You are on page 1of 99

ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 

1. GENERAL 
 
1.1 Taking over the Command (K) 
 
 

Take over command as a master
1. Go to company office and meet technical superintendents, discuss about:

• Ship particulars
• Trading areas
• Company’s and charterer’s instructions
• Voyage instruction, type of charter
• Special instruction for maintenance and survey

2. Complete change of command form‐ marine‐40 in duplicate.
3. Obtain authorization slip issued by MPA which to be attached to cert of registry and letter of 
memorandum.
4. On the way to master’s accommodation, form an initial impression of the ship’s general condition and 
maintenance by observing exterior conditions such as: draft marks, load line marks, condition of hull, 
deck, superstructure, rigging of accommodation ladder, safety net, LSA & FFA arrangements.
5. Meet outgoing master and hand over letter of appointment and authorization slip.
6. Go through the hand over note, ship’s condition report, manning level, company and charterer’s 
instructions.
7. Sight all the statutory certificates as per MSC‐14/2005, any survey due, maintenance/preparation for 
each survey. 
8. Go through the filing system and all types of log books.
9. AOA & last port clearance
10. Crew welfare and watch arrangements, any crew change/ repatriation in this port/ next port.
11. Watch arrangement.
12. Take over all stores, ROB of FO/DO/GO/FW, provisions, medical stores as per scale, narcotics under 
master’s control.
13. Cash balance onboard, ship’s account, satellite radio accounts.
14. Ask master about port rotation, trading areas, general condition of ports, present cargo work, ship’s 
stability, estimated time of completion, cargo plan, departure draft, trim, GM etc.
15. Detail of cargo gears, anchors, deck machineries, hatches and their conditions, maintenance condition 
and schedule.
16. Crew familiarization process, basic trainings, onboard training programs, drills etc.
17. Go to bridge with master, familiar with bridge and navigation equipments, their operational conditions 
and deficiencies, maneuvering characteristics of the vessel in various conditions, passage plans, charts 
and publications, GMDSS equipment familiarization and their operations.
18. Latest weather report received, weather expected in voyage.
19. Enter new master’s name in OLB. Also the changeover of command including the list of documents 
onboard in OLB, signed by both masters.
20. Enter new master’s particulars, sign off/on in AOA, attach change of command form Marine‐40 in 
certificate of registry.
21. Ensure approved copy of stability booklet is available.

ARK    Page 1 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
1.2 Winter area – as a master what is your main concern? (K) Cold weather precautions. 
 

Before proceeding to ice zone, I will check the following items: 
1. Article of agreement and the geographical limit, expiry of article of agreement. 
2. Class certificate, if ship has ice notation. 
3. Check the charter party contract 
4. Insurance coverage – premium may be high. 
5. Polar Code is available onboard. 
(Polar Code:  
• Aimed at ensuring: 
− Safe navigation of ships in polar waters. 
− Prevention of pollution in polar waters. 
• It take into account the sea and glacis ice which can present serious structural hazards to ships navigating 
in polar waters. 
• It consists of the following parts: 
Part A – Construction provisions. 
Part B – Equipment. 
Part C – Operational; 
Part D – Environmental protection and damage control.) 
 
6. Instruct C/E: 
• To check heating system for accommodation, steering gear, bridge windows;  
• To check viscosity of hydraulic oil for all cranes, winches and boat engines, if necessary, renew. 
• To check emergency generator fuel tank. 
 
7. Instruct C/Off to check/ indent: 
• Warm clothing for full complement 
• Protective gloves 
• Extra blanket 
• Spare bulbs for navigation light 
• Steam hoses 
• De‐icing compounds 
• Axe, shovels. 
8. Instruct navigating officer to ensure: 
• Navigational equipments in good working condition 
• Sufficient charts are available 
• Gather all information regarding the limits of ice, ice seasons, navigation in ice. 
 

Actions when navigating in the vicinity of ice 
Ensure the followings, when navigating in the vicinity of ice: 
• Additional look out have been posted, they know their duties. 
• Continuous radar watch 
• Obtain as much information possible about sighting ice and other navigational warnings. 
• Monitor temperature of air and sea, especially at night. 
• Make obligatory reports of ice sighting as per MSA/SOLAS. 
• Adjust the speed of the ship if passing through the ice, according to the type and thickness of ice. 
• Inform engineers when temperature drops to about 0 to 1°C. 

ARK    Page 2 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Information received from ice patrol, coastal stations, shipping broadcast and meteorological 
observations may result in an alteration of course to avoid ice. 
• Make the fullest use of navigation equipment and aids to ascertain accurate navigation. 
• Ensure the deck is safe for crews to go about their normal duties. Remove ice by chipping or by 
sweeping. 
• Do not use normal window washers. Use window heaters in stead. 

Cold weather precautions 
1. Provide suitable warm clothing
2. Organize and brief bridge team prior to entry into the ice regarding:
• Indications of presence of ice
• Not to be overexposed to extreme cold
• Look outs need to be rotated at short interval
• Report to master on sighting ice
• Regular radar watch in appropriate range
• Second watch keeper
• Obtain up to date ice reports and ensure that ice limits are entered in the chart, plot occasional 
icebergs.
• Change over to manual steering until the vessel is clear of ice region. Helmsman to report D/O if loss 
of steering.
3. Instruct C/E to regularly check the followings:
• Steering gear
• Heating arrangements of steering gears
• To check viscosity of hydraulic oil for all cranes, winches and boat engines, if necessary, renew.
• Keep the jockey pump running at all times.
4. Inform all departments
• Check all navigation equipments are in satisfactory conditions.
• Check navigation lights, search light and sound signaling appliances
5. Instruct C/O the followings:
• The ship has sufficient stability
• Ship should be sufficiently trimmed that propeller tips are well submerged.
• Ballast tanks, FW tanks, life boat FW tanks not to press up full, keep allowance for expansion. 
Especially above water line tanks. Calculate free surface effect.
• Drain fire lines on deck.
• All deck scuppers to be cleared to prevent water trapping on deck.
• Cover deck machinery and controls with canvas.
• If steam windlass, run slowly.
• Cranes/ derricks to be freeze, to prevent this, they should be topped/slewed at regular intervals.
• Hawse pipes/ spurling pipe covers are in position.
• Rig life lines on deck as may become slippery
• All LSA/FFA in satisfactory condition and ready for immediate use.

ARK    Page 3 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Factors of ice accretion
If wind force increases above force 6, the rate of ice accretion increases because:
• Wind chill factor increases.
• Increase of shipping sprays
 
Air temperature falls below ‐2°C
Sea temperature decreases
Shipping seas and sprays increases
Excessive ship's speed
Unsuitable ship's course
Rate of ice accretion on a slow moving ship  
with the wind ahead or on the beam, given  
wind and sea temperature, can be estimated  
using "Icing Nomograms" given in mariner's  
handbook 
 

 
 
 
 
 
1.3 Two days after sailing, one ship called you to tow them to the nearest port (they face machinery 
problem) what is your action? (K) 
As per SOLAS‐V Regulation33, Master is only obliged to provide assistance to the persons in distress. 
 
 
1.4 What is MSA? What is regulation? (K) 
Merchant Shipping Act of Singapore incorporates rules and regulation relating to merchant shipping.  
The international maritime conventions are implemented on board Singapore ships by incorporating 
it in MSA. 
It is required to be carried on all Singapore registered vessels.  
 
MSA ‐ VARIOUS DEFINITIONS 
Regulation‐a law, rule, or other order prescribed by authority, esp. to regulate conduct 
Articles‐ Points 
Protocols‐Amendments to the regulations which are not yet enforce. 
Resolution – Changes to the present regulations. / A formal expression of opinion or intention
made, usually after voting, by a formal organization, 
Gross tonnage
It is a measurement of the overall size of a ship determined in accordance with merchant shipping 
(Tonnage) regulation. 
It is the total volume of all enclosed spaces and all accommodation and cargo spaces. 
Net tonnage 
It is a measurement of the total earning capacity of a ship determined in accordance with merchant 
shipping (Tonnage) regulation. 
It is the total volume of only all cargo spaces. 
 Ton and tonne:
• Ton is the gross tonnage of a ship. 
• Tonne is the metric ton, measurement of a unit of weight, equals to 1000kg. 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 4 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 

1.5 Night orders? Reason for such orders? 
 

Night Orders 
1. Required to be written by master before he is going to take a rest at night.
2. A set of instructions to OOW in written format.
3. Depends on the events expected at the night.
4. Generally includes following points:
• To comply with standing orders.
• Follow the laid courses.
• Check and plot positions at required intervals.
• Keep proper look out and comply with ROR.
• Calling master at required position, if applicable.
• Anti piracy watch if required.
• Preparations before proceeding to pilot stations.
• Inform ETA.
• Slow down one hour (or as required for engine) before end of passage position.
• Call master at the marked position.
• Rigging pilot ladders in time.
• Stand by crews in time.
• Check the vessel's position frequently if at anchor.
• Calling master if in any doubt.
 
 
1.6 What do you know about Code of Safe working Practice (S) 

• This Code is concerned with improving health and safety on board ship. 
• The Code provides guidance on safe working practices for many situations that commonly arise on 
ships, and the basic principles can be applied to many other work situations that are not specifically 
covered. 
• It is a statutory requirement for copies of the Code to be carried on board UK ships.  
• Non‐UK ships are not subject to all UK safety regulations, although failure to meet international 
standards of safety enshrined in those regulations may result in enforcement action while the ship is 
in UK waters. 
• The Code is arranged in sections which deal with broad areas of concern. 
• The introduction gives the regulatory framework for health and safety on board ships and overall 
safety responsibilities under that framework. 
• Section 1 is largely concerned with safety management and the statutory duties underlying the 
advice in the remainder of the Code. All working on board should be aware of these duties and of 
the principles governing the guidance on safe practice which they are required to follow. 
• Section 2 begins with a chapter setting out the areas that should be covered in introducing a new 
recruit to the safety procedures on board. It goes on to explain what individuals can do to improve 
their personal health and safety. 
• Section 3 is concerned with various working practices common to all ships. 
• Section 4 covers safety for specialist ship operations. 
 
1.7 Working Aloft – Can you send the cadet? What is the age restriction? 
 
• Personnel working at a height may not be able to give their full attention to the job and at the same 
time guard themselves against falling. 
• Personnel under 18 years of age or with less than 12 months experience at sea, should not work 
aloft unless accompanied by an experienced person or otherwise adequately supervised 
 

ARK    Page 5 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
2. EMERGENCIES 
Aground 
2.1 Vessel aground, initial and subsequent actions, main concern before refloating. What dangers may 
be associated with grounding? Cannot refloat‐action, Can refloat – action, (Stability, breaking up, 
fire) 
2.2 Vessel aground and leaking oil what is your action.  (K) Legal & commercial point of view. 
2.3 Grounded point amidships port& forward No‐1 tank, action? Bilging amidships DB‐tank. CO informed 
that there is ingress of water in No.3 also. 
2.4 If your ship is partially aground, how does it worry you? What are your concerns? (Stability, Breaking 
up, Fire, explosion) (Partial grounding stability in detail) 
2.5 Your mate informs you that we need to jettison 250 containers to remain refloat, what is your 
action? 
2.6 After you tried your best, CE informed Engine is OK; 2O informed in 2hrs time will be the high tide – 
Action? (Hint: Tell him advantages & disadvantages of refloating) 
2.7 Why you used engine for short time? 
2.8 Precautions for refloating a grounded ship and subsequent surveys, beaching a ship, selecting POR> 
2.9 After vessel refloat at her own, salvage tug arrived, what will you do? (K) 
2.10 What safety measures you should concern after vessel grounded. (K) 
2.11 What logs are important to you as a master to sign as required by international Law and in 
case of claims? (K) 
 
 
Immediate actions: 
  
Take the con.  
Follow emergency procedure as per company emergency procedure manual, which should include: 
• Sound general emergency alarm.  
• Stop Engines. 
• Announce by PA. 
• Head count, look for casualty and establish communication. 
• Close watertight doors. 
 
 Activate SOPEP and take preventive actions in case of any oil pollution. 
  
Order chief officer for damage assessment. 
• Water tight integrity of hull and subsequent breaches of same. 
• Obtain sounding form all tanks, bilge’s, hold  
• Condition of machinery space. 
• Check hull for damage.  
• Determine which way deep water lies. 
• Visually inspect compartments where possible 
• Sound bilge’s and tanks. 
• Sound around the ship to find possible point of grounding. 
 
 Obtain following information from emergency teams: 
• Details of casualties. 
• Any fire risk 
• Any other information regarding associate problems.  
 
On the bridge, the command team will do the followings: 
• Maintained VHF watch. 
• Exhibit light / shapes and any appropriate sound signals. 
• Switch on deck lighting at night. 

ARK    Page 6 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Determine the vessel’s position. 
• Obtain information on local currents and tides, particularly details of the rise and fall of the tide. 
• Broadcast urgency or distress massage as required. 
• Inform the accident with positions and time to the following parties: 
− Local authorities. 
− Owners, charterers. 
− P & I club. 
− Under‐writer 
− Next port agent. 
− Class. (Emergency Technical Assistance Service) 
− Make an accident report to MPA in the correct format. 
 

 Determine possibility of refloating the ship and take appropriate actions: 
• Calculate height of tide and time of rise and fall. 
• Reduce draught of ship: 
• De‐ballasting 
• Jettisoning cargo 
• Use main engines to maneuver. 
• Obtain assistance from port authority, coast guard, salvage tugs. 
 

Subsequent legal and commercial actions: 
Try to minimize immediate danger such as pollution, fire etc. 
While taking tug assistance, consider: 
• LOF, if the danger imminent. 
• Salvage contract if the situation permits. 
 
Use all available means of the ship to refloat the vessel. 
Keep all records of incidents and actions. Appropriate records to be entered in: 
• Deck log book 
• Movement book 
• Engine log book 
• Telegraph recorder 
• Echo sounder graph. 
• Used chart 
• Entry to be made in official log book. 
• Record of all damage and subsequent actions. 
• Prepare a statement of fact of all the happenings. 
• Prepare a note of protest, stating the facts only. 
If it is possible to refloat the vessel, consider deviating to port of refuge. 
 

 
2.12 FSA 
 
FORMAL SAFETY ASSESSMENT ‐ FSA 
FSA is a structured and systematic methodology, aimed at enhancing maritime safety, including protection 
of life, health, the marine environment and property, by using risk and cost/benefit assessment. 
 
FSA consists of five steps: 
1) Identification of hazards: A list of all relevant accident scenarios with potential causes and 
outcomes. 
2) Assessment of risks: Evaluation of risk factors. 
3) Risk control options: Devising regulatory measures to control and reduce the identified risks. 
4) Cost benefit assessment: Determining cost effectiveness of each risk control option.  
5) Recommendations for decision‐making: Information about the hazards, their associated risks and 
the cost effectiveness of alternative risk control options is provided 
ARK    Page 7 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Collision 
2.13 Draw a DRA for collision (COSWP) at least 10 relevant points. 
Refer to attached notes. 
 
2.14 Collision – MSA, instruments, action as a master after collision. How soon will you report 
to flag state? 
2.15 What is your obligation if collided with another vessel? 
2.16 Which parties are involved with report to collision? 
2.17 What is P&I involvement? ¾ Collision clause, GA, S&L Clause, adjustment of GA. 
2.18 In case of collision what are your duties? What notice will you issue to another vessel in 
order to limit the liabilities of your owner? 
 
COLLISION 
Immediate actions: 
  
Take the con.  
  
Follow emergency procedure as per company emergency procedure manual, which should include: 
• Sound general emergency alarm.  
• Stop Engines. 
• Announce by PA. 
• Head count, look for casualty and establish communication. 
• Close watertight doors. 
  
Activate SOPEP and take preventive actions in case of any oil pollution 
  
Order chief officer for damage assessment. 
• Water tight integrity of hull and subsequent breaches of same. 
• Assess rate of flooding 
• Condition of machinery space. 
• Check hull for damage in relation to the waterline and whether can be raised by changing trim. 
• Check sounding of all tanks and bilges. 
• Visually inspect compartments where possible 
• Prepare lifeboats, life rafts and all LSA for immediate launching in case of subsequent Abandonment. 
 
Obtain following information from emergency teams: 
• Details casualties. 
• Any risk of fire, explosion or emission of toxic gases. 
• Any other information regarding associate problems.  
 
On the bridge, the command team will do the followings: 
• Maintained VHF watch. 
• Exhibit light / shapes and any appropriate sound signals. 
• Switch on deck lighting at night. 
• Determine the vessel’s position. 
• Broadcast urgency or distress massage as required. 
• Save the VDR data. 
• Inform the accident with positions and time to the following parties: 
− Local authorities. 
− Owners, charterers. 
− P & I club. 
− Under‐writer 

ARK    Page 8 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
− Next port agent. 
− Class. (Emergency Technical Assistance Service) 
− Make an accident report to MPA in the correct format. 
(Accident Report 
• Masters/Owners are obliged to report all reports to MPA within 24hrs of accident. 
• Report shall be made in the following circumstances: 
− Loss of life. 
− Injury. 
− Material Damage to ship or its equipment. 
− Deficiency of LSA & other safety equipment. 
− Any Peril. 
• It applies to: 
− Singapore registered ships. 
− Ships issued with passenger safety certificate in Singapore. 
− Ships in Singapore waters. 
− Ships arriving Singapore. 
 
Obligatory Actions 
• Once I am sure that my vessel is not in imminent and grave danger; it is my obligation to provide all 
possible assistance to other ship if they are in need; 
• Standby other vessel until no further assistance is required. 
• It is also my obligation to provide the following information to the other vessel and get the same 
from the other. 
− Name of Ship 
− Port of registry 
− Last port of call 
− Next port of call 
• Exchange ship’s particulars. 
• Lodge note of protest holding the other vessel responsible, reserving the right to extent on a later 
date and time.  
• Accept the note of protest from the other vessel, for receipt only. 
(Non‐compliance fine S$10,000) 
 
Subsequent, legal and commercial actions: 
Try to minimize immediate danger such as pollution, fire etc. 
Consider actions to be taken to minimize extent of damage and prevent the vessel from sinking or capsizing, 
such as: 
• Using bilge and/or ballast pumps to cope up with the rate of ingress. 
• Trimming the vessel to raise the damage area above the waterline. 
• Plugging of any hole to reduce the ingress of water. 
 
While taking tug assistance, consider: 
• LOF, if the danger imminent. 
• Salvage contract if the situation permits. 
 
Keep all records of incidents and actions. Appropriate records to be entered in: 
• Deck log book 
• Movement book 
• Engine log book 
• Telegraph recorder 
• Echo sounder graph. 
• Used chart 
• Entry to be made in official log book. 
• Record of all damage and subsequent actions. 

ARK    Page 9 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Prepare a statement of fact of all the happenings. 
• Prepare a note of protest, stating the facts only. 
 
Emergency Towing Arrangement 
1. You are a master on a disabled ship at sea how will you prepare for emergency towing? (L) 
2. Towing disabled ship at sea. Show all ways of towing arrangements you would consider and why? 
3. Knowledge of towing arrangement including procedure for towing and being towed.  
 
Fire  
1. In Cargo Hold 
 
Fire in cargo hold at sea 
Immediate actions: 
1. Sound fire alarm 
2. Announce by PA 
3. Inform E/R 
4. Reduce speed 
5. Activate ship's contingency plan for fire. 
6. Muster as per Muster List 
7. Carry out head count 
8. Check if any casualty 
9. Establish communication between emergency teams and bridge. 
 
Command team will: 
1. Check vessel’s position 
2. Check weather condition, wind direction, force 
3. Suit vessel’s course appropriate for minimum wind effect if traffic condition permits. 
4. Alter course 
5. Reduce speed 
6. Record all the events and steps taken 
7. Send urgency or distress message depending on the extent of fire. 
 
In‐charge of emergency team to ensure 
1. Any casualty. 
2. Prepare fire fighting team for fighting fire. 
3. Investigate location and nature of fire, inform to bridge. 
4. Rig fire hoses for boundary cooling. 
5. Seal off the hold, close all ventilators, flaps, blowers, fire doors. 
6. Cut off electrical supply to the hold. 
 
Back up team will: 
1. Ensure fire men’s outfit, BA sets & spare bottles are readily available. 
 
Support team will: 
1. Prepare life boats for lowering. 
2. Take care of casualty. 
 
C/E will ensure: 
1. Start emergency fire pump 
2. Start emergency generator 
3. Maintain fire pump pressure 
 
I’ll decide the best way to fight fire based on all available information and instruct C/O to fight fire 
accordingly: 
ARK    Page 10 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• If there is small fire, use portable fire extinguishers depending on the type of fire. 
• In case of big fire: 
− Send two men donning firemen’s outfit to fight the fire with fire/dry powder hose. 
− They are to be supported by two men, with fire hoses used to produce protective curtain. 
− Back up team to continue boundary cooling. 
− Check adjacent compartments if there is sign of spreading fire. 
− If fire is uncontrollable and deep seated: 
o Flood the hold with CO2 as per ship's fire plan. 
o If hold contains nitrates, sulfates or explosives, flood hold with water. 
o Never open hatch. Entry of air may cause flash back. 
o Consider loss of stability while using water to fight fire. 
o Refer to damage stability booklet for loss of stability. 
o Continuously monitor temperature of affected area and its surroundings. 
o Maintain fire watch when fire is extinguished. 
o Cancel distress/urgency message. 
 
Follow up actions: 
• Report details to owner, charterer, P&I club, under‐writer, Cargo owners, agent of next port. 
• Send an accident report to MPA. 
• Prepare a note of protest to save owner's interest, stating the facts only. 
• Prepare a master’s report that includes: 
1. When fire started. 
2. Extent of fire. 
3. Details of damage to cargo due to fire. 
4. Any personnel injury. 
5. Attempts made to extinguish fire. 
6. Time taken to extinguish fire. 
7. Weather condition. 

 
3. ROR & BOYAGE 
ROR  
1. Write down all signals as per Annex‐IV (L) 
 
ANNEX IV: INTERNATIONAL DISTRESS SIGNALS 

1. The following signals, used or exhibited either together or separately, indicate distress and need of assistance:  

a. a gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of about a minute;  
b. a continuous sounding with any fog‐signaling apparatus;  
c. rockets or shells, throwing red stars fired one at a time at short intervals;  
d. a signal made by radiotelegraphy or by any other signaling method consisting of the group 
. . .‐ ‐ ‐. . . (SOS) in the Morse Code;  
e. a signal sent by radiotelephony consisting of the spoken word "Mayday";  
f. the International Code Signal of distress indicated by N.C.;  
g. a signal consisting of a square flag having above or below it a ball or anything resembling a ball;  
h. flames on the vessel (as from a burning tar barrel, oil barrel, etc.);  
i. a rocket parachute flare or a hand flare showing a red light;  
j. a smoke signal giving off orange‐colored smoke;  
k. slowly and repeatedly raising and lowering arms outstretched to each side;  
l. the radiotelegraph alarm signal;  
m. the radiotelephone alarm signal;  
n. signals transmitted by emergency position‐indicating radio beacons;  
o. approved signals transmitted by radiocommunication systems, including survival craft radar transponders.  

ARK    Page 11 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
2. The use or exhibition of any of the foregoing signals except for the purpose of indicating distress and need of assistance and the 
use of other signals which may be confused with any of the above signals is prohibited. 

3. Attention is drawn to the relevant sections of the International Code of Signals, the Merchant Ship Search and Rescue Manual and 
the following signals:  

• a piece of orange‐colored canvas with either a black square and circle or other appropriate symbol (for identification from 
the air);  
• a dye marker.  

