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ART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010

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ART BASEL
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AUCTIONS LONDON
CONTEMPORARY ART EVENING SALE 29 JUNE 2010
CONTEMPORARY ART DAY SALE 30 JUNE 2010
ITALIA 30 JUNE 2010
Art Basel vernissage
Most wanted: established artists
Collectors vied for works with proven track records and critical validation
Art Basel began with a bang yes-
terday at the preview of the 41st
edition of the modern and con-
temporary fair. As they crowded
into the stands, collectors report-
ed a renewed sense of excite-
ment at the fair.
“There’s an energy level here,
a vibrancy—more than I’ve seen
in the past two fairs,” said Miami
billionaire Norman Braman, as
he peered into a cupboard on
David Juda’s stand (B10).
Collectors Howard and Cindy
Rachofsky of Dallas, the Rubells
and De La Cruzs from Miami,
Dimitris Daskalopoulos, the con-
temporary Chinese art collector
Uli Sigg and Russian billionaire
Roman Abramovich accompa-
nied by his partner Dasha
Zhukova were also among the
collectors attending the fair
At Gavin Brown (N6), pub-
lishing mogul Peter Brandt was
examining works by Spencer
Sweeney, with movie-star Val
Kilmer who said he was “seeing
some friends and trying to learn
new things”. Mick Jagger’s ex-
wife Bianca Jagger, on her first
visit to Art Basel, was eyeing up
Billy Childish’s paintings at
Neugerriemschneider (H2).
While the crowds were typi-
cal of every edition of the fair,
the art on offer this year reflects
the market’s changing tastes.
“The tone of the fair has
changed: it’s far more intellectu-
al,” said art adviser Todd Levin,
noting there were fewer works
by artists popular before the
financial crisis, such as Anselm
Reyle. “There is a big interest in
art from the 1970s, because
there have been so many muse-
um shows of this period,” said
Mary Sabbatino, vice president
of Lelong in New York (E3),
showing works by Jannis
Kounellis, Nancy Spero and
Hannah Wilkie. “Lots of people
are rediscovering artists from
around 20 to 25 years ago, such
as Ross Bleckner,” said Michael
Briggs of Patrick Painter (P17).
“It’s a cycle—they were huge in
the 1980s, things change and
then they cycle back.”
“There is renewed interest in
artists who were overlooked but
were part of very important
movements,” said Michael Short
of Sperone Westwater (E4).
“People are most confident with
artists with museum records,
solo exhibitions and works in
permanent collections.
Validation is more important
than price. If a work doesn’t
have that history then there is
not so much interest,” said
Theodore Bonin of Alexander
and Bonin of New York (P11).
Recent auction results have
also increased confidence.
“We brought better and more
expensive things this year, the
price points are higher,” said
Andrew Fabricant of Richard
Gray (E7). Smaller galleries
did the same. Umberto Raucci
of the Neapolitan gallery
Raucci/Santamaria (K1) said
he was feeling “more confi-
dent” than last year and had
raised some prices.
Sales were swift from the
start: five minutes into the open-
ing, Jan Krugier (A2) sold
Picasso’s Personnage 1960,
Cannes for $15m to a European
collector. “That does tend to put
a smile on one’s face,” said
gallery associate Martin
Summers. The sculpture is one
of 26 works by Picasso on the
gallery’s stand. Indeed Picasso
and Warhol continue to under-
pin the entire market for blue-
chip art with no less than 23 gal-
leries showing the former and
28 the latter.
Meanwhile contemporary art
was also selling briskly: two col-
lectors even said they had to
compete to buy work and, in
both cases, were disappointed.
Skopia (M17) sold a massive
charcoal drawing by the Swiss
artist Alain Huck to Olivier
Varenne, the London-based
curator, who buys art for David
Walsh, the Tasmanian gambling
millionaire opening a museum
in Hobart next year. The work,
Le Banquet, 2010, was inspired
by battle scenes from the Vatican
and newspaper photographs of
the Iraq War, priced at
SwFr50,000. A set of five
dwarves from Paul McCarthy’s
“White Snow” series sold to a
European collector for $3m at
Hauser & Wirth (B19).
Meanwhile, Pace (B20) sold one
of the largest pieces in Art
Unlimited, a 32-foot sphinx by
Chinese artist Zhang Huan, to
Japanese artist Takashi
Murakami, priced at $1.8m.
On the ground floor,
Skarstedt (E12) reported seven
sales in the first 90 minutes,
including Rosemarie Trockel’s
unravelling knitting, Untitled,
1986 ($175,000), and
Kippenberger’s Fred the Frog
Rings the Bell, 1990 ($450,000),
as well as two George Condos
and a Barbara Kruger. “People
are looking for security in their
acquisitions,” said associate
director Valerie Marquez.
On the whole, visitors seemed
impressed with the art on dis-
play. First time visitor, New
York financier Stefan Kaluzny
was enthusiastic, calling the fair
“unparallelled”. “There is a seri-
ousness and focus here which is
good for the art,” said Maureen
Paley (P10); “Art should address
serious issues—they are all part
of our time.”
Georgina Adam, Charlotte
Burns, Lindsay Pollock and
Cristina Ruiz
Preview day: the usual throng but tastes are changing
France
Young collector plans social space in Paris...
First day
reported sales
French collector Steve Rosen -
blum has come to Art Basel to
meet dealers and spread the word
about his newest venture.
Following five years of contem-
porary art acquisition, the collec-
tor, and his wife Chiara, are
opening a 15,000 sq. ft public
exhibition space in Paris this
autumn designed to be “the anti-
white cube,” he says. Rosenblum
Collection and Friends takes
inspiration from existing private
collection spaces—including
Miami’s Rubell Family
Collection and Berlin’s Hoff -
mann Sammlung. The collection
includes 120 pieces by 35 artists
including Matthias Bitzer,
Kelley Walker, Barbara Kruger
and Matthew Day Jackson.
The space will resemble a
home with living and dining
rooms, library, kitchen and play-
room for children. They will host
dinners and educational events
and encourage visitors to bring
their children.
“We want people to spend the
day there,” said Rosenblum. The
goal is to allow a more intimate
connection with the artists.
Artists have been invited to share
their own books, CDs and
movies which will be displayed
in a library. Artists will also dis-
play their childhood possessions
in the playroom. “These cultural
hints help you to make new
bridges between you and the
artists,’’ said Rosenblum.
Rosenblum, 36, the founder of
the e-commerce website Pix -
mania, is developing a website
for visitors to connect as
“friends”, taking a cue from
Facebook and other online social
networks. “We will try to
achieve connections between
people on the website and in the
physical space,” says
Rosenblum.
The Rosenblums previously
collected African masks, textiles
and musical instruments but
began focusing on contemporary
art in 2005. The couple have
been acquiring work across
media, especially painting and
installation.
The venue, a former photo-
graphic lab in the 13th
arrondissement, will open on
20 October during Fiac. The
space will be open during the run
of the fair and then by appoint-
ment. The first show, “Born in
Dystopia”, will focus on politi-
cally themed works and include
Swiss artist Christoph Büchel’s
2006 container piece AKE 0489
PE. Lindsay Pollock
...while Hirst bids to open a London gallery
Damien Hirst is one of three contenders shortlisted to open a gallery
in London’s Kensington Gardens. The artist submitted a proposal to
the Royal Parks with architect Mike Rundell to transform an old
munitions store into a space for art from Hirst’s collection, which
includes work by Bacon, Warhol and Jeff Koons. The gallery would
also display Hirst’s diamond skull, For the Love of God, 2007, which
visitors would have to pay to see. A Royal Parks spokesperson told
The Art Newspaper the winning bid will be announced shortly.
However, Rundell told the London Evening Standard that they may
have been outbid: “Our proposal is still under discussion, but there
seems to have been a considerably higher financial bid.” C.R.
Luc Tuymans, Dalida,
2010, sold for €600,000 at
Zeno X (M7)
Paul McCarthy, White
Snow Dwarf (Sleepy),
2010, set sold for $3m at
Hauser & Wirth (B19)
Damian Loeb, Say Hello
to the Angels, 2010, sold
for $90,000 at Acquavella
(E16)
Christian Marclay, Five
Cubes, 1989, sold for
between $200,000 and
$300,000 at Cooper (E9)
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2 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
Most dealers have played safe at
Design Miami Basel, held in
Hall 5 off the Messeplatz, and
sales were solid yesterday—but
the fair still has the ability to
surprise. The fifth edition
includes 32 dealers from Asia,
Europe and the US (27 dealers
took part in 2009) with Parisians
making their presence felt
through 12 participating gal-
leries. Innovations include a
connecting first-floor walkway
between Art Basel and Design
Miami Basel, a move welcomed
by the design dealers who
expect to see increased footfall
between the two fairs.
“The Americans are back,”
said Dorte Slot, director of the
newly opened Zurich branch of
Dansk Møbelkunst (G15) which
specialises in 20th-century
Scandinavian design. The
gallery sold a Finn Juhl sofa
group (1950) to a US collector
for 80,000. Meanwhile, a
dome light by Rolf Sachs
(Rattus Maximus, 2010) at
Gabrielle Ammann Gallery
(G01) went to a New York-
based buyer for 15,000.
Evan Snyderman of R 20th
Century (G22), who is showing
a rare group of 1960s furniture
by US designer Wendell Castle,
attested to the resurgence of the
New York design market:
“Since September last year, we
have been overwhelmed with
business.” One of the most sig-
nificant deals was sealed by
Manhattan dealer Demisch
Danant (G05) for a private com-
mission worth $175,000 for a
suite of furniture by veteran
designer Maria Pergay ordered
by a New York client.
Key US art collectors
Norman and Irma Braman of
Miami and Aspen-based Nancy
and Robert Magoon were spot-
ted darting through the aisles
at the preview. Pierre Marie
Giraud of the eponymous
Brussels-based gallery
(G14) also sold a
Ron Nagle
c e r a mi c
priced at
$ 2 8 , 0 0 0
to a US
collector but
J a p a n e s e
cont emporary
ceramics proved
to be the surprise hit
on his stand, with some
works by artists on show in
Europe for the first time. A
Belgian collector pounced on
Moonlight I, 2010 (above), a
striking ceramic nest of bowls
by Kyoto-based artist Fukumoto
Fuku priced at around 8,000.
Giraud’s stable of Japanese
artists also includes Takayuki
Sakiyama, whose Untitled,
2010, swirling ceramic piece
was purchased by a European
buyer. “It takes time for
Japanese designers to feel confi-
dent about showing their work
in Europe and involves many
journeys to remote studios,”
said Giraud.
These new additions were a
welcome inclusion among the
otherwise predictable roster of
blue-chip names prevalent on
other stands such as Zaha Hadid
(David Gill Galleries, G02),
Maarten Baas (Contrasts
Gallery, G11) and Studio Job
(Vivid Gallery, G31). Works on
view by the latter include Boot
and Bucket, both 2009. These
bronze pieces from the “Farm”
series were purchased by a
Swiss collector for around
9,000 each.
Other sales included a twisted
steel bench by Pablo Reinoso
(Big Beach Bale, 2010) at
Carpenters Workshop Gallery to
a European collector (G21,
priced at 40,000, edition of
eight); David Gill sold a range of
pieces by Swiss-born designer
Mattia Bonetti at prices ranging
from 45,000 to 68,000.
Ironically, one of the talking
points proved to be a pair of
19th-century French cast-iron
cachepots at Galerie Perrin
(G08), bought by a European
collector for 85,000. Their vis-
ible interior rivets and bolts com-
bined with the decorative floral
exterior appealed to both con-
temporary and classical tastes.
These functional domestic
items could not be more
different from Bush
of Iron, 2010, an
unsettling seat
and resting
p l a t f o r m
by Spanish
designer Nacho
Carbonell crafted
from metal spikes
(Galleria Rossella
Colombari, G26, unsold at
92,000 as we went to press)
that blurs the boundaries
between function, design and art,
the defining feature of contem-
porary design over the past
decade.
Gareth Harris
and James Knox
Design Miami Basel
Dealers put safety first
But there were still surprises on show
Bush of Iron, 2010 (above), with designer Nacho Carbonell
Spain
Saving Arco
Fair director sets out rescue plan
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Tate Modern bound
Carlos Urroz, the new director of
Arco—Spain’s main contempo-
rary art fair—has inherited a
toxic situation. The once mighty
fair was plagued with in-fighting
in the run-up to the most recent
edition last February when the
selection committee—and a
number of key galleries—threat-
ened a boycott after accusing
Ifema, the organisers, of “creat-
ing back-door access” for black-
listed galleries. The weak
Spanish economy has not
helped, and trade sources say
that Arco’s health is critical.
Urroz’s appointment has been
well received. The Spanish
press, which months ago ran
headlines stating that Arco must
“reinvent or die”, is now striking
a more positive note, comment-
ing that “the soap opera seems to
be coming to its end.”
Urroz, who worked as the
fair’s deputy director between
1994 and 1998, and as director
of the Helga de Alvear gallery
for seven years, acknowledges
the challenges ahead, but is not
deterred. “There are problems
everywhere, but the fair is so
important for Spain,” he said. He
is giving up his consultancy,
Urroz Proyectos, to focus on the
fair: “The most important thing
right now is to build up trust—I
will go wherever I have to in
order to encourage people to
come to Arco,” said Urroz—in
town this week for Art Basel.
“We have to select the best—
but we need the applications to
make the selection.” He wants to
make the next edition, scheduled
for February 2011, a smaller
affair, following criticism that
organisers were filling the fair
with so-so galleries. “We need
focus,” he said.
How will Urroz tackle the bad
blood between gallerists and
organisers? He said Ifema will
grant the selection committee
autonomy: “I’ve spoken to the
organisers and they have agreed
with me about how to move for-
wards,” said Urroz. He does not
yet know who will comprise the
new committee—most of the
former members resigned after
the last edition: “It’s yet to be
decided. There were so many
quarrels that some people can’t
sit at the same table,” he said.
“We will keep prices the same
for everyone, but offer 10% dis-
count if people pay in advance.
We will also encourage govern-
ments and institutions abroad to
help their galleries to attend.”
Charlotte Burns
Independent set for New York return in 2011
Independent, the edgy satellite to New York’s Armory show, will
return for a second edition next February. “I’ve signed up,” said
London dealer Maureen Paley, who took part in the fair’s debut. “It
was a breath of fresh air and brought some real energy to New York.”
There will be 35 commercial spaces and five non-profits, said co-
organiser Darren Flook of London’s Hotel gallery. “We’re lucky that
more people want to take part than we have places, but it’s about get-
ting a good balance and creating a show that will excite New York.”
Flook wants to combine established names with younger galleries,
and has so far confirmed non-profit spaces White Columns and
Artists Space, as well as galleries including Stuart Shave and Isabella
Bortolozzi. The fair will return to the former Dia building in Chelsea,
even though Zach Feuer and CRG Gallery have recently signed leas-
es in the building. “We’ll take over all the other floors and are mov-
ing the artists’ projects to a pavilion on the roof,” said Flook. C.B.
The most
important thing
right now is to
build up trust


