also available
for show attendees as long as
supplies last,
says Organic
Works publicist
Katie Hunsberger. “Though we will
have many on hand, it is possible
that they may run out at some
point, so we encourage people to
swing by when they can,” she says.
The products by Ecosystem are
designed with a sleek, modern sensibility and offer a variety of color,
size, and type combinations,
including artist (blank pages),
author (lined), advisor (calendar),
and architect (grid). All notebooks
and calendars are produced in the
U.S. using a low-impact, fair-trade–
consistent process that fits the goal
of environmental responsibility.
Consumers can visit Ecosystem
online at www.ecosystemlife.com to
learn the origin of every component in the product they buy and
how it was constructed. And if
someone loses a notebook or calendar, the Web site even offers a way
to register online with a unique ID
number that can help get it back. .

—The End —

very funny, very sad and wickedly clever. I wish I had written it.”
—Zoë Heller, author of The Believers

Meet CHARLES ELTON, author of MR. TOPPIT,
at Booth #4340, Thursday, May 27, 10 AM.
www.otherpress.com

—Gwenda Bond

Junior.indd 1

OTHER PRESS

5/12/2010 6:07:58 PM

70

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Faith Comix for All

Celebrating Viente y Cinco Años

Kingstone Media Group is “brand
new,” says Art Ayris, its chairman
and president, though the group
began doing research and development years ago on faith and the
comic industry, and has been working on production for its fall 2010 list
since 2009.
“One of the reasons we started
Kingstone is
because not many
people were playing with the faith
market for comics
and graphic novels,” says Ayris,
“and the response we’ve had from
buyers, church bookstores, and
retailers has been great—we just
signed with our first Christian chain,
Mardel.” He continues, “But this is
Kingstone’s first time at BEA and our
first foray into the general trade
market. We are featuring our debut
launch for the company and introducing titles we think are generalmarket friendly.”
This debut list features a number
of serialized comics and graphic novels, including Babylon and 2048, and

If you stop by booth
advantages of bilin4504A at 4 p.m.
gual publishing, it
today, you’ll be able
wisely heeded the
to wish the awardadvice of author
winning Cinco PunJoe Hayes, who
tos Press a happy
urged them to pub25th anniversary.
lish his book in
“We’re serving
both English and
Mexican-styled
Spanish. Now, pubEditor John Bryd and copublishers Lee
sweets, the star of
lishing bilingual
and Bobby Byrd.
which will surely be
books for children
a delicious cookie inspired by our
is the house’s specialty.
logo,” promises John Byrd, senior
Recently, Cinco Puntos
editor of the El Paso, Tex., press.
expanded its list with titles focusing
Authors Youme Landowne and
on Native American culture, such
Cynthia Weill, as well as illustrator
as Saltypie: A Choctaw Journey
Christopher Cardinale, will also be
from Darkness into Light by Chocon hand.
taw storyteller Jim Tingle. The
Lee Merrill Byrd, Cinco Puntos
house also plans to publish books
Press president, co-publisher, and
on serious topics. “We are so close
co-owner (with her husband Bobby
to Mexico,” says Lee Byrd, “that we
Byrd), tells Show Daily that what
see the results of the lengths people
the house is most proud of is that
will go to for drugs. Legalizing them
“almost without knowing it, we
might change that situation.”
seem to have made a good mirror
To that end, in September Cinco
of this culture along the U.S./MexPuntos will publish Drug Lord: The
ico border where we live. “
Life & Death of a Mexican KingpinThe press’s bestseller is La LloA True Story by Terrence Poppa, an
rona/The Weeping Woman, pubout-of-print adult title self-published in 1987. Although at the time
lished in 1990.
—Diane Patrick
Cinco Puntos didn’t understand the

what Ayris refers to as “cinematic
novels”—three of them: The Memory
Closet (Sept.), Sudan (Aug.), and
Home Grown (Sept.), all written by
Ninie Hammon.
Ayris has big plans for Kingstone,
not only this year at BEA but for Kingstone’s presence
at the trade show
in the future.
“Each year we’ll
continue to do
BEA. Even though
some of our comics are primarily
for the faith market, a fair amount
of our stuff is general trade—a lot of
our artists have worked for Marvel
and DC—and then, we are having a
lot of international meetings at BEA
as well. Riggins Rights out of Nashville is representing us internationally at the show.”
Attendees interested in checking
out Kingstone (3264) should come
by the publisher’s booth for today’s
signing by Marvin Olasky, author of
the graphic novel series 2048, 10–11
a.m., and for comic book sample
—Donna Freitas
giveaways.