 
2. Explain Rule‐1 in your own understanding. Do the Rules apply in the lake when it is not connected 
with the high seas? (L) 
3. Explain Rule‐2 (What do you understand by exonerate?), 8[f (i), (ii) & (ii)], 10, 19, 6 in your own 
understanding. (L) 
4. Who the organization is as mentioned in the ROR. (IMO) 
5. How do you know that whether the TSS is being adopted by the IMO? 
6. What is your action when you are overtaking the vessel ahead of you in restricted visibility?  (L) 
7. Various Lights and shapes (Sailing vessel, mine clearance vessel etc.) (L) 
8. On the radar screen, little aft of starboard beam, distance 6, 5, 4nm but brg stead, 2O called you and 
told you visibility is 1nm‐ action?  
9. Now distance 3nm steady brg, but you can see the vessel visually, action? 
  
Refer to COLREGS Notes 
 
BUOYAGE 
1. Explain a yellow buoy cone. Which side would you pass and according to what direction? With or 
against? (Hint: Explain regarding the special stbd hand buoy, maneuver as per the chart or with the 
help of the sailing direction as seen from seaward by mariner) (L) 
2. What is the conventional direction of Buoyage? How is it being depicted on the chart? (L) 
3. What is a preferred channel to port in Region A? Explain the features. 
4. Explain E&W cardinal buoy. 
 
Refer to IALA Buoyage System Notes. 

ARK    Page 12 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 

5. Explain an Emergency wreck marking buoy. How soon does the authority must put the buoy and 
till when? What are the features? 
 
Emergency wreck marking buoy 
• IALA has introduced on trial basis. 
• For temporary response. 
• Typically to be used for first 24‐72 hrs. 
• Deployment to be promulgated through usual maritime safety information system. 
• Designed to provide a prominent aid to navigation. 
• To be placed as close of wreck as possible. 
  
It will maintain a position until: 
• The wreck is well known and has been promulgated in nautical publications eg notices to mariners. 
• The wreck is fully surveyed and exact details such as position and least depth above the wreck is 
known. 
• A permanent form of marking of the wreck has been carried out. 
  
Characteristics: 
Shape: Pillar or spar buoy, size dependent on location. 
Color: Equal number and dimensions of blue and yellow vertical stripes. 
Light:  
• Altering blue and yellow flashing light.  
• Nominal range: 4 nm, may be altered depending on local condition. 
• Blue and yellow 1s flashes altered at interval of 0.5s. 
• If multiple buoys deployed, their lights will be synchronized. 
Racon: May be fitted with Racon‐D and/or AIS transponder. 
Topmark: If fitted, straight yellow cross. 

Fig: Emergency wreck marking buoy & light characteristics

ARK    Page 13 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
4. CREW MATTERS 
 

Medical Problems 
1. Crew member seriously sick at sea, action as a master? 
• Conduct a medical assessment of victim for primary medical treatment. 
• Attend to treatment as best as possible with onboard facilities and medication. 
• Request for medical advice from the RCC or other appropriate authority, 
• If medical evacuation is required, alert appropriate authorities. 
• Prepare patent for evacuation. 
• Gather appropriate paper work and attach to patient.  
 
2. Crew is dead, cold room is out of order – action? 
• Make sure he is dead. (Refer to “Signs of death” in SCMG Chapter 12) 
• Master to take charge of his property. (Wages, Valuables & Personal effects) 
• Make an inventory of his effects and enter in OLB. (Entry to be attested by the mate or any other 
crew member) 
• Communicate with Owners, Next of Kin and MPA. 
• Obtain explicit instructions from owners/next of kin. 
• Consider deviate to land the body ashore. 
• Since cold room is out of order, consider sea burial. (Ref: SCMG Ch:12 “sea burial”) 
• Clean & wash the body, close all openings, provide burial rituals with the help of an elder 
seaman of same religion. 
• Make OLB entry. (Burial position, time and date) in section – “Return of Births and deaths in 
ship” 
• Deliver the property of the deceased seaman within 48 hrs after arriving Singapore to DOM.  
 
 
DESERTED SHIP 
1. Crew missing prior departure (L) 
2. Before sailing, CE informed you that 5E is not back from shore, as a Master will you sail? What will 
you do? (K) (AOA entry, OLB, Dispensation form MPA, ENG‐2A, Remarks – deserted ship) To whom 
you will have to inform? How will you inform them? How about his personal effects? (Hint: Give 
him all the related points but don’t forget about informing the MPA through the owner/agent via 
copies of the AOA & OLB and most importantly ENG 2A. Take and inventory with the presence of a 
crew+officer and log down, send back)  
 
Crew missing before sailing  
1. Check gangway roaster, register. 
2. Quick search in accommodation, E/R and other places in the ship where he may be found. 
3. Call the person who went ashore with him and ask. 
4. Inform agent and ask him to check all suspicious places as hospitals, police station, seamen's club, night 
clubs etc. 
5. Inform different parties:  
• Owner 
• MPA 
• Local port authority 
• P&I club 
• Charterer (If required) 
• Local police 
6. Make a list of his personal belongings and money. 
7. Sign him off from AOA (Marine 68D) 
8. Make an entry in OLB 

ARK    Page 14 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
9. Fill up form ENG‐2A 
10. Make his final wages account 
11. Give him discharge certificate 
12. All those things to be handed over to agent to send to DOM, MPA. 
13. Keep the receive copy from agent. 
14. Check safe manning doc and check if the ship is able to sail without him. 
15. If ship is unable to sail, check from juniors if somebody have certificate, give him promotion after consult 
with dept head and owner. 
16. If promoting is not possible, arrange permission from MPA to sail up to next port. 
17. Keep an eye to the jetty upto departing for the last moment of his arrival. 
18. Do a thorough search of the accommodation for any suspicious items he kept onboard. 

 
 
AOA 
1. What do you know about AOA? How much voyage limit? (L) 
2. How to open/close AOA.  
3. Contents of AOA? 
 
Article of agreement 
 
 Before opening, master must ensure the followings: 
  
• Terms and conditions of AOA is understood by all crews. 
• A memorandum is signed. 
• A change of command form Marine‐40 is endorsed by MPA. 
• Change of crews ENG‐2A form is endorsed. 
• New AOA effected before expiry date of old AOA. 
  
Procedures of opening AOA: 
 1.    Expiry:  
If the AOA expires at sea, the new Agreement shall be valid until its next port of call. 
 2.    The AOA:  
• Consists of Marine 68A, 68B, 68C and 68D forms in duplicate.  
• The black copy of AA is to be retained on board.  
• The red copy is to be forwarded to the Marine Department. 
 
3.     Marine 68A  
a) This form is the front cover of the Agreement.   
b) The particulars of the ship which may be obtained from the Certificate of Registry shall be stated in 
the space provided at the top of the form. 
c) The trading area in which the ship is plying and the period of validity of the Agreement i.e. 12 or 24 
months are to be indicated. 
d) Other stipulations: Blank space after "And it is also agreed that" is for inserting other stipulations 
such as: 
• See Additional Clauses; 
• As per individual agreement; 
• As per collective agreement. 
e) A copy of any of the above documents so used must be attached to each copy of the AA. 
  
f) Voyages: Bottom boxed columns concerning "voyages" must be completed. Master is to sign at the 
bottom right side and end of voyage column. 

ARK    Page 15 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
g) Particulars of statutory certificates: On the inside front cover of red copy of AA the Master is to 
complete particulars on SOLAS ,ILL & IOPP certificates, as well as medical supplies certificate. 
  
4.     Marine 68B 
a) Additional clauses: On the page "Additional Clauses" certification by Master must be countersigned 
by Shipowner's representative or any member of the crew; on same page Master and/or Chief 
Engineer must sign concerning their responsibilities and duties to be performed by 
Cadets/Apprentices and/or Cadet Engineers. 
 Scale of provisions: Scale of provisions to be furnished to each seaman. 
b) Position of loadlines:  on the reverse page "Positions of the deck Line and Load Lines" to be written. 
c) Discipline: "Regulations for maintaining discipline" are stated. 
d) Offences: list of offences are written. 
e) Endorsements: Certificates or endorsements made by Consular Officers or Superintendents. 
  
5.     Marine 68C 
Particulars of young persons under 18 years of age and apprentices employed on the vessel. 
  
6. Marine 68D 
 

• Particulars of all persons employed on the vessel, including the Master and young persons: 
• Full name of seaman in BLOCK LETTERS 
• Seaman to sign in "ENG" box after engagement 
• The "Ref No" to run serially, and new seaman engaged given next consecutive number 
• Master to witness seaman's signature and sign in the extreme right‐ hand column.  
  
 7.      FORM U 
 It incorporates salient features of AOA. 
It is to be posted up in a conspicuous place on board the vessel. 
  
8.     Certificates of Competency 
Master is to sight the original COC and other certificates prior signing on an Seaman. 
A copy of these certificates to be forwarded to Marine Dept. 
  
 9.     Documents to be sent to MPA 
On completing the new Agreement, the Master shall forward the red copy of the Agreement to the Shipping 
Division, MPA together with the: 
 
1. Red & Terminated black copy of the previous crew agreement and official log book (in the case of 
renewing crew agreement); 
2. Officers’ Certificate of Endorsement numbers (COE) or their applications for COE and Tanker 
endorsement  Certificates (*for vessels carrying Petroleum, Chemical and Liquefied Gas Products); 
3. The ‘Order On A Druggist’ form duly completed; 
4. A copy of the Contract of Employment made between the crew members and the owners. 
5.  Names of ratings forming part of a navigational or engine room watches as shown in the List of 
Ratings.  The  
6. “List of Ratings” form (for (for foreign going ship only) is to be kept on board; 
7. A copy each of the ship’s Safety Radio and Safety Equipment Certificate with the sea areas i.e A1, A2 
and showing the number of crew the vessel is allowed to carry. 
 
 10. OLB Entry 
 The Master also enter in the narrative section of OLB a statement to the effect that a new Agreement has 
been opened, giving particulars such as date and place of opening the Agreement.  
The Log Book entry must be countersigned by the Chief Officer or any other member of the crew. 
 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
ARK    Page 16 of 99 
ORAL QU
UESTION
NS ‐ 2008

 
of closing arrticles of agrreement: 
Procedures o
• Each h seaman siggns in the "REELEASE" colu umn and the e Master to innitial in the eextreme righ
ht hand 
colu
umn. 
• The adjacent shaaded boxes aare to be com mpleted. 
• Certtificate of Discharge musst be given w whether the sseaman is ree‐engaged orr not. 
• Acco ount of wage es to be giveen upon discharge of a seeaman. 
• Masster should complete thee four boxes at the bottom of front co over of the A Agreement. 
• OLB B Entry of terrmination of AA. 
• Finees imposed o on the seamaan during thee currency off the Agreem ment should be remitted by crossed 
cheqque made in favour of th he "Maritimee Port and Au uthority, Ship
pping Divisioon ". 
 
4. What is form‐U and d what is the main purpo ose of this form? (L) 
 
Form‐U 
  It is a legible cop
py article of aagreement.
  To b be made acceessible to thee ship’s crewws. 
  To b be posted it o
on notice board in order to enable th
he crew to kn
now the main features of article of 
agreement.  
  
Following arre the contents of form U: 
  Shipp’s name / PO OR / Registerr Tonnage. 
  No o of crew to whom the acccommodation is certified. 
  Nam me of Masterr and his COC C details. 
  Scale of Provisio on.  
  Regu ulation for m
maintaining ddiscipline. 
  Voyage Limit. 
  Shorrt summary of employment of underr aged person. 
   
Fine for nonn‐compliance e:  
Not exceeding SS$ 100. 

FRE‐13 
  Notiice of draft aand freeboarrd. 
  To b
be displayed in conspicuo ous place beffore sailing.
  Contains particu ulars of loadline, sailing d
draft and free
eboard. 
 
5. Your Ow
wner tells you to advice h him if vessell can load grrain in a rem
mote port in ccold region w
which is 
above 7
75°N. How do o you go aboout advising him? (Hint: Ice class on certificate o of class , Pola
ar Code, 
AOA, Un
nderwriters a affected) 
 
Perform Vo
oyage Beyo ond terms & & condition of AOA: 
A) Prep
paration reg garding legall/documenta ation part:
• Inform MPA / Class. 
• Studdy additionall clauses & collective agreement. 
• Consult with uniion if necessary. 
• Makke a separatee memorand dum for creww to sign to pproceed to vo oyage. 
• Masster to use taact to convince the crew.. 
• Any exemption rrequired from m class / MPPA. 
• Ensu ure vessel is permitted to
o proceed on n voyage without violatin ng insurance warranty. 
• OLB entry aboutt owners’ insstruction / ap pproval. 
• Careeful study of voyage ordeer & proper p planning of vvoyage. 
• Own ner to seek aapproval fromm MPA / Classs / under writers. 
ARK  Page 17 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Crew miss‐conduct / incompetency 
1. Seaman on drugs at sea – what is your action? 
• Investigate if he is an addict. 
• Search for possibility of large quantity onboard or other crews involved. 
• Take Urine/blood sample for testing. 
• Communicate with owner. 
• If seaman proved addict repatriate him and request Police. 
• OLB entries to be sent to Owners and MPA. 
 
2. What are the possible consequences if seaman is found guilty of smuggling? Actions as Master? 
 
• Drug smuggling will lead to heavy liability to ship‐owners. 
• Delays due to investigation. 
• Ship may be arrested if unable to proof of not being a part of it. 
• Seaman may be fined, and jailed. 
Master’s Actions: 
• Investigate and identify the crew and surrender him to the authorities. 
• Communicate with owners, P&I club. 
• Lodge note of protest for vessel not being held responsible. 
• Determine the source of Drugs. 
• Cooperate fully with the port authorities. 
Owners has right to: 
• Sue the seaman. 
• Forfeit his wages. 
• Take Legal action against the offender to recover expenses. 
 
 
3. Crew member drunk and report for duty. Action? 
If a seaman is under the influence of drink or drug that his capacity to fulfill his responsibility for the 
ship or to carry out his duties in impaired, he shall be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine. 
(S$2000) 
4.  CO complained that one of crew member has not reported for duty since last 2‐3 days, state your 
action. (K) (Formal Warning – Written reprimand – Dismissal) 
5. Two crew members found fighting – action as Master? 
6. C/O approached to you regarding an AB not willing to work. How will you handle the situation? If 
you intend to impose any penalties, what and how much you can impose? 
 
General Disciplinary Offences: 
A. Striking or assaulting any person on board or belonging to the ship. 
B. Bringing or having onboard intoxication liquors. 
C. Drunkenness. 
D. Taking onboard and keeping possession of any fire‐arm, knuckle‐duster, loaded cane, slung 
shot, sword‐stick, bowie‐knife, dagger or any other offensive weapon or offensive 
instrument without the concurrence of the Master, for every day during which a seaman 
retains such weapon or instrument. 
E. Insolence and contemptuous language or behavior to the Master or any officer, or 
disobedience of any lawful command. 
F. Absence without leave for each day on which such absence occurs. 
Each of the above offences shall be punished by a fine equal to one day’s pay, for the first occasion 
and two day’s pay for the second and any subsequent occasion.  
Actions by Master 
Deal with disciplinary offences within 24hrs from the time it comes to notice, if any delay record in 
OLB. 
ARK    Page 18 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
7. Out‐going Master told you 2O is not good – so before mooring station what will you brief to 2O? (K) 
(As per COSWP Chapter 25) 
1) Sufficient personnel available. 
2) Responsible person is incharge. 
3) Suitable means of communication. 
4) PPE. 
5) Heaving line with monkey fist. 
6) Mooring area free to be clutter free, anti‐skid, and adequately lit. 
7) All mooring equipment to be in good condition. 
8) Ropes and wires should not be used directly from the reel. 
9) Ropes and wires should not be led through the same fairlead. 
10) Personnel to stand clear of bights. 
11) Operation of winch to be carried out by competent person. 
12) When moorings are in strain, all personnel to remain at safe distance. (Avoiding the snap 
back zones) 
13) When stoppering the following to be observed: 
• Natural fiber stopper on natural fiber rope. 
• Synthetic fiber stopper on synthetic fiber rope but not poly amide. 
• West country method is preferable for ropes. 
• Wire ropes should be stoppered with chain, using two half hitches, suitably placed 
(25mm or 10cm) with the tail backed up against the lay of wire. 
  
 
8. How will you train your crew? 
 
 
Crew Complaints 
1. One crew member complained for food and water – As a master how are you going to resolve the 
matter? Two days later 3 crew members complained about food and water what will you do? 
(OLB, Mess committee) 
2. How will you tackle the problem with regard to water? 
3. How do you clean FWT? 
4. After all the efforts still not happy what are the options you have? (Can report to director of 
marine) 
5. After the investigation all is found OK, what is the master’s/owner’s protection that such a 
reporting should not occur again. (Fine imposition on crew if guilty) 
 
Complaint against food and water: 
• 3 or more seamen can complain about food and water.
• They can complain if they consider the provision of food and water 
− are of bad quality, 
− unfit for use,
− Deficient in quality.
• They may complain to the master.
• Master shall investigate the complaint.
• If the seamen are dissatisfied with the action taken by the master or he fails to take any action, they 
may state their dissatisfaction to him and may complain to the director.
• Master shall make adequate arrangements to enable the seamen to complain, as soon as the route 
of the ship permits. (within 7 days)
• The director shall investigate the complaint.
• He may examine provision and water.

ARK    Page 19 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• If master fails to arrange to complain to director without reasonable cause
• He shall be guilty of an offence.
• Fine not exceeding S$ 2000.
• If, after complains and investigation, the investigate person notify the master in writing that any 
provision or water are unfit to use
• The master and owner shall be guilty if they are not replaced within a reasonable time.
• The fine is not exceeding S$5000.
• If master without reasonable cause permits them to use, he shall be guilty of an offence, fine not 
exceeding S$5000.

Other complaints: 
• A seaman may complain to master:  
− against master 
− any seaman 
− About the conditions onboard. 
− Inadequate provision / water. 
− Unsafe ship 
− Overloaded ship 
• Master is to investigate and take action about the complaint. 
• If seaman is dissatisfied with the action taken by master or failure of master to take any action. 
• He may state his dissatisfaction and may complain to the director. 
• Master is to make adequate arrangements to enable seaman to do so as soon as the service of the 
ship permits. 
• If he fails to do so without reasonable cause, 
• Shall be guilty of an offence 
• Shall be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding  S$2000. 

Actions by master: 
• Note down the complaints in official log book. 
• Make statement of fact of each crew members with their signature.
• Elect a committee, members consisting of a crew from each department.
• Investigate all the allegations with the committee members.
• Make known the outcome of the investigation via an emergency gathering meeting.
• Rectify the problems as soon as possible, giving the completion date for the next follow up.
• Keep notes of all the proceedings, investigations, with proofs and photographs.
• Inform the office about the outcome.
• If the crews are not satisfied with the actions taken, inform the office.
• If the crews want to complain to the director, inform office and arrange so in the next suitable 
opportunity.

ARK    Page 20 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 Stowaway 
1. Stowaway found prior arrival Singapore, action? How much is security bond? Thorough 
familiarization with the recent port circular on stowaways.   
 
• Obtain identity of the stowaway. (Nationality) 
• Check if he is carrying any other documents. 
• Make an entry in the OLB. 
• Inform Flag State within 24hrs. 
• Lock him and provide food. 
• Report to Last & Next port agents. 
• Communicate with owners, agents, P&I club, ICA and Embassy. 
• Arrange his repatriation as soon as possible. 
• On arrival port, “NO SHORE LEAVE” board to be displayed, until the stowaway has been handed over to the 
authorities. 
 
Landing Stowaway in Singapore: 
(As per Port Marine Circular No.14 of 2006, “CONDITIONS FOR REPATRIATION OF STOWAWAYS”) 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 21 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
5. SHIPHANDLING/SEAMANSHIP 
1. What do you mean by short Round Turn, what is its purpose? 
 

Vessel is turned round in her own length. 
It will be useful, when turning a vessel where there is a less sea room such as: 
• Within a channel 
• Congested Anchorage Area 
• Any danger close 
Principle 
When an engine is reversed a powerful swing to starboard is generated. 
Method 
a) Engine is worked full ahead on hard starboard helm. 
b) At first sign of head way the helm is put mid ship and engines are worked full astern. 
c) Swing to starboard continues. 
The above sequence is repeated until the vessel is turned. 
Caution – if astern power is small the watch for headway must be carefully watched. 
 
2. What is Screw Race (Spiral motion of water when propeller blade cuts the water), what is its 
effect?  
3. Describe transverse thrust, what are the principles and how does it work?  (Explain by drawing) Do 
you see it practically at sea? (DJ‐House) – berthing without tug. 
4. What is wake current? (L) 
 
Transverse thrust: 
• Thrust of the propeller is divided into two components, a fore‐and‐aft one and a very small 
athwart‐ship one. 
• Athwartship component of propeller thrust is called Transverse Thrust. 
 
Direction of Motion
  Reaction to  
Side component 
  (Small) 
Upper blades meet less 
resistance near surface level. 
  Side component Water tends to breakup, causing 
  aeration. 
 
  Lower blades meet greater 
reaction to motion of propeller. 
  Side component  At greater depth the water is 
  more solid and does not break 
Reaction to  easily, with little aeration being 
  Side component 
Direction of Motion  caused. 
  (Large) 
 
Cause: 
The upper blades work near the surface and their transverse effect is not sufficient to cancel out the 
opposite effect of the lower blades.  
 

Effect on ship: 
• The effect is for right‐handed propellers resultant thrust tends to cant a vessel's stern to the 
starboard and her bow to port when the engines are put ahead.  
• When going astern, the stern cant to port and the bow cants to starboard. This action cannot be 
controlled as the rudder is ineffective when going astern. 
• Left hand screws will have the opposite action to that described above.
• For controllable pitch propellers the canting effect of transverse thrust will always be in the same 
direction, whether the pitch is set to ahead or astern, because the shaft always rotates in the same 
direction.
• The result of this force may be deduced by considering the propeller to be a wheel, carrying the 
stern through the water at right angles to the vessel’s line of motion.  
 

ARK    Page 22 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 Screw race: 
• When engines works ahead, a spiral flow of water is thrown towards rudder. 
• It is opposite to transverse thrust. 
• It gives better steerage. 
• It increases as the ship speed increases. Therefore it cancels the transverse thrust. 
 
Wake current: 
• When a vessel moves ahead, a cavity is created at stern. 
• Water from sides flow and swirl to fill the cavity, which is called wake current. 
• Steering will be adversely affected as the rudder works in partial vacuum. 
• Propeller works in disturbed water, speed will be lost, vibration will set up.  
• Wake current and cavitation increase with speed. 
• In a finely sterned vessel, wake current is less. 
• When engines work astern, wake current is less and propeller or steering is not affected. 

Frictional wake:
• When a vessel moves ahead, belt of water is drawn along the hull, which is called frictional wake. 
• This frictional wake creates a resistance to upper blades of propeller. 
• As a result, transverse thrust reduces. 
• Under sternway there is very little wake strength at the propeller, and transverse thrust increases as 
speed increases. 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
 
5. What is girthing? When is the capsizing moment? What are the conditions for it to happen? 
 
Girthing 
It is the capsizing moment of the tug due to the sudden movement of ships. The line is usually secured very 
near to the center of flotation and for this reason the tug is liable to be girded. This phenomenon is known 
variously as girthing, girding or girting, in differing parts of the world.  
It can be caused by one, or both of the following: 
• The ship turning independently and too quickly away from the tug. 
• Excessive straight line speed with a tug made fast.  
Girting: Forward
Let us look at an example of a common situation, with a conventional tug forward on a long line.  
Position‐1: 
In this area the tug is relatively safe and regardless of 
whether the ship's speed is too high it does not result in 
any immediate problem, provided it remains within a small 
angle on the bow.  
Position‐2:
If the tug is out in this position broad on the bow the ship 
could, as a result of too much starboard helm or excessive 
speed, or both, outrun the tug which may have neither the 
time nor maneuverability to turn and keep up with the 
rapidly swinging or accelerating ship. 
Position‐3:
This is the worst possible situation where the tug is being 
pulled around on the radius of the tow line and because of the position of it's hook, is then dragged along  
with the tow line out on its beam. Due to the nature of the forces involved, it will also be pulled over to a 
dangerous angle of heel and unless the tow line breaks, or can be released immediately, the tug which is 
powerless to respond and already listing heavily, may capsize! 
  