Belgian Chris Dercon (right)
has been named the new direc-
tor of London’s Tate Modern,
coming from Munich’s Haus
der Kunst. He replaces Vicente
Todoli, whose last day at the
museum was yesterday. A sur-
prise appointment, Dercon is
the third continental European
director of Tate Modern. Lars
Nittve (1998-2001), from
Sweden, left surprisingly soon
after the opening of the muse-
um in 2000. His successor, the
Spaniard Todoli (2001-10),
announced his resignation last
March, on the grounds that it
was time for new challenges.
Dercon, aged 52, began his
career at New York’s MoMA
PS1 (1988-89). He then
became the first director of the
Witte de With contemporary art
centre (1990-95) and later the
Boijmans Van Beuningen
Museum (1996-2003), both in
Rotterdam. He has been at the
Haus der Kunst since 2003
where he oversaw an ambitious
exhibition programme and
undertook a massive refurbish-
ment of the building.
One of the main challenges
at Tate Modern will be to raise
money for the planned Herzog
& de Meuron extension.
Dercon knows the architects
well, having mounted a show
on their work and employed
them for the renovations on the
Haus der Kunst. Tate Modern’s
project is costed at £215m, of
which £77m has so far been
raised. The extension is expect-
ed to be completed by 2012,
but it may take longer.
Commitments in Munich
mean that Dercon will be join-
ing the Tate in spring 2011. In
the meantime, Nick Serota is
acting director of Tate Modern,
as well as overall head of Tate.
Martin Bailey

Tate has hired a very intriguing exhibition organiser.
Chris [Dercon] put Munich on the map in the interna-
tional exhibition circuit. He made the city a lively place,
particularly for contemporary art. He is excellent at
working with artists—that is one of his strengths. Being a
successful fundraiser is a challenge, particularly for an
outsider.

Wim Pijbes, general director, Rijksmuseum,
Amsterdam

Chris Dercon is energetic, philosophical and rather
fashionable. What is important is down-to-earth history
of art; someone like Beuys cannot be dismissed as old-
fashioned. Museums should resist fashion. Dercon should
also make some deal with Nick Serota over who plays
what role.

Rudi Fuchs, independent curator and former
director, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

Chris [Dercon] is a surprise appointment. He is good
at creating impressive exhibitions and events. It was a
difficult job to transform the Haus der Kunst, but he got
on well in Munich society and made the gallery into a
great exhibition centre. Tate Modern is very different,
with a collection.

Martin Roth, director, Staatliche
Kunstsammlungen Dresden [or Dresden Museums]

I think the appointment of Chris Dercon is A
Spectacular Good Choice.

Anthony d’Offay, former
art dealer and Artist Rooms founder

He has such varied and rich experience—it’s going to
be great for London.

Hans Ulrich Obrist, co-director,
exhibitions and programmes, Serpentine Gallery, London

He’s always held to a radical agenda. He will be a
great addition to the London artistic scene and his reso-
nance will be felt beyond Tate.