DISTRIBUTION CHANGE

All signings will be held at the BEA Autographing Area

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SPORTS STORY SERIES

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Fred Bowen

1:00 – 2:00 PM
TABLE 7

2:00 – 3:00 PM
TABLE 4

THE BLUE HOUSE DOG
Adam Gustavson & Deborah Blumenthal

3:30 – 4:30 PM
TABLE 8

PLAY BALL LIKE THE PROS
TIPS FOR KIDS FROM
20 BIG LEAGUE STARS

Steven Krasner

4:00 – 5:00 PM
TABLE 7

VISIT PEACHTREE TO
1. Enter to win an
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2. Have us donate
to the ASPCA
on your behalf

Effective August 1, 2010, Getty Publications
will be distributed and sold by the University
of Chicago Press.
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5/13/2010 12:54:35 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

W E E K LY

71

Frommers’ Must-do List
Ready, set, go! You’ve got three days
to explore the greatest city in this
hemisphere (says this local, with the
understatement we New Yawkers
are known for). It’s unlikely you’ll get
to many of the city’s most famous
sites—the crown of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, the United
Nations—as those places, alas, close
when the sun sets, and you’re going
to be too busy at the BEA itself. But
here are 10 other must-dos that you
should be able to slot in, before and
after your time in the Javits Center.
Head to a Broadway or OffBroadway Show: You can’t say
you’ve been to the Big Apple without participating in a standing ovation. Surf BroadwayBox.com to
snag a discounted seat (quicker
than the line at the TKTS booth); for
show reviews, check NYTimes.com.
Stroll a Gallery at 3 a.m.: The Whitney Museum’s Biennial, its retrospective of the best American art of
the last two years, is in full swing, and
this year, from midnight Wednesday,
May 26, through 11:59 p.m. Friday,
May 29, the museum is opening its
doors for 72 hours straight. The show,
the first in its history with more
female artists than male, is a solid

one... though seeing who wanders
through at dawn may be just as interesting as the art.
Museum Hop: It’s not only the
Whitney that stays open late. The
New-York Historical Society (170
Central Park West, at 76th Street) is
featuring a popular show on the history of the Grateful Dead and doesn’t
boot out visitors until 8 p.m., Tuesday–Friday. On Thursdays, four terrific museums—The New Museum
(235 Bowery, near Stanton), the
Rubin Museum (Tibetan Art, 150 W.
17th St.), the Museum of Arts and
Design (2 Columbus Circle, between
58th and 59th streets), The Jewish
Museum (1109 Fifth Avenue, at 92nd
Street)—stay open until 9 p.m. (the
first three) and 8 p.m. (the Jewish
Museum), respectively.
Take a Walk: New York is a pedestrian’s paradise, and the best way to
view three of the city’s most iconic
stretches is on foot. Consider taking
an early morning window-shopping
expedition à la Breakfast at Tiffany’s
along Fifth Avenue (55th Street down
to 41st Street); trek across the Brooklyn Bridge as the sun rises or sets; or
get lost in Central Park for an hour or
two.

St.); succulent noodles at
Momofuku Noodle Bar
Marvel at the Sky(171 First Ave.) or Ippudo
line: Make your way
(65 Fourth Ave.); or goureither to the Brooklyn
met Malaysian food at
Promenade or hop a
Fatty Crab (643 Hudson
ferry to Staten Island
St.). These are just a few
(free). Be sure you have
of the city’s dazzling yet
a camera with you, as
affordable restaurants.
the vistas will be specJazz It Up: There’s no
tacular.
better place in the world
Get high: I’m suggestto listen to jazz. Try the
ing views, at either the
refined Jazz at Lincoln
Pauline Frommer’s Big Apple tips. Center, Harlem’s Lenox
Empire State Building
or Top of the Rock in
Lounge, or Greenwich
Rockefeller Center (not as tall, but
Village’s Blue Note or the Village
timed admissions mean you won’t be
Vanguard.
stuck in an hourlong line).
Take a busman’s holiday: Browse
Shop the Sample Sales: One of the
the “18 miles of choices” at the
few areas the Javits Center is actuStrand Bookstore (Broadway at
ally near is New York’s Garment Dis12th Street), marvel at the Beaux
trict. Pick up a copy of the magazine
Art splendor of the New York PubTime Out New York or check out
lic Library at 42nd Street, or
NYMag.com to see if any good sales
indulge your inner child with a pilare going on at the designers’ showgrimage to Books of Wonder (18 W.
rooms this week, then run out at
18th St.). There are so many options
lunchtime to score a deal.
for bibliophiles in this literate city.
—Pauline Frommer
Feast: Foodies love New York
City and for good reason: not only is
Arthur and Pauline Frommer will be
our grub amazing, it’s often quite
signing copies of NYC: Free & Dirt
reasonably priced, whether you’re
Cheap and Pauline Frommer’s New
downing wood-burning-oven–fired
York City in the Wiley booth (4141)
pizzas at John’s Pizzeria (260 W.
tomorrow, 10–11 a.m.
44th St.) or Motorino (349 E. 12th