ARK    Page 23 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Girting: Aft
A conventional tug working aft, is perhaps 
more at risk than the forward tug, as its 
design characteristics frequently oblige it to 
lay with the tow line much more inclined 
towards its beam.

Position‐1:
Provided the ship is either stopped or 
proceeding at extremely low speeds a 
conventional tug can work quite efficiently 
with maximum bollard pull in all directions at 
this and any other position around the stern.  
 
Position‐2:
If the ship's speed now increases, the tug will 
have to work around onto a heading which is more in keeping with the ship, not only to keep up with the 
accelerating ship but also to maintain a safe lead with the tow line. In this situation, if the tug works with the 
tow line dangerously near the tug's beam, might result in a substantial loss of bollard pull over what was a 
previously large useful arc of operation.  
 
Position‐3:
Should the ship's speed become excessive, or if the stern of the ship is swung rapidly away from the tug, it 
may be unable to respond quickly enough and could fail to keep the safe station previously illustrated. As a 
consequence the tug might be dragged around on the radius of the tow line to this dangerous position and 
capsize with shocking rapidity.  
  
It is also very important to note that a tug attending a ship aft, but in the close confines of a lock, may find 
itself in a similar situation, but with even less ability to maneuver. Should the tug get caught across the lock 
with a ship proceeding at too high a speed it will be exposed to a very serious risk of girting. 
  
For those unfortunate enough to have witnessed it, a tug being girted and capsized is an awesome and 
frightening sight. It frequently happens too quickly to activate quick release gear and allows absolutely no 
time whatsoever for the evacuation of the crew who may become trapped in the submerged tug. 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 24 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Definitions 
Wave Period 
The wave period is the time interval between the generation of a foam patch by a breaking wave and its 
reappearance after passing the wave trough. 
It can be measured by using a stop watch 
or the following figure. 
 
Wave length 
The wave length is the distance between 
successive wave crests. 
It can be measured by: 
•  visual observation in comparison 
with the ship’s length; or 
• By reading mean distance between 
successive wave crests on the radar. 
 
Period of encounter 
The time interval between the passage of 
two successive crests relative to the ship 
borne observer. 
It can be measure as the period of pitching 
by using stop watch. 
 
 
Synchronism
Occurs when rolling or pitching period is equal or nearly equal to the apparent period of wave. 
Synchronism may be synchronized rolling or synchronized pitching. 
 
Panting
Tendency of the bow plating and to a lesser extent the stern plating to work in and out when the ship is 
pitching. 
Fore and aft regions of the vessel are extra strengthen by thicker plating, panting beams and stringers, 
reduced frame spacing in designed to withstand panting stress. 
 
Backing
Change of true wind direction to an anti‐clockwise direction. 
 
Veering
Change of true wind to a clockwise direction. 
 
Following seas 
Occurs when vessel running before the sea. 
Sea comes from the stern. 
The ship encounters various dangerous phenomena. 
 
Quartering seas 
Occurs when vessel running before the sea. 
Sea comes from the quarter. 
The ship encounters various dangerous phenomena. 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 25 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
6. Synchronized Pitching?  What is your action? What are the damages? (Propeller racing)(He asked me to 
draw and explain in detail.)  (L) How does it damage the propeller? (Hint: Give him all related points but 
don’t miss out about the propeller racing where the governor has to be adjusted to the load and 
adjusting the amount of fuel when it is under load when submerged in the water and when it is race 
above the water with less load. 
Synchronized Pitching 
It occurs when natural pitching period of a ship coincides with the encounter wave period. 
How to determine: 
• Vessel pitching heavily. 
• There is no period of lull; pitching is increasing with every wave encounter. 
• Vessel is encountered by the same phase of wave almost all the times. 
Effects 
• It causes excessive racing of engines. 
• Longitudinal of hull. 
• Damage due to shipping seas. 
Corrective actions: 
Change apparent period of waves by: 
• Alteration of course 
• Reduction of speed (Increase in speed will cause excessive pounding). 
 
 
 
7. Following Quartering Sea – effect and phenomenon: 
− Surf Riding  
− Broaching‐to,  
− Reduction of intact stability when riding on wave crest amidships 
− Synchronized rolling,  
− Parametric rolling,  
− Pooping,  
 
Phenomena occurring in following and quartering seas 
A ship sailing in following or quartering seas encounters the waves with a longer period than in beam, head 
or bow waves, and principal dangers caused in such situation are as follows: 
  
1. Pooping 
2. Surf riding 
3. Broach to 
4. Reduction of intact stability when riding on wave crest amidships 
5. Synchronous rolling 
6. Parametric rolling 
7. Combination of various dangerous phenomenon 
8. Successive wave attack 
 

1. Pooping
• Breaking of rising wave over the stern in poop deck area. 
• Develops when bad weather is directly from stern. 
• Vessels with less freeboard may suffer from popping. 
• Occurs when a vessel falls into the trough of a wave and does not rise with it. 
• It may occur if the vessel falls as the wave is rising. 
• Causes following wave to break over the stern or poop deck areas. 

ARK    Page 26 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Result: 
• May cause considerable damage to stern area. 
• Damage to propeller and rudder due to severe buffeting. 
• Engine room can be flooded if the openings which face aft are not properly secured. 

Corrective actions: 
• Occurs when velocity of sea is equal to or greater than ship's speed. 
• Alter course and head sea. 

2. Surf riding
• Occurs when a ship situated on a steep forefront of high wave in a following or quartering sea 
conditions, the ship can be accelerated to ride on the wave. 
• This phenomenon is called surf riding. 
Result: 
In this situation the so called broaching‐to phenomenon may occur, which endangers the ship to capsizing as 
a result of a sudden change on ships heading and unexpected large healing. 

Action: 
Ship’s speed higher than (1.8√L)/cos(180°‐α) knots is considered dangerous, and; 
Surf riding/broaching‐to may occur when angle of encounter 135°<α<225°. 
To avoid surf riding, speed/course or both to be taken outside the dangerous region.  
 

3. Broach to
May occur when a ship is surf ridden in a 
following or quartering sea. 
The vessel is slewed violently. 
Ship heels suddenly and unexpectedly to a 
large angle.  

Result: 
Positive stability disappears to the existing 
angle of heel. 
Vessel may capsize due to sudden change of 
heel and heading. 

Action: 
Reduce speed below 1.8√L knots. 
A marginal zone (1.4√L to 1.8√L) below critical 
speed may cause a large surging motion (broach to). Speed to be reduced below 1.4√L in the case. 

4. Reductions of intact stability when riding on a wave crest


When a ship is riding on the wave crest, the intact stability can be decreased substantially according to 
changes of submerged hull form. 
This stability reduction may become critical for wave lengths within range of 0.6L to 2.3L, within this range 
the amount of stability reduction is nearly proportional to the wave height. 
This situation is particularly dangerous in following and quartering seas, because the time interval of reduced 
stability becomes longer. 

5. Synchronous rolling
Large rolling motions may be excited when natural rolling period of a ship coincides with the encounter 
wave period. 
In following and quartering seas this may happen when the transverse stability is marginal and therefore the 
natural roll period becomes longer. 
ARK    Page 27 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
How to determine:
• Vessel rolling heavily. 
• There is no period of lull; rolling angle is almost same or increasing in every roll. 
• Vessel is encountered by the same phase of wave almost all the times. 
 
Corrective actions:
1. Change apparent period of waves by: 
• Alteration of course 
• Alteration of speed 
2. Change vessels rolling period by changing GM 
• By ballasting 
• By deballasting 
• Shifting of ballast, FO, FW etc and changing transverse position of G. 

6. Parametric Rolling
Parametric roll motions with large and dangerous roll amplitudes in waves are due to variation of stability 
between the position on the wave crest and the position in the wave trough. 
It occurs when the encounter period is approximately half of the natural roll period of the ship. 
The stability attains a minimum twice during each roll period. 
It occurs when the ship has very marginal intact stability due to which its rolling period becomes very large. 
Parametric rolling may occur in head and bow seas when the encounter ratio is 1:0.5. 
Corrective actions:
3. Change apparent period of waves by: 
• Alteration of course 
• Alteration of speed 
4. Change vessels rolling period by changing GM 
• By ballasting 
• By deballasting 
• Shifting of ballast, FO, FW etc and changing transverse position of G. 

7. Combination of various dangerous phenomena


The dynamic behavior of ship in following and quartering seas is very complex.  
Ship motion is three dimensional and  various dangerous phenomena may occur simultaneously, such as: 
Additional heeling moments due to deck‐edge immersion, water shipping and trapping on deck, or cargo 
shift due to large heeling motions. 
This may create extremely dangerous combinations, which may cause ship capsize. 

8. Successive high-wave attack


When average wave length is larger than 
0.8L and significant wave height is larger 
than 0.04L a ship may experience successive 
attack of high waves.  

Preventive Action: 
Ship’s speed should be reduced and course 
should be changed to keep the ship out of 
the danger zone. 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 28 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
8. Explain Squat, shallow water effects.  
 
SHALLOW WATER EFFECTS 
Shallow water: 
When the depth of water is less comparing to the draft of the ship. The hydrodynamic forces affect the ship 
handlings in different ways. The effects become evident when the depth of water is less than 1.5 times of 
the draft of the ship. 
  
In shallow waters, following effects may be evident: 
a) Sluggish movement 
b) Vibration 
c) Erratic steering, slow response. 
d) Smelling the ground 
e) Squat 
f) Bow cushion and bank suction effect 
g) Canal effect 
   
a) Sluggish movement: 
As the hull moves along the water, the water which is displaced is not instantly replaced by surrounding 
water. 
• A partial vacuum is created. 
• The vessel takes longer to answer helm. 
• Response to engine movement becomes sluggish. 
• Speed reduces. 
   
b) Vibration: 
• In shallow water vibrations set up. 
• It becomes very difficult to correct a yaw or sheer with any degree of rapidity. 
  
c) Steering: 
• Steering becomes erratic. 
• Rate of turning is reduced. 
• Turning circle becomes larger. 
• Loss of speed due to turning is less in shallow water. 
   
d) Smelling the ground: 
When the vessel enters the shallow water, she experience a 
restricted flow of water under the keel, which causes an 
apparent increase in the velocity of water around the vessel  Area of 
relative to the ship’s speed. Consequently, an increase in the  expected  
Sheer 
frictional resistance from the ship’s hull will result. 
If the increase in the velocity of water is considered in relation 
to the pressure under the hull form, a reduction in pressure will 
be experienced, causing the ship to settle deeper in water. The 
increase in the frictional resistance of the vessel, together with 
the reduction of pressure may result in “smelling the bottom or 
ground”.  
Effects 
• A cushion effect may be experienced, causing an initial 
attraction towards shallow water, followed by  a more distinct ‘sheer’ away to deeper water.  
• The movements of a sluggish ship may suddenly become astonishingly lively. 
Occurs when a ship is nearing an extremely shallow depth of water, such as a shoal. 
  
ARK    Page 29 of 99 
ORAL QU
UESTION
NS ‐ 2008

 
e) Squat: 
• Water ddisplaced by the hull is no ot easily replaced. 
• Bow waave and stern n wave increase in heightt. 
• Trough becomes deeper and vesssel is drawn n downwardss. 
• This effeect is called ssquat. 
• Squat mmay occur by the head orr stern: 
− If thhe LCB is aft o of the COF, aa squat by sttern would be expected; and 
− If thhe LCB is forw ward of the C COF, the vessel would bee expected to
o settle by th
he head. 
Effects:  
− Steeering will be sluggish. 
− p handling will become difficult. 
Ship
− Undder keel clearrance decreaases. 
Squat varies on the follow
wing factors: 
 
Ship's speed d: Squat is directly propo ortional to the square of speed. 
            Squatt α  V2    (V=sp
peed in knots) 
 
Block co‐effficient: Squatt directly varries with CB.
            Squatt  α  CB 
 
Blockage facctor (S): It is the ratio between cross section of th d cross section of the can
he vessel and nal or river. 
Squat variess with blockaage factor as.. 
 
Blockage facctor=b/B   x  d/D   (squat is more apparent when the blockadee factor is beetween 0.1 aand 0.3) 
Squat α  S0.81 
 
So, in confin ned water, sq quat is more than in open n water. 
Squat may b be calculated d by the follo owing simpliffied formulae e: 

Squat =  (CB X V ) / 100              (In op pen waters)
Squat =  2 X (CB X V2 ) / 1 100        (In co
onfined wateers) 
  
Precaution 
• Squaat may causee grounding in spite of en nough UKC.
• Squaat to be calculated beforrehand. 
• Speeed to be reduced to redu uce squat. 
• While determiniing UKC, squat for the sp peed to be taaken into connsideration. 
  
f) Bow cusshion and ba ank suction eeffect: 
• Occu urs in narrow w channels n near proximitties of 
banks. 
• Therre is a tendency for the b bow of a shipp to be 
pushhed away fro om the bank,, called bow cushion. 
• The ship moves bodily towards the bankk, which 
appeears at the stern, called b bank suctionn. 
• Caussed by the reestricted flow w of water oon the 
bank's side. 
• Velo ocity of wateer to the bank increases aand 
presssure reducees. 
• Resu ults in drop o of water leveel towards th he bank. 
• As aa result, a thrrust is set up p towards bank. 
• A veessel approacching to the bank will have to apply 
helm
m to the bank and reducee speed to prevent the 
sheeer from deveeloping. 
ARK  Page 30 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 Canal effect: 
• Water level drops towards a bank. 
• Vessel heels towards bank to displace constant volume. 
• Varies as the square of speed. 
• Corrective helm to be applied. 
 
 
9. How do you turn vessel in bad weather? (L) 
 
Alteration of course in heavy weather
• Dangerous/critical period when sea comes from beam. 
• Wave group consists of about 8 waves. 
• Lull period 1‐2 waves  among wave groups. 
• Alter the vessel during lull period. 
• Before turning, inform all department heads, take necessary precautions. 
• No one is allowed on deck. 
• Understand turning ability of the ship. 
• Study wave development cycle carefully to find out calm period. 
• To minimize danger of being capsized or swamped, the timing of turn to be coincide with calmer waves 
when abeam. 
• Consider possibility of misjudgment of lull period and turning ability of the vessel. 
• About 2/3 waves before the calm wave, start turning slowly with extreme caution. 
• If turning misjudged, come back to previous heading. 
• If turning is correct, continue the turn as fast as possible. 
• When critical period is passed, increase the turning rate. 
• Steady to next course and observe situation carefully. 
• Adjust speed if necessary for following and quartering sea. 
 
10. Use of Oil in Bad weather? 
 

Use of oil in bad weather 
• Storm oil may be used to reduce heavy seas. 
• It prevents seas from breaking. 
• Reduces hazards of bad weather. 
• May be used to in heavy seas to: 
− Turn the vessel. 
− Lowering life boats. 
− Rescue persons. 
− Hove to. 
− Towing operation. 
− Crossing a bar. 
• Vegetable, animal or fish oil may be used. 
• If not available, lubricating oil may be used. 
• Fuel oil and crude oil not recommended, as they may congeal or may cause harm to men in water. 
• A small amount of oil can quench a comparatively large sea area. 
• About 200 Liters of oil can quell 4500 m2 sea area. 
• To be distributed from both bows when heading into wind and seas. 
• To be distributed from weather side when lying stopped or running with seas on the quarter. 
• Should be used gradually. 
  
 It may be done by: 
ARK    Page 31 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Trailing a punctured hose full of oil  
• Through a punctured canvas bag which have been weighted and filled with oil soaked 
cotton. 
• Flushing through water closets 
 
11. You sailed from port, POB, near Sebarok, beam current; pilot can’t control the ship, he want to 
Dredging the anchor, what is that? (K) 
 
Dredging Down 
A vessel is said to dredge when she moved under the influence of the tidal stream but with her 
anchor held at short stay so that it drags along the bottom. 
Her SOG is therefore retarded and is not as great as the rate of stream.  
She therefore has headway through the water. Her rudder may be used to steer her. 
 
If a vessel when dredging, puts her rudder to port, the vessel will remain parallel with the stream 
direction but will gradually move diagonally across it towards her port. 
She will similarly dredge to starboard.  
In each case the most efficient movement is achieved by using the anchor on the side opposite to 
that in which she wishes to dredge. 
  
12. As a master is turning circle important to you? (K) Both the circles are same? Which one is smaller 
and why? 
Yes.  
With a right handed propeller the circle to port will be slightly smaller in radius than the circle to 
starboard, due to the effect of transverse thrust. 
 
13. Turning circle is traced by CG or Pivot point? 
Turning Circle 
• When a vessel alters her course 360° she moves on a roughly circular path known as its turning 
circle. 
• The turning circle is the path traced out by vessel’s centre of gravity. 
• Seaman usually refer to the turning circle as being the path traced out by the pivot point, the 
definition given previously being that of naval architectures. 
• Advance – distance travelled by the COG  along the original course. (About 3 to 5 ship’s lengths) 
• Transfer – distance travelled by the COG measured from the original track to the point where 
the vessel has altered her course by 90°. (about 2 ship’s lengths) 
• Tactical Diameter – is the transfer for 180°. (about 4 ship’s lengths) 
• Drift angle – angle between the ship’s F&A line and the tangent to the turning circle. 
• The two circles will be very close together, and concentric. 
• The time taken to complete a turning circle can range from 6 to nearly 30 minutes.  

ARK    Page 32 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
14. Now speed increasing from noon, but after 1700 CO informed you that wind speed is 10‐11, what 
will you do? 
15. TRS? Pressure increasing/wind veering in which quadrant & your action? 
16. How would you determine the position of TRS? 
17. As a master what are the precautions in a TRS? 
18. Explain heavy weather precautions. (Hint: Bridge, deck, reporting, LB entries, hourly monitoring 
and logging, practical actions of staying away from the centre) 
19. You are in N‐Hemp., wind is backing, barometer pressure falling, what is your action as a master? 
Where do you keep the wind. 
 
Tropical revolving storms ‐ TRS 
 

Formation/characteristics 
For development of TRS, following conditions must be met: 
• Alarge ocean area. 
• Near seasonal location of equatorial trough or existing low pressure or depression. 
• In northern hemisphere, 5‐25°N, in southern hemisphere 5‐18°S, for sufficient Carioles force. 
• Sea water temp 27°C or more. 
• Moves along 275‐350° in northern hemisphere, 225‐250° (WSW‐SSW) in southern hemisphere. 
• Region of small vertical wind sheer. 
 
Master's obligations in a TRS: 
As per SOLAS Ch:V, regulation 31; masters of all ships, which encounter a TRS for which no warning was 
broadcasted, are obliged to 
• Report to the nearest coast radio station. 
• All nearby shipping. 
• By all available means at his disposal. 
 

He should also place his ship in a safe position by: 
• Avoiding passing within 75nm of storm 
• Preferably outside 200nm of center. 
 

The format of the message is not obligatory. It may be in plain English language or ICS. 
• It shall be preceded by “securité” or “TTT” 
• Statement that a TRS is encountered. 
• Barometric pressure with unit, whether corrected or not. 
• Barometric tendency for last 3 hrs. 
• True wind direction 
• Wind force 
• Sea state 
• Swell 
• Own ship’s course and speed. 
• Message to be transmitted every 3 Hrs. 
 
Weather signs of an approaching TRS 
1. An approaching Swell from the storm center can be experienced as much as a thousand mile away. 
2. Corrected barometric reading below the mean pressure at that locality. 
3. Appreciable change in strength and direction on wind. 
4. A clear sky on a preceding day. 
5. Unusually clear visibility. 
6. A peculiar dark red/copper color of sky. 
7. Frequent violence. 
8. Rain squalls of increasing frequency and violence. 
 

ARK    Page 33 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Methods of receiving TRS forecast 
Various methods are available for receiving TRS or gale warning forecast. 
• VHF weather forecast from coast radio station. 
• MF‐HF radio telephony weather broadcast from met stations. 
• MF‐HF telex from met stations. 
• MF‐HF weather fax from met stations. 
• EGC messages. 
• Navtex. 
• Inm‐B fax from met stations (paid service). 
• Visual observation, by barometric pressure and wind force. 
 
Pressure below Wind force (Beaufort Bearing of center from wind Approximate distance 
mean  scale)  direction
5mb  > 6  12 Points  Within 200nm 

10mb  > 8  10 Points  Within 125nm 

20mb  About 12  8 Points  Within 75nm 

 
 
Ship entered in TRS 
1. Inform C/O, order him to secure deck. 
2. Inform C/E, order him to secure E/R. 
3. Plot storm’s position and observe its movement.  
4. From weather report 
5. Buys Ballots law: 
 
6. Determine sector in which the ship is in.  
• From the weather report 
• From the observed storm position and movement. 
• Heave to for a few hours and observe the change of wind direction.  
• For a stationary observer if the wind veers; he is in RHSC and if it backs LHSC. 
• Distance from the storm can be estimated using the above table. 
• Take 2 bearings of the storm center at an interval of 3hrs, note storm normally travels in a WNW 
direction in latitudes less than 20°. 
 
7. Take appropriate maneuvers as follows: 
 

• In Dangerous Semicircle 
− Keep wind on starboard bow (Port SH) 
− Proceed at maximum practicable speed 
− Alter course as wing veers. (Back SH) 
 
• In navigable semicircle  
− Keep wind on starboard quarter (port SH) 
− Proceed at maximum practicable speed 
− Alter course as wing backs. (Veers SH) 
− If the sea room is insufficient, heave‐to; wind to be kept where it is most comfortable.  
 
• In the path of storm 
−  Keep wind on starboard quarter. (port SH) 
− Make all possible speed to NSC. 

ARK    Page 34 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
• Vessel overtaking storm 
− Heave‐to 
− Wind will veer (back SH) 
− Allow the storm to clear. 
 
8. Order OOW to  
• Update and monitor weather information and reports. 
• Record hourly in log book: 
• Wind direction and force. 
• Wind shift. 
• Barometric pressure. 
• Swell direction and height. 
9. Arrange a FSA for storm. 
10. Strengthen the bridge watch and ensure proper look out. 
11. Change over to manual steering if auto pilot cannot cope up with weather condition. 
12. Continuous watch as visibility can be reduced. 
 
 
13. Instruct C/O to:  
• Close all water tight/weather tight doors, dead lights, side scuttles. 
• Check ship’s stability, draft, trim. 
• Press up tanks to reduce FSE and windage area 
• Propeller and rudder sufficiently immersed to prevent : 
− Loses of their efficiency 
− Racing of engines 
− Excessive vibration 
• Check lashing of the deck cargo 
• Batten down all hatches. 
• Stop hold ventilation. 
• Rig life line. 
• Secure derricks and cranes. 
• Secure anchors, spurling pipes. 
• Drain swimming pools. 
 
14. I will remain outside of a radius of 200nm from storm center. If necessary: 
15. Ensure vessel does not roll or pitch heavily, as it may cause  
• May be damage to cargo 
• Shifting of cargo 
• Damage to ship’s structure 
• Damage to deck equipments, cranes, derricks etc. 
16. All preparations for heavy weather to be entered in official log book in details and deck log book. 
 
17. I will keep in mind:  
• Storm can be erratic and different from weather forecast. 
• Engine and any navigational/ communication equipment may fail any time. 
18. Ensure personnel get enough rest, considering fatigue due to storm. 
19. No body to go on deck without C/O’s permission. 
20. Instruct C/E to check steering gear and M/E performance regularly. 
21. Inform following parties about storm and amended ETA:  
• Owner. 

ARK    Page 35 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Charterer 
• Agent of next port. 
 