Anish Kapoor, artist

He’s one of the best curators because he looks at art
in a very special, sometimes unexpected, way. He doesn’t
just do the obvious, fancy thing. We will definitely see
ambitious projects.

Philomene Magers, co-director,
Sprüth Magers, Berlin
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4 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
R
olf Fehlbaum is the chief
executive of the Swiss
design company Vitra,
which is taking advantage of Art
Basel week to show off its new
Herzog & de Meuron-designed
VitraHaus building (housing the
Vitra Home Collection) on its
campus at Weil am Rhein, just
7km from Basel across the bor-
der in Germany. This week the
VitraHaus and the Vitra Design
Museum, by Frank Gehry, will
have extended opening hours. In
collaboration with the Corning
Museum of Glass in New York
state, the Design Museum is
staging daily design “perfor-
mances” by designers including
Nacho Carbonell and Tomás
Libertiny.
Vitra is a furniture firm that
continues to release classics by
the likes of Charles and Ray
Eames while also developing
new products with leading con-
temporary designers such as
Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec.
Although product design is the
company’s main focus, Fehl -
baum has also commissioned a
series of important buildings for
the Vitra Campus. In 1986 the
Nicholas Grim shaw-designed
Vitra Factory was completed,
with Gehry’s Vitra Design
Museum opening in 1989. The
VitraHaus is the most recent
addition to the campus.
The Art Newspaper: The intro-
duction of the Home Col -
lection in 2004 is clearly what
drives the concept behind
Herzog & de Meuron’s design
of the VitraHaus. Why was it
so important to design a space
for this collection now?
Rolf Fehlbaum: Vitra doesn’t
have showrooms all over. Where
we do have them they are most-
ly dedicated to the office furni-
ture we produce. The company
needed a central place where we
can represent our ideas on the
home in a broader way than is
possible in a city showroom: to
open a 3,000 sq. ft showroom in
London is simply not viable.
The Home Collection is sold
through dealers, but it was cru-
cial to underline the importance
of the collection by tailoring an
actual showroom. We also
thought it was important to
establish direct contact with our
customers to better understand
their needs from their reactions.
TAN: How did you begin the
commissioning process with
Herzog & de Meuron?
RF: A couple of things came
together. When we first started
discussing the project the econo-
my was robust and we had just
purchased the piece of land adja-
cent to our current plot. Jacques
[Herzog] and Pierre [de Meuron]
came up with the idea of intro-
ducing something more vertical
to the Vitra Campus. Not some-
thing really high, but something
higher than the other buildings
on the site, such as Zaha Hadid’s
Fire Station. There was also the
idea of incorporating the three
views [to] Switzerland, France
and Ger many. For all of us
involved in the project it is cru-
cial that the region grows togeth-
er and so sensitivity to this con-
text was crucial.
TAN: With the VitraHaus,
Herzog & de Meuron have
extended their interest in
architectural archetypes of
the home. Do you think that
the Home Collection—which
includes the famous Eames
Lounge Chair and Erwan and
Ronan Bouroullec’s Slow
Chair—does the same thing
with product design?
RF: The archetype of the house
is something that has been in the
work of Herzog & de Meuron
since the very beginning. With
the VitraHaus, they simply
found a further application of
this idea. Combined with their
stacking technique, it became an
even more abstract house. And
yes, in a way, this has happened
with the Vitra furniture too.
Think of the Eames Lounge
Chair: it combines a very old
idea—the leather club chair—
with a new idea, to fragment the
traditional club chair and add
modern elements to it. The
result of this play on traditional
and modern archetypes creates a
new type in its own right.
TAN: Design Miami/Basel
focuses on rarefied, limited-
edition design, whereas your
concern is with affordable
design classics. Do you wel-
come the comparison?
RF: Actually we have been
involved in both areas, but the
high-quality, industrially pro-
duced item is our main focus.
We enjoy occasional excursions
in the editions field to open our
minds, but the greatest satisfac-
tion comes from applying new
insights to the design and pro-
duction of everyday objects.
TAN: The VitraHaus displays
items as if they were in a
museum. Why was this impor-
tant and what type of state-
ment are you trying to make
by adopting this approach?
RF: VitraHaus is not a house,
although it has been designed to
resemble the archetype of a
house and nor is it a museum,
despite the use of museum
conventions of display. The key
thing that seems to have
worked, from the initial
feedback we have had, is that
people like to be able to enjoy
viewing the design objects and
the information panels as if they
were in a museum, and then try-
ing them out and even buying
them as if they were in a show-
room. Fresh approaches to the
museum and the showroom
have to be developed in the
future in the design world.
VitraHaus is our first attempt. I
Interview by Alex Coles
J Vitra Campus, Charles Eames Strasse,
Weil am Rhein, Germany. The VitraHaus and
Vitra Design Museum are open from 9am-
9pm up to and including 20 June. For more
details of the Design Performances see list-
ings, p12.
Interview: Rolf Fehlbaum
Vitra shows off its latest campus star
The VitraHaus, by architects Herzog & de Meuron, is part museum, part super-showroom, says design company boss
Raising the roof: Herzog & de Meuron’s VitraHaus on the company’s Campus at Weil am Rhein
SI NCE 1707
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Valuation Day Basel, 21 June
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Agostino Bonalumi, Nero, 1966, 85 x 67 cm, Auction May 2010, price realised € 122,300
The archetype of the house has
been in the work of Herzog &
de Meuron since the very beginning


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V
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Keeping it Real
Whitechapel Gallery
The D. Daskalopoulos
Collection
Supported by:
An Exhibition in Four Acts
10 June 2010–22 May 2011
Act 1: The Corporeal
10 June–5 September 2010
whitechapelgallery.org
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Felix Gonzalez-Torres
Specif ic Objects without Specif ic Form
22 Mav - 29 ßugust 2010
FONDßTION BEYELER
































































































































































THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010 7
T
he word “curate” may be the most
confused term used in galleries
today. It shares the same Latin root
as the word for a priest charged with
looking after a church’s flock: a
concept that certainly suits our
secular temples—art museums—where curators
are entrusted with permanent collections or
temporary exhibitions they propose. In galleries,
the word is often used to describe a show that
departs from a dealer’s primary programme and
can include exhibitions or projects produced by
an external curator or expert, as well as by an in-
house team. It also raises the gallery’s profile.
Attaching a well known curator’s name to a
show draws attention to the gallery, burnishing its
reputation. Several years ago, Matthew Marks
(A10) established a practice of inviting an outside
curator, often an artist or other gallerist (Robert
Gober, Mitchell Algus, Charles Ray) to curate a
show, with considerable success. Barbara
Gladstone (A1) invites guest curators to do shows
every summer (Neville Wakefield, Matthew
Higgs, Klaus Kertess, Russell Ferguson). They are
shows you would not see in a museum but offer
high quality work, sometimes undervalued in the
market. They can also benefit the gallery by
drawing in new artists and collectors as well as
critics. They also help the gallery test the market
for new artists it may be interested in, thereby
affecting its future programme.
Art Basel has introduced Art Feature over two
floors in Hall 2 this year, a new 20-gallery sector
of the fair intended to bring the curatorial skills
of dealers to the fore. Related to, but not the
same as, Art Premiere or Art Basel Miami
Beach’s Art Kabinett, galleries were invited to
present a solo show, an historical presentation of
“exceptional” material, or a selection of work by
two or three artists that could provoke a new
consideration of each.
But gallerists have different objectives to
professional curators in institutions, so what in
this context does “curating” mean. Museum
curating is intended to illuminate an artist’s
work, not sell it—the prime purpose of a
commercial gallery. Yet galleries also display
works that are not for sale, sometimes to add
weight to those that are.
At bottom, curating is an editing job, and it
can affect both the market value and the public’s
perception of an artist’s work or the period in
which it was made. A curated show in a gallery—
or a booth at an art fair—can also influence how
collectors view the dealer, and how artists in the
gallery feel about their representation there.
Moreover, an exhibition created either by
commercial dealers or a professional in their
employ can alter the identity of the gallery itself.
One of the most significant and surprising
exhibitions in New York last year was “Picasso:
Mosqueteros” at Gagosian Gallery (B7), curated
by the artist’s biographer John Richardson and
Bernard Ruiz-Picasso. Throughout its ten-week
run, Gagosian’s foray into modernism drew large
crowds of viewers who may not have expected
to take away fresh ideas about artists thought to
be beyond a new reckoning or possible to
acquire outside of an auction house.
Now Gagosian is featuring the late work of
Claude Monet, put together for the gallery by
Monet scholar Paul Hayes Tucker, while its
Britannia Street space in London is hosting
another show by Richardson and Ruiz-Picasso,
“Picasso: The Mediterranean Years, (1945-62).”
If most works were borrowed from museums and
private collections, their presence in a gallery
dedicated to the art of the moment cast the
operation in a completely different light. The next
time someone wants to sell a Monet, for example,
that person may well turn to Gagosian to handle
it. (In fact, the gallery is currently forming a
department to deal in modern work.)
At least a third of the works in a Dan Flavin
show that curator Tiffany Bell produced for
David Zwirner (E10) last autumn were not for
sale either. “I wanted to do a museum-quality
show and the notion of availability was of no
import,” said the dealer. “We were announcing
our representation of the estate and we wanted a
great show to do that.” (Zwirner is currently
presenting a rarely seen Flavin work from 1969
at Art Unlimited (U42).)
Asked about the strategy behind his gallery’s
presentation of work it can’t sell, Zwirner said:
“It’s to present work at the highest level.” It’s not
all about altruism. Two years ago, when the
dealer financed the recreation of Flavin’s 1964
Green Gallery show at the former Zwirner and
Wirth, “it opened the door to a dialogue and
ultimately to our working with the estate.”
Zwirner also presented a show of minimalist
and conceptual works from the Helga and
Walther Lauffs Collection, some of which he
brought to Art Basel this year. “For us it’s a
departure to do an historic booth,” he said.
What’s behind it is the promotion of a two-
volume catalogue raisonné that the gallery
created for the collection. “Again, that’s
something a museum would do,” Zwirner said,
“and it’s one of my proudest moments.”
New York-based art advisor Todd Levin said he
had long wanted to do a show revealing the
affinities between the late Joseph Cornell and
Karen Kilimnik, an artist Sprüth Magers (B12)
represents. “Normally, the gallery wouldn’t have
anything to do with Cornell,” he said (the gallery
only represents living artists). “But they thought
the idea was amazing.” Now the show is on at
Sprüth Magers in London until 27 August. The
Cornell estate is represented by L&M Arts. (B18).
Traditionally, galleries present shows
organised by artists or outside curators in the
summer months. But since the recession began,
we have seen an increasing number unfold during
the regular season. “I’m always thinking that
there is an economic and then a historical cycle,”
said New York dealer Andrea Rosen, who
routinely takes a curatorial approach to her booth
(N4) at Art Basel and in her gallery as well.
But the slow-down is only partly responsible
for the new emphasis on context. Another
consideration is the physical space of galleries
now. In New York’s Chelsea, for example,
galleries like Gagosian, Matthew Marks and
Zwirner offer large, multiple facilities that hardly
existed ten years ago but can accommodate
ambitious shows that mimic those at museums.
“We’re having a lot of fun with these shows,”
Zwirner said, “and usually find a way to make it
work financially. You might meet a new collector
or artist. You never know. But it feels like an
important thing to do.”
Some gallerists, like Matthew Higgs, regularly
function as curators. He points to the example of
Gavin Brown (N6), whose more memorable art-
fair presentations have included Urs Fischer’s
rotating cigarette pack at Art Basel Miami Beach.
“That’s not about the gallery’s programme,” he
said, “but more about its attitude or spirit.” It’s
market branding, in other words. To sell the art,
dealers sell themselves as well.
Starting with the project space in her Chelsea
gallery, Rosen has made a practice of
constructing shows that would seem out of
character for a shop that customarily supports the
work of up-and-coming artists. (One that Rosen
introduced in the past is the late Cuban-born
artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, whose work is
currently on show at the Beyeler Foundation and
who posthumously represented the US at the
2007 Venice Biennale.) Sometimes she puts on
shows by artists she doesn’t represent, as a kind
of trial balloon that may lead to a relationship
with them—or with collectors interested in them.
Last year she mounted a show pairing works
by Eva Hesse, Willem de Kooning and Lucio
Fontana. “There’s something new in relooking,”
she said. “The opportunity to rethink what I know
inspires me and I feel a sense of responsibility to
present opportunities for others to be inspired. To
quote Felix,” she said, “I’m always interested in
‘an implosion of meaning’—how you maximise
someone’s experience of the work.”
Her booth at Art Basel this year combines
older material with work by young artists like
Elliott Hundley and Katy Moran, a ploy that has
previously brought contemporary clients into the
secondary market and vice-versa. “Putting a
Katy Moran next to a Franz Kline may be
risky,” she said. “But I hope it works.” If she
doesn’t make sales, that’s okay. “Here’s this
unbelievable stage,” she said. “If people come
and understand a David Altmejd better, why
make it just about money?”
Elyse Goldberg, director of James Cohan’s
New York gallery, she curates spirited thematic
shows works borrowed and consigned for sale
once or twice a year. For the Cohan booth in Art
Feature (G7), she has brought 13 early drawings
by Robert Smithson based on religious imagery,
something that might surprise even Smithson
connoisseurs. Five are not for sale. “This is a
great opportunity to create a dialogue within
them,” she said. “And a great way to show
material people don’t get a chance to see.
Sometimes it’s nice to shake things up in a
booth. It’s like putting on a new pair of shoes.”
Jocelyn Wolff’s six-year-old gallery had never
been in the fair before its inclusion in Art Feature
(G3). “For a gallery of my generation,” he says,
“this is a way to prove the quality of my
programme is as rich as those already in the
fair.” But his choice —photographs and paper
sculptures from 1958 to 1963 by the German
proto-conceptualist Franz Erhard Walther—is not
fully representative of his programme, which is
mostly devoted to emerging artists. “It’s nice to
work with an artist who is important to them,”
Wolff explained. The Walthers, based on air, are
rare pieces priced between 10,000 and
120,000. They come from the artist’s studio
and have never before been exhibited.
“Basel is maybe the only fair where you can
take up such a specific project,” Wolff said,
“because it’s not just about the market. You have
museum curators and critics as well as collectors.
This is important for the international visibility
of an artist who was never really in the market
outside Germany. He’s still an artist who has yet
to be integrated with artists of his generation.
And I want to him to see success in his lifetime.”
Massimiliano Gioni, the New Museum
curator who is also in charge of the upcoming
Gwangju Biennial in Korea, recalls that the late
Harald Szeemann—one of the most famous
curators of his generation—used to say he was
just a waiter who would set the table, make a list
of invited guests, and serve the food. The
success of the event, however, depended on the
guests—that is, on the artists.
“Of course, Szeemann was much more than a
waiter,” Gioni said. “He was one of the greatest
chefs, but his anecdote does say something
important about curating: you need to be
attentive and very, very visible, but the moment
the show arrives, you have to recede in the
background. The curator is a means to the show.
He or she should never interfere with the art.”
Linda Yablonsky
Art market
When is a curator not just a curator?
The answer might be when the curated show is for a commercial gallery, a practice increasingly adopted at fairs
Left to right: Presenhuber (N13), Hauser&Wirth (B19) and Galerie 1900-2000 (D2)
Gallerists have different
objectives to museum
curators so what does
‘curating’ mean?