Visit The
London B
ook Fair
Lounge o
n the 4E
Terrace
located o
ff the Cry
stal Palac
e

The London Book Fair Lounge offers a great place to
hold meetings, take a break from the show floor or
just catch up on your emails.
There will be a selection of seminar highlights from
The London Book Fair shown throughout the day so
why not join us for English Tea, served every day at
4pm, and check out the content you may have missed.
The London Book Fair Lounge is open from
Tuesday 25th May to Thursday 27th May so
come along and meet the team.

The London
Book Fair is the
global marketplace for
rights negotiation and the
sale and distribution of content
across print, audio, TV, film and
digital channels
www.londonbookfair.co.uk

sponsored by

RUSSIA
MARKET FOCUS 2011

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5/13/2010 10:54:47 AM

72

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Goodies Galore
T Well, we’ve survived another year
and are gathering with anticipation
to see what new titles await to thrill,
charm, astonish, and capture our
imaginations. It’s also an opportunity
to load up new tote bags with more
than just books. As always there is a
vast array of posters, pens, notepads,
pencils, mousepads, and more. Oh, if
you need a little nibble to keep your
energy up, you’ll also find taste treats
here and there.

Canvassing for Bags
Okay, tote bags, shopping bags and

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Design Dossier
drawstrong backpacks at Paintbox
Press (2722); at
Weldon Owen
pick up an ecoTo celebrate 25 years, Consortium Book Sales & Distribution (4510,
friendly farmers’
4513) is giving away bumper stickers to promote indie booksellers that
market canvas
say “Start Seeing Booksellers” –which marketing director Jennifer
tote bag—in limSwihart Voegele says, “is kind of a riff on the popular “Start Seeing
ited quantities
Motorcycles” bumper stickers.
carryalls are in abundance this
(4251); Sandra
year—check out these booths to
Boynton tote bags (limited edition)
make your selection: Abbeville
are at Workman (4259, 4359); Raven
Press will have totes and chocoTree Press provides tote bags with
lates (4215); Appalachian Trail
books to the first 100 booth visitors
Press adds note pads as well (4533);
(2666);
Lonely Planet Publications offers
Robert Kennedy Publishing will
canvas bags and buttons (3371); get
give out the Eat-Clean Diet shopping

bag with a book purchase (3777); zippered totes are the thing at Moody
Publishers (3635, 4950); try Soho
Press for totebags (4505); Running
Press offers Hello Kitty tote bags
(4235). More bags: Blue Apple Books
(2641); DK (3553, 3641); Thunder Bay
Press (3223); Headline Books (3164);
Portable Press (3223); Kodansha
(4742); Duke Univ. Press (3727); Silver
Dolphin (3223), and more.

Stuff for the Store
Check out Anthology, where you
can pick up a bar code scanner
($255 value) with a Visual Anthology
software purchase (2634); two free
displays of E-Z Books will be given
away at Barron’s Educational
Series (3240, 3241); at Ben Bella
Books, pick up a “Smart Pop Books”
sampler (1411, 1412).
MP3-CDs (various) are the attraction at Blackstone Audio (3980);
they’ll be giving out MP3-CDs at inbooth signings at Brilliance Audio
(3977); Hachette Audio (Hachette
Book Group) will give out audio
download cards (3746); Sounds
True offers meditation and healing
music sampler CDs (3848).

Eating Opportunities

Come to booth #4251
to win an
eco-friendly tote bag.
Drawings daily!