Suddenly wind force 10 or above 
1. Take heavy weather precautions. 
2. Heavy weather maneuver to ensure safety of the vessel. 
3. Transmit a danger message with the suitable equipments to the ships in the vicinity and to the nearest 
coast station. The message shall include following information:  
• Barometric pressure. 
• Barometric tendency. 
• True wind direction. 
• Wind force in beaufort scale. 
• State of the sea. 
• True course and speed of the ship. 
• The message may be transmitted by telex/ VHF or by any means, and may be preceded by securité 
or TTT. 
 
 
20. What all available options you have as maneuver in such bad weather? (Head to, Stern to, heave 
 
to, etc..) 
BAD WEATHER MANEUVERS 
 Following options are available to the master, in case of bad weather: 
1. Head to sea 
2. Stern to sea 
3. Heave to 
4. Anchoring 
5. Altering course 
 

1. Head to sea, or wind and sea on fine bow, at reduced speed:


• Most suitable for deep draft vessels.
• Leeward drift is minimized (vessel is liable to sustain considerable pounding).
• Weather is allowed to pass over the vessel.
• The speed is considerably reduced.
• It affects the period of encounter of the oncoming wave formation and subsequently reduces 
pounding.
• Course and speed to be altered to remove possibility of hogging, sagging and synchronism.
• Situation becomes uncomfortable when violent pitching results in ‘racing propellers’, puts excessive 
stress on engines.
• Absolute control of rudder power is essential. 
• Power should be reduced to minimum necessary to maintain steerage way and avoid undue stress 
on machinery.
• Two steering motors to be operational.
• Critical rpm to be avoided.

2. Stern to sea, at reduced speed, running before the wind: 


• When bad weather overtakes vessel, she will find herself running before the wind.
• Preferable to take a course with wind on the quarter rather than stern, which may cause ‘pooping’.
• Vessel will not move as violently as a vessel head to sea.
• Speed adjustment together with long period of encounter will probably reduce wave impact without 
any great delay.
• A distinct danger with stern to sea is when the vessel required to turn across the wave front is 
‘broach to’.

ARK    Page 36 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
  
3. Heaving to, preferably on the lee of an island: 
• Necessary when due to the stress of the weather the voyage is required to be temporarily 
discontinued.
• The vessel is maneuvered so as to ride the sea in the most favorable position.
• Problems may be encountered associated with crew fatigue or damage to cargo for a lengthy period 
of time.
• Most effective when taken advantage of a lee of an island or land mass.
• Action will depend on the type and form of the vessel.
• A reduction of speed will probably be the earliest action to reduce motion of the vessel and avoid 
cargo shift.
• Power not to be reduced to an extent of stalling the main engine or revolutions are critical.
• If it is decided to stop the vessel, sufficient sea room should be available.
• Heavy rolling can be expected.
• There is risk of synchronism and cargo shift.
• Vessel needs to have a good water tight integrity and adequate GM.
 

4. Anchoring in shallow waters: 


• Used when the vessel in shallow water.
• Employed to prevent blown down to a lee shore.
• Two anchors may be used.
• Engines can be used to reduce stress on the cable.
• Anchor will reduce the rate of drift.
• If grounding is not prevented, refloating may be assisted by heaving on the cables.

5. Altering course to avoid bad weather: 


• Verify vessel's position. 
• Obtain up‐to‐date weather forecasts and expected weather prediction for surrounding areas. 
• Warn all departments of impending weather. 
• Rig lifelines fore and aft. 
• Check anchors and securing, lifeboats and lashing, water tight doors, general cargo stowage and 
securing, especially lashing of deck cargoes. 
• Close up ventilators, removing cowls (gooseneck) where appropriate. 
• Check stability, reduce free surface effects. 
• Note preparations in log book. 
• Contact shore station, passing position and obtain constant plotting of storm track. 
• Secure derricks, cranes, hatch covers. 
• Clear surplus gear from deck. 
• Close down deadlights (porthole covers). 
• Slacken off signal halyards and other relevant cordage. 
• Drain swimming pools. 
• Reduce manpower on deck by operating heavy weather work routine. 
• Take down awnings. 
• Secure bridge for excessive rolling and pitching. 
• Warn engine room in plenty of time to reduce revolutions. 
• Check distress rockets and LSA gear. 
• Organize meal reliefs before bad weather arrives. 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 

ARK    Page 37 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
21. OK no TRS is there, gale force wind, why & what will you do? 
Depressions 
1) Depressions are frequent in middle latitudes. 
2) They are associated with unsettles weather conditions, often accompanied by strong winds. 
3) Size varies from very small to very large circulation over 2000 miles in dia. 
4) Central pressure in extreme cases may be as low as 950hPa. 
5) They can produce gale force winds and dangerous seas. 
6) In NH the wind circulates in anti‐clock‐wise and slightly inwards across the isobars towards the 
low pressure; in SH the circulation is clockwise. 
7) Depression may move in any direction; though most middle latitude systems move in a Easterly 
direction. 
8) There is no normal speed movement; small depression can travel very quickly indeed, possibly 
30‐60Knots, but a large depression moves much slowly. 
9) Depressions often originate on a front which is the boundary zone between two contrasting air‐
masses. 
In the middle latitudes it is usual for air moving from the Polar Regions to encounter warm air 
from subtropics moving in the opposite direction. 
At the frontal boundary where the two meet; there is a tendency for small disturbances to 
develop on the front where warm air makes incursion into the cold air mass and vice‐versa, the 
warm air rises over the cold air. 
 
Warm Font  
 When the air in the warm sector of depression meets the denser cold air on the frontal boundary, 
the warm air over‐rides it; extensive clouds and precipitation covering a large area is experienced. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cold Front  
The cold air behind the front overtakes the warm air and undercuts it, causing less dense warm air to 
rise. A belt of large cumulus or cumulonimbus clouds result, associated weather is squalls and heavy 
thunder showers. 
 

ARK    Page 38 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Occlusion 
Cold front generally moves faster than the warm front and eventually overtakes it, thereby closing or 
occluding the warm sector of depression. 
Thereafter cold front may displace the warm front effectively leaving the cold front with mixed 
characteristics. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 39 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
 

Weather Sequence for depression 
1) The approach of a depression is indicated by a falling barometer. 
2) If a depression is approaching from west and passing on the pole ward side of the observer, high 
cirrus clouds appear in the West and the wind shifts to SW or S in the NH or to NW or N in the 
SH. 
3) The cloud layer increases to give overcast skies which gradually obscure the sun, as the clouds 
become lower rain or snow at first intermittent, becomes continuous and heavy.  
4) As the warm front passes: 
− The wind veers in the NH, or backs in the SH; 
− Fall of barometer eases; 
− Temperature rises; as the rain stops or moderates. 
5) In the warm sector visibility is moderate to poor. 
6) The arrival of cold front is marked by: 
− approach from W of a thick bank of clouds.  
− A belt of heavy rain, hail or snow precedes the arrival of cooler, clearer air,  
− the barometer begins to rise. 

ARK    Page 40 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
22. How do you berth a ship? 
23. Berthing with off‐shore wind, current from astern, how will you go about it? 
Refer to Ship handling Notes. 
 
24. What is the purpose of anchor chain stud? 
It has two functions: 
• Strengthen the link. 
• Prevent kinking or twisting of chain when it is stowed inside the chain locker. 
 
25. Knots, Chain stopper, bosun’s chair, staging, why chain stopper against the lay? (L) 
Refer to DJ House  
 
26. How will you clear a foul hawse? 
 
Clearing a foul hawse  
  Preparation: 
• Gears necessary should be made ready at slack water. 
• Gears will include 20‐25mm slack wires, a smaller wire about 10mm or fiber rope, a boatswain's 
chair, equipments for breaking joining shackles. 
• Operation to be started as soon as ship swung to new stream. 
  
Procedure: 
• Turns are hove above the 
water line. 
• Cable below turn lashed 
together.  
• Sleeping cable is 
unshackled on the deck. 
• A preventer may be used 
to prevent sudden loss of 
the parted cable and 
stress. 
• A wire messenger then 
passed down through the 
hawse pipe, dipped 
around the riding cable, 
and returned to the 
forecastle deck. 
• One inboard end of the 
wire is secured to the 
joining shackles, other 
end to the wrapping 
drum. 
• Easing wire may surge on 
the bitts. It can be led to a 
wrapping barrel or may 
be veered under power. 
• The messenger is hove and the easing wire is eased. 
• When one turn is cleared, the weight taken off the stoppers. 
• The wire is then cast off. The procedures are repeated until the cable is cleared. 
• Later, the joining shackle is joined, preventer cast off and fiber lashing burned through. 
ARK    Page 41 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
27. How will you hang the anchor? 
 
Hang off an anchor (detach anchor) 
Objectives: 
• Necessary if required to use free end of cable. 
• Used when making fast to a buoy. 
• First joining shackle of cable, usually 2 ‐ 4 meters from anchor, is opened. 
  
When using through panama lead: 
• The anchor is stowed between gypsy and hawse pipe. 
• The anchor is secured by wire lashing. 
• The cable is passed through fairlead by using chain hooks. 
  
When using through hawse pipe: 
• If cable is passed through the hawse pipe, anchor to be removed and secured on ship's side. 
• The anchor is lowered at cockbill. 
• A slip wire (24mm wire rope for a 5t anchor) passed from bitts situated near hawse pipe, anchor 
shackle and back to deck. 
• Both parts are hove taut and secured with maximum flare. 
• Another wire (No2) of same dia passed from bitts through the cable forward of the joining shackle, 
led to the nearest winch. 
• No2 wire veered (slacked) slowly so that the anchor swings aft. 
• When both the wires are taut, or when weight is transferred to slip wire, no2 wire is cast off. 
• Cable now can be broken and used. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 42 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
28. What do you know about Interaction? 
 

Interaction 
 Interaction it is the reaction of a ships’ hull to pressure exerted on it’s under water volume.  
Pressure fields of a vessel moving ahead may be depicted as following figure: 

Ship to ship interaction - Overtaking:

Ship-B will experience increase in speed.

At position-2, bow of ship A will experience sheer to ship-B. When passing abeam, both of the
ships will experience strong turning force. Their bows will be repelled and sterns will be
attracted. Counter helm is necessary.  At this position, bow of ship-B will
experience sheer towards ship-A. Corrective helm is necessary. 
ARK    Page 43 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Ship to ship interaction ­ Passing:

     

Both of the ships bows will be pushed away. Both of the ships will be attracted to each other. Sterns will be 
attracted to each other. 

The following general points should be noted.
a) Prior to the maneuver each ship remains in the centre of the channel for as long as possible. Failure 
to do so, could expose either ship to bank effect, leading to a sheer across the path of the oncoming 
ship or grounding. 
b) Speed should be low to reduce the interactive forces. There is then, plenty of reserve power for 
corrective 'kicks ahead'. 
c) If the ships pass from deep to shallow water, at any time during the maneuver, the forces will 
increase drastically and extreme caution should be exercised. 
d) The smaller of two ships and tugs, are likely to be the most seriously affected. Large ships should be 
aware of this and adjust their speed accordingly. 
e) Figures above illustrate the anticipated sheers that may develop throughout each maneuver and the 
maximum corrective helm that may be required, in this case 35°. 
f) The engines should be brought to dead slow ahead for the maneuver, particularly turbine or fixed 
pitch propeller ships, so that power is instantly available to control the ship with 'kicks ahead'. 
g) On completion of the maneuver each ship should regain the centre of the channel as quickly as 
possible to avoid any furtherance of bank effect. 

ARK    Page 44 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Interaction with tugs:
It should be remembered that the strength of interaction zones and the distance they extend out from the 
ship can increase dramatically, not only with a small increase in ship speed but also if the ship passes into 
shallow water and the pressure zones are restricted. 

Interaction forward:
When a tug is working its way in towards the ship's forebody, with the intention of passing a line forward, it 
may pass through one or more of these important areas (see following figure) and experience adverse 
handling characteristics. 

In position 1 for example, and similarly all the way down the side of the ship, if the tug is allowed to get in 
too close, it might, despite all the efforts to prevent it, be bodily and inexplicably sucked into the ship's side. 
This might occur unintentionally in strong winds, when a tug is in the lee of a large ship which is drifting 
down upon it. Once trapped alongside it can be extremely difficult to get off again, unless the ship's speed is 
substantially reduced thereby relaxing the strength of the suction area. For the unfortunate tug master, this 
can be the start of a chain of handling difficulties which can accumulate and end in disaster. 
 
In position 2 the tug is again working in close to the ship's side and passing through an area where it is half in 
and half out of the respective pressure and suction zones. A positive force is pushing the bow out from the 
ship, while another force is pulling the 
stern into the ship. This combined turning couple will create a strong shear away from the ship which will 
require rapid and bold use of both helm and power to correct it. 
 
In position 3 when working close in under the bows, the tug may have run slightly ahead of the ship's bow 
pressure zone and consequently find a very strong positive force being exerted on the stern and rudder. This 
will give a similar effect to that of 
putting the helm hard over towards the bow of the ship and the tug could sheer rapidly across its path. Bold 
corrective counter rudder with power will be needed instantly, but even then may be ineffective against a 
force which can be very strong. 
 
If the ship's speed is too high and the interaction forces correspondingly severe, or if the tug master fails to 
keep control, the tug can find itself in position 4 with alarming and fatal rapidity. The consequences may be 
flooded decks and serious collision damage, particularly from underwater contact with the ship's bulbous 
bow, with the possibility of capsize and loss of life. A sudden and catastrophic loss of stability is the most 
likely cause of a capsize and this can occur even with a very slight collision. Tugs, it should be noted, roll over 
and flood extremely quickly, thus affording little time for the crew to escape! 

 
 
ARK    Page 45 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
Interaction aft:
When a tug is approaching to pass a line aft it is also likely to feel the effect of interaction and may, similar to 
the forward tug, experience some handling difficulties. This will be particularly evident if the ship's speed has 
not been sufficiently reduced. 
The resultant interaction forces may be too strong, causing vigorous suction, or low pressure area, around 
the after body of the ship (see following figure). This is compounded by the more obvious and widely 
recognized risk that is associated with working under the stern, in close proximity of the ship's propeller. 

When a tug makes its approach and is in, for example, position 1, it will be influenced by this suction and 
may start to take a sheer towards the ship's stern. As this maybe a low pressure area, the tug will have less 
water resistance ahead of it and may also experience an unexpected increase in speed. Unless quick action is 
taken, with counter rudder and appropriate power, the tug will be drawn unwittingly into the stern of the 
ship and become stuck somewhere alongside in the region of position 2. 
 
Extreme cases are possible, when the forces are so strong that the tug fails to respond to full rudder or 
power and may inadvertently land heavily alongside. If the ship is in ballast, partly loaded or has a large 
overhanging stern the tug could be drawn into position 3, with the possibility of serious structural damage to 
the tug's superstructure and upperworks. The danger from the propeller is a more obvious threat and, 
naturally, care should be exercised whenever a tug is working close under the stern.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 46 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Beaching a Ship 
1. You are a Master, how will you beach your ship? What is your main concern and what are the 
factors to consider? What type of sea bed and gradient you would consider?(L) 
 
Beaching 
Beaching is referred as intentional grounding. 
• Reason for beaching  Anchor points ashore 

Beaching is normally done due the 
following: 
− To prevent imminent collision. 
− To prevent loss of vessel, when 
severely damaged and in danger of 
sinking. 
The intention is to repair damage and 
refloat at a later time. 
• Ideal condition for beaching 
− Daylight  Anti‐slew preventer 
wires shackled to the 
− Gentle slopping beach  ganger length of the  Buoy on 
− Sandy or rock free beach  Anchor Cable  sinker 
− Little or no current  Prevailing 
− Sheltered waters  Weather  Anti‐Pollution barrier rigged 

− Free from surf  Let go both anchors on 
when ship has taken the 
ground. (Mooring ropes may 
− Less traffic  approach to the beach  be used) 
(Weather anchor first)
• Actions before beaching 
− Take full ballast, it will help in re‐
floating. 
− Clear both anchors.  Taking the ground forward  Take on 
− Lay anchors and cables clear of  of the collision bulkhead is  maximum Ballast 
preferred. 
position that the vessel is expected 
to come at rest, so minimizing the 
bottom damage. 
• Bow Approach 
Advantages 
− Clear observation of approach. 
− Propeller and rudder are in deeper 
water. 
− Strong bow would cushion any pounding effect. 
Disadvantages 
− Vessel is more likely to slew. 
− Use of anti‐slew wires in conjunction with the anchors is necessary. 
− Difficult to lay ground tackle. 
 
• On taking the ground 
− Drive the vessel further on and reduce the possibility of pounding. 
− Take additional ballast and secure the hull against movement from weather and sea/tide. 
− Take precautions to prevent oil pollution. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 47 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Moorings 
1. Mediterranean Moor – How much distance from wharf? (About 2 ships length) 
2. Baltic Moor – When do you use it and what are the advantages? 
3. Standing Moor 
 
Refer to DJ House Page 598 

ARK    Page 48 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
6. SOLAS 
1. SOLAS CHAPTERS 
 

ChapterI General provisions


Chapter II-1 Construction – Structure, subdivision and stability, machinery and
electrical installations
Chapter II-2 Construction – Fire protection, fire detection and fire extinction
Chapter III Life-saving appliances and arrangements
Chapter IV Radiocommunications
Chapter V Safety of navigation
Chapter VI Carriage of cargoes
Chapter VII Carriage of dangerous goods
Chapter VIII Nuclear ships
Chapter IX Management for the safe operation of ships
Chapter X Safety measures for high-speed craft
Chapter XI-1 Special measures to enhance maritime safety
Chapter XI-2 Special measures to enhance maritime security
Chapter XII Additional safety measures for bulk carriers
Appendix Certificates  
 
2. Maintenance of CO2 fire extinguishing system? (L) 
 
  
3. You sent the crew in ES with 1200L, when will you call him back? 
Capacity Vs Duration 
Compressed air cylinders are of various sizes, usually of either 9 or 6 litre water capacity. The fully 
charged pressure of cylinders also varies. Some types are charged to as high as 300 bars (4500 p.s.i.). The 
maximum charging pressure is always stamped on either the neck or the shoulder of a cylinder. 
To obtain the approximate quantity of free air in a cylinder, simply multiply the water capacity in litres 
by the pressure in bars, atmospheres or Kg/cm2. For example, a 6 litre cylinder charged to 200 bars: 
6 x 200 = 1200 litres (approximately) 
On the basis of a consumption of 40 litres/minute the rated  
Total Duration of such a cylinder would be: 1200 = 30 minutes. 
However, the Working Duration always allows for a safety reserve of 10 minutes and in this case it will 
therefore be 20 minutes.  
 
Dead Space: Is a space where the CO2 is accumulating in the face mask during exhalation. This reduces 
the amount of fresh air entry into the face mask. To keep the dead space to minimum an inner mask is 
introduced. Misting of visor is also minimized. 
 
Demist: Demist mask visor with anti demist solution prior wearing the BA set. 
 
 
4. How do you instruct your Chief Officer about Maintenance of Life boat davits? (L) 
MSC/Circ. 1206 
GUIDELINES FOR PERIODIC SERVICING AND MAINTENANCE OF LIFEBOATS,
LAUNCHING APPLIANCES AND ON-LOAD RELEASE GEAR 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 49 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
5. In what Circumstances as a master you are required to transmit safety messages. (K) 
6. You encounter very rough weather and not being informed, what is your action in accordance with 
SOLAS? 
 
Regulation V/31
Danger messages
 
Regulation V/32
Information required in danger messages
 
7. Onboard Training – are you under obligation to provide training? Where is it stipulate? 
 
Regulation III/19
Emergency training and drills 
 
Master’s Authority 
1. Under what regulation you will consider safety rather than business? 
Regulation 34
Safe navigation and avoidance of dangerous situations 
sub‐paragraph 3:  
The owner, the charterer, or the company operating the ship or any other person shall not prevent 
or restrict the master of the ship from taking or executing any decision which, in the master’s 
professional judgment, is necessary for the safe navigation and protection of the marine 
environment. 
 
2. Other than ISM where will you get the Master’s authority? 
3. Your charterer rejects your rescuing plan, and does not agree with the diversion, action as a master. 
(Hint: Still go to rescue, Master’s over‐riding authority.) 
4. Due to heavy sea, some problem in engine, reduce speed, can’t maintain ETA to load port, C/E 
informed you that M/E piston ring is damaged, DPA, manager, charterer asked you to maintain ETA, 
otherwise you may be sacked, what will you do? 
5. Master’s Authority under ISM? 
 
ISM Code
International management code for the safe operation of ships and pollution prevention

Objectives
• Ensure safety of life at sea
• Prevention o human injury and loss of life
• Avoidance of damage to marine environment and property

Functional Requirements of SMS

1) Safety and environmental protection policy


2) Instructions and procedures to ensure safe operation of ships and protection of environment.
3) Define level of authority and lines of communication between and among the shore and shipboard
staff.
4) Procedures for reporting accidents and Non-conformities with provisions of the codes.
5) Procedures to prepare for and respond to emergency situations.
6) Procedures for internal audits and management reviews.

Master’s Management Review File


Management review file is managed by the master.
It contains:
• Master review of SMS
• Reporting of deficiencies to DPA.

ARK    Page 50 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Corrective actions taken.
• Near miss reports.
• Safety committee meetings
• Accidents Reporting

MASTERS RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY under ISM 


 The Company should clearly define and document the Master’s responsibility with regards to 
implementing the Companies safety and environmental‐protection policy, and the SMS should include a 
clear statement emphasizing the Master’s authority. 
 Any system of checks used by the Company should allow for and take account of the Master’s overriding 
authority to take whatever action he considers to be in the best interests of persons on board, the yacht 
and the marine environment. 
 Master's responsibility and authorities are defined in the following aspects: 
1. Implementing the safety and environmental protection policy of the company. 
2. Motivating the crews in the observation of the policy. 
3. Issuing appropriate orders and instruction in clear and simple manner. 
4. Verifying the specified requirements are being observed. 
5. Reviewing the SMS and reporting its deficiencies to the shore based management. 
 
MASTERS RESPONSIBILITY AND AUTHORITY under STCW
1. Ensure trainings are conducted as per the requirements. 
2. Arrangement of watches. 
3. Monitoring rest hours. 
4. Ensure crew have their valid documents 
5. Ensure safe Navigation. 
6. Ensure maintenance of shipboard equipments 
7. Ensure safe loading & discharging 
8. Keep vessel ready for Inspection. 
9. Ensure safe working procedures on board. 
10. Ensure personnel hygiene onboard. 
 
ISM Code requirement for statement of master's authority
• The company should ensure that the SMS operating on board the ship contains a clear statement
emphasizing the master's authority. The company should establish in the SMS that the master has
the overriding authority and the responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and pollution
and to request the Company's assistance as may be necessary.

ISPS Code requirement for statement of master's authority


• The company shall ensure that the Ship Security Plan must contain a clear statement emphasizing
the master's authority. The company shall establish in the Ship Security Plan that the master has
the overriding authority and the responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and security
of the ship and to request the assistance of the Company or of any SOLAS Contracting
Government as may be necessary.
 

ARK    Page 51 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
7. MARPOL 
 
Annexes: 
There are six annexes at present: 
 
Annex‐I     : Regulations for the prevention of pollution by oil.  
Annex‐II    : Regulations for the control of pollution by noxious liquid substances in bulk. 
Annex‐III   : Regulations for the prevention of pollution by harmful substances in packaged form. 
Annex‐IV  : Regulations for the prevention of pollution by sewage from ships. 
Annex‐V   : Regulations for the prevention of pollution by garbage from ships. 
Annex‐VI  : Regulations for the prevention of air pollution from ships. 
 