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8 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
Artistsat Art Unlimited
During the political unrest of
1968, Italian artist Mario Merz
(1925-2003) seized upon the
archetypal form of the igloo.
Afterwards, dome-shaped
temporary constructions have
become central to the Arte
Povera artist’s oeuvre. With its
associations of a pre-industrial
society and man’s relationship
with nature, Merz’s igloos
became metaphors for his
opposition to consumer society.
For Art Unlimited, Konrad
Fischer Galerie (B4) is showing
a little-known igloo entitled
Pythagoras’ Haus, 1994 (U46).
The sculpture has been on
display once before outside of
the gallery. Made from glass,
steel, slate, marble and
grapevine wood, the igloo bears
a sequence of Fibonacci
numbers in glowing blue neon
around its circumference.
Merz had a life-long
fascination with mathematics
and science, perhaps inherited
from his father, who was an
inventor and engineer. Many of
his works refer to the Fibonacci
sequence that underlies the
growth patterns of natural life.
The igloo has an irregular
white rectangle that alludes to
the geometry of Pythagoras.
“There is the double of
Pythagoras and Fibonacci in
the work,” said Konrad Fischer
associate director Thomas
Rieger. “The shape of the curve
follows the Fibonacci numbers.
Pythagoras can be seen in the
rectangle inside the igloo.”
Mario Merz, Pythagoras’
Haus, 1994 (U46), Konrad
Fischer Galerie (B4), more
than 1m
Igloo highlights Merz’s love of Pythagoras
Visitors flock to obliteration
“Pierre is an intellectual artist,
an artist’s artist, but he is also
just a funny guy,” said José
Freire, the owner of Team
Gallery. For his installation as
part of Art Unlimited, Pierre
Bismuth has created a replica
of Team Gallery’s booth (L4)
using black and white Xeroxes
of the works of art on the stand
in Hall 2.
Among the works that have
been subjected to Bismuth’s
photocopying are three large-
scale Cory Arcangel works
from his “Gradient” series,
2008-ongoing, a David Ratcliff
drawing, a series of
photographs by Ryan McGinley
and two of Bismuth’s own
works. A Banks Violette
sculpture is represented on the
“fake” booth by a cheap
plywood copy.
“Pierre talks about how
many of us assimilate art
through art fairs,” said Freire.
“In this work, the whole idea of
the art fair is historicised.” A
work in progress, as originals
are sold on the gallery’s real
booth and others are hung in
their place, Bismuth’s
installation will be altered
accordingly, with the new work
pasted directly over the copy of
the sold work. Only the
statement pieces by Arcangel
and Violette will remain
untouched throughout the fair.
The dynamic is two-way:
Bismuth’s echo of other artists’
work has helped sales upstairs
as well. One of the original
Arcangel pieces was sold for
$34,000 to a European collector
on the back of a jpeg. “They
saw Bismuth’s photocopy of
the work, were shown a jpeg of
the original and bought the
work on that basis,” said Freire.
Accompanying the work is a
text by Karl Marx that Bismuth
has appropriated, substituting
the word “religion” with the
word “desire”. The artist said:
“We live in a time of desire and
consumerism rather than
religion.” And as if to make the
point, Freire says the
installation is free to anyone
who will dismantle the booth
and maintain documentation of
the piece.
Pierre Bismuth, Flip Side of
the Same, 2010 (U20), Team
Gallery, New York (L4), free,
subject to conditions
The 1969 Dan Flavin in Art
Unlimited (U42) is one of the
few examples of the artist
diverging from using vertical
and horizontal configurations
of fluorescent lights in favour
of curved structures. The work,
which belongs to the Flavin
estate and is on sale for $4m,
has only been shown once
before.
For its installation at Art
Basel, it has been carefully
reconstructed as an exact
replica of the version that was
shown at the National Gallery
of Canada in Ottawa more
than 40 years ago. Archival
photographs show the original
installation was cordoned off
with a rope on the opening
night, but the next day Flavin
designed the Plexiglas barrier
that became integral to the
work, providing a reflective
surface for the lights to glow.
“Everything is the same, all
the way down to the barrier
that the artist designed,” said
New York dealer David
Zwirner (E10). “Flavin wanted
it to be contemplated from the
edge rather than from inside.”
Part of the reason for
exhibiting this Flavin was to
announce that Zwirner started
representing the artist in 2009.
“We all think that news travels
fast, but it actually travels
slowly,” said Zwirner. “It is
only just reaching Europe
now.” Flavin’s work of art is
surrounded by other important
historical works such as Mario
Merz’s igloo and Michelangelo
Pistoletto’s cardboard
installation. “I like Art
Unlimited because it gives us
the chance to show works we
couldn’t place in our regular
booth,” said Zwirner.
Dan Flavin, Three Sets of
Tangented Arcs in Daylight
and Cool White (to Jenny and
Ira Licht), 1969 (U42), David
Zwirner (E10), $4m
The Chinese artist Zhang Huan
has installed a giant hybrid
beast made from swathes of
oxhides stitched together,
measuring 16 foot-tall and
weighing five tonnes. A work
that recalls his childhood
growing up in the Central
Plains and Henan Province of
China where oxen were
common, the monumental
sculpture is loaded with
symbolic meaning.
“The animals that cover the
giant were slaughtered in a
respectful way according to
Buddhist practice,” said Peter
Boris, the executive vice
president of Pace Gallery.
“Like much of Zhang’s work,
the work is about life, death
and rebirth.”
The work, which was sold
for $1.8m during the VIP
opening on Monday, is also
available in a much smaller
format. Last week, Pace
launched an iPhone application
that explains its layers of
meaning.
Zhang Huan, Hero No.1,
2009 (U1), Pace (B20), White
Cube (J15), Blum and Poe
(J2), sold, $1.8m
Interviews by Anny Shaw
Photographs by Katherine
Hardy
Dan Flavin emerges from the dark
Zhang goes hell
for leather
Art Unlimited had barely
opened its doors for its VIP
preview on Monday afternoon
before a long queue formed to
enter Yayoi Kusama’s
installation. Inside, fairgoers
are transported into a
meditative state by the infinite
reflections in its mirrored
interior. Aftermath of
Obliteration of Eternity, 2008
(U56), is a darkened room hung
with LED lights shaped like
votive candles that flicker
according to a pre-set timer.
The walls and ceiling are made
from polished mirrors, while
the floor is a shallow pool of
water around a central island,
creating a shimmering mirage
on six sides.
“The longer you stand in it,
the more everything replicates,”
said Louise Neri, director of
Gagosian Gallery (B7). “You
start by thinking you are seeing
a few hundred lights, but end
up seeing a few million.” The
work of art is an edition of
three, the first of which was
sold to Brazilian art foundation
Inhotim last year.
It is the latest in a series of
“infinity rooms” Kusama has
been creating since the 1960s.
“Her obsession with infinity
has been there from the outset
of her career,” said Neri. “But
she constantly revisits and up-
ends motifs.” The water holds
particular significance. “It
makes it more humid inside,
but it also makes you think of
underworld myths.”
While the work offers
viewers an escape from the
hubbub of the fair into a
potentially spiritual realm, the
artist is more philosophical
than religious, said Neri. “The
word enlightening often
appears in the title of her work.
I think this piece is just that.”
Yayoi Kusama, Aftermath of
Obliteration of Eternity, 2008
(U56), edition of three,
Gagosian (B7), 500,000
Bismuth’s copy reaps rich rewards
ED RUSCHA (B. 1937)
REVIEW IT LOOK IT OVER AND WHATEVER · acrylic, pencil and charcoal on canvas · 59
3
⁄4 x 59
3
⁄4 in. (152 x 152 cm.) · Painted in 2004
£800,000–1,200,000
Post-War & Contemporary Art Evening Auction
London · 30 June
Highlights on View
19–23 June
Auction Viewing
26–30 June
Contact
Francis Outred
foutred@christies.com
+44 (0)20 7389 2270
8 King Street, SW1Y 6QT
christies.com
©

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10 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
If the “design-art” trend is los-
ing its lustre, so-called “critical
design” is beginning to take
centre stage in the design world.
The two couldn’t be more
different: where design-art
emphasised the gloss of appear-
ance, critical design is a gritty
analysis of the design world.
But what is critical design and
how does it function? Accounts
differ, but the one with the most
institutional authority comes
from Anthony Dunne, the head
of Design Interactions at
London’s Royal College of Art,
a department that has devoted
its entire syllabus to nurturing
critical designers. “Critical
design,” said Dunne, “uses
speculative design proposals to
challenge narrow assumptions,
preconceptions and givens
about the role products play in
everyday life. It is more of an
attitude than anything else, a
position rather than a method.”
One of the Design Inter -
actions Department’s most sig-
nificant alumni is the Berlin-
based design studio Beta Tank,
founded by Michele Gauler and
Eyal Burstein in 2007 and one
of this year’s winners of the W
Hotels high-profile Designer of
the Future Award showcased at
Design Miami/Basel. In 2008
the duo’s project “Eye Candy”,
a series of sweets and lollipops
with electronic interfaces send-
ing stimuli to the brain, was fea-
tured in the Museum of Modern
Art’s watershed exhibition
“Design and the Elastic Mind”
(and has subsequently made its
way into MoMA’s prestigious
design collection). In 2009,
“Memory Stücks”, a series of
devices which bond a memory
stick with an artefact, was fea-
tured at the International Design
Festival in Berlin.
For “Taxing Art”, commis-
sioned by Design Miami, Beta
Tank are mounting a critique of
how design is treated differently
to art by bureaucratic bodies.
According to Gauler: “Taxing
Art is a series of objects that
question how art and design are
classified through laws, VAT and
customs regulations.” What par-
ticularly intrigues the duo, says
Gauler, “is how these governing
bodies know how to define one
thing from the other—where one
ends and one begins.”
The objects in “Taxing Art”
have been delivered to the fair in
separate shipments, incurring
different customs charges along
the way depending on how they
are classified. For example, one
object from the series, Pyramid
Table, is made with a swivel top.
“On one side there are 120 pro-
truding pyramids while the other
is flat. When the pointy side is up
the table is not usable in a utili-
tarian way; when down it is,”
says Gauler. So precisely how
Pyramid Table functions—and
therefore how it is defined—
changes according to something
as arbitrary as which side is up.
When the pyramids point
upwards, the table is classed as
art and taxed at a modest 7%
VAT in Germany, but when they
point down it is classed as design
and taxed at a weighty 19%. As
the table travelled to Basel it was
classified by accountants, book-
keepers, customs officials and
even fair organisers and accrued
a telling paper trail. Beta Tank
are specifically interested in the
discussions this will trigger.
“Our education is key here,” said
Burstein. “We come from the
design-for-debate strand of
design: for us, these objects are
only bits of furniture for the
product design world. If we work
on an issue like the present
one—how taxation effects small
companies like ours—it is
through an emphasis on
process.” Indeed, the stress on
thought process is probably the
keynote of critical design.
Beta Tank’s point of focus is
intriguing given Design
Miami’s role in promoting
design-art from its founding five
years ago. “Taxing Art” could
be interpreted as a critique of
the very premise of Design
Miami—specifically its role in
blurring the distinction between
design and art. At the same time,
“Taxing Art” is arguably a
canny move by Design Miami
to incorporate any movement in
design that was previously out-
side of its remit.
On the subject of critical
design, Craig Robins, the
founder of Design Miami, said:
“It is an important area of con-
temporary design that is going
to be more and more widely
appreciated in the future—it’s a
growing phenomenon.” Regard -
ing Beta Tank’s “Taxing Art”,
Robins said: “It originates from
the question of whether an
object is design or art. By liter-
ally asking this question they
implicitly pursue this issue.
With this, design itself becomes
conceptual and there is space for
a free flow of ideas.”
At best, critical design
announces an epistemological
change in the design world:
instead of designing more
super fluous objects, critical
designers question our need for
those objects in the first place.
New products only emerge after
this rigorous process of ques-
tioning has been completed. As
a result, the products generated
are more thoughtful and sensi-
tive to human needs, lending
them a longer life.
There is, however, an under-
lying danger that critical design
could be interpreted and used by
interested parties as just another
trend. If this happens, critical
design will lose the edge it cur-
rently has. One possible way to
avoid this is for critical design to
maintain a large degree of
reflexivity in the way it deals
with the design world—and per-
haps keep a “critical” distance
from aspects of it. For now, it’s
too early to tell what will happen
to critical design. But one thing
is for certain: by serving the
academy, the museum, and the
market equally well, critical
design is sure to gain in both
currency and visibility for some
time to come.
Alex Coles
J Alex Coles is an art and design critic and
editor. He is the author of DesignArt (Tate
Publishing, 2005) and the editor of Design
and Art (MIT/Whitechapel, 2007)
J Beta Tank will be interviewed, along with
the other Designer of the Future winners,
Graham Hudson, rAndom International and
Zigelbaum & Coelho, by curator Cédric
Morisset, tomorrow, 17 June, at the Hall 5
Mezzanine, 5.50pm-6.30pm
Design
The table turned upside down
Designer of the Future winners Beta Tank, and the rise of “critical design”
Beta Tank’s Eyal Burstein and
Michele Gauler, above, and
the duo’s Pyramid Table
Instead of designing more superfluous
objects, critical designers question
our need for those objects in the first
place. New products only emerge after a
process of questioning


