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812 Main Street • Fort Worth, Texas 817.877.3999

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2008 Honorees
Adam Blake Ethan Boothe Brandon K. Brewer Anthony Burks Benton Cantey Kelly Campbell Melissa Cawyer Richard Dorough Sunny L. Drenik Mark Dungan Joseph Fackel Alyson Farmer Neil Foster Caroline E. Gary Caroline C. Harrison Dak Hatfield Jennifer Henderson Ben King Gary Lewis Quang T. Le Jim Luttrell
Publisher

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Ryan Matthews Hunter McLean Niraj Mehta Mike Micallef Colin L. Murchison Jim Morse Stephanie Pratt Clare Pritchett Susan Roberts Cathy Reagan Sheffield Colby Siratt Donnie Siratt Marc Sloter Yi-Jiun Su Grace Taylor Greg Trevino Rick Wegman Mindia Whittier Chris Wilkie Randy Woods

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Banks Dishman
Chairman, Advisory Board

Richard L. Connor
Editor

Best of the Best
Who would have thought that pastel colors and gold chains would shape a generation? But that’s exactly what we found out reading the profiles of the 40 Under 40 recipiCRYSTAL FORESTER ents. Growing up many MANAGING EDITOR faithfully sat in front of the TV to catch the weekly episodes of Miami Vice and The A Team. Whatever it was that the 40 Under 40 Class of 2008 was watching, it has paid off. This is a group of individuals who shine with the qualities of true leaders in the workplace and the community. All of the men and women in this group set high expectations for themselves and have met – if not exceeded – their goals. Members of this class include someone worked at the White House with President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush, someone who started a real estate business his freshman year of college, a social worker at the Federal Bureau of Prisons and some who have followed in their family heritage. Like many classes before them the Class of 2008 not only has an impressive resume but they also have a volunteer list just as long. In addition to the long hours at the office, our honorees spend countless hours on the boards of many nonprofit organizations, coaching children’s sports teams or just volunteering their time. For some recipients, community involvement overlaps and becomes their business. One of the honorees founded the Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation after their child was diagnosed with the disease. Who’s who? You’ll have to turn off your 80s pop and Justin Timberlake to flip through the pages of the Fort Worth Business Press’ 40 Under 40 Class of 2008 and find out.

Robert Francis
Associate Editor

Michael H. Price
Managing Editor

Crystal Forester
Contributors

Aleshia Howe, Betty Dillard, Elizabeth Bassett, John-Laurent Tronche, Leslie Wimmer, Sarah Mason, Celestina Phillips, Tonie Auer, Darwin Campbell, Laurie Barker James, Stephanie Patrick
Production

Brent Latimer, Clayton Gardner
Photography

Glen E. Ellman, Glenn Killman
Advertising Executives

Andrea Benford, Elizabeth Northern Mary Schlegel, Robert Southerland, Annie Warren
Sales Director

Anjanette Hamilton
Vice President of Operations

Shevoyd Hamilton
Marketing & Events

Mary Lou Jacobs
Reception

Maggie Franklin

3509 Hulen, No. 201 • Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-336-8300 • Fax: 817-332-3038 www.fwbusinesspress.com Fort Worth Business Press. © 2008

May 28, 2008

3

Adam Blake
Venture Corp. president and founder

age

22

Hometown

Leawood, Kan.

L Adam Blake’s entrepreneurial passion. But whatever it was, it
has served Blake, 22, well. Just one year after graduating with a triple major from Texas Christian University, Blake has taken his Fort Worth-based real estate company to the next level – the multimillion dollar level. “I’m having fun; it’s an exciting time in real estate because there’s a lot going on and I’m glad to be in on it,” Blake says. Blake founded Venture Corp. during his freshman year of college when he got his real estate license and $100,000 in startup money from a fraternity brother. His first foray into the real estate business was renting properties to college students. His success in rentals led him to start flipping houses, and by the next year he was managing properties for several investors. Venture Corp. has since grown into a multimillion-dollar-a-year company with more than 10 employees. The full-service real estate company specializes in investment properties but offers services in residential and commercial development, property management, investment syndication, and buyer and seller representation. Today, Blake says the company has moved more into commercial development and – thanks to the current housing market – into residential foreclosures. “I have put together a large fund to buy foreclosures and because there are so many out there right now, unfortunately, they’re a great investment,” Blake says. “The company will be going in that direction for the foreseeable future.” Since the start of his business, it has become a family affair. Both Blake’s father and brother have moved to Fort Worth to work for the company. “I am really enjoying what I am doing right now, and I think it’s just going to get better,” Blake says. – Aleshia Howe

ooking back, maybe it was his father’s layoff that first ignited

Who was your biggest influence?