1. Annex I, IV, V, VI 
 
Annex VI : Prevention of  Air Pollution from Ships  
• Set limits on sulphur oxide (SOx) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from ship exhausts and prohibit 
deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances. 
• Includes a global cap of 4.5% m/m on the sulphur content of fuel oil and calls on IMO to monitor the 
worldwide average sulphur content of fuel once the Protocol comes into force. 
• Provisions allowing for special  "SOx Emission Control Areas" to be established with more stringent 
control on sulphur emissions. In these areas, the sulphur content of fuel oil used on board ships 
must not exceed 1.5% m/m.  
• Ships must fit an exhaust gas cleaning system or use any other technological method to limit SOx 
emissions. 
• The Baltic Sea is designated as a SOx Emission Control area. 
• Prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances, which include halons and 
chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).  
• New installations containing ozone‐depleting substances are prohibited on all ships.  
• New installations containing hydro‐chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are permitted until 1 January 2020.  
• Sets limits on emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from diesel engines. A mandatory NOx Technical 
Code, developed by IMO, defines how this is to be done. 
• Also prohibits the incineration on board ship of certain products, such as contaminated packaging 
materials and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). 
 
2. Special Areas under Annex‐I and Annex‐V 
 
Annex‐I
As per regulation 1, followings are the special areas: 
I. Mediterranean seas 
II. Baltic seas 
III. Black seas 
IV. Red seas 
V. Gulf area (Persian gulf) 
VI. Gulf of Aden 
VII. Antarctic areas 
VIII. North‐west European waters 
IX. Oman area of Arabian sea 
X. South of South Africa 

Annex‐V
As per regulation 5, followings are the special areas. 

ARK    Page 52 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
I. Mediterranean seas 
II. Baltic seas 
III. Black seas 
IV. Red seas 
V. Gulf area (Persian gulf) 
VI. North seas 
VII. Antarctic areas 
VIII. Wider Caribbean regions 
  
• In special areas, only food waste can be disposed off in seas greater 12 n.m. from shores. 
• In wider Caribbean regions only food waste comminuted to 25mm can be discharged in seas more 
than 3miles from the coast. 
 
3. How do you make sure that you are complying with the regulation? 
 
• Check all Certificates issued under MARPOL convention are valid. 
• All equipments are functioning properly and maintenance records are available. 
• ORBs are filled up properly and do not contain any violation of the MARPOL requirements. 
• Officers are well aware of the MARPOL requirements. 
 
4. 2E discharged bilges but there is oil, other vessels are passing, what is your action? 
 
Discharge Engine Room bilge 
• Discharge as per MARPOL regulation‐15 paragraph 2 & 3, Annex‐1. 
• The ship is proceeding en route; 
• The oily mixture is processed through an oil filtering equipment meeting the requirements of 
regulation 14 of this Annex; 
• The oil content of the effluent without dilution does not exceed 15 parts per million; 
• The oily mixture does not originate from cargo pump room bilges on oil tankers; 
• The oily mixture, in case of oil tankers, is not mixed with oil cargo residues. 
• In respect of the Antarctic area, any discharge into the sea of oil or oily mixtures from any ship shall 
be prohibited. 
 
5. For how long the ORB to be kept onboard? 
As per MARPOL Annex‐1 Regulation 20 subpara‐5: 
The Oil Record Book shall be kept in such a place as to be readily available for inspection at all 
reasonable times and, except in the case of unmanned ships under tow, shall be kept on board the 
ship.  
It shall be preserved for a period of three years after the last entry has been made. 
 
6. MARPOL protocols. 
 Protocol of 1997 to amend the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 
1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto 
 
7. Anti‐fouling convention, anti‐fouling certificate. 
AFS Convention 2001 
(International convention on the control of Harmful Anti‐Fouling System on ships) 
• It prohibits the use of “harmful organotins” in anti fouling paints used on ships. 
• It establishes the mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in 
anti‐fouling systems. 
• It came into force on September 17, 2008. 
• Singapore is expected to enforce the convention in 2009, the date will be announced by MPA. 
 
ARK    Page 53 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
8. What do you know about ‘Bunker Convention’? 
THE INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON CIVIL LIABILITY FOR BUNKER OIL POLLUTION DAMAGE, 2001
(BUNKER CONVENTION)
• Adopted to ensure that adequate, prompt and effective compensation is available; to persons who suffer 
damage by bunker oil pollution from ships. 
• It is required on ships >1000GT. 
• Under bunker convention, victims will be able to claim compensation from ships insurer even if the owner 
of the ship is unable or unwilling to pay. 
• It came into force on November 21, 2008. 
 
Obtaining Bunker Certificate
Applications for BC Certificates for applicable Singapore-registered vessels can be made to the office of
Singapore Registry of Ships at (SRS) at MPA by completing the Form (Annex A) , and attaching a copy
of the Blue Card for submission to the SRS via email to marine@mpa.gov.sg. Alternatively, the
application can be mailed to SRS at this address: 460 Alexandra Road, #21-00, PSA Building, Singapore
119963 (Attn: Ship Registry). For a company that holds an account with MPA, the BC certificate would
be charged to this account and the BC certificate would be mailed to the applicant. For a company that
does not hold an account with MPA, we would require the company to make arrangement to collect the
certificate from the SRS office.
 
9. What is CLC? 
 
International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage (CLC), 1969 
 Adoption: 29 November 1969, Entry into force: 19 June 1975 
  
The merchant shipping (civil liability and compensation for oil pollution) act 1998 of Singapore 
The Civil Liability Convention was adopted to ensure that adequate compensation is available to persons 
 

who suffer oil pollution damage resulting from maritime casualties involving oil‐carrying ships. 
The Convention places the liability for such damage on the owner of the ship from which the polluting oil 
 

escaped or was discharged. 
Subject to a number of specific exceptions, this liability is strict; it is the duty of the owner to prove in 
 

each case that any of the exceptions should in fact operate.  
The Convention requires ships covered by it to maintain insurance or other financial security in sums 
 

equivalent to the owner's total liability for one incident. 
The Convention applies to all seagoing vessels actually carrying oil in bulk as cargo, but only ships carrying 
 

more than 2,000 tons of oil are required to maintain insurance in respect of oil pollution damage. 
  
The owner of a ship shall be entitled to limit his liability as follows:  
 

For a ship not exceeding 5,000 gross tonnage, liability is limited to 4.51 million SDR (US$5.78 million) 
For a ship 5,000 to 140,000 gross tonnage: liability is limited to 4.51 million SDR (US$5.78 million) plus 
631 SDR (US$807) for each additional gross tonne over 5,000. 
For a ship over 140,000 gross tonnage: liability is limited to 89.77 million SDR (US$115 million) 
 
 
  
No liability for pollution damage shall attach to the owner if he proves that the damage:  
 

Resulted from an act of war, hostilities, civil war, insurrection or a natural phenomenon of an 
exceptional, inevitable and irresistible character, or 
Was wholly caused by an act or omission done with intent to cause damage by a third party, or 
Was wholly caused by the negligence or other wrongful act of any Government or other authority 
responsible for the maintenance of lights or other navigational aids in the exercise of that function. 
 
 
  
No claim for compensation for pollution damage under this Convention or otherwise may be made 
 

against:  
The servants or agents of the owner or the members of the crew; 
The pilot or any other person who, without being a member of the crew, performs services for the ship;
ARK    Page 54 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Any charterer (howsoever described, including a bareboat charterer), manager or operator of the ship;
Any person performing salvage operations with the consent of the owner or on the instructions of a 
competent public authority; 
Any person taking preventive measures; 
All servants or agents of persons mentioned in subparagraphs (c), (d) and (e); unless the damage 
resulted from their personal act or omission, committed with the intent to cause such damage, or 
recklessly and with knowledge that such damage would probably result. 
 
  
When an incident involving two or more ships occurs and pollution damage results therefrom, the owners 
 

of all the ships concerned, unless exonerated under Article III, shall be jointly and severally liable for all 
such damage which is not reasonably separable. 
  
CLC certificate (Article‐VII) 
The owner of a ship carrying more than 2,000 tons of oil in bulk as cargo shall be required to maintain 
 

insurance or other financial security, such as the guarantee of a bank or a certificate delivered by an 
international compensation fund, in the sums fixed by applying the limits of liability as per Article V. 
A certificate attesting that insurance or other financial security is in force shall be issued to each ship by 
 

the appropriate authority of the State of the ship’s registry. This certificate shall be in the form of the 
annexed model and shall contain the following particulars:  
Name of ship and port of registration; 
Name and principal place of business of owner; 
Type of security; 
Name and principal place of business of insurer or other person giving security and, where appropriate, 
place of business where the insurance or security is established; 
Period of validity of certificate which shall not be longer than the period of validity of the insurance or 
 
other security. 
The certificate shall be carried on board the ship. 
 

The State of registry shall, subject to the provisions of this Article, determine the conditions of issue and 
 

validity of the certificate. 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 55 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
8. STABILTY 
1. Why timber GM is less? (L) 
As the timber is a floating cargo so it provides additional buoyancy to the ship, therefore a lesser 
minimum GM of 0.10m is allowed for ships carrying timber in accordance with ‘timber deck cargo 
code’. 
 
2. Static Stability diagram for angle of LOL. 
3. Draw and explain angle of flooding.  
Refer to attached notes. 
 
4. What is progressive flooding? What are the causes? Give examples, what is weather tight and 
what is water tight? 
 
Weather Tight 
Water will not enter in any condition on weather. 
e.g.: Ventilators, Doors of stores, accommodation, mast houses, etc. 
 
Water tight 
Water will not penetrate from any side. 
e.g. Tank manholes. 
 
5. Vessel suddenly listed, what is your action? 
 Vessel suddenly listed 
• Sound emergency alarm to alert personnel onboard, address in PA. 
• Muster in emergency station. 
• Verify vessel's position. 
• Reduce and/or stop engines as necessary. 
• Proceed to contingency anchorage if near shallows. 
• Stop all cargo/bunker/ballasting operations. 
• Determine the cause of list. It may be due to angle of loll, flooding, cargo shifting. 
• Check stability. 
• Check soundings of all the tanks. 
• Visual inspection of cargo on deck and in hold, as far as practicable, to check if list is due to cargo 
shift. 
• Monitor weather, check weather report. 
• Take appropriate action if list is due to cargo shift. 
• Take appropriate action if list is due to flooding. 
• Take appropriate actions if list is due to angle of loll. 
• Transmit distress/urgency message as necessary if situation is uncontrollable. 
• Proceed to a port of refuge if necessary and unsafe to continue voyage. 
• Inform owner, charterer, P&I club, MPA. 
• Inform port control/VTIS if necessary. 
• Log down all timings, corrective actions taken. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 56 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
9. IAMSAR 
Definitions: 
SC (SAR Coordinator):
• Country's top SAR manager. 
• Develops SAR and SAR training policies. 
• Establishes RCCs and Rescue Sub Centers. 
• Provides for, arranges and manages SAR facilities of the country. 
SMC (SAR Mission Coordinator):
• Appointed for and oversees each SAR each SAR operation under guidance of SC(SAR Coordinator). 
• Normally this duty is undertaken by the head of RCC. 
Duties of SMC 
• Obtain all data on emergency. 
• Ascertain type of emergency equipment carried by distress craft. 
• Obtain update on weather /sea conditions. 
• Locate shipping in search areas. 
• Plot search areas and methods. 
• Maintain radio listening watch. 
• Allocate radio frequencies. 
• Designate OSC and CSS. 
• Dispatch delivery of survival supplies to survivors. 
• Maintain record of events. 
• Record results of searched areas. 
• Monitor SAR units engaged eg. helicopter flying hours, etc. 
 
        OSC (On scene coordinator): 
• Person coordinates SAR facilities working at the scene. 
• Designated by SMC. 
• The person in charge of the first facility to arrive on scene normally assume OSC function unless 
SMC arranges relief. 
Who can be an OSC: 
• When two or more SAR facilities conduct operations together, the SMC should designate an OSC.  
• If this is not practicable, facilities involved should designate, by mutual agreement, an OSC.  
• This should be done as early as practicable and preferably before arrival within the search area.  
• Until an OSC has been designated, the first facility arriving at the scene should assume the duties of 
an OSC.  
• When deciding how much responsibility to delegate to the OSC, the SMC normally considers the 
communications and personnel capabilities of the facilities involved.  
 Duties of OSC 
1) Co‐ordinate operations of all SAR facilities on‐scene.  
2) Obtains the search action plan from the SMC. 
3) Plan the search or rescue operation, if no plan is otherwise available.  
4) Modify the search action or rescue action plan as the situation on‐ scene dictates, keeping the SMC 
advised. 
5) Co‐ordinate on‐scene communications.  
6) Monitor the performance of other participating facilities.  
7) Ensure operations are conducted safely, paying particular attention to maintaining safe separations 
among all facilities, both surface and air.  
8) Make periodic situation reports (SITREPs) to the SMC.  
− The standard SITREP format may be found in IAMSAR Vol‐3, appendix D.  
− SITREP should include but not be limited to:  
− Weather and sea conditions  
− The results of search to date  
− Any actions taken  
− Any future plans or recommendations.  
 
ARK    Page 57 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
9) Maintain a detailed record of the operation:  
− On‐scene arrival and departure times of SAR facilities, other vessels and aircraft engaged in 
operation  
− Areas searched  
− Track spacing used  
− Sightings and leads reported  
− Actions taken  
− Result obtained.  
10) Advise the SMC to release facilities no longer required.  
11) Report the number and names of survivors to the SMC.  
12) Provide the SMC with the names and designations of facilities with survivors aboard.  
13) Report which survivors are each facility.  
14) Request additional SMC assistance when necessary (for example, medical evacuation of seriously 
injured survivors).  
 
 
1. You are OSC ship & another 4 ships came to assist while search operations, which way you will 
conduct search plan, show me by drawing. (L) 
2. 3 ships & you are OSC, survival craft location unknown, on large area, which search patterns will 
you use? Draw. 
 
Refer to IAMSAR Vol. III 
 
3. Precautions and procedures for launching a rescue boat or survival craft in bad weather and 
recovery of survivors and their care. 
 
Lower lifeboat in heavy weather condition 
Preparation 
• Some steadying method to be used so that the life boat does not land hard against the ship side. 
• Prevent the fall blocks to hit ship crew or lifeboat. 
• Boat crews must wear life jacket, helmet, immersion suit in cold climate for rescuing operation. 
• Sea quelling oil may be used to reduce the seas. 
• Vessel to create a good lee. Wind to be on the opposite bow. 
• Ship plugs. 
• Lower lifeboat into the trough of a wave. 
• On the next rising crest, release the hooks immediately and simultaneously. 
• Cast off the painter once clear. 
• Bear off the ship's side with tiller, oars or boat hook. 
• Engine is started before the release of blocks and kept neutral. 
• Once lifeboat is underway, tiller put against ship's side and with full throttle clear off the ship. 
Precautions 
• Rig fenders, mattresses or mooring ropes to prevent the boat from being staved during an adverse 
roll. 
• A cargo net, slung between davits and trailing in the water for crew to hang on in case the boat 
capsize alongside. It should not hamper the operation of the boat. 
• The painter is rigged and kept tight throughout so as to keep the boat in position between the falls. 
• The falls are loosely tied with a line, led to the deck and manned. When the boat is unhooked, the 
line will steady the falls and prevent accidental contact with the boat crews. 
• Once unhooked, the blocks should be taken up to avoid injuring the crews in lifeboat. 
 
Rescuing survivors 
 Rescue vessel can bring the survivors floating in a craft, by any or several of the following means. 
 

ARK    Page 58 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
1. Hoisting the survivors boat with all the personnel. 
• Boats are not too heavy. 
• The weight of the boat with the personnel are within the SWL of the hoisting crane / derrick. 
• Suitable lifting gears are available.  
2. Lower the vessel's own rescue boat, transfer the survivors and hoist them aboard. 
3. Scrambling cargo nets and ladders may be rigged. Survivors can climb. 
4. Survivors may not have sufficient energy to climb. In that case they may be hoisted by: 
• Canvas slings. 
• Bosun's chairs. 
• Cargo baskets. 
• Whips rove through blocks on davit heads. 
5. Floating stretcher capable of being hoisted, for injured men. 
6. Cargo net may be slung overside between davits, lower end partly submerged. It is passed through 
the blocks attached to the davit. It can be hauled onboard. 
7. A side boom or derrick may be swung overside with a net attach to it. Survivors may cling to it to 
wait for their turn. 
8. Inflatable life‐rafts may be thrown overboard for if for any reason immediate rescue is impracticable. 
 
9.  Isolated swimmers may be rescued by careful use of line throwing apparatus, fired well overhead. 
 
Rescuing survivors in water 
 
By rescue boat 
• Lower rescue boat. 
• Approach from lee side of the survivor. 
• Throw a life buoy with a strong buoyant life line to the survivor. 
• Pull him near boat and haul him carefully. 
• If the person is unconscious, rescue crew (with immersion suit, if required) to enter sea. 
• Rescue person to carry the rescue quoits, the open end to be on the rescue boat to haul the person and 
prevent him from drifting from the rescue boat. 
• In the way survivors to be rescued one by one.  
 
Using LTA 
Use LTA, shooting downwind towards the survivors. 
 
4. After picked up survivors onboard – Master’s obligation? 
Masters of ships who have embarked persons in distressed at sea shall treat them with humanity, 
within the capabilities and limitations of the ship. 
 
Care of survivors 
• Once onboard, medical care and welfare of survivors should be attended to. 
• Additional assistance should be sought from SAR authorities. 
• Medical advice should be sought from the Telemedical Maritime Advice service, via RCC. 
• Survivors must be delivered to a place of safety as quickly as possible. 
• SMC should be advised if ambulances are required. 
• Keep record of all medical treatments provided to the survivors and send it to SMC. 
 
5. Received a distress 50nm off – state actions and plans, State defense if cannot go. 
  
Upon receiving a distress alert 30 miles off 

• Check distress position and own ship’s position. 
• If able to provide assistance without endangering own ship and crew: 

ARK    Page 59 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
− On receipt of distress alert 
− Listen on VHF CH‐16 for 5 minutes. 
− If RCC does not acknowledge, acknowledge alert by radiotelephony (CH16). 
− Inform CS and/or RCC. 
− Enter details in log. 
− Reset system. 
• Establish plain language communication as soon as possible and obtain details of distressed vessel such 
as: 
− Identity  
− Position 
− Course 
− Speed 
− Nature of distress 
− Type of assistance required. 
• Provide the distressed vessel my following information: 
− Identity 
− Position 
− Course 
− Speed 
− ETA at the scene 
− Distressed vessel’s bearing and distance. 
• I will contact RCC / SMC via coast radio station. 
• I will take required onboard preparation for search and rescue. 
• If I cannot find any survivor after going to the scene, I will report to RCC and conduct a search. 

When master is not obliged to assist 
• When vessel is unable to rescue, e.g., vessel does not have enough bunker. 
• When it is unreasonable e.g., the distance is so far the vessel will rake 4/5 days to rescue, but that place 
is a traffic dense place and survivors may be easily picked by other vessel. 
• When it is unnecessary, e.g., a man overboard in ice/cold region and distance is so far that vessel will 
take long time to go there. So it is impossible for a man to survive in this situation. 
• If the vessel has not been requisitioned by the master of distress vessel, but more other ships have been 
requisitioned and they are complying with the requisition. 
• The master of a requisitioned vessel will be released from the obligation if he is informed by the 
distressed vessel or by the search and rescue service or by the master of another vessel which has 
reached the distressed position that assistance is no longer required. 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
 
6. How would you instruct your officers to respond to distress alerts from VHF, MF & HF? 
 
Responding to distress alert 
 On receipt of distress alert, follow the procedures as per annex 1,2,3, of marine circular 3/2000: 
• Watch on VHF CH‐16 /2182 KHz or subsequent RT/NBDP frequency for 5 minutes. 
• If any RCC or does not acknowledge and if no distress traffic in progress, acknowledge alert by 
radiotelephony (CH16 or 2182 KHz) if distress call continues. In case of HF distress alert, transmit 
relay on HF to coast station. 
• Inform CS and/or RCC. 
• If there is distress communication or RCC acknowledgement, consider if vessel able to assist. In the 
case, inform RCC or assisting vessel whether any assistance is required. 
• Enter details in log. 
• Reset system. 
 
RELAY OF DISTRESS ALERTS FROM SHIPS 
ARK    Page 60 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• The original distress alert from a ship in distress should not be disrupted by other ships, by 
transmitting a DSC distress relay alert. 
• A ship would transmit a distress relay call (distress relay alert) only in the event of followings: 
− On receiving a distress alert on a HF channel, which is not acknowledged by a coast station 
within 5 minutes. The distress relay call should be addressed to the appropriate coast station. 
− On knowing that another ship in distress is not itself able to transmit the distress alert and the 
Master of the ship considers that further help is necessary. The distress relay call should be 
addressed to "all ships" or to the appropriate coast station. 
• In no case is a ship permitted to transmit a DSC distress relay call on receipt of a DSC distress alert on 
either VHF or MF channels. 
• Distress relay calls on HF channels should be initiated manually. 
 
 
7. Onboard preparation when proceeding for rescue? 
  Onboard preparations and proceeding for search and rescue: 
1. Post extra look out. 
2. Inform owner/ charterer about the deviation. 
3. Note down deviation time, position and ROBs. 
 
4. Assign duties to officers. 
 
5. Inform C/E to st‐by engine, but at full sea speed. 
 
6. Instruct C/O to prepare: 
• Ship’s hospital to receive casualties and prepare stretchers, blankets, foods, medicines. 
• Prepare rescue boats and ready for immediate launching. 
• Prepare rescue boat crews and check communication. 
• Extra life jackets, life buoys, buoyant life lines, line throwing apparatus readily available. 
• Rig guest warp, accommodation ladder, scrambling nets and life lines running from bow to 
astern at the water edge on both sides. 
• Prepare crane/derricks with cargo nets for recovery of survivors. 
• Test search lights, signaling lamps, torches. 
 
7. Instruct 2nd officer to: 
• Plot both vessels’ positions and establish course to rendezvous at maximum speed and 
update ETA. 
• Plot other vessels within the search vicinity together with their respective movements. 
• Change over to manual steering. 
• Plot search pattern. 
• Keep continuous radar watch. 
• Track all vessels in the vicinity. 
 
8. Instruct 3rd officer to: 
• Contact RCC via CRS 
• Maintain communication radio watch and update distress information. 
• Monitor weather report. 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 61 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
10. COMPASS WORK 
Magnetic Compass 
1. Take the compass error from the compass binnacle in the compass room, check the deviation and 
draw out a table with the calculations and explain the causes, heading & correction methods. (Given 
30 minutes) (L) 
2. Swing the compass and find all co‐efficient. (K) 
3. What is the cause of coefficient C & D, How to correct coefficients. (K) 
4. Heeling error – how to correct? What is the name of instrument? Is the heeling error same in 
Singapore and in China? (Hint: No, the correction is only true for that particular latitude due to the 
vertical force Z and horizontal force Hf changes with latitude) 
5. What do u understand by Coefficient E, Why is it not normally found onboard merchant ships? 
6. What do u understand by Coefficient A? What is real A & what is apparent A? 
7. What is Gaussian’s error and retentivity error? 
8. All methods of magnetic compass adjustment, explain Kelvin deflector method. 
9. Where is the best location to swing the magnetic compass? 
 
Gyro Compass 
1. Gyro compass and everything in detail 
2. What is the 3 degree freedom for Gyro? 
3. Ballistic deflection 
4. Damping in tilt (Give examples) 
5. Damping in azimuth (Give examples) 
6. What do you understand about precession? 
7. What do you understand by rigidity in space? 