NY dealer with designs on the Hamptons
The Tribeca design gallery R 20th Century and Turpan, a design
store with branches in Eastern Long Island and Los Angeles, plan to
run a new shared space in East Hampton that is set to open this
month. Called R/Turpan, it will mix of vintage design and new
home furnishings. “We have been discussing it with the Turpans for
years,” said Zesty Myers, co-founder of R20th Century. “It’s a win-
ning combination with classic period design like Josef Hoffmann
flatware paired with new Rosenthal china that was designed by
Walter Gropius in 1969,” said Greg Turpan. At the top end of the
range will be $105,000 furniture by Brazilian designer Joaquim
Tenreiro. Talks by artists and designers are planned to lure wealthy
shoppers and collectors who summer in the Hamptons. B.S.M.
Christie’s private sale of fashion collection
The sale of Isabella Blow’s collection has been called off by
Christie’s after the auction house negotiated a private sale of the col-
lection of photographs and couture pieces from the late fashion
leader’s estate. The sale, planned for September, was to include over
50 hats by the milliner Philip Treacy, 90 outfits by designers includ-
ing the late Alexander McQueen, and photographs by the likes of
Mario Testino and David LaChapelle. Married to art dealer Detmar
Blow, she was a regular fixture on the art fair circuit, even appear-
ing in the 2005 art project “What Do They Wear at Frieze Art Fair?”
by French artist Matthieu Laurette. Christie’s declined to name the
buyer, but according to W magazine Blow’s friend and fellow fash-
ionista Daphne Guinness purchased the collection. E.S.
In the June main edition
Coming up in July
Our current edition contains
120 pages packed with the
latest art world news, events
and business reporting, plus
high profile interviews (and a
smattering of gossip)
News Find out what’s
behind the latest appoint-
ment at über collector
François Pinault’s troubled
Venice venues (top)…
Biennials Shanty town
roofs, recordings of extinct
dialects and fields of scrap
metal celebrate the van-
quished, dispossessed and
marginalised at the 17th
Sydney Biennale (middle)…
Museums Early signs of
sibling rivalry as the director
of the Centre Pompidou-
Metz insists that the new
72m centre is not an
outpost (bottom)…
Art Market Should art
fairs feel threatened by the
increasing number of
gallery weeks?
Features Analysis:
finding money for the arts in
a global financial crisis…
Artist interview
Belgian-born, Mexico-based
artist Francis Alÿs on running
into the centre of tornadoes,
failing to sabotage the art
market and the appeal of
living in Mexico…
Books Better with age:
five new books devoted to
British octogenarian sculptor
Anthony Caro…
News Round-up of the 6th
Berlin Biennale… Country
house treasures going to auc-
tion… Iceland to buy back art
from its beleaguered banks…
Museums Mixed
reactions to Zaha Hadid’s
MaXXi… Where the Whitney
goes next… Cuts at the
Hamburg Kunsthalle… Neo
Rauch donates painting to
his hometown of Leipzig…
Conservation Dürer
altarpiece restored and
reunited after 1988 acid
attack…
Opinion With govern-
ment cuts looming, critic and
cultural historian Robert
Hewison offers a “rational”
argument for arts funding…
Features We commem-
orate the 400th anniversary
of Caravaggio’s death by
looking at how an artist
largely ignored in the 19th
century had become a cult
figure by the 21st…
Artist interviewThe
gambling millionaire David
Walsh is building a museum
in Tasmania that will be
unlike anything you’ve ever
seen before; we take an
exclusive first look…
Books Getting to know
the Victorians through their
jewellery…
Art market An analysis
of the forthcoming June
impressionist, modern and
contemporary sales in
London…
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© UBS 2010. All rights reserved.
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Gagosian Gallery
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Boolh B20 Ho|| 2
June 16¬20, 2010
English Furniture, Ceramics and Silver from the Collection of Mr. & Mrs. Martin Gersh
AUCTION IN NEW YORK l0 MAY 2008 I ENQUIRIES ·l 2l2 606 7000 I SOTHEBYS.COM
Invitation to Consign Contemporary Art
AUCTIONS IN LONDON 28 & 2º JUNE ENQUIRIES ·44 (0)20 72º3 S40l
NEXT AUCTIONS IN NEW YORK º & l0 NOVEMBER ENQUIRIES ·l 2l2 606 72S4 I SOTHEBYS.COM/CONTEMPORARYART
REDEFINING THE MARKET
MAURIZIO CATTELAN UNTITLED,
$7.9 million
ESTIMATE $3– 4 MILLION
A RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION
©
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12 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
What’s On Basel 2010
FAIRS
Art Basel
Halls 1 and 2, Messe Basel
Messeplatz
www.artbasel.com
15 June, VIP Preview 11am-9pm
16-20 June, 11am-7pm
Design Miami/Basel
Hall 5, Messe Basel
Messeplatz
www.designmiami.com
15-20 June, 11am-7pm
Hot Art Fair
Claramatte Parkhaus
Klingentalstrasse 25
www.hot-art-fair.com
15 June, 4pm-11pm
16-19 June, 1pm-9pm
20 June, 1pm-6pm
Liste—the Young Art Fair
Werkraum Warteck PP
Burgweg 15
www.liste.ch
15-19 June, 1pm-9pm
20 June, 1pm-7pm
Scope Basel
Kaserne Basel
Klybeckstr 1b
www.scope-art.com
15 June, VIP Preview 3pm-7pm
16-19 June, 11am-7pm
The Solo Project
St Jakobshalle
Brüglingerstrasse 19-21
www.the-solo-project.com
16 June, VIP Preview 10am-noon
16 June, Public View noon-8pm
17-19 June, 10am-7pm
20 June, 10am-5pm
Volta6
Dreispitzhalle
Dreispitz Areal, Gate 13,
Helsinki Strasse 5,
Münchenstein
www.voltashow.com
16 June, VIP Preview 2pm-4pm
16 June, Public View 4pm-8pm
17-20 June, noon-8pm
NON-COMMERCIAL
SHOWS IN AND
AROUND BASEL
AARAU
Aargauer Kunsthaus
Aargauplatz
www.aargauerkunsthaus.ch
15-16 and 18-20 June, 10am-5pm
17 June 10am-8pm
Ugo Rondinone:
the Night of Lead
Until 1 August
Markus Uh
Until 1 August
Abstractions II:
Non-Representative Tendencies
Until 1 August
BASEL
Antikenmuseum Basel
St Alban-Graben 5
www.antikenmuseumbasel.ch
15-20 June, 10am-5pm
Hermes versus SMS:
Communication in Antiquity
Until 15 August
Fondation Beyeler
Baselstrasse 101
www.beyeler.com
15-20 June, 9am-8pm
Basquiat
Until 5 September
Felix Gonzalez-Torres:
Specific Objects without
Specific Form
Until 29 August
Kunsthalle Basel
Steinenberg 7
www.kunsthallebasel.ch
15, 17-20 June, 10am-8pm
16 June, 10am-10pm
Strange Comfort (Afforded
by the Profession)
Until 22 August
Fabio Marco Pirovino:
Razzle Dazzle
Until 28 November
Moyra Davey:
Speaker Receiver
Until 17 June-29 August
Kunsthaus Baselland
St Jakob-Strasse 170
www.kunsthausbaselland.ch
15-16 and 18 June, 11am-6pm
17 June, 11am-8.30pm
19-20 June, 11am-5pm
Leopold Kessler: Voks-
Shoeshine Machine
Until 4 July
Keren Cytter: Repulsion
Until 4 July
Agnieszka Brzezanska:
Cosmic Equation
Until 4 July
Karin Suter: Dwelling on Matter
Until 4 July
Kunstmuseum Basel
St. Alban-Graben 16
www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch
15-20 June, 10am-6pm
Gabriel Orozco
Until 8 August
Rosemarie Trockel: Drawings,
Collages, and Book Drafts
Until 5 September
Matthäus Merian d. A.
(1593–1650)
Until 25 July
Kunstmuseum Basel Extension
Until 19 September
Museum für Gegenwartskunst
St. Alban-Rheinweg 60
www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch
15-20 June, 10am-6pm
Rodney Graham: Through
the Forest
Until 26 September
Museum Tinguely
Paul Sacher-Anlage 2
www.tinguely.ch
15-20 June, 11am-7pm
Robot Dreams
Until 9 September
Tinguely for Karola
Until 20 June
Plug.In
St. Alban-Rheinweg 64
www.iplugin.org
15-20 June, 10am-6pm
Eva&Franco Mattes
aka 0100101110101101.org
AD/HD
Until 19 September
S AM Schweizerisches
Architekturmuseum
Steinenberg 7
www.sam-basel.org
15 and 17-20 June, 10am-8pm
16 June, 10am-10pm
Environments and Counter
Environments: Experimental
Media in ‘Italy: the New
Domestic Landscape’, MoMA
1972
Until 27 June
Schaulager
Ruchfeldstrasse 19
www.schaulager.org
15 and 17-20 June, 10am-6pm
16 June, noon-6pm
Matthew Barney: Prayer Sheet
with the Wound and the Nail
Until 3 October
BERN
Kunsthalle Bern
Helvetiaplatz 1
www.kunsthalle-bern.ch
15-18 June, 11am-6pm
19-20 June, 10am-6pm
Animism
Until 18 July
Kunstmuseum Bern
Hodlerstrasse 8-12
www.kunstmuseumbern.ch
15 June, 10am-9pm
16-20 June, 10am-5pm
Albert Anker
Until 5 September
Chantal Michel, Honey, Milk and
First Violets: a Confrontation
with Albert Anker
Until 5 September
Don’t Look Now
Until 20 March 2011
LUCERNE
Kunstmuseum Lucerne
Europaplatz 1
www.kunstmuseumluzern.ch
15-16 June, 10am-8pm
17-20 June, 10am-6pm
Olaf Breuning: Yes? No?
Until 1 August
Stefan à Wengen: the Mission
Until 1 August
Reference and Affinity: 21st Art
Century from the Collection
Until 27 June
ST GALLEN
Kunsthalle St Gallen
Davidstrasse 40
www.k9000.ch
15-18 June, noon-6pm
19-20 June, 11am-5pm
Hassan Khan
Until 8 August
Kunstmuseum St Gallen
Museumstrasse 32
www.kunstmuseumsg.ch
15 and 17-20 June, 10am-5pm
16 June, 10am-8pm
Press Art: Works from the
Collection of Annette and Peter
Nobel
Until 20 June
Ambigu: Contemporary Art
between Abstraction and
Narration
Until 12 September
WINTERTHUR
Kunstmuseum Winterthur
Museumstrasse 52
www.kmw.ch
15 June, noon-8pm
16-20 June, noon-5pm
Rita McBride: Previously
Until 5 September
WEIL-AM-RHEIN
Vitra Design Museum
Charles-Eames-Strasse 1
www.design-museum.de
15-16 June, 10am-6pm
17-20 June, 9am-9pm
The Essence of Things: Design
and the Art of Reduction
Until 19 September
ZUG
Kunsthaus Zug
Dorfstrasse 27
www.kunsthauszug.ch
15-18 June, noon-6pm
19-20 June, 10am-5pm
Ilya Kabakov: Orbis Pictus
Until 20 June
ZÜRICH
Haus Konstruktiv
Selnaustrasse 25
www.hauskonstruktiv.ch
15 and 17-18 June, noon-6pm
16 June, noon-8pm
19-20 June, 11am-6pm
Ryan Gander: Zürich Art Prize
Until 8 August
Franz Mon
Until 8 August
Kunsthalle Zürich
Limmatstrasse 270
www.kunsthallezurich.ch
15-16 and 18 June, noon-6pm
17 June, noon-8pm
19-20 June, 11am-5pm
Rosemarie Trockel
Until 15 August
Kunsthaus Zürich
Heimplatz 1
www.kunsthaus.ch
15 and 19-20 June, 1pm-6pm
16-18 June, 10am-8pm
Adrian Paci
Until 22 August
Thomas Struth
Until 12 September
Rodney Graham: Through the Forest
Museum für Gegenwartskunst
Until 26 September, www.kunstmuseumbasel.ch
Visitors to the 2009 edition of Art Basel may remember seeing Graham’s large-scale
photographic work Allegory of Folly: Study for an Equestrian Monument in the Form of a Wind
Vane, 2005, taking pride of place at the entrance of the Schaulager’s exhibition “Holbein to
Tillmans: Prominent Guests from the Kunstmuseum Basel”. This year the 61-year-old Canadian
receives a solo show at the Museum für Gegenwartskunst, featuring more than 100 works
including paintings, books, videos, installations and sculptures dating from 1978 to 2008. The
exhibition offers insight into the development of Graham’s oeuvre and pays homage to the
cultural figures who have shaped his work including Sigmund Freud, Edgar Allen Poe, Georg
Büchner, Picasso and Jeff Wall and Donald Judd. Above, Can of Worms, 2000.
Art Basel Conversations:
Artist Talk
10am-11am
Hall 1, Auditorium, Messe
Basel, Messeplatz
Los Angeles-based artist
Paul McCarthy speaks with
Massimiliano Gioni, artistic
director of the Fondazione
Nicola Trussardi in Milan
and the director of special
exhibitions at the New
Museum in New York.
Art Salon
Hall 1, Auditorium, Messe
Basel, Messeplatz
noon-12.30pm, Painting and
Misappropriation: Adolf
Dietrich and Richard
Phillips, discussion with US
artist Richard Phillips and
Beatrix Ruf, the director of
the Kunsthalle Zürich.
2pm-2.30pm, Centro de
Artes Visuales Fundacion
Helga de Alvear, Spanish
collector and gallerist Helga
de Alvear discusses her
new foundation in Cáceres
with architect Luis Mansilla
and Harald Falckenberg, the
collector and president of
the Kunstverein Hamburg.
3pm-3.30pm, Collector
Power: Who Has it and
Who Doesn’t, a discussion
between art advisor and
Baer Faxt publisher Josh
Baer and New York collec-
tor Adam Lindemann.
6pm-6.30pm, Pleasure, a
performative talk with
British artist Spartacus
Chetwynd and Zürich col-
lector Cousin Itt, moderat-
ed by Migros Museum für
Gegenwartskunst curator
Raphael Gygax.
Design Talks: Trends in
High-Tech Art and Design
5.30pm-6.30pm
Hall 5, Mezzanine Level,
Messe Basel, Messeplatz
French curator and design
consultant Cédric Morisset
moderates a conversation
between collector and
Riflemaker gallery co-
founder Tot Taylor and
designers Bill Moggridge,
Eric Gunther and Paul
Cocksedge.
GlassLab: Design
Performances
Wendell Castle, 4pm-
5.30pm; David Wiseman,
6pm-7.30pm; Tomás
Libertiny, 8pm-9pm; Jeff
Zimmerman, 9.30pm-
10.30pm; Paul Haigh,
10.30pm-12am;Vitra Design
Museum, Charles-Eames-
Strasse 1, Weil-am-Rhein
Artist Talk:
Rodney Graham
From 7pm
Lecture Hall,
Kunstmuseum Basel, St
Alban-Graben 16
The Canadian artist talks
about his “Through the
Forest” exhibition at the
Museum für
Gegenwartskunst.
Exhibition Opening:
Moyra Davey
7pm-10pm, Kunsthalle
Basel, Steinenberg 7
Opening reception for a
solos exhibition devoted
to the New York-based
photographer.
Art Film: Reference Points
10pm-11pm, Stadtkino
Basel, Klostergasse 5
Film scholar Marc Glöde
has selected six films that
“relate to different dynam-
ics of the world” including
Ryan Gander’s Basquiat
(2009), Clemens von
Wedemeyer’s “Found
Footage” (2009), and
Laurent Grasso’s
“Satellite” (2006).
Art Club
11pm-3am
Campari Bar, Kunsthalle
Basel, Steinenberg 7
Concerts and DJ
performances
Today’s highlights
16/06/10
C
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Pablo Picasso, Buste d’Homme, October 17, 1969 (II)
Oil on canvas, 45
5
/8 x 35 inches (116 x 89 cm)
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18 East Seventy Ninth Street, New York, New York 10075, 212 734-6300, www.acquavellagalleries.com
Galerie Marc de Puechredon
E-halle
11:00 am - 07:00 pm / June 17 - 20, 2010
Erlenmattstrasse 7-11, CH-4058, Basel
e Collection
18 works of contemporary art
AMANDA ROSS-HO • ANNE HARDY
CLAIRE HEALY & SEAN CORDEIRO
DANWEN XING • ELLIOTT HUNDLEY
FEFE TALAVERA • FRANCESCA GABBIANI
FRANCESCO CUOMO • GULLAUME LEBLON
JONATHAN JONES • MODOU DIENG
MARCELLA VANZO • MUSTAFA HULUSI
SEHER SHAH • THUKRAL & TAGRA
TJORG DOUGLAS BEER • WILFRID ALMENDRA
JULY 24 2010 >/@/27A=
SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL WATERMILL SUMMER BENEFIT
THE WATERMILL CENTER
benefit@watermillcenter.org & watermillcenter.org/benefit
03<347B/C1B7=<
AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:

MARINA ABRAMOVIC, DAVID ADAMO, MONICA BONVICINI, CAROL BOVE
FRANCESCO CLEMENTE, MICHAEL CRAIG-MARTIN, ROSSON CROW
SHEPARD FAIREY, PIERRE HUYGHE, JOAN JONAS, ANISH KAPOOR
ANSELM KIEFER, MARILYN MINTER, YOUSSEF NABIL, SHIRIN NESHAT
OTTO PIENE, LOU REED, PIPILOTTI RIST, TARYN SIMON, ROBERT WILSON AND MORE.
auction@watermillcenter.org & watermillcenter.org/auction
5
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Louise Bourgeois 1911–2010
Cheim & Read
15 THE ART NEWSPAPERART BASEL DAILY EDITION 16 JUNE 2010
Fondation Beyeler F1, Hall 2.0
www.fondationbeyeler.ch/acanthes
www.nationalesuisse.ch/artas
The last word…
ART BASEL DAILYEDITION
Contributors:
Georgina Adam is The Art
Newspaper’s editor at large. She is
also art market correspondent for
the Financial Times
Charlotte Burns is The Art
Newspaper’s assistant editor (art
market). She previously worked for
Anthony d’Offay, Hauser & Wirth
and Bolton & Quinn
Katherine Hardy is The Art
Newspaper’s photographer. She
studied at the Royal College of Art
in London and has had a number of
solo shows
Gareth Harris is The Art
Newspaper’s editor at large. He
also writes for the Financial Times
and the Independent
Lindsay Pollock is a New York-
based writer who has been covering
the art market since 2000. Besides
The Art Newspaper, she writes
regularly for Bloomberg News
Cristina Ruiz is a former editor of
The Art Newspaper and is an arts
correspondent for The Sunday
Times
Anny Shaw is a freelance
journalist based in London. She
was a staff writer at Art World
magazine
Jean Wainwright is the presenter
of The Art Newspaper TV. An art
critic and art historian, she has
published extensively as well as
appearing on television and radio
Ossian Ward is the visual arts
editor of Time Out London and is a
former editor of Art Review
Editorial and production:
Editor: Jane Morris
Deputy editor: Javier Pes
Assistant editor: Emily Sharpe
Copy editors: James Hobbs,
Simon Stephens
Designer: Emma Goodman
Editorial researcher/picture editor:
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Contributors: Robert Bound, Alex Coles,
Brook Mason, Iain Millar, András Szántó,
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Published by Umberto Allemandi & Co.
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Buck drops here
An almighty crash rattled
White Cube (J15) yesterday as
Marc Quinn’s sex-change
bronze of half-woman, half-
man Buck, 2010, was toppled
to the ground. Quinn’s series of
surgically altered bodies has
already fallen flat on its face in
London, metaphorically at
least, where his recent show
was greeted with one- and two-
star reviews, but two White
Cubers quickly grabbed poor
Buck by the arms and dragged
him/her into the backroom. A
concerned Quinn soon arrived
on the scene to see if any more
corrective surgery was required
but the effigy was soon righted
and restored to its spot.
“You’ll meet a…”
Hungry for answers, volunteers
have been signing up at
London gallery Hotel (2/5/1),
showing at Basel’s Liste 15 art
fair (15-10 June), to have their
fortunes read by local tarot
soothsayer, Medium Yvonne. In
collaboration with artist Juliette
Blightman, who’s interested in
Jung’s famous study of occult
phenomena when he was
briefly based in Basel, the tarot
card reader successfully
divined that Frieze Projects
curator Sarah McCrory was
employed by a man and a
woman (Matthew Slotover and
Amanda Sharp), although the
appearance of a Death card was
not an omen of anything
untoward. And arts writer
Francesca Gavin was also
subjected to a probing reading,
in which a long distance fling
was predicted...
Holy honey
London’s Carpenters Workshop
Gallery (G21) at Design Miami
Basel assure us that no insects
were harmed during the
installation of The Unbearable
Lightness, 2010, an eye-
popping piece by Tomás
Gabzdil Libertiny made up of a
honeycombed crucifix figure
enclosed in a glass case
surrounded by a swarm of bees.
As a ‘sweet’ gesture, the honey
made by the buzzing beauties
(not sold as part of the piece)
will be given to the farm that
donated the bees for their
striking Basel debut.
Blaggers’ Basel
We know of at least one
resourceful fairgoer who set out
to last the whole week without
spending a single Swiss franc,
surviving on museum brunches,
champagne dinners and VIP car
services. Alas, he cracked on
day three once he realised no
amount of black card power
would buy him water,
toothpaste or a beer at the
Kunsthalle Bar.
Wilkommen,
bienvenue
A couple of young gallerists
are staying in a youth hostel
this week, while homegrown
talent Eric Hattan (of the
uprooted street lamp in
Messeplatz) always plays the
hotelier during art fair week,
turning his apartment into a
makeshift bed and breakfast for
artist friends to find shelter.
Anti-apparatchiks
Gallery XL from Moscow
decided to combat the craze for
art apps—two have been
launched this week—with a
twisting iPhone on its stand
(H6). The sculpture, 3G
International, 2010, by
Aristarkh Chernyshev and
Alexei Shulgin, features such
seditious apps on its screen as
the marijuana icon of “Legalize
It”, the “I Am Rich” app and
“Lush”, which is for confirmed
drinkers. No problems have
been raised by the notoriously
litigious Apple Inc—so far.
Eivind Furnesvik,
the director of
Standard, Oslo,
(R7)
My biggest mistake…
not becoming one of my
artists—they seem to make
more money than I do.
My secret passion...
will have me putting up a sign
at my booth reading “Back in
110 minutes” twice a day and
will be obvious to anybody
spending time near the TV in
the lounge upstairs.
The museum I’d like to
lead...
Rasmus Meyers Samlinger in
my hometown Bergen, which
is just around the corner from
my grandmother’s place and
would provide me with a
chance to see her more often.
The artist I should have
signed...
Edvard Munch, I should say
for evidently ethno-kitsch
reasons.
I last cooked for...
friends in Oslo two weeks ago:
monkfish with fennel and con-
fit tomatoes (and generous
amounts of white wine to
numb their judgement).
I should have been...
left-footed, which would have
boosted my chances of becom-
ing a professional footballer.
Dealers are misunderstood
because...
they sometimes respond to
questions at art fairs with food
in their mouth.
Fairs are important...
if you’re located in the upper
right corner of the European
map.
Small talk is...
sometimes as good as it gets.
A recurring nightmare
involves...
Sigmund Freud sitting by my
bed, taking notes.
I was happiest when...
in past tense: not so sure. In
present tense: whenever
Manchester United is winning;
luxuriously lazy Sunday break-
fasts; and in spring, which
allows for mountain biking and
diving into the Oslo fjord.
My greatest achievement is...
opening the gallery with less
money than what a used
Toyota Corolla would cost.
I wish I had met...
Astrid Lindgren—a writer who
keeps on recruiting new gener-
ations of readers and giving
them some of their most pro-
found memories of inspiration
and imagination.
Travel broadens the
mind...
but the in-flight selection
of films tends to narrow
it back to where it was.
Life’s too short to...
be spending time fig-
uring out slogans.
My favourite person
in the art world is...
if I don’t answer my
assistant Anders he
will be bugging me the
entire week.
My Art Basel dream is…
leaving the de-installation
to somebody else.
Interview by
Gareth Harris
Confessions of an art dealer
Comic strip heroes
Everyone knows Hans Ulrich Obrist as a prolific curator and
interviewer of artists, but what about as a comic strip
character? His latest tête-a-tête with Bali-based artist Ashley
Bickerton, subtitled “The Gold of Their Bodies: a
Conversation Before Death”, has been illustrated as a graphic
novel by Argentinian artist Ignacio Noe, to be published by
Damien Hirst’s Other Criteria. The two comic-book heroes are
pictured chatting in the seedy backstreets of an imaginary
Asian megalopolis. What’s really stranger than fiction is their
dialogue—while ignoring the floor show, Obrist asks: “So,
your work was somehow a reaction to conceptual art?”
Bickerton replies: “This work was all about being initiated
and anointed and it was about a connoisseurship of that
sensuality, a connoisseurship without sexuality.”
Eivind Furnesvik
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© UBS 2010. All rights reserved. Quote: The purpose of art is to make visible the invisible. Artist: Franco Fontana. Some of his works are represented in The UBS Art Collection.
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