Simon & Schuster
Order Dept
1 800 223 2336

Stock your pantry with fresh titles from
1_4 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 3:44:45 PM

At some point, you’ll be feeling
ready for a nibble of this and a taste
of that, and a boost of sugar will
perk up your possibly flagging
energy level. Check out Chronicle
Books for gluten-free cookies
(2641); sweets are available from
EDC Publishing/Usborne/Kane
Miller (3070); everyone loves Hershey’s Kisses—pick them up at
Getty Publications (2835); at
Peachtree Publishers, get your special Cracker Jacks (2869); or try fish
candy from Candlewick Press
(2759); or for a double-whammy, get
over to Running Press for “boozy
cupcakes” (4235). There will be inbooth tastings at Red Rock Press
(3146); snacks at Newmarket Press
(4114); and to bring a glow to your
cheeks, go to Octopus Books USA
for a whiskey tasting (3758).

Miscellaneous Stuff
W.W. Norton (3423) offers luggage tags
(to make sure those book-filled bags
get to their destination); Interweave
will give out yarn, knitwear, jewelry
samples, and project items to promote
its craft books (4113); Baker & Taylor
has branded merchandise and a comprehensive suite of information about
products and companies (3223, 3323);
at Dundurn Press, look for sticky pads;
pens; and mystery/teen fiction prize
packs (4404, 4405, 4409). Marvel Entertainment is giving away comics and
posters (4558). Pick up Read/Write/
Revolt pins and stickers from South
End Press (4511); your dog will happily
greet you when you bring home Nylabone dog chew products from TFH Publications (4461); and drop by Publication Services for an always useful glossary of publishing terms (2940).
1_4 hor.indd 1

5/7/2010 3:47:14 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

PUBL I SHERS

Be a Winner

W E E K LY

2010 frontlist titles (3868); win the
entire spring 2010 list at Tundra
Books (4252); go to Sleeping Bear

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

73

Press, where you can win $100
“bear bucks” to purchase SBP
books (2243).

While the days of drawings for
Books, Books Everywhere
As always, BEA exhibitors hold
weekend vacations and other luxudrawings for a wide range of books.
ries have disappeared from the
Pets Horoscopes is raffling off a set
scene—at least for the time being—
of books and greeting cards and
there are still opportunities to take
other surprises (3161); at Hay
home some very nice surprises.
House, enter to win its “log on and
Visit these booths to enter and win.
load up” contest, a $1,000 value
Need to replace your iPod? At
(3605); Abbeville Press’s offering is
Turner (4271), you can win an iPod
China: A Photographic Journey
Shuffle or Ancestry gift basket
Through the Middle Kingdom, and
(complete with one-year World
from Abbeville Kids, Wonders of the
Deluxe Membership, a $300 value;
Indian Wilderness by Erach BharuKaplan Logistic will also offer an
cha, a $100 value (4215);
iPod (2247). If you’re interested in
Appalachian Trail Press has a
the New York dining experience,
package of official guides and
hasten to Red Rock Press to win a
maps for the Appalachian Trail
“memorable meal for two” at the
Conservancy and other TrailFour Seasons, 21 Club, or Carnegie
related books, calendars, and note
Deli (3146) or to Taunton Press for
cards (4533); Brannin Books, a first“dinner for two” at a New York City
time exhibitor, is a mother-daughrestaurant featured in Harvest to
ter team that writes children’s
Heat (3858).
books and is offering an autoAt Octopus
graphed copy (4481); at Chronicle
Books USA
Books, enter to win “The Worst(3758), win a
Case Scenario Survival Handbook:
necklace
Gross Junior Edition
worth $550
Recipe Contest”
from Judith
(2641); Welcome
Miller, author of
Books will hold a
Miller’s Costume
Lady Gaga
drawing each day for
Jewelry, or an Orla
9781849
hen
Co
d
ar
384056
on
Le
one title: The ConstiKiely handbag promot3
8184938138
97
tution of the United
ing her new book, PatStates, Limited Editern; at Interweave
tion, $500 value; The
(4113), there is a drawPeople You’d
Book of Exodus, Liming for an original neckLike to Know
ited Edition, $500
lace designed exclu9781849382304
value; Canyon Wilsively for BEA by Lisa
derness of the SouthNiven Kelly, author of
west, Limited Edition,
Stamped Metal Jewelry: Lucky winners can take home a
Creative Techniques &
Karen Karnes ceramic art piece or $195 value (4352). Win
Designs for Making Cus- Judith Miller’s handcrafted piece a complete set of
www.omnibuspressusa.com
of costume jewelry.
anthologies with
tom Jewelry.
Available from Ingram Publisher Services
business-card drop-off at WriteGirl
If you’re a movie buff, check out
Telephone: 866 765 0178
(2448); Fox Chapel Publishing Co. is
Newmarket Press for movie memoEmail: customercare@ingrampublisherservices.com
raffling off a complete set of fall
rabilia (4114); Nintendo DS Lite is the
prize at Plexus Publishing (2353);
HighBridge Co. will hold daily draw1_4 vertical.indd 1
5/7/2010 1:46:57 PM
ings for audio prepacks (4259, 4359),
while Oasis Audio will raffle off an
audiobook library (4177).