ARK    Page 62 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 

11. CARGO WORK 
 

11.1 Brief on all Codes (S) 
 

a) BC Code 
Code of safe practice for solid bulk cargoes 
• Aimed to promote the safe stowage and shipment of solid bulk cargoes. 
• Highlights dangers associated with shipment of certain cargoes. 
• Procedures for hold cleaning and ventilation. 
• Names of instruments to be carried for chemical hazard cargo. 
• Listing typical cargoes currently shipped in bulk. 
• Describing test procedures to determine characteristics of cargoes.  
• Safety of persons and general precautions. 
• Trimming procedures.  
• Properties of bulk cargoes. 
Hazards Associated with the shipment of bulk cargoes:  
a) Structural Damage due to improper distribution of cargoes. 
b) Loss of stability during the voyage due to: 
• Cargo shift due to improper distribution or inadequate trimming. 
• Cargoes liquefy under the stimulus of vibration and motion. 
c) Chemical Reactions 
• Emission of toxic or explosive vapours 
• Spontaneous combustion 
• Severe corrosive effect 
 
b) BLU Code 
(Safe loading & Unloading of Bulk Carriers Code) 
It incorporates recommendations for precautions to be followed during loading and unloading of bulk 
cargoes. 
Main features: 
• Loading/unloading sequence 
• Ballasting/Deballasting sequence 
• Readiness of fire and safety equipments during loading/unloading 
• Ship/Shore safety Checklists 
 
c) Timber Code 
Code of Safe Practice for ships carrying timber deck cargoes 
Continuing occurrences of casualties involving shift and loss of timber deck cargo set the need to 
development of this code. 
Purpose: 
To make recommendation on safe stowage, securing and shipment of timber deck cargo.     
Application: 
Ships of 24m or more in length engaged in carriage of timber deck cargoes. 
 
Key Requirements: 
Stability consideration 
• Comprehensive stability information booklet 
• Comprehensive rolling period diagram/table 
• 10% safety margin for calculating stability for deck cargo.   
Height of deck cargoes not to exceed 1/3rd of the breadth. 
Cargo operation to be ceased if a list develops for unknown reason. 
Safe access for the crew to be provided from work spaces to the accommodation. 
 
ARK    Page 63 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Grain Code 
International code for the safe carriage of grain in bulk 
Divided into 02 parts 
Part‐A: Specific Requirements 
Part‐B: Calculation of assumed heeling moments and general assumptions. 
 
Application 
Applies to all ships engaged in carriage of grain in bulk, regardless of size. 
 
CSM 
Cargo Securing Manual 
 
Chapter I – General 
Chapter II – Securing devices and arrangements 
Chapter III – Stowage and securing of non‐standardized and semi standardized cargo. 
Chapter IV – Stowage and securing of containers and other standardized cargo. 
 
Features: 
1. Details of fixed securing arrangements and their location. 
2. Locations and stowage of portable securing gears. 
3. Details of portable securing gears including an inventory of items provided and their strength. 
4. Example of correct application of portable securing gears on various cargo unit, vehicle and 
other entities carried on the ship. 
5. Indication of the variation of transverse, longitudinal and vertical acceleration to be expected in 
various positions onboard. 
  
IMDG Code 
It has two volumes and one supplement. 
 
Volume 1:  Volume 2:  Supplement 
1) General provisions, definitions  1) DG List  1) Emergency Procedures 
and training.  2) Limited quantities exceptions  2) MFAG 
2) Classification.  3) Appendices A&B  3) Reporting procedures 
3) Packing and tank provision.  4) The Index  4) Packing cargo transport 
4) Consignment procedures.  units 
5) Construction and testing of  5) Safe use of pesticides 
packings  6) INF code 
6) Transport operations 
 
Classification of IMDG Cargo: 
Class 1 – Explosive. 
Class 2 – Flammable Gas. 
Class 3 – Flammable Liquid 
Class 4 – Flammable Solid 
Class 4.1 – Substance liable to spontaneous combustion. 
Class 4.2 – Substance in contact with water liable to emit toxic gas. 
Class 5.1 – Oxidizing substance.  
Class 5.2 – Organic Peroxide. 
Class 6.1 – Poisonous Substance. 
Class 6.2 – Infectious Substance 
Class 7 – Radio Active materials. 
Class 8 – Corrosive &   
Class 9 – Miscellaneous  
ARK    Page 64 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
11.2 Grain Code (K)‐ How to do strapping and lasing? 
 
a) Shifting Board      (F+P)  
b) Overstowing    (F+P)  
c)  Strapping and Lashing   (F+P)  
d)  Bundling        (F)  
e)  Saucering       (F)  
f)   Feeders           (F) 
g) Securing with wire mesh (F+P) 
          (F‐filled, P‐partly filled) 
 
Shifting Board  
‹ Longitudinal divisions (called shifting 
board), which must be grain tight may be 
fitted in both "filled" and "partly filled 
compartments". 
‹ In "filled compartments, they must extend 
downwards from the underside of the 
deck or hatchcovers, to a distance below 
the deckline of at least one‐eighth the 
breadth of the compartment, or at least 
0.6m below the surface of the grain after 
it has been assumed to shift through an 
angle of 15o  
‹ In a "partly filled compartment', the division, should extend both above and below the level of grain, 
to a distance of one‐eighth the breadth of the compartment. 
 
Overstowing 
‹ For a partly filled compartments –topped 
off by loading bagged grain or other 
suitable cargo 
‹ Surface to level off over and spread with 
separation cloth (gunny sack) or wooden 
boards 
‹ Overstowed with sound well filled bags to a 
height of 1/16th the maximum breadth of 
the free grain surface, or to a height of 1.2 
m whichever is greater 
 
 
Saucering 
‹ For filled compartment 
‹ The top (mouth) of the saucer is 
formed by the underdeck structure 
in the way of the hatchway, ie, 
hatch side girders or coaming  
‹ The saucer and hatchway above is 
completely filled with bagged grain 
or other suitable cargo laid down 
on the separation cloth and stowed 
tightly against adjacent structures 
and the hatch beams. 
 

ARK    Page 65 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
Strapping & Lashing 
‹ Surface of grain should be levelled but 
slightly crowned. 
‹ Surface covered with separation cloths or 
tarpaulins, whose joints overlaps at least 
1.83m 
‹ Two solid floors of 25mm x 150mm to 
300mm lumber to be laid athwartship‐first 
tier and F&A‐2nd tier. 
‹ Lashed with double steel strapping, wires 
with ends at a point approx 450mm below 
the final grain surface. 
‹ Lashings should not be placed more than 
2.4m apart. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bundling 
‹ "filled compartment", shifting prevented by bundling the grain cargo.  
‹ A bundle of similar bulk cargo is made by lining a saucer with tarpaulin or similar materials with 
suitable means of securing.  
‹ Athwartship lashings to be 
placed inside the saucer formed 
in the bulk grain at interval not 
more than 2.4metres.  
‹ Dunnage of not less than 24mm x 
150 to 300mm to be placed fore 
and aft over these lashings to 
prevent the cutting or chafing of 
the material which is placed 
thereon to line the saucer. The 
saucer is filled with bulk grain 
and secured at the top.  
‹ Further dunnage to be laid on top after lapping the material before the saucer is secured by setting 
up the lashings. If more than one sheet of tarpaulin is used to line the saucer, they shall be joined at 
the bottom either by sewing or double lap. 
‹ The top of the saucer should be made level with the bottom of the beams when these are in place 
and suitable general cargo or bulk grain may be placed between the beams on top of the saucer.  
 
 
 

ARK    Page 66 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Feeders 
‹ It may be assumed that under the 
influence of ship motion underdeck voids 
will be substantially filled by the flow of 
grain from a pair of longitudinal feeders 
provided that: 
 i) the feeders extends for the full length of 
the deck and that the perforations therein 
are adequately spaced. 
 ii) the volume of each feeder is equal to the 
volume of the underdeck void outboard of 
the hatchside girder and its continuation.  
 
 
 
11.3 Concern as a master if the vessel has to be fumigated. 
FUMIGATION
Fumigation in charge to be designated by appropriate authority. 
FIC will provide master the following information:  
• Type of fumigant 
• Hazards 
• TLV 
• Precautions to observe. 

Fumigation in port 
In port, normally fumigation is done in empty cargo spaces and accommodations. 
It is done by certified fumigator companies. 
  
Preparations 
A thorough cleaning of cargo spaces after discharge. 
Box beams, stiffeners, deck girders, pipe casings, bilge wells, strum boxes etc, are cleaned thoroughly from 
cargo residues. 
Cargo spaces to be air tight. 
All compartments, accommodations, store rooms to be available to the fumigators.  
They should be opened internally, but outside doors locked. 
Food stuffs must be removed unless permitted by fumigators. 
 

The ship has been prepared as required by the fumigator. 
Watchmen posted to prevent unauthorized boarding. 
Warning notices posted on gangway and entrances of the accommodation. 
All crews to be landed ashore during the fumigation period. 
A complete search to be carried out for any crew or person left onboard and a certificate is given by master, 
countersigned by fumigator to this respect. 
All blowers, air cons, fans in holds and accommodations to be switched off. The generators may be shut off 
for the fumigation period. 
 
Procedures
Fumigation is carried out to disinfest the ship. 
Carried out in cargo holds and accommodations. 
Strong toxicants are used. 
Fumigants are applied as solid or liquid but act as gases. 
No pesticides to be applied on human or animal foods without professional’s advice. 

ARK    Page 67 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
After all preparation and precautions, fumigant is released and the ship kept under gas for at least two hours 
for empty ship and four hours for loaded ship. 
Entry to be made in fumigated spaces in an extreme emergency.  
People must be wearing protective equipment, breathing apparatus and safety harness in case of such an 
entry. 
  
As per the fumigators, when the ship is disinfested adequately,  
Fumigator is to inform master. 
With assistance of necessary crew, they will gas free the ship. 
Engine personnel to start generator, ventilation fans. 
The must be wearing sufficient protective clothing with breathing apparatus. 
When the ship is gas free and safe for reoccupy, a test of all spaces to be made for toxic gases and oxygen 
content. 
A gas free certificate is to be issued by fumigators stating that the ship is free of toxic gases and safe for re‐
occupancy. 
  
 Fumigation at sea 
Done at the discretion of master. 
Master to be aware of the flag state regulations regarding transit fumigation. 
Done only in cargo spaces, empty or loaded. 
It may be done in following occasions:  
• Fumigation done in port but ship is not gas freed. 
• Fumigation is done but no clearance certificate is issued. 
 
Preparation 
Fumigators to demonstrate and train required ship personnel, at least 2 crews and one officer. 
A trained representative should brief the crews before the operation takes place. 
A thorough cleaning of empty cargo spaces after discharge. 
Box beams, stiffeners, deck girders, pipe casings, bilge wells, strum boxes etc, are cleaned thoroughly from 
cargo residues. 
Cargo spaces to be air tight. 
Warning notices to be posted. 
Details of fumigants, their properties, hazards are known. 
Symptoms of poisoning are known. 
First aid and emergency procedures in case of poisoning are known. 
Required medicines are on board. 
A copy of latest MFAG is onboard. 
Necessary gas detection equipments are available. 
Protective equipments are available. 
Measures taken to ensure E/R, accommodation and other working areas are free of fumes and prevent 
leakage of fumigants.  

Procedures
Fumigation is carried out by fumigators and/ or trained personnel. 
Carried out in cargo holds. 
Strong toxicants are used. 
Fumigants are applied as solid or liquid but act as gases. 
No pesticides to be applied on human or animal foods without professional’s advice. 
After all preparation and precautions, fumigant is released and the ship kept under gas for specified time 
required by fumigators, generally 1 week. 
After ascertaining that the ship is safe to sail and there is no leakage, the FIC should furnish the master 
following written statement:  
• The gas in hold spaces reached certain high concentration to determine any leakage. 
• Spaces adjacent to the cargo spaces have been checked and found gas free. 
ARK    Page 68 of 99 
ORAL QU
UESTION
NS ‐ 2008

• The ship's representative is ffully converssant with the
e use of gas d
detection eq
quipment. 
 
Entry to be m made in fummigated spacees in an extreeme emerge ency.  
People mustt be wearingg protective eequipment, b breathing appparatus and safety harness in case o of such an 
entry. 
  
When the sp paces are dissinfested suffficiently (after required ttime as per tthe fumigato ors):  
Thorough veentilation of cargo spaces is done. 
Cargo holds may be opened few dayys before arriival port. 
A test for the presence o of toxic gasess is made. 
All to be don ne under sup pervision of ttrained perso onnel. 
Protective equipments aare to be worn. 
Discard of reesidues of fumigants as p per fumigato ors advice. 
A detail entrry of all the p procedures in deck log bo ook and officcial log bookk is to be madde in chronoological 
order. 
 
 
12 Loading g grain‐ GC ccode, DOA, Stability criteeria. 
 
Document o of authorizattion  
  A doocument of aauthorization n shall be issued for everry ship loadeed in accordaance with the e regulationss 
of this Code either by the Administraation or an o organization recognized b by it or by a C
Contracting Governmentt 
on behalf off the Adminisstration. It sh hall be acceppted as evideence that thee ship is capaable of comp plying with 
the requirem ments of these regulation ns.  
    The document shall accompany or be inccorporated into the grain n loading maanual provide ed to enablee 
the master tto meet the requirementts of A 7 (Staability require ement). 
    A co
opy of such aa document, grain loading stability daata and assocciated plans shall be placced on board d 
in order thatt the masterr, if so required, shall pro oduce them ffor the inspeection of the Contracting 
Governmentt of the coun ntry of the poort of loading.  
    A sh
hip without such a docum ment of authorization shaall not load ggrain until the master demonstrates 
to the satisfaaction of thee Administration, or of th he Contractin ng Governmeent of the po ort of loadingg acting on 
behalf of thee Administraation, that, in n its loaded ccondition forr the intendeed voyage, thhe ship comp plies with 
the requirem ments of thiss Code. See aalso A 8.3 (Sttability requirements for existing ship ps) and A 9 (LLoading 
grain withou ut DOA).   
 
LOADING Grrain withoutt DOA
A ship not having on boaard a document of autho orization issu
ued in accord dance with AA 3 of this Cod de may be 
permitted to o load bulk ggrain provideed that:  
.1. the total weight of th he bulk grain shall not excceed one thiird of the deadweight of the ship;  
.2. all filled ccompartmen nts, trimmed, shall be fittted with centtreline divisions extendin ng, for the fu
ull length of 
such compartments, dow wnwards fro om the underrside of the d deck or hatch covers to aa distance be elow the 
deck line of at least one eighth of the maximum breadth of tthe compartm ment or 2.4 m, whicheve er is the 
greater, exceept that sauccers constructed in accordance with A 14 may bee accepted in n lieu of a centreline 
division in and beneath aa hatchway eexcept in thee case of linsseed and oth her seeds havving similar p properties; 
.3. all hatchees to filled coompartmentts, trimmed, shall be clossed and coveers secured in n place;  
.4. all free grrain surfacess in partly filled cargo spaace shall be ttrimmed leveel and secureed in accordance with A 
16, A 17 or A A 18;  
.5. througho out the voyagge the metaccentric heigh ht after corre
ection for thee free surfacce effects of liquids in 
tanks shall b be 0.3 m  
.6. the master demonstrrates to the ssatisfaction o of the Adminnistration or the Contractting Governm ment of the 
port of loadiing on behalf of the Adm ministration tthat the ship in its propossed loaded ccondition will comply 
with the req quirements o of this section
n.  
 
 

ARK  Page 69 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 Preparations and precautions for loading grain 
Prior loading:
• Make a pre stowage plan. 
• Get cargo information from the shipper. 
• Calculate the stability criteria complies with the requirement of International grain code. 
• Planning, calculation and loading to be made for ship's stability at all stages of loading. 
• Clean and prepare cargo holds for loading grain. 
• Clean and test cargo hold bilges. 
• Check weather tightness of hatches. 
• Check cargo handling gears in good operational condition. 
• Initial draft survey to be carried out before loading grain. 
  
During loading: 
• Load grain as per cargo stowage plan. 
• Follow loading sequences. 
• Check stresses on hull are within the limit. 
• Trimming of cargo to be carried out as per loading plan. 
• Precautions to be taken for grain dust to protect human hygiene and equipments. 
• Check cargo for any sort of damage. 
• Check cargo for infestation. 
  
Prior sailing: 
• Securing cargo as per grain code, to reduce grain heeling moment. 
• Fumigate the cargo using pesticides if required. 
• All cargo holds to be closed and properly secured. 
• Take proper draft and calculate loaded quantity by final draft survey. 
• Calculate final state of stability after completion of loading. 
 
During the voyage: 
• Check humidity and adjust ventilation if required. 
• Regular sounding of bilges. 
• Ensure ship's stability is maintained. 
• Inspect securing arrangements regularly if possible. 
 

ARK    Page 70 of 99 
ORAL QU
UESTION
NS ‐ 2008

Stability ccriteria for grrain laden sh
hips 
ƒ Throughout the vo oyage, after ggrain shift, the ship meets the follow wing minimum m criteria; 
1.  Angle of heel due to grain shiftt shall not bee greater thaan 12 degreees (for ships b built after 19
994, 'angle 
of decck edge immeersion' if thiss angle is less than 12 de egrees); 
2.  In the statical stab m, the net or residual area between the heeling arm curve and the 
bility diagram
rightinng arm curvee up the maxximum difference betwee en the curves (or) 40 deggrees (or) thee angle of 
progreessive down flooding, wh hichever is th he least, shall be not lesss than 0.075m
metre‐radian ns; 
3.  The co orrected GM shall be nott less than 0.3mtr; 
4.  The sh hip must be u upright before proceedin ng to sea. 

R
Righting arm

Righting arm
m curve
λ0 Heeling
g arm curve
λ40
Angle off heel
0 10 20
2 30 40 50 60
an
ngle of heel due
d to grain shift
s

HM
Total VH
λ0 =
S x displaccement
S.F

λ40 = λ0 x 0.8

al VHM
Tota
Total heeling
h mome
ent = {for slack
k holds, multiply by 1.12}
SF

Total heeliing moment


tan Heel angle =
displacem
ment x GM

angle of progressivve down floooding – anglee of heel at w
which lower edges of thee any openings in the 
hull, superstructurre or deck ho
ouses which lead below tthe deck and d cannot be cclosed waterrtight would 
be imm mersed (smaall openings tthrough which progressive flooding ccannot take place need n not be 
considdered as opeen) 
 
 

13 IMDG co ontainers arre being load ded, what arre your conceerns as a ma aster? 


 
LOADING IM MDG CONTAIINERS 
  Check DG note, DG manifestts are provided. 
  Vesssel to be giveen proposed stowage plaan. 
  Check if segregaation requirements are m met. 
  Check marking, labeling and placarding o of the contaiiners are in ggood conditio on. 
  Dam maged or leakked containeers will not bbe accepted.
  Keep p combustibble materials away from ssources of ignition. 
  Stow damage or heating. 
w in places not liable to d
  Stow on so that the contents m
w in a positio may be move ed/jettisoned d in case of aany emergen ncy.  
  Naked lights and d smoking is prohibited in or near DG G areas. 
  Fire fighting apppliances are kkept ready too deal with ppossible fire.
  Prottective clothing and SCBA A sets to be aavailable. 
  Bunkering, hot w work, use of radar or radio transmitte ers to be sto
opped, especcially if the caargoes are 
explosive type. 
  If po operation to be in dayligh
ossible, the o ht hours. At night, adequ uate lightingss to be provided. 
  Amb bient temperrature in relaation to the fflash point too be taken innto account. 
  Any spillage to bbe carefully d
dealt with, taaking into coonsideration the nature o of the substance. 
  Consult EMS and d MFAG in caase of any acccident involving DG. 
  Once containerss are loaded, location of DG containe ers to be counterchecked d with the baay plan. 
 
ARK  Page 71 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
14 How will you load DG cargo? How to go through all publications? 
 
Documents require to carry dangerous goods 

• Document of compliance (SOLAS CH-2/II, regulation-19, Paragraph-4). 


• DG Note/ Shipper's declaration of DG goods which will include: (SOLAS CH-VII, Regulation-4).  
− Proper shipping name 
− UN no 
− Class and division 
− Packaging group 
− No and kind of packages 
− Quantity 
− Date of preparation of declaration 
− Name, rank, company and address of signatory. 
• DG manifest (SOLAS CH-VII, Regulation-4). 
• Detailed stowage plan.(SOLAS CH-VII, Regulation-4). 
 
 
15 BC Code (K) –  
− Bulk Carrier loading sequence, concern as a master. 
− As a master what is your main concern in the usage of a BC code when loading bulk cargo. (Hint: 
EMS, MFAG, Equipment for emergency, Reporting, Contacts, Guidelines) 
− You are going to load class 5.1 in bulk – main concern as a master. 
 

16 Timber code –  
− Loading logs/timber under deck, loading timber on deck. 
− Voyage planning, weather routeing. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

17 How will you know the loadicator is working satisfactorily as required by class? (K) 
 

• Check the Compliance Certificate issue by the class. 
• Input the test condition in the loadicator and compare the results. 
• If the results are within the tolerable limits, it implies that the loadicator is working satisfactotily. 

ARK    Page 72 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 

18 Tanker Operation 
− Draw Flammability diagram and explain, which instruments to use and where? When do you use an 
explosimeter? Why do you use it at 1% and why not at 2%? 
 
Draw Flammable Diagram 
Every point on the diagram represents a hydrocarbon gas/air/inert gas mixture, specified in terms of its 
hydrocarbon and oxygen contents. Hydrocarbon gas/air mixtures without inert gas lie on the line AB, the 
slope of which reflects the reduction in 
oxygen content as the hydrocarbon contents 
increases. Points to the left of AB represent 
mixtures with their oxygen content further 
reduced by the addition of inert gas. 
The lower and upper flammability limit 
mixtures for hydrocarbon gas in air are 
represented by the points C and D. As the 
inert gas content increases, the flammable 
limit mixtures change as indicated by the lines 
CE and DE, which finally converge at the point 
E. Only those mixtures represented by points 
in the shaded area within the loop CED are 
capable of burning. 
 
On such a diagram, changes of composition due to the addition of either air or inert gas are represented by 
movements along straight lines directed either towards the point A (pure air), or towards a point on the 
oxygen content axis corresponding to the composition of the added inert gas. Such lines are shown for the 
gas mixture represented by the point F. 
It is evident from Fig. that as inert gas is added to hydrocarbon gas/air mixtures the flammable range 
progressively decreases until the oxygen content reaches a level, generally taken to be about 11% by 
volume, when no mixture can burn. The figure of 8% by volume of oxygen specified in this guide for a safely 
inerted gas mixture allows a margin beyond this value. 
 
When an inerted mixture, such as that represented by the point F, is diluted by air its composition moves 
along the line FA and therefore enters the shaded area of flammable mixtures. This means that all inerted 
mixtures in the region above the line GA go through a flammable condition as they are mixed with air, for 
example during a gas freeing operation. 
 
Those below the line GA, such as that represented by point H, do not become flammable on dilution. Note 
that it is possible to move from a mixture such as F to one such as H by dilution with additional inert gas (i.e. 
purging to remove hydrocarbon gas). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 73 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
 
Gas Equipment 
 
The Catalytic Filament Combustible Gas (CFCG) Indicator is used for measuring hydrocarbon gas in air at 
concentrations below the lower flammable limit (LFL). The 
scale is graduated in % LFL. A CFCG Indicator must not be used 
for measuring hydrocarbon gas in inert atmospheres.  
Two types of instrument are available commercially for 
measuring hydrocarbon gas concentrations in excess of the LFL 
or in oxygen deficient (inerted) atmospheres ‐ the Non‐ 
Catalytic Heated Filament Gas Indicator and the Refractive 
Index Meter. The scale is graduated in % volume hydrocarbon 
gas. 
 
Operating Principle of Explosimeter: 
The sensing element of a CFCG indicator is usually a catalytic 
metal filament heated by an electric current. When a mixture 
of hydrocarbon gas with air is drawn over the filament; the gas 
oxidises on the hot filament and makes it hotter. This increases 
its resistance and the change of resistance provides a measure 
of the concentration of hydrocarbon gas in the mixture. 
 
