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Ottawa River dredging activities, May 2010

Ottawa River dredging activities, May 2010

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The Ottawa River Great Lakes Legacy Act project is underway in Toledo and will remove 240,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the River over the next 6-9 months. Approximately 10,000 cubic yards has already been removed from Sibley Creek.

1) During dredging operations, areas of the river may be closed to boat traffic.
2) After the water is separated from the sediments, it is treated at the onsite water treatment plant and pumped back to the river. The water is released to the river via a diffuser pipe (shown here) that sits along the river bottom.
3) De-watering pad for the ~7,000 cubic yards hydraulically dredged from the PCB hot spots. This is sediment with higher PCB concentrations that will be de-watered and taken to a specially licenced facility for disposal.
4) Sediments are treated with a thickening agent before being pumped into "geobags." The geobags trap the sediment but allow the water to seep out. The water is collected and treated before being returned to the river.
5) During the preliminary thickening phase, a rake and chain system moves the thickened sediment at the bottom of the tank toward the next phase where the sediments are drawn into the geobags.
6) After the sediment is thickened, the remaining water flows into weirs where it is collected, treated and returned to the Ottawa River.
7) One of two dredging barges on the Ottawa River. At the front of the barge is the hydraulic dredge with is lowered to the bottom of the river to precise depths and the sediments are suctioned up and pumped to the Hoffman Road Landfill.
8) Overflow basin next to the specially constructed cell at the Hoffman Road Landfill.
The Ottawa River Great Lakes Legacy Act project is underway in Toledo and will remove 240,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment from the River over the next 6-9 months. Approximately 10,000 cubic yards has already been removed from Sibley Creek.

1) During dredging operations, areas of the river may be closed to boat traffic.
2) After the water is separated from the sediments, it is treated at the onsite water treatment plant and pumped back to the river. The water is released to the river via a diffuser pipe (shown here) that sits along the river bottom.
3) De-watering pad for the ~7,000 cubic yards hydraulically dredged from the PCB hot spots. This is sediment with higher PCB concentrations that will be de-watered and taken to a specially licenced facility for disposal.
4) Sediments are treated with a thickening agent before being pumped into "geobags." The geobags trap the sediment but allow the water to seep out. The water is collected and treated before being returned to the river.
5) During the preliminary thickening phase, a rake and chain system moves the thickened sediment at the bottom of the tank toward the next phase where the sediments are drawn into the geobags.
6) After the sediment is thickened, the remaining water flows into weirs where it is collected, treated and returned to the Ottawa River.
7) One of two dredging barges on the Ottawa River. At the front of the barge is the hydraulic dredge with is lowered to the bottom of the river to precise depths and the sediments are suctioned up and pumped to the Hoffman Road Landfill.
8) Overflow basin next to the specially constructed cell at the Hoffman Road Landfill.

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Published by: Great Lakes Restoration on Jun 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/10/2010

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One of two dredging barges on the Ottawa River.

At the front of the barge is the hydraulic dredge with is lowered to the bottom of the river to precise depths and the sediments are suctioned up and pumped to the Hoffman Road Landfill.

During dredging operations, areas of the river may be closed to boat traffic.

De-watering pad for the ~7,000 cubic yards hydraulically dredged from the PCB hot spots. This is sediment with higher PCB concentrations that will be de-watered and taken to a specially licenced facility for disposal.

After the sediment is thickened, the remaining water flows into weirs where it is collected, treated and returned to the Ottawa River.

After the water is separated from the sediments, it is treated at the onsite water treatment plant and pumped back to the river. The water is released to the river via a diffuser pipe (shown here) that sits along the river bottom.

Sediments are treated with a thickening agent before being pumped into "geobags." The geobags trap the sediment but allow the water to seep out. The water is collected and treated before being returned to the river.

During the preliminary thickening phase, a rake and chain system moves the thickened sediment at the bottom of the tank toward the next phase where the sediments are drawn into the geobags.

Overflow basin next to the specially constructed cell at the Hoffman Road Landfill.

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