Donald Trump. I like all his books and his confident attitude.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Right now, probably somewhere in China.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

I can’t remember.
Another profession you would like to try?

Something with alternative energy
What was your favorite high school subject?

Economics
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

I have never watched a lot of TV, but probably Sports Center or something on the Discovery Channel
What book would you recommend?

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill or The World is Flat by Thomas Friedman
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Classic rock

4

May 28, 2008

Ethan Boothe
Deloitte senior manager

age

34

Hometown

Fort Worth

ITexas Panhandle. They were one of the first families in the area,
and among the first to try growing cotton in the previously untilled land. Several generations later, Ethan Boothe has tangible evidence of his family’s legacy. A fifth-generation Texan and third-generation Fort Worth native, Boothe has the Stetson his great-grandfather, who was just a boy when his family trekked halfway across the country, wore on weekends and for special occasions. Boothe and his family still hold on to that adventurous spirit. As a senior manager for Deloitte, he provides financial guidance to companies and their employees with multinational offices. Personally, he grew up in a family that spent a lot of time outdoors and he is doing the same with his young family, he says. “We are definitely an outdoor activity-oriented family,” Boothe says. In the office, Boothe works with companies to help manage the finances of their employees. He researches the companies to understand their background and where they are trying to move in the future, and then provides a customized way to manage the company’s global talent. Part of the intrigue of working in his position is being able to see the inner workings of successful companies in different sectors around the world, he says. “You really get an appreciation of things that are happening across industries,” Boothe says. The job also allows for occasional travel. Boothe says at one point he was going to Rome on the business trip, and he asked his then-girlfriend to accompany him. He took a few days off and they traveled to Tuscany, where he proposed. Kristen Boothe, now his wife, and Ethan Boothe are expecting their second child in June. While you can read about a country or a company, the only way to really know it is to go and see it, he says. “I don’t think there’s any substitute for the actual experience,” he says. —Elizabeth Bassett

n the late 1800s, a family from Georgia made their way to the

Who has been your biggest influence?

I would have to say that my late grandfather, Melvin E. Boothe, who passed away in March 1997, has probably had the greatest impact on my life.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

I’d have to split my time between Vail, Colo. and the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My fist paycheck was probably around 1982 from delivering circular advertisements in West Fort Worth for my grandfather’s Benjamin Franklin 5 & 10 Store.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

As a youngster you could find me and my brother glued to the TV for The Dukes of Hazard. The A-Team definitely took me through my middle school years and of course Saturday Night Live kept me and my friends entertained in high school.
What book would you recommend?

Theodore Rex by Edmund Morris
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Justin Timberlake, specifically “SexyBack.” I know I’m not alone out there.

May 28, 2008

5

Brandon Brewer
Republic Title vice president

age

37

Hometown

Lubbock

Bthrough several jobs in different fields before landing at

randon Brewer grew up just outside of Lubbock, and moved

Republic Title. His first job was selling office equipment, which he did for a few years, then went to work for Airborne Express selling freight services and express packages. After a third sales job, Brewer started his own company that provided temporary services in executive searches. He later sold that company, and went to work for a software company that focused on real estate business software. “I tried to stay everywhere about six months,” Brewer says. “After I left the software company, I went to go to work for Land America doing commercial title insurance, and then was recruited at Republic Title.” Lauren Pointer, who met Brewer at a young business professionals group, nominated Brewer for 40 Under 40. Brewer “kind of became my mentor, he helped me get tied into civic organizations, professional organization, and really has been a great source of advice for me,” Pointer says. “And I’ve watched him do it with other people too, he’s just incredibly galvanizing.” Brewer spends his days connecting people together, he says. “I may connect a banker with a real estate developer or an engineer with an architect, I just play the connection game all day long,” Brewer says. “And that means that I’m going to lunch a lot, going to sporting events a lot, playing sports a lot. I play for a living.” Although Brewer is lucky to spend his work hours playing, he does have limited spare time outside of the office. When he isn’t creating business relationships across Fort Worth, he often works around his house. “I get to play during the day so my weekends are strictly dedicated to staying home with my family, working in the yard, stuff like that,” he says. “But, that’s totally different from my hobbies. I play a lot of golf, I like to cycle, bicycling is very fun, and I like to play basketball but never get to do it.”

Who has been the biggest influence in your life?

My wife
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Hawaii
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My dad
What is another profession you would like to try?

Real estate development
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Seinfeld
What book would you recommend?