This oxidation can only take place if there is sufficient oxygen 
present. 
The non‐catalytic filament is not affected by gas concentrations in excess of its working scale. The 
instrument reading goes off the scale and remains in this position as long as the filament is exposed to the 
rich gas mixture. 
 
Calibration: 
The calibration is carried out using a Span gas of known hydrocarbon‐air mixture. 
The calibration to be carried out as per manufacturer’s instructions. 
 
Operating Principle of Tank Scope: 
The sensing element of this instrument is a non‐catalytic hot filament. The composition of the surrounding 
gas determines the rate of loss of heat from the filament, and hence its temperature and resistance. 
 The sensor filament forms one arm of a Wheatstone bridge. The initial zeroing operations balance the 
bridge and establish the correct voltage across the filament, thus ensuring the correct operating 
temperature. During zeroing the sensor filament is purged with air or inert gas that is free from 
hydrocarbons.  
The presence of hydrocarbon changes the resistance of the sensor filament and this is shown by a deflection 
on the bridge meter. The rate of heat loss from the filament is a non‐linear function of hydrocarbon 
concentration and the meter scale reflects this non‐linearity. The meter gives a direct reading of % volume 
hydrocarbons.  
 
Calibration: 
The calibration is carried out using a Span gas of known hydrocarbon‐nitrogen or inert gas mixture. 
The calibration to be carried out as per manufacturer’s instructions. 
 
 
‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 74 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
12. CIRCULARS 
1. Name all types of circulars issued by MPA and tell me the difference. 
 1. Port Marine Circular (PMC) 
Changes of any rules, Regulations and or any legislation which affect only within the harbor limits 
issued by Port Master to:‐ 
• Shipping Community. 
• Harbor Craft 
• Pleasure Craft. 
 
2. Port Marine Notice (PMN) 
If there is any construction or maintenance/repair works is carried out which temporarily hampered 
the navigation within the harbor, issued by Port Master to 
• Shipping Community. 
• Harbor Craft 
• Pleasure Craft 
 
3. Shipping Circular (SC) 
It is the national & International Regulation issued by Director of Marine. 
• Ship Owners. 
• Ship Manager / Operator. 
• Ship Master of Flag Ship. 
• Shipping Community.  
 
4. Shipping Notice 
Scanned copy of Important IMO circular / regulations and also List of Life Raft Servicing Station & 
Radio Surveyor appointed by MPA. 
5. Maritime Security Circular: 
 
 
 
2. Change of Ballast (K) Bad Weather (K) 
Main Concerns 
• Loss of stability 
• Free surface effect 
• Structural damage due to additional longitudinal stresses and bending moments 
• Sloshing 
• Bow Slamming due to reduced drafts 
• Propeller immersion 
• Bridge visibility 
 
3. New convention is coming for bulk carriers, what does it talk about? 
 (Check shipping notice SCI69(79) regarding hatch cover maintenance) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ARK    Page 75 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
4. LRIT 
 
LRIT: LONG RANGE IDENTIFICATION AND TRACKING OF SHIPS 
A new Regulation to Chapter V (Safety of Navigation) of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention enters 
into force on 1 January 2008 and will introduce a requirement for Long‐Range Identification and Tracking of 
Ships (LRIT) for certain categories of ships on international voyages, under a phased implementation 
programme beginning 31 December 2008. 
LRIT is primarily intended to improve maritime security and assist with search and rescue (SAR). Other 
usages relating to maritime safety and marine environmental protection are currently being considered by 
IMO. 
Ships will be required automatically to transmit their identity, position and date and time of transmission at 
regular intervals. 
Ships fitted with AIS operating only in GMDSS A1 areas will not be required to transmit LRIT messages. 
Shipowners need to ensure that GMDSS equipment on their ships has the required capabilities for automatic 
transmission of LRIT messages. 
LRIT information will be received only by Administrations and Contracting Governments subject to the 
provisions set out in paragraph 8 of the new Regulation. 
 The concept of Long‐Range Identification and Tracking of Ships (LRIT) was developed for ships on 
international voyages. The new SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19‐1 (which enters into force on 1 January 2008) 
establishes a multilateral agreement whereby LRIT information will be shared for security and search and 
rescue (SAR) purposes. 
 Information from LRIT transmissions will be restricted for use by Contracting IMO Member States and 
Administrations. It will not be available to third parties or other 
ships. 
   
Ships required to transmit LRIT messages 
Information to be transmitted automatically 
  
Ship’s identity (Transmitting equipment identity) 
Ship’s position (Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position in Latitude and Longitude based on WGS‐
84 datum;) 
Time and date of 
transmission 
(associated with the 
GNSS position.) 
  
  
On‐board equipment 
  
LRIT data can be 
provided by using 
equipment already 
fitted on many ships, 
such as Inmarsat C, 
mini‐C or D+. There 
will also be systems 
available which utilize 
alternative satellite 
networks and 
specifically designed to function within the LRIT infrastructure. All these systems have a built‐in GNSS 
receiver, providing the vessel’s position, date and time. They also have the equipment‐unique identification 
(ID) built in to them. Remote control of transmissions is also possible. 

ARK    Page 76 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
Shipowners and masters are responsible for ensuring that the equipment fitted is fully compliant with the 
requirements of LRIT. Studies have revealed that some Inmarsat C equipment will not be able to support all 
LRIT operations. If in any doubt ship masters or owners should check with the equipment manufacturers or 
service facilities. 
The following are on‐board equipment requirements as specified in the LRIT Performance Standards (IMO 
Resolution MSC.210(81)). The equipment must:be capable of automatically and without human intervention 
on board the ship transmitting the ship’s LRIT information at 6‐hour intervals to an LRIT Data Centre; 
• Be capable of being configured remotely to transmit LRIT information at variable intervals; 
• Be capable of transmitting LRIT information following receipt of polling commands; 
• Interface directly to the ship‐borne global navigation satellite system equipment, or have internal 
positioning capability; 
• Be supplied with energy from the main and emergency source of electrical power1; and 
• Be tested for electromagnetic compatibility taking into account the recommendations developed by 
the Organization.2 
  
  
Frequency of transmissions 
  
Ships will transmit LRIT data every 6 hours at Security Level 1. The frequency of LRIT transmissions must be 
capable of being controlled remotely. At higher security levels (2 or 3), or if there is particular interest in a 
vessel or vessels, the frequency may be increased remotely up to one transmission every 15 minutes. 
  
Security of LRIT data 
  
SOLAS regulation V/19.1 establishes a multilateral agreement between Member States for sharing LRIT data, 
for security and SAR purposes. It maintains the right of flag States to protect ships flying their flag, where 
appropriate, while allowing coastal States access to information about ships navigating off their coasts. None 
of the rights, jurisdiction, duties or obligations of States in the UN Convention on the Law Of the Sea 
(UNCLOS) are altered. 
  
  
System architecture 
  
The following elements comprise the LRIT system: 
• Ship‐borne transmitting equipment 
• Communications service provider(s) 
• Application service provider(s) 
• LRIT Data Centre(s) 
• LRIT Data Distribution Plan 
• International LRIT Data Exchange 
 

ARK    Page 77 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 

No. 30 of 2008

25-11-2008

CONFORMANCE TESTING FOR LONG RANGE IDENTIFICATION AND TRACKING (LRIT)

Applicable to: This circular is for the attention of ship owners, managers, operators, agents, masters, crew
members and surveyors

1 Shipping Circular No. 29 of 2008 informed the shipping community that all ships engaged on international
voyage: passenger ships and cargo ships of 300 gross tonnage and above, and Mobile Offshore Drilling Units
(MODUs). must be fully compliant with the LRIT regulation that has been inserted in SOLAS V/19-1 by the 1st
Radio Survey after 31 December 2008. There is an exemption for ships operating exclusively in sea area A1 from
the requirement to transmit LRIT information, since such ships are already fitted with the Automatic
Identification System (AIS).

2 The MPA in compliance with MSC.1/Circ.1257 has appointed “Pole Star Space Applications Limited” as the
Singapore Ship Registry’s Recognised Application Service Provider (ASP) to conduct the conformance test in
accordance with the procedures and provisions set out in MSC.1/Circ.1257 for vessels registered in Singapore.
Application for Conformance Testing

3. Shipowners/managers are to ensure that their shipborne equipment is LRIT compliant and capable of
transmitting LRIT information.
5 On satisfactory completion of a conformance test, the ASP will issue a ‘conformance test report’ on behalf of
the MPA. This ’conformance test report’ will be required to be submitted to MPA upon issue via the email
lrit_crpt@mpa.gov.sg. MPA will issue the ‘LRIT Certificate of Compliance’ for the vessel. Please note that both
the ‘Conformance Test Report’ and ‘LRIT Certificate of Compliance’ must be retained onboard the vessel for
subsequent survey or inspection purposes.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 78 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
13. NAVIGATION 
1. How will you instruct your 2/O to prepare passage plan (K)‐ What are your main concerns? 
Refer to Bridge Procedure Guide Chapter 2 – ‘PASSAGE PLANNING’. 
 
2. How will you check the passage plan, as you know you 2O is not good? 
 
Checking a Passage Plan: 
1) The following checks should be made while checking a passage plan: 
2) All voyage charts are corrected upto the latest NTM available including T&P Notices. 
3) All voyage publications are corrected upto the latest NTM. 
4) Largest scale charts are available and are being used especially during coasting. 
5) Latest Met/Nav. Warning are identified and plotted on chart. 
6) The reliability of charts (e.g. Survey dates, date of publishing) has been taken into account. 
7) Errors of datum shift is taken into account. 
8) ‘NO GO AREAS’ has been marked appropriately. 
9) True courses plotted on the charts are clear of all dangers, taking into account vessel’s deepest 
navigational draft, minimum UKC and controlling depth. 
10) Places of tidal streams and strong currents are identified and clearly marked on the appropriate 
charts. 
11) Calculation for squat at different speeds of the vessel is done. 
12) Contingencies have been identified at each leg of passage and shown on chart, such as abort 
point, point of no‐return and contingency anchorages. 
13) Bridge manning levels and position fixing methods (primary and secondary) identified at various 
legs of the passage plan. 
14) Radar conspicuous objects, transit bearings, clearing bearings/ranges and indexing lines are 
marked on chart. 
15) Course/Speed alteration points taking into consideration, advance/transfer, w/o positions 
marked. 
16) Points where change of machinery status is required. (e.g. Standby Engines, Change over to 
manual steering, etc.) are marked properly. 
17) Reporting points with reference to mandatory or voluntary ship reporting systems (Pilot 
stations, port control, VTIS, etc.) are marked. 
18) Places where less depth may be encountered shall be marked with “Echo sounder  on & monitor 
UKC”. 
19) Pilot embarkation/disembarkation points, points where anchor or mooring stations to be 
standby are marked. 
20) All courses transferred on charts are correct and distance and ETA to each point is shown. 
21) Tidal predictions are included at all critical positions. 
22) Focal points of heavy traffic are marked. 
23) Places where master to be called and master to be on bridge are clearly marked. 
24) MARPOL Special areas are marked. 
 
3. Where will you get the tidal information for Malacca and Singapore Straits? 
There is a tide table published by MPA every year. 
This book contains the following information: 
The predictions consist of 5 main segments to facilitate easy reference: 
1. High and Low Water Predictions 
2. Hourly Tidal Heigth Predictions 
3. Hourly Tidal Stream Predictions 
4. Maximum and Slack Tidal Stream Predictions 
5. Malacca Strait ‐ High and Low Water Predictions 
The predictions cover stations in Singapore and selected stations in West Coast of Peninsular 
Malaysia. 
ARK    Page 79 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
4. You received a chart, edition Nov07, in file you have one T ‐ correction Sep07 for that chart, 2O 
telling you no need for the correction, explain. (K) 
Check the Latest List of T&P in‐force, which is published in monthly edition of WNTM. 
If the said T‐correction is still in‐force, then it has to be done on the chart. 
   
5. What are the various sources to obtain Navigational Warnings. 
Navigational Information 
Two systems. 
• Admiralty notices to mariners  
• Radio navigational warnings.  
 
 

ARK    Page 80 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
14. MARITIME LAW 
SHIPS REGISTRY 
1. Ship laid up for 2 years, how you as a master will put the ship in service? (AOA, trading area) 
2. Change of Ships registry from foreign flag to Singapore flag. 
3. Carving and Marking Note. 
 
 
POR 
Consideration while deciding POR and action at POR? 
Upon arriving POR you find insufficient space in the warehouse for stowing your cargo which is perishable? 
Action as Master. (K) 
 
P&I Club 
− What is P&I Club function? What is P&I club class1 & class2 coverage? Give an example of FD & D 
coverage. 
− Name the several P&I Clubs. 
 
Various 
− DLOSP, what does it mean? What is time Charter & Voyage charter? Difference between them? 
− What is your main concern as a master in voyage charter? What information you need from the 
charterer regarding the cargo? 
− What is Note of Protest? When you reserve the right to extend? And when you donot? 
− York‐Antwerp Rule, Hamburg Rule, Hague Rule, Hague‐Visby Rule? Difference between them? 
− What is LIEN? State all types of LIEN (Maritime, possessory, contractual, common law, damage. Etc) 
with example. 
− Marine policy for trading region? 
− Seaworthy 
− Innocent passage (UNCLOS) 
− PA 
− GA. What is GA adjuster? 
− Difference between PA & GA 
− How to claim PA & GA 
− ¾ Collision clause 
− What are COGSA, Hague Visby Rule, and Hague Rule? 
− Main concerns of Hague Visby & COGSA? 
− Lay days, Lay Time, Cancelling date. 
− New Jason Clause (When and where to apply?) 
− Paramount Clause 
− What is Sue and labor clause? 
− CLC 
− RDC 
− Tender clause. 
− SCOPIC 2000 
 
UNCLOS 
Contiguous zone 
EEZ 

ARK    Page 81 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Master acting as agent of necessity 
1. The ship needs to be dry‐docked and there is cargo onboard, state your action. (Discharge in warehouse, 
go with no cargo, reload again or transship cargo) (Master acting as agent of necessity) 
2. Who will pay for these expanses? (GA, P&I, Underwriter) 
3. While doing so you found out that two refer containers will not make it to the destination in any way 
possible, what is your action? (Sell, recondition) 
 
Master as an agent of necessity 
• In some exceptional circumstances master becomes agent of shipowner. 
• Master becomes agent of necessity of the cargo owners.  
• To save the interests of all parties concerned in a voyage. 
Conditions 
• Order for emergency repair. 
• Call a port of refuge due to emergency situation. 
• Raise money for disbursement of ship's crew. 
• Transship cargo. 
• Recondition or sell damaged cargo. 
• Order warehouse to save cargo. 
• Deviate from contract route of voyage. 
• Enter into a salvage agreement while ship is in emergency situation. 
• Jettison cargo to save life or property. 
 
 
SALVAGE 
1. What is LOF?  
2. Tell me about SCOPIC (Special compensation P&I Clause). 
3. How SCOPIC came into the picture when article 14 is already there? 
4. What is the difference between LOF and towage contract? Which one will you apt for and why? 
5. As a salvor what are your benefits from LOF?   (Guarantee of Money, LIEN on property) 
6. What is the benefit of the SCOPIC clause to the salvors? (Assurance of US$3M bank security bond 
within 2 days) 
7. Suppose the tug hired on LOF, after one week of working says that he cannot pull you out, state you 
r action. Also the 1st tug is asking for remuneration, what is your defense? (No cure – no pay) 
8. Anything to stop master for accepting LOF when there is immediate danger? 
9. Is there anything that stops a master from taking a tug (under LOF) in first place? Even though the 
situation may not be of imminent danger? (No nothing stops a master to do so, if it is in professional 
judgment of the master to do so, then he can) 
10. While waiting for the tug which will come in two days, suddenly in high tide you refloat her, state 
your action. 
11. Does it concern you as a master, whether a SCOPIC clause is being invoked? How do you know when 
it has been invoked? (Line no 7 in the LOF2005 checklist includes a line/check box that requires the 
master/salvor to check or tick) 
12. Any obligation to salvage when encounters small vessel asking for salvage help? 

ARK    Page 82 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
15. SURVEYS & CERTIFICATES 
15.1 How are you kept informed for the surveys due? 
Survey Status Report issued by the class states the dates of all surveys carried out, their validity and 
next inspection date. 
This report can be obtained by the class at any time via internet. 
 
15.2 What is condition of class? How to obtain them? Can there be 2 conditions of class? 
 
Condition of class certificate 
Provisional certificate 
Interim certificate 
  
¾ Issued to a classed vessel. 
¾ Issued by classification society surveyor. 
¾ Enables the vessel to proceed to voyage when as per surveyor: 
• The vessel is fit. 
• In efficient condition. 

¾ Certificates will embody surveyor’s recommendation for continuance of class. 
¾ Subjected to the confirmation of the committee. 
   
Issued in the event of: 
Seaworthiness of the vessel in question due to: 
• Collision 
• Grounding 
• Any maritime accident by which vessel sustained damage to hull/ machinery. 
¾ Repair done as required. 
¾ If surveyor thinks that the ship is only safe to proceed to next port for a cheaper or more thorough 
repair, an endorsement to be made on interim certificate as: 
¾ “The vessel is safe for intended passage until the next port for further repair and examination.” 
 
15.3 List all mandatory certificates to be carried on board. 
Refer to MPA Shipping Circular No. 14 of 2005. 
 
15.4 Survey Preparation Guidelines (Where will you find?) 
It is issued by the classification society of the vessel. 
Example: ClassNK
Guidance for undergoing Class maintenance surveys. 
 
15.5 What is Enhanced Special Survey? Which publication to refer? 
15.6 How do you conduct an ESP? What is its application? 

GUIDELINES ON THE ENHANCED PROGRAMME OF INSPECTIONS DURING SURVEYS OF BULK


CARRIERS AND OIL TANKERS (IMO RESOLUTION A.744(18), AS AMENDED) 
 
ENHANCED SPECIAL SURVEY 
Required for:  
• Tanker:Mandatory for crude oil carrier 20,000DWT & above. 
• Product tanker of 30,000DWT and above.  
• Bulk Carriers: No limit.  
 

ARK    Page 83 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
As the age increase the survey becomes more stringent. 
Required as per regulation‐2, CH‐XI‐I of SOLAS convention. 
 
Aspects of ESP
• It is basically to detect structural weakness & area of corrosion.  
• It has been in forced since 1st July 1993 for oil tankers & bulk  carriers including OBO.  
• It commences at 4th annual survey and progressed during succeeding year with a view to complete by 
5th anniversary.  
Additionally  
• require internal examination; 
• close up survey; 
• Thickness measurement report etc. 
• A specific survey program in written format must be worked out in advance. 
• Dry docking is required to complete a vessel's special survey of hull. 
• All tank coatings are to be evaluated periodically. 
• Tanks having poor coating conditions to be evaluated more frequently. 
• Close up survey to be carried out to check the condition of critical members of ships structure. This 
includes: 
 
• Enhanced survey carried out  
− During Periodical Survey. 
− During annual survey &  
− Intermediate Enhanced survey. 
  
• It covers all cargo spaces, ballast tanks, tunnel, cofferdam, void space, deck & outer hull. 
• After survey the administrator will give an endorsed condition evolution report to the owner n a copy to 
be placed on board. 
• Vessel to keep record of
− Thickness measurement report. 
− Survey report 
− Executive hull summary. 
 
 
15.7 How do you conduct a ship construction, Safety Equipment & Load‐line Survey? 
 
Preparation for safety construction survey 
Before safety construction survey, followings to be checked: 
1) Structural strength of the vessel is good. No part of deck or hull is not badly corroded. 
2) Water tight doors are in good condition. Remote and local controls working properly. 
3) Bilge pumping and drainage arrangements are in good condition. 
4) Electrical equipment and installation 
5) Emergency sources of electrical power 
6) Electric and electro hydraulic steering gears 
7) Precaution against shock, fire and other hazards of electrical origin 
8) Fire protection arrangements, fixed and portable fire fighting equipment are well maintained and in 
good operational condition. 
9) Boilers and machinery 
10) Means of going astern 
11) Shaft 
12) Boiler feed system in good condition. 
13) Steam pipe systems in good condition. 
14) Air pressure systems are in good condition. 
15) Cooling water systems are in good condition. 

ARK    Page 84 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
16) Fuel, lubricating and other oil systems are in good condition. 
17) Means of communications are in good condition. 
18) Steering gear 
19) Anchor chain and cables 
20) Means of escapes are well maintained and in good condition. 
21) Means of stopping machinery 
22) Shutting off fuel suction pipes 
23) Closing of openings 
24) For specialized tankers and UMS ships, additional items. 
 
Checklist and preparation for safety construction survey may be found in company's ISM manual. 

 
Preparation for safety equipment survey 
• Refer to form‐E, attached to certificate which reflects items of that certificate appropriate for the ship. 
• Items will include LSA, FFA, Pilot hoist, bridge equipments and navigation lights. 
  
Preparation of life saving equipments:
1) Muster list updated and posted in conspicuous position. 
2) Life jacket donning instructions displayed in conspicuous places. 
3) Emergency stations directed by arrows. 
4) Life boat and associated equipments are maintained and in good condition. 
5) Life boat engine tested. 
6) FO flash point not more than 43°C. 
7) L/B engine power supply (battery charging) is maintained. 
8) Life boat davit, embarkation arrangements, launching arrangements, brakes are in good condition. 
9) Life boat fall in good condition. Renewed or changed end for end if required. 
10) Lifeboat markings, reflecting tapes in good condition. 
11) Life raft serviced annually. Marked as per SOLAS. 
12) Launching instructions of all survival crafts are displayed near the craft. 
13) No. of lifebuoys are as per SOLAS. Their markings, symbols, life lines, smoke signals are in food 
condition. 
14) Bridge pyrotechnics are adequate, in good condition as per SOLAS. 
15) Emergency lights and general alarm are in good condition. 
 
Preparation of fire fighting equipments
1) Fire control plans displayed in conspicuous places.  
2) Copies of fire plans are available in fire wallet. 
3) Fire detection system in good condition. 
4) Main and emergency fire pumps in good condition. 
5) Fire hoses, nozzles, fire hose boxes in good condition and stowed properly. 
6) International ship shore connection in proper place. Location is marked properly. 
7) Fixed fire extinguishing system in good condition. 
8) Portable fire extinguishers in good conditioned, properly maintained, marked and uses appropriate 
color as per SOLAS. 
9) Fire main system, isolating valves, hydrants in good and operational condition. 
10) Location of firemen's outfit marked. All associated equipments ar adequate as per SOLAS and in 
good condition. 
11) Number of firemen's outfit, BA sets, air bottles are adequate as per SOLAS. 
Other items:
1) Navigation lights, shapes, sound signaling appliances in good condition. 
2) Magnetic compass in good condition and  deviation curve, compass error book are properly 
maintained. 

ARK    Page 85 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
3) Radar, ARPA, echo sounder, gyro compass, position fixing equipments, log, rate of turn indicator in 
good condition. 
4) Adequate and up to date charts and publications are onboard.  
5) Pilot ladder or mechanical hoist in good condition. 
 
 
Preparation for lOPP survey 
For a IOPP survey, followings items to be checked: 
• Oil record book properly filled up and endorsed. 
• Oil discharge monitor and control system in good working condition. 
• Oily water separators and oil filtering equipment in good working condition. 
• Pumping and piping systems are in good condition. 
• SOPEP is updated and endorsed. 
• Anti‐pollution gear is sufficient. 
 
 
Preparation for loadline survey 
For a loadline survey, information for preparation may be found from "Condition of assignment" issued 
along with loadline certificate. 
 
Followings items to be checked:
Stability booklets available and endorsed by surveyor. 
 