Hot New Titles
from Omnibus Press

Visit
us at
booth #

2635

This ’n’ That
To celebrate the publication of A
Chosen Path: The Ceramic Art of
Karen Karnes, win a Karen Karnes
ceramic art piece, valued at $300,
from University of North Carolina
Press (3723); at Tuttle Publishing
the prize is an original piece of
origami art by artist/author
Michael G. LaFosse (3623); Kodansha America offers a piece of original fabric art by Jeffrey Rutzky
and Chris K. Palmer (4742).
Amber Communications Group
holds a daily drawing for gift baskets (4952); Cleis Press/Viva Editions holds a drawing for an “Eden
Fantasies Gift Basket,” a $500
value (4324); go to the Jewish Publication Society booth where there
is a raffle for four $25 gift certificates, two each day (3453); and at
ManLoveRomance Press you can
win a 10-mystery gift basket (3481).
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5/13/2010 11:46:59 AM

74

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

A Few Good
Words

Nancy Pearl is famous for
guiding readers to the best
books in every section of the library
and bookstore—whether through

Soho Press Author Signings
May 26th in the Autographing Area

CARA BLACK

MURDER IN THE

PALAIS ROYAL
Table 22 | 10:30-11:30

HENRY CHANG

RED JADE
Table 23 | 10:30-11:30

JAMES R. BENN
RAG AND BONE

Table 24 | 10:30-11:30

MICK HERRON
SLOW HORSES
Table 25 | 10:00-11:00

www.sohopress.com | www.sohocrime.com | www.sohoconstable.com

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W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

her recommendations on
NPR or her popular Book
Lust series. Now with Book
Lust to Go: Recommended
Reading for Travelers, Vagabonds, and Dreamers
(Sasquatch, Oct.), Pearl will
send readers on a literary
journey around the world.
Known as “America’s favorite
librarian,” Pearl admits she’s not a
“comfortable, happy traveler” in
real life, but says that made her wellsuited to write this book. “I’m a total
traveler in the virtual world of books.”
Pearl began her career working
as a bookseller and librarian in
Detroit; Tulsa, Okla.; and Seattle. In
Seattle, she became a local celebrity
known for her recommendations
and the creation of the “If All Seattle
Read the Same Book” program in
1998. The release of her bestselling
Book Lust in 2003 brought her

national prominence as a
practicing advocate for
connecting good books and
readers. And, of course, she
also has bragging rights as
the only librarian with a
mass-produced action figure based on her, complete
with “shushing action.”
Says Pearl, “It was a joy discovering all these books that I hadn’t
read before, hunting used bookstores and libraries.” Pearl cites as
some of her favorite discoveries
books by Patrick Leigh Fermor on
his travels through Greece—which
New York Review Books has in
print through its classics series—
and the work of Sara Wheeler on
her travels in Chile and Antarctica.
Pearl signs galleys of Book Lust to
Go, the fourth in the Book Lust series,
today at 11 a.m. in the Sasquatch
—Gwenda Bond
booth (4330B).

Li on New Leadership Paradigms
Charlene Li is the founder of the
Altimeter Group, a strategy firm
that counsels clients how to successfully use emerging technologies to
drive business. Li, coauthor (with
Josh Bernoff) of Groundswell (Harvard Business School Press, 2008), is
a noted speaker on the strategic use
of emerging technologies. Her new
book, Open Leadership: How Social
Technology Can Transform the Way
You Lead (Jossey-Bass), pubbed this
week. She will be signing in the
Wiley booth (4140, 4141) at 1 p.m.
Briefly, what is Open Leadership
about?
Leadership has fundamentally
changed because the relationship
between leaders and followers has
changed. You are no longer a leader
simply because you are in a situa-