The World is Flat by Thomas Friedman
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

LL Cool J

– Leslie Wimmer

6

May 28, 2008

Anthony Burks
Vendigm Construction owner and president

age

33

Hometown

Fort Worth

Aabout getting an education and bettering themselves, but the
East Fort Worth high school graduate didn’t think he could do it. Now 33, Burks not only speaks to troubled teens – he has given them a role model, donating his time to them as well as to elementary school students in the inner city. “Your perception becomes your reality and the drug dealers are the only businessmen these kids see so that’s what they want to become,” Burks says. “But, I want to show them an alternative of what a successful businessman can look like.” Burks is the co-founder and co-owner of Vendigm Construction, a real estate construction company founded in Fort Worth in 2006. In its first year, the start-up company reported annual earnings of $14,000. This year the company had more than $1 million in sales in its first quarter. Burks was born and raised in Fort Worth’s Stop Six neighborhood, an economically challenged area in East Fort Worth. Burks, however, avoided much of the gang activity that surrounded him in his high school years and graduated valedictorian at Dunbar High School, earning a basketball scholarship to Texas A&M University. After transferring to Texas Christian University, Burks graduated with a bachelor’s degree in organizational communications. “I just had good parents, a good church and I was able to avoid a lot of stuff going on around me,” Burks says. Those positive influences fueled Burks to give back to the community he was raised in and to other inner-city children. He also wants to be a role model to his own children – a 7-year-old son and 13-year-old daughter. “It all starts with going to school and opening your eyes to more than what your surroundings are showing you,” Burks says. – Aleshia Howe

t 18, Anthony Burks was asked to speak to troubled teens

Who has been your biggest influence?

My business partner Johnathan White and my father.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Landscape work with my father. He owns George’s Lawn and Landscaping Services.
Another profession you would like to try?

Foreign diplomat or ambassador
What was your favorite high school subject?

English
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Good Times and Dallas
What book would you recommend?

The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Late 80s, early 90s R&B

May 28, 2008

7

S. Benton Cantey V
Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP associate

age

32

Hometown

Fort Worth

Wing up, he wanted to be a sportscaster. Later in life,

hen Fort Worth native S. Benton Cantey V was grow-

he found a passion for the mix of business and law. Being an alumnus of Auburn University, Texas Tech, the University of Tulsa and Georgetown University Law Center, Cantey brought together his interests in law and business to start a law career at Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP focusing on corporate securities, mergers and acquisitions. “Well, before I went into law, I got a master’s degree in business, and I thought that combining business and law would be the ultimate career choice for me,” Cantey says. “After getting my MBA then going on to law school made that possible. I definitely had no interest in doing litigation work. I thought that combining the elements of business into law and corporate securities was the best fit, and working on big [merger and acquisition] deals was always exciting.” Cantey is a member of Leadership Fort Worth and is affiliated with the Tarrant County Bar Association, Tarrant County Young Lawyers Association and the American Bar Association. He says the best part of his job is watching business owners reap the benefits of years of hard work and dedication. Along with corporate finance and securities regulation, Cantey also focuses on corporate governance, partnership and joint venture transactions and private equity law. He likes to come in to his office early and get as much work done as he can before 9 a.m., when his schedule picks up. Cantey’s top priority he says is spending time with his wife and son, going to the park and the Fort Worth Zoo. In his spare time, Cantey likes to go fishing as well as turkey and bird hunting. – Leslie Wimmer

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Lake Como, Italy
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Mowing yards
Another profession you would like to try?

Private equity investments
What was your favorite high school subject?

American History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

CHiPS
What book would you recommend?

China, Inc. by Ted Fishman
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Country music

May 28, 2008

9

Kelly Campbell
Fort Worth Convention and Visitors Bureau vice president of marketing communications

age

34

Hometown

Jenks, Okla.

AWorth Convention and Visitors Bureau, Kelly Campbell says
she’s got one of the greatest jobs in the area. Attracting people to Fort Worth is easy, Campbell says, as it’s a product she loves and enjoys herself. “It’s like any product you have to sell — you have to believe in it,” Campbell says. “Fort Worth is home to me and I enjoy living here. Our quality of life here is amazing.” At the Bureau, Campbell oversees a team of five who work on strategies to market the city — through mediums such as advertising, public relations and e-marketing. The hospitality industry is a field Campbell would like to stay in as long as she can, a meaningful way to reach out to people and help them enjoy themselves, Campbell says. “Travel and hospitality affects everyone and it’s something everybody enjoys doing,” she says. “At my job, I get to make people comfortable and happy when they come here.” The hospitality industry of Fort Worth has been mostly unaffected by recent changes in the economy and gas prices, Campbell says. If anything, she says, Fort Worth has gathered momentum in the last couple years, with two new hotels to be opened by January 2009 and plans for major changes, such as the Trinity River Vision project. “Fort Worth is very fortunate in its economy due to the Barnett Shale,” she says. “We’re not experiencing the same dips as many cities have to deal with. During spring break, our books show record breaking numbers of people coming through Fort Worth.” – Sarah Mason

s vice president of marketing communications at the Fort

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Tuscany, Italy
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Mazzio’s Pizza
Another profession you would like to try?