Vessel's structural strength is sufficient: 
 
• The decks or hulls are not badly corroded. 
• There is no crack on deck or hull. 
• Hatch ways and hatch openings are weather tight. 
• Machinery space openings weather tight. 
• All ventilators on deck and their coamings are in good condition. 
• All openings on the weather deck are weather tight. 
• Cargo ports and other similar openings below freeboard deck are watertight. 
• Non‐return valves, overboard discharging valves are operational. 
• Pumping arrangements in steering flat and forepeak tanks are in good condition. 
• Portholes, funnel flaps, sky lights in good condition and operational. 
• Bulwarks, railings are in good condition. 
• Deck line, loadline and draft markings are well painted. 
   
Company's ISM manual provides guidance and checklist for loadline survey. 
 
15.8 Safety certificates are expiring, next port does not have survey facility, state actions, and how long is 
the extension? (SOLAS, Chapter‐1, Reg:14 (e))  
15.9 How will you prepare your vessel for De‐rating certification? 
15.10 ISPS Survey preparation. 
15.11 What is HSSC? 
 
HARMONIZED SYSTEM OF SURVEY AND CERTIFICATION 
• A harmonized system of survey and certification covering international shipping regulations adopted by 
the International Maritime Organization enters into force on 3 February 2000. 
• The system covers survey and certification requirements of the followings codes and conventions: 
− International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974 
− The International Convention on Load Lines, (LL) 1966  

ARK    Page 86 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
− The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, as modified by the 
Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78) 
− The International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals 
in Bulk (IBC Code) 
− Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (BCH Code) 
− Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code). 
 
  
Purpose
Harmonize periods between surveys of all statutory certificates issued to cargo ships. 
Certificates to have a uniform period of validity of five years. 
  
Features
One year standard interval between surveys, which could be any of the followings: 
− Initial survey 
− Annual survey 
− Intermediate survey 
− Periodical survey. 
− Renewal survey 
 
• Renewal survey may be completed within three months before the expiry of the certificate with no loss 
of its period of validity. Time window of six months for other surveys. 
• A maximum period of validity of five years for all cargo ship certificates. 
• A maximum period of validity of one year for all passenger ship certificates. 
• Three months extension for cargo ship certificates, one month for short voyages. 
• If a certificate is extended, the period of validity of new certificate starts from the expiry date of last 
certificate. 
• At least two inspections of ship's bottom in a five year period, maximum interval between the 
inspections should not be greater than thirty six months. 
• A combined cargo ship safety certificate that will replace existing safety equipment, safety construction 
and safety radio certificate. 
• No more unscheduled inspections. 
• Annual surveys are mandatory. 
• Intervals between surveys of cargo ship's safety equipment will be changed to interval of two and three 
years instead of two years. 
• Intermediate surveys are required for all ships under the cargo ship safety construction certificate. 
• Inspections of the outside of ship's bottom required for all cargo ships. 
• Intermediate surveys for the cargo ship safety construction certificate can be held within three months 
of either the second or third anniversary date. 
• There is a provision for combined cargo ship safety certificate. 
   
Certificates related to HSSC 
• Passenger Ship Safety Certificate, including Record of Equipment 
• Cargo Ship Safety Construction Certificate 
• Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate, including Record of Equipment 
• Cargo Ship Safety Radio Certificate, including Record of Equipment 
• Cargo Ship Safety Certificate, including Record of Equipment 
• International Load Lines Certificate  
• International Load Lines Exemption Certificate 
• International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate 
• International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in Bulk 
• International Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk 
• International Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Liquefied Gases in Bulk 

ARK    Page 87 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk 
 
15.12 Explain ISM Survey, audits and certification. 
15.13 Validity of Certificates if they are not harmonized? 
 
15.14 What surveys can be carried out in dry dock? 
 
Following surveys may be carried out in dry dock: 
    
• Special survey for renewal of class certificate. 
• Docking survey under class rule including tailshaft survey. 
• Renewal survey of all other statutory certificates under HSSC. 
• Statutory inspection of ship's bottom. 
 
 

ARK    Page 88 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
16. DRY DOCKING 
1. Entering dry‐dock – concern as a master 
 
Before entry:
• Check the stability of the vessel, especially during critical period. 
• Check the vessel at required draft. 
• No list. 
• Prepare mooring lines. 
• Unused mooring lines stowed. 
• Standby for dock master and dock mooring gang. 
• Proper flags displayed as required. 
• Free surface effects minimum. 
• Movable weights to be secured. 
• Ship power, fire main, fresh water, telephone connections to be ready. 
• Logs off/ retracted. 
• Off echo sounders. 
• Overboard discharges to be shut. 
• Gangway/ accommodation ladders to be stowed. 
• Anchors stowed and secured. 
• Crews standby to assist moorings as required. 
  
While entering:
Times of the followings to be logged down:  
• When vessel enters dock. 
• When the gate closed 
• When pumping out commenced. 
• When vessel sewed 
• When pump out completed. 
 
 After vessel docked:
Tanks and bilge soundings throughout the vessel. 
Records to be kept with copy to dock‐master. 
Hull high pressure wash as the level goes down. 
Initial inspection of the hull to be done as soon as possible:  
• The extend of the hull damage if any. 
• The extend of the rudder and propeller damage 
• Suitable and efficient shoring arrangements 
• Suitable and efficient keel blocks 
 
Plugs to be removed, if draining of the tanks to be required. 
All removed plugs to be in safe custody of C/O. 
Bridge equipments, gyro shut down, heading recorded. 
 

ARK    Page 89 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
2. Preparation, Safe Working Practices, Plans required 
 
The preparation of a vessel for dry docking  
a) Arrange a meeting with the heads of departments. Inform them about the dry docking plan. Inform them 
about:  
• The dry dock, particulars of dry dock, if any, expected date of dry dock etc. 
• Instruct the chief engineer / chief officer to prepare a comprehensive dry docking and repair list. 
• Arrange another meeting with the head of the departments to go through the repair list 
respectively. 
• Determine which repairs can be done onboard by ship’s personnel. 
• Check there is no overlapping of repairs between various departments. 
• Recompile repair list of  both departments. 
b) Prepare an official repair list, include proper photocopies of plans or diagrams of parts to repair. 
 
c) Send the repair list to office. Also send the list of repairs to be done by ship’s personnel. 
 
d) Ensure all plans are onboard. 
 
e) Approved list from head office will be send back to the ship. 
 
f) Heads of departments to have copy of repair lists. 
 
g) Send docking plan to dry dock for preparation of dock. 
 
h) Heads of departments to brief crew members regarding dry dock repairs. 
 
i) Safety committee also to be involved regarding dry dock repairs. 
 
j) The surveys due and to be done in dry dock. 
 
k) Required preparation for surveys. 
 
l) Any modification to be carried out. 
 
m) Order the necessary stores, materials for repair jobs by ship's crew. 
 
n) Ask to company for extra officer if deem necessary. 
 

o) Assign duties for officers and brief them about safety and security of the vessel and maintaining efficient 
watch at all times. 
• For chief officer, overall supervision of deck work list, safety and organization of crew for dry dock 
and survey. 
• For 2nd officer, supervision of hull cleaning and painting and to keep watch under c/o's instruction. 
• For 3rd officer, in charge for safety while in dry dock and to keep watch under c/o's instruction. 
• Designate personnel for fire patrol and gangway watch. 
• Designate personnel for filling FW and disposal of garbage. 
p) Instruct c/o to brief the crews on general safety requirement, dock and regulations to be followed and 
procedures to be taken in case of emergency / accident. 
q)  Stability of the ship to be calculated before entering. Following things to be considered: 
• The GM of the ship, maximum loss of GM during critical period. 
• Vessel to be stable throughout the process. 
ARK    Page 90 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Trim of the ship should be adequate. 
• Vessel should be upright. 
• Amount of ballast, FW, FO, cargo onboard and their distribution. 
r) Cranes to be stowed to avoid obstruction to dry dock cranes. High antennas to be lowered. 
  
s) Lifebuoys to be removed from deck to avoid over painting. 
  
t) Off‐hire time and position to be ascertained and logged (if time chartered). 
 
 
Plans required in dry dock 
 
For dock master: 
• Docking plan. 
• Cargo stowage plan (If docking with cargo). 
• Reports from last dry dock. 
 
Following plans to be kept ready: 
• Fire plan. 
• Midship section plan. 
• General arrangement plan. 
• Capacity plan. 
  
Contents of a docking plan:
• Position of bulkheads 
• Position of main structural members. 
• Rise of floor (if any). 
• Position of plugs. 
 
3. Critical Period, Critical instant, formula for loss of GM 
 
Critical instant 
Critical moment 
  
• It is the moment just before the vessel takes blocks overall. 
• The upthrust of bilge block acts on the stern frame. 
• The upthrust is maximum at this moment. 
• It can be calculated by following formula: 
            Pmax = MCTC X t / l 
            MCTC = Moment to change trim by 1 cm. 
            t = Trim in cm. 
            l = Distance of CF from AP. 
  
• It is called critical instant because maximum loss of GM occurs at this instant. 
• If GM becomes negative, the ship may capsize or slip from block 
 
 
Critical period 
  
The period since the keel first touches the block until the vessel takes blocks overall. 
 
An upthrust is caused by the blocks, denoted by "P". 
P at any instant can be calculated by the following formula: 
ARK    Page 91 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
P = TPC X Change in mean draft in cm. 
P is maximum at the instant before vessel takes blocks overall. It can be calculated as: 
P = MCTC X t / l        { t = trim in cm, l = dist of CF from AP} 
  
Due to the upthrust, the vessel reduces its GM. 
The G moves UP, thereby GM is reduced. 
  
M moves down to M', thereby GM is reduced. 
  
Shift of G (Center of gravity) or M (Transverse metacenter) may be calculated as: 
• GG' = (P X KG)/(W ‐ P)
 
• MM' = (P X KM)/W 
  
• The danger is, due to subsequent loss of GM, the vessel may lose positive stability and may capsize. 
 
• Maximum loss of GM to be calculated beforehand. 
 
• It is dangerous if negative GM occurs in dry dock. 
 
 
If negative GM occurs in dry dock 
• The vessel will lose positive stability. 
• She may capsize. 
• She may slip off from the blocks. 
 
 
4. Dry docking with cargo onboard 

Dry docking with full cargo onboard: 


 Followings things to be considered while docking with full cargo: 
• Vessel is subjected to more severe stress and strains than normal dry dock. 
• Uneven distribution of weight. 
• Additional weight of the vessel 
• Unable to achieve required draft for entering  
• Certain extra precautions to be taken. 
 Following actions to be considered if practicable, before entering: 
• Discharge cargoes at port facility 
• Transship cargo 
• Press up the DB tanks beneath the holds. 
• Distribute the weight of the cargo evenly over the inner bottom. 
• Avoid local loading. 
• Inform yard about cargo's characteristics, cargo plan and weight distribution in respective holds. 
• All cargoes onboard properly lashed, secured. 
• Communicate with yard with respect to extra shores or keel/bilge blocks. 
• Vessel upright, minimize free surface effect, adequate stability, trimmed as per yard's requirement. 
• Stand‐by and prepare fire fighting equipments for repair and adjacent areas. 
Procedures: 
• Not possible for normal dry docking. 
• Damage or repair works in a suitable position. 
• Possible to pump out some of the dock water sufficient to expose the affected area. 

ARK    Page 92 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Leave the vessel partly waterborne. 
• Reduce the reactions on the blocks. 
• Reduce the tendencies of hogging. 
• Reduce the tendencies of sagging. 
 
5. What things you will check before refloating in dry dock? 
 Before: 
1. Ship’s stability condition to be kept as close as to that when she is entering in the dry dock. 
2. Enough GM and positive stability during critical period. 
3. No changes of weight to be made without the consent of the dock‐master. 
4. Movable weights to be secured. 
5. Minimum free surface effect and no list. 
6. All plugs to be secured. 
7. Anchors stowed and secured. 
8. All overboard discharges secured. 
9. Anodes fitted. 
10. All pipings, cable connections with shore disconnected. 
11. Start gyro, check heading. 
   
While refloating: 
1. Inform E/R when flooding dock. 
2. Check for water tightness. 
3. Sound all tanks. 
4. Following times to be logged down: 
• Flooding commenced 
• Vessel floated 
• Dock gate opened 
• Vessel left dock. 
 
After refloating: 
1. Check operation of all equipments. 
2. General cleaning and washing 
3. Normal sailing checklist. 
4. Check water tight integrity of the vessel. 
 
 

ARK    Page 93 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
17. ISPS 
1. What do you understand by ISPS? 
 
The International Ship and port facility security code. 
 
The objectives are: 
a) To establish an international framework involving cooperation between contracting 
governments, local administrations, shipping and port industries to detect/assess security 
threats and take preventive measures against security incidents affecting ships or port facilities 
used in international trade. 
b) To establish the respective roles and responsibilities of all parties concerned. 
c) To ensure the early and efficient collation and exchange of security related information; 
d) To provide methodology for security assessments so as to have in place plans and procedures to 
react to changing security levels; 
e) To ensure confidence that adequate maritime security measures are in place. 
 
2. What is DOS? When do you use it or issue it? (Hint: Give all 6 points about the DOS) 
 
DECLARATION OF SECURITY
• Contracting Governments shall determine when a Declaration of Security is required by assessing the 
risk the ship/port interface or ship to ship activity poses to persons, property or the environment. 
 
• A ship can request completion of a Declaration of Security when: 
1. The ship is operating at a higher security level than the port facility or another shipit is 
interfacing with; 
2. There is an agreement on a Declaration of Security between Contracting Governments covering 
certain international voyages or specific ships on those voyages; 
 
3. There has been a security threat or a security incident involving the ship or involving the port 
facility, as applicable; 
 
4. The ship is at a port which is not required to have and implement an approved port facility 
security plan; or 
 
5. The ship is conducting ship to ship activities with another ship not required to have and 
implement an approved ship security plan. 
 
3. Frequency of drills. 
 
• Drills should be conducted at least once every three months.  
• In addition, in cases where more than 25 percent of the ship’s personnel has been changed, at any 
one time, with personnel that has not previously participated in any drill on that ship, within the last 
3 months, a drill should be  conducted within one week of the change. 
• Exercise: ‐ to be carried out at least one each calendar year or not exceeding 18 months. 
 
4. Validity of certificate. 
 
International Ship Security Certificate (ISSP Cert.)  
• to be valid for 5 Years. 
• Initial Verification 
• Intermediate (3 months before or after) between 2nd or 3rd anniversary. To be endorsed on the 
certificate. 
• Renewal not exceeding 5years. 
ARK    Page 94 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
• Additional verification as determined by the administration. 
 
Interim ISSP Cert:‐  
Followings are the reason:‐  
1) Ships on delivery. 
2) Change of flag state / Registry.  
3) Change of Management/Operator. 
It is valid for 6 months only with no extension. 
 
5. Duties of SSO 
a) Under take a regular security inspection. 
b) Maintain & supervise the implementation of SSP. 
c) Coordinating security aspect. 
d) Proposing modification of SSP. 
e) Reporting to CSO & Review. 
f) Improve security awareness. 
g) Adequate training to ship’s crew to be provided. 
h) Coordinating with CSO & FPSO. 
i) SSAS Operate, Test, Calibrate & Maintenance. 
 
 
6. CSR 
Continuous Synopsis Record. Circular: 07/2004,  
• SOLAS Chapter XI‐2 Regulation 5 
• A ship to carry CSR which is intended to provide an onboard record of history of the ship issued by 
flag state. 
• Form 1: All CSR documents issued by ships administration. 
• Form 2: All amendment forms, Company or Master to complete. 
• Form 3: All indices of amendment. 
• Note: CSR Must be issue asap but not latter than 3 months from the date of change. 
• The Ship Security Alert System (SSAS):‐ This system should be provided in two location 
• In navigating bridge. Other agreed by CSO. 
 
Shall contain, at least, the following information:  
• The name of the State whose flag the ship is entitled to fly; 
• The date on which the ship was registered with that State; 
• The ship’s identification number in accordance with regulation (IMO Number) 
• The name of the ship; 
• The port at which the ship is registered; 
• The name of the registered owner(s) and their registered address(es); 
• The name of the registered bareboat charterer(s) and their registered address(es), if applicable; 
• The name of the Company, as defined in regulation IX/1, its registered address and the address(es) 
from where it carries out the safety‐management activities; 
• The name of all classification society(ies) with which the ship is classed; 
• The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized organization 
which has issued the Document of Compliance. 
• The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized organization 
that has issued the Safety Management Certificate 
• The name of the Administration or of the Contracting Government or of the recognized security 
organization that 
has issued the International Ship Security Certificate and 
• The date on which the ship ceased to be registered with that State. 

ARK    Page 95 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
Any changes relating to the entries shall be recorded in the Continuous Synopsis Record so as to provide 
updated and current information together with the history of the changes. 
 
The Continuous Synopsis Record shall be kept on board the ship and shall be available for inspection at all 
times. 
 
 
7. Master’s Responsibility under ISPS: 
 
The master’s responsibility in ISPS is to: 
• Provide necessary support & resources to Ships Security Officer; 
• To implement the ISPS efficiently; 
• To ensure that the ISPS is fully maintained and there should not be any breach of security; 
• Trainings are conducted; 
• Crews are performing their duties accordingly;  
• Inspections of gangway register / log book entries frequently and To keep the confidential file in 
safe.  
 
8. Ship sailing in piracy prone area – what is your action? 
• Arrange anti‐piracy watches. 
• Raise security level of your ship after consulting with CSO. 
 
9. Pirate attack your ship – what are your actions? 
• Send out a “piracy/armed robbery attack” message. 
• When RCC becomes aware of such a situation, it will advice appropriate agencies. 
• Vessel should comply with any order by pirates not to make any form of transmission informing 
shore authorities of the attack. 
 
10. When do you show PSCO your security plan? Which part you can show? (Hint: Only when PSCO has 
clear grounds that vessel is not complying with the regulations) 
 
When the attending inspector have clear ground to believe that the vessel is not complying as per SOLAS XI – 
2 and or ISPS Code then only he can but have limited access to specific section of the plan relating to the non 
compliance is exceptionally allowed but only with the consent of the contracting Government or the Master 
except the following area as per ISPS CODE A. 
• Identification of restricted area & measures to prevent unauthorized access. 
• Procedure for responding to security threat. 
• Procedure for responding to any security instructions. 
• Duties of ship board personnel. 
• Procedures to ensure inspection test calibration of security equipments. 
• Identification of location of Security alert activation point. 
• Procedure, Instructions and Guidance of SSAS. 
(4‐Procedure,  2‐Identification  &  1‐Duty.) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ARK    Page 96 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
18. STCW 

STCW
International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers

ƒ STCW 78 was extensively revised in July 1995;


ƒ the revised version is known as STCW 95 and entered into force on 1st February 1997;
ƒ STCW 95 comes into full effect on 1st February 2002;
ƒ STCW 95 incorporates the STCW code;
ƒ Part A of the STCW code is mandatory and contains the minimum standards for seafarers;
ƒ Part B is only recommended and contains guidance intended to help with implementation of the
Convention.

8 Chapters in STCW 95
Chapter I General Provisions
Chapter II Master and Deck Department
Chapter III Engineering Department
Chapter IV Radio Communication and Radio Personnel
Chapter V Special Training Requirement for Personnel on Certain Types of Ships
Chapter VI Emergency, Occupational Safety, Medical Care and Survival Functions
Chapter VII Alternative Certificates
Chapter VIII Watchkeeping

White List
ƒ A list of countries found to be conducting their maritime training and certification in accordance with
the requirements of STCW 95.

Hours of work
(1) A minimum of 10 hours of rest in any 24-hour period.
The minimum 10 hours may be reduced to not less than 6 hours provided that any such reduction
must not extend beyond 2 days and not less than 70 hours rest are provided in each 7day period.
(2) The hours of rest may be divided into no more than 2 periods, one of which must be of at least 6
hours.
(3) The requirements for rest periods need not be maintained during an emergency or drill or in an
overriding operational condition.
(4) Watch schedules must be posted.

ILO Convention No. 180 – Seafarers' Hours of Work and Manning of Ships Convention, 1996

Levels of responsibility
(1) Management Level – (master, chief mate, chief engineer, second engineer)
♦ to ensure that all functions are properly performed;
(2) Operational Level – (watchkeeping officers)
♦ to maintain direct control over the performance of all functions under the direction of management
level;
(3) Support Level – (watch ratings and other ratings with safety & pollution prevention responsibilities)
♦ to perform assigned tasks and duties under the direction of operational or management level;

Seven functions
(1) Navigation;
(2) Cargo handling and stowage;
(3) Control and operation of the ship and care of persons on board;
(4) Marine Engineering;
(5) Electrical, electronic and control engineering;
(6) Maintenance and repair; and
(7) Radiocommunications;
 
 

ARK    Page 97 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
19. PSC & FSC 
1. What is the fine for misuse of distress signal?  
 

S$10,000 
 
2. What do you know about PSC & FSC? What are their powers? 

Port State Control 
Port State control, or PSC, is the exercise of the right of a port State, when granting permission to a 
foreign flagged ship to enter a port of the port State, to inspect the vessel to ensure that it meets 
international safety, pollution and other requirements.  
Although the flag State and owner of a ship have fundamental responsibility for ensuring that these 
requirements are implemented, supervision by the flag State is many times insufficient.  
This consists of conducting inspections of various aspects of a ship once it has arrived in port, including 
the safety of life and property onboard the ship, prevention of pollution by the ship, and the living and 
working conditions onboard the ship. 

PSC inspection process 
A PSC inspection typically consists of a check of the documents and certificates onboard ship combined 
with a condition survey of the vessel.  

However, a more detailed survey is carried out if there are "clear grounds" for such, as when 
deficiencies are found in the ship's compliance with mandatory international requirements, or; there is 
some question as to the safety condition of the vessel.  

If serious deficiencies are found affecting safety as a result of the inspection, the ship is detained and the 
captain is instructed to rectify the deficiencies before departure.  

In the event that the deficiencies are not rectified or no suitable plan is presented for rectifying them, 
the ship will be prohibited from leaving the port. 

 
Flag State Control 
Maritime administration of the country under whose the vessel flying its flag. Their purpose is to ensure 
the safety at sea with regards to construction, maintenance, seaworthiness, manning, labor condition, 
Crew training, Prevention of collision and to ensure the ship is appropriately surveyed as to condition, 
equipment & manning. They are empowered to inspect the. They can verify the competency of the 
officer & crew.  
 
3. Suppose you are in a port and your lifeboat is damage, what will you do and what PSC can do? 
 

• Inform owners and request for repairs. 
• Get the repairs done before departing from the port. 
• If repairs are not possible in the current port; 
• Inform owners, 
• P&I club, 
• Ask for additional Life rafts. 
• Obtain a Letter of dispensation from MPA to sail without the repairs upto the next port where 
the repairs can be done. 
 

PSC may detain the ship. 

ARK    Page 98 of 99 
ORAL QUESTIONS ‐ 2008 
 
4. What is the main purpose of MOU? (K) 
 
Port state regime & MOU 
• A system of harmonized inspection procedure. 
• Established under a formal agreement between neighboring port states ‐ is called MOU, 
memorandum of understanding. 
• Designed to target sub standard ships with the objective their eventual elimination from the region 
covered by MOU. 

I. There are following MOUs in operational: 
 Black Sea MOU (Black Sea region) 
II. Abuja MOU (West and Central African region) 
III. Acuerdo de Viña del Mar (Latin American region) 
IV. Tokyo MOU (Asia‐Pacific region) 
V. Indian Ocean MOU (Indian Ocean region) 
VI. Caribbean MOU (Caribbean region) 
VII. Mediterranean MOU (Mediterranean region) 
VIII. Paris MOU (Europe and North Atlantic region) 
IX. Riyadh MOU (The Gulf region) 
 
5. Difference between FSC and PSC? 
 

ARK    Page 99 of 99