5/13/2010 12:58:34 PM

5/12/2010 9:44:25 AM

tion of command. The information
you collect and share allows you to
lead. Things can seem very chaotic
because everything is all over the
place, very fast and very flexible.
That’s the way work is
getting done now.
How has technology
changed between the
publication of
Groundswell and
Open Leadership?
The biggest change is
that social media was
still pretty new and
everyone was trying to figure out
things. Twitter was one year old;
now it’s become mainstream. More
people are using Facebook than
Yahoo. It’s become so mainstream
that it’s become a habit, this culture
of sharing. It’s quite normal to
share with complete and total
strangers. We’ve started to see the
benefits of sharing, but we haven’t
seen this in the workplace.
How is the ongoing economic downturn affecting this?
Last year, people were slashing
marketing budgets because
demand wasn’t there. First, companies turned to social marketing
because of the low cost. Second, it
was a way to stay in touch with customers already in the pipeline
rather than trying to drive demand.
Which company is a poster-child for
using social technology to drive its
businesses forward and increase
ROI?
Bestbuy. They have trusted their
employees; they recruit enthusiastic people, part-time workers usually
in their 20s who want a discount.
They started using social media to
reach employees internally, then
thought it would be a way to reach
the customer—employees have blogs
and e-mails to talk to customers.
The company is social and open—a
tremendous advantage over other
—Karin Pekarchik
retailers.

Visit the Harlequin booth and meet
your favorite authors!
Wednesday, May 26th
IN-BOOTH SIGNINGS
Time

Author

Title

10:00-10:45 am Debbie Macomber
Hour

Event

Debbie Macomber

92 Pacific Boulevard
Debbie Macomber’s
Cedar Cove Cookbook

11:00-11:45 am

Tosca Reno Hour

Tosca Reno

Your Best Body Now:
Look and Feel Fabulous at
Any Age the Eat-Clean Way

12:00-12:45 pm

Young Adult Hour

Gena Showalter
Rachel Vincent
Maria V. Snyder
Artist Arthur
Celeste O. Norfleet
Earl Sewell

Intertwined
My Soul to Keep
Inside Out
Manifest
She Said, She Said
Decision Time

1:00-1:45 pm

Kimani Hour

Brenda Jackson
Rochelle Alers
A.C. Arthur
Celeste O. Norfleet
Gwynne Forster

Hidden Pleasures
Breakaway
Defying Desire
Sultry Storm
Yes, I Do

2:00-2:45 pm

Harlequin Series
Showcase

Kate Hewitt
Leslie Kelly
Linda Goodnight
Susan Mallery
Christine Merrill
Terri Brisbin

Her Mediterranean Playboy
Blazing Bedtime Stories, Vol V
The Wedding Garden
High-Powered, Hot-Blooded
Pleasurably Undone!
Pleasurably Undone!

3:00-3:45 pm

Harlequin Series
Showcase

Sandra Marton
Brenda Jackson

Blackwolf’s Redemption
Hot Westmoreland Nights/
Spontaneous
The Hunted
Dream Daddy
Stranger in a Small Town
Wife Wanted in Dry Creek

Anna Leonard
Daly Thompson
Kerry Connor
Janet Tronstad

Booth #3922

OFFICIAL BEA AUTHOR AUTOGRAPH SESSIONS
Time

Table

Author

Title

Robyn Carr
Linda Lael Miller
Susan Mallery

A Summer in Sonoma
McKettricks of Texas: Garrett
Almost Perfect

Time

Author

Title

10:30 am
10:30 am

Diane Chamberlain
Deanna Raybourn

The Lies We Told
The Dead Travel Fast

9:30-10:30 am 7
10:00-11:00 am 1
10:00-11:00 am 2

ABA BOOTH SIGNINGS

ABA LUNCHEON/Special Events Hall
Time

Author

11:45 am
11:45 am

Diane Chamberlain
Deanna Raybourn

76

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

Relax with
Buddhist
Publishers
Two publishers specializing in Buddhist materials offer a meditative
breath, signed books, and tea.
Hoof it over to the Wisdom Publications’ booth (4307B) at 2 p.m. today for
a signed copy of The Banyan Deer by
Rafe Martin, illus. by Richard Wehrman. The gift book’s subtitle, A Parable of Courage and Compassion,
telegraphs its little story about a deer
who teaches a king a lesson; it’s based
on a “jataka tale,” a fable that tells a
story from an earlier lifetime of the
Buddha and that, like a fairy or folk
tale, conveys a moral. It doesn’t mention the Buddha. “It has a very universal message of kindness and compassion,” says Joe Evans, who handles publicity and marketing at Wisdom. The book is being positioned as
a gift for all ages. Author Martin’s
pile of awards includes three American Library Association Notable Books
awards and four Parents’ Choice
Gold Awards. Illustrator Wehrman’s
recognitions include a gold medal

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

from the Society of Illustrators.
Parallax Press, the principal
publisher of Vietnamese Zen Buddhist master Thich Nhat Hanh, is
focusing on mindfulness for children in two signings at the show.
Today, at 1 p.m., author Gail Silver
and illustrator Christiane Krömer
will sign copies of the award-winBoth authors are doing book signings.
ning Anh’s Anger at Table 14.
Same time tomorrow at Table 16,
Dr. Christopher Willard will sign

Child’s Mind: Mindfulness Practices
to Help Our Children Be More
Focused, Calm, & Relaxed.
Parallax and Wisdom will cohost
their annual tea gathering for Buddhist and Buddhist-friendly publishers and editors at long day’s end
tomorrow. Tea and cookies will be
provided from 4 to 5 p.m. at Wisdom’s
booth. BYOM (bring your own mind—Marcia Z. Nelson
fulness).

A Few Good Words

ment. Eating at home is considerably
less expensive. And less expensive
cuts of meat do very well in a slow
cooker.
Is the growing interest in local and
sustainable agriculture an influence in your new book?
This book doesn’t hinge on the need
for fresh, only because the recipes
tend to cook for a long time. These
aren’t salad recipes. But people
clearly are concerned about that.
We now have a consciousness and
conscience about what we feed our
families. There is mystery in buying
packaged, finished foods. People
are becoming highly alert to where
meat comes from. Locally produced
meat will certainly pay off in the
final results of these dishes.

Phyllis Pellman Good,
author of the Fix-It and
Forget-It series of cookbooks, is celebrating the
10th anniversary of the the
first Fix-It and Forget-It
Cookbook, which has just
been updated. Sales are
close to 10 million units for
all of the Fix-It cookbooks.

could see at a glance what
they were committing to.

How has cooking changed
since it was first published?
The commitment to cook
at home has grown in the
past 10 years, yet I see
how little people know
about it.
What makes the Fix-It
cookbook so popular?
It’s not intimidating. PeoRecipes from homes.
ple have also said that they
Why did you update this cookbook?
love that the recipes come from
There are three elements missing
other families. It reassures them that
from the first edition—What is the
they come from other people’s
ideal slow cooker size for this recipe?
homes and that they work.
How long does it take to prep? How
Is the economic downturn affecting
long does it take to cook? I wanted to
how families cook?
include this information so people
The economy has been a big ele-

—Karin Pekarchik

Meet the Authors
Peter Quinn
Autographing Copies of

The Man Who Never
Returned
Wednesday, May 26 1:00-2:00
Table 9

Frank Deford
Autographing Copies of

Bliss, Remembered
Thursday, May 27 10:00-11:00
Table 9

P.F. Kluge
Autographing Copies of

A Call From Jersey
Thursday, May 27 3:00-4:00
Table 13

Booth 3552

The Overlook Press
www.overlookpress.com

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78

BEA SHOW DAILY ■ DAY 2

PUBL I SHERS

W E E K LY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 , 2010

Your BEA Horoscope
GEMINI (May 21–June 20)
Something has depressed you, but
these feelings will dissipate the
minute you put your trade show
plan into action. A fascinating idea
(maybe the one that saves publishing?) is hidden in your brain, and
you have the power to recruit a key
person to your cause!
CANCER (June 21–July 22)
This week signals a long-term shift
(perhaps to a new location or a new
audience for your work). All this
adds up to more money—and your
talents blooming in a setting with-

out the usual schedules and deadlines! Did you bring your résumé to
the show?
LEO (July 23–Aug. 22)
Currently, fiery Mars is zooming
through Leo, and you have a chance
to make it big. Take a brave stand
with powers-that-be. It’s time to
close a door and put on speed
toward a special ambition! Go
ahead, have that extra glass of wine
at dinner with your boss tonight.
VIRGO (Aug. 23–Sept. 22)
You’re not a bragger, but it’s definitely time to blow your own horn.

Usjtubo!Qvcmjtijoh
books with a message

Booth 4132

1_6 vertical.indd 1

Make sure others see the visionary
scope of your idea. You have brilliance for handling money and can
tap into public taste.
LIBRA (Sept. 23–Oct. 22)
A “no” turns into a “yes,” but with a
slight twist. Think out of the box.
This is a special opportunity to get
to your goal, but in a way that allows
you to take on a far more public
role. Just remember: what happens
at the PGW party doesn’t stay at the
PGW party!
SCORPIO (Oct. 23–Nov. 22)
Complex career issues that others
would run from are where you
shine. So refuse to be hampered by
petty rules and plunge forward
with your attention-getting project.
You’re about to get good financial
news. Sales are up! Returns are
down!
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23–Dec. 21)
Your observant eye has already
spotted opportunity. Now you need
to say “no” to a previous arrangement and handle an enterprise
according to your own vision. Deal
directly with an outfit that can market your star-quality project! (Note:
it’s not Chat Roulette!)
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22–Jan. 19)
You face a decision that requires a
great leap of faith. Go for it. You
already work in the book industry,
so what have you got to lose? You
have a fabulous chance to widen
your power base. Put your exacting,

perfectionist style on a creative
undertaking only you can handle!
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20–Feb. 18)
You have the gift of being farsighted—and an original concept
now ignites the enthusiasm of a
group with deep pockets. Neptune
in Aquarius is smiling on a venture
in which you parlay a small sum
(your fall list) into a large success
(thousands of iPhone applications.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19–Mar. 20)
People may be telling you to cool
it, but you need to do the reverse
and fixate on your own ambition.
(If you appear wishy-washy, you
won’t get what you want.) Act
boldly, strike a deal, and don’t let
others speak for you! When you
see that famous cable television
talk show host on the floor, reach
for the stars.
ARIES (Mar. 21–Apr. 19)
It is day one of BEA, and today
you’re both a performer and a
muse. As an inspiration to people,
you can persuade others to buy
what you’re selling. An action you
now take will change the opinion of
an entire group. Who is on your
meeting calendar today?
TAURUS (Apr. 20–May 20)
Don’t be reluctant to present yourself to a group of strangers. You
have one-of-a-kind creative skills
and fabulous star potential. To snag
the deal, stop worrying about looking pushy—and be pushy. This is
your BEA to shine! —Joanna Martine
Woolfolk

Woolfolk, author of The Only
Astrology Book You’ll Ever Need:
Twenty-first Century Edition (Taylor, Oct.), will be in the Taylor/
National Book Network booth
(3777) today at 3:30 p.m.

5/7/2010 4:46:42 PM

Knitters Rejoice

Recession Stress?
Award-Winning Stress-Relief on CD!
by National Stress-Relief Expert, Susie Mantell
• “BEST AUDIOBOOKS”
Publishers Weekly Award

Grab your free skein of
yarn from Interweave

New England Knits is available
July 2010. Come to booth #4113
and check out an advance copy!

Wednesday only! Stop by the
Interweave Booth #4113 to pick
up a FREE skein
of yarn to
celebrate the
release of New
England Knits.
We’re handing
out free skeins
of Princess yarn,
a merinocashmere blend from
Classic Elite Yarns, featured in
the gorgeous Old Port Pullover
found in the book. Swing by
while supplies last!

• “BESTSELLER” (5 Categories)
Amazon
• “BESTSELLER”
New Leaf
• “BEST ORIGINAL WORK”
Audie Awards Finalist
• “HIGHLY RECOMMENDED”
Library Journal
• “SUPERB”
The American Pain Society
• “AS GOOD AS IT GETS” Issue
Town Country

Soothes Away Layer-After-Layer of
Stress, Sleeplessness, Depression, Pain, Trauma...
SEEN: NBC, ABC, CBS,-TV • Billboard • Los Angeles Times
The Mayo Clinic • Sloan-Kettering • Canyon Ranch (#1 Spa)
Citibank • Verizon • Forbes • Betty Ford Center • Military
ISBN: 978 0965072410

($14.95 U.S.)

Enjoy Free Stress Tips at www.relaxintuit.com
Small Press United (through IPG)

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5/12/2010 5:51:44 1_6
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Ingram

B&T

New Leaf

5/14/2010 10:53:37 AM

Stop by booth #3352-3353 to
get your publishing-exclusive
limited edition Tron poster!

Also
Coming
October
2010

IN THEATERS DECEMBER 2010
PUBLISHING PROGRAM BEGINS
OCTOBER 2010

Into the Light
Early Reader
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Out of the Dark
Early Reader
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Derezzed
8x8 Picture Book
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Game On
8x8 Picture Book

Tron: Legacy
The Junior Novel

Tron: Legacy
The Movie Storybook

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Tron
An Original Graphic Novel
Prequel to Tron: Legacy
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It’s Your Call:
Initiate Sequence
Reader
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PERCY JACKSON
was ju e beginning.
A new series from #1 new york times

be-selling auor

Rick Riordan
coming

oober 12, 2010!
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Celebra
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Every weekend,
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