Interior designer or police detective
What was your favorite high school subject?

Humanities
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Saturday Night Live
What book would you recommend?

The Elements of Style by Strunk and White
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Justin Timberlake

10

May 28, 2008

Melissa Cawyer
Albert, Neely & Kuhlman LLP oil and gas attorney

age

38

Hometown

Port Arthur

Albert, Neely & Kuhlmann’s Melissa Cawyer has her hands full.
She is a mother to three young children, actively involved in her church and an oil and gas attorney working in one of the country’s most active natural gas plays, the Barnett Shale. “What we do is we write title opinions for most of the oil and gas companies here in town,” says Cawyer, including Devon Energy Corp., XTO Energy Inc. and Denbury Resources Inc. “What that entails is that we go to various counties within Texas and we examine titles, kind of like a title attorney for a real estate company would do.” Cawyer and her company’s work helps the energy producers “know who to pay and what proportion to pay,” she says. The Port Arthur-native started off in the litigation field, previously having worked for the Texas Department of Public Safety. She switched to insurance defense before finally moving from Corpus Christi to Fort Worth in 1999. After welcoming her first son in 2001, Cawyer said managing litigation and a newborn child proved to be a difficult task, so at her firm’s request, she switched to oil and gas law. It was a move made to give Cawyer more free time. Few could have predicted the boom to come. “We could work 24 hours a day and still not get everything done,” says Cawyer, adding at times she could spend half her time on the road, or a month without leaving her downtown office. Cawyer and husband, Russell D. Cawyer, an attorney at Kelly Hart & Hallman and previous 40 Under 40 designate, will soon visit Italy for the couple’s 10th anniversary of marriage. Kelly Hart & Hallman’s Leslie Darby, who nominated Melissa Cawyer, said she is role model for all “In a day and age where women are commonly choosing to forego the workplace in favor of being caretakers,” Darby says, “Melissa is living proof that it can be done: Women can have a career and a family.” – John-Laurent Tronche

Who has been your biggest influence?

My father
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Italy
Where did your first paycheck come from?

I delivered the Port Arthur News
Another profession you would like to try?

Kindergarten teacher, if money were no object
What was your favorite high school subject?

Computer Science
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The Incredible Hulk
What book would you recommend?

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

The soundtrack to Evita, the 1996 movie

May 28, 2008

11

Richard Dorough
Textron chief information security officer

age

38

Hometown

Fort Worth

Fage of 12, he was hooked to computer technology. When

rom the time Richard Dorough first got a computer at the

Dorough earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science, he had his sights on a chief information security officer position, but thought it would take years longer than it actually did to make it to that position, he said. Now with a year under his belt as CISO for Textron, which owns Bell Helicopter and Cessna Aircraft along with others, Dorough says his main struggle is balancing his passions. “I’m really involved with my family, with my church and I’m really involved with work,” Dorough says. “It’s been really challenging trying to balance all this.” In between a few annual business trips, Dorough protects Textron’s information by monitoring Textron’s firewalls and incoming traffic on network computers. When Dorough isn’t working in the virtual realm, he’s hammering away in the real one, working on construction projects in his own house and for his church. “Our church is on its 52nd house,” Dorough said. “I just hop in whenever I have time to volunteer whether they’re roofing or putting in plumbing.” Changes within the field of technology keep Dorough on his toes and keep his business in a constant state of fluctuation. With the advent of the Internet and growing number of ways to “hack” or break into computer systems, security officials such as Dorough need to keep up with new types of protection, from fire walls to systems that track the activity of computers on a network, he says. “As IT trends change and we get more dynamic technologies, you have to change security measures too,” Dorough says. These interesting changes and his passion for computers will keep Dorough hooked to IT jobs for as years to come, he says. – Sarah Mason

Who has been your biggest influence?

Rik Boren, a friend
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Cayman Islands
Where did your first paycheck come from?

A Western clothing store in East Texas
Another profession you would like to try?

Race car driver
What was your favorite high school subject?

Computer courses
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Riptide
What book would you recommend?

Anything by W.E.B Griffin and The Cuckoo’s Egg by Clifford Stoll
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Classical music

12

May 28, 2008

Sunny Drenik
Baylor All Saints Medical Center director of marketing

age

38

Hometown

Pittsburg, Kan.

Aworking behind the scenes, it seemed to suit Sunny Drenik that
her first step towards the hospital industry took her out of the limelight. Drenik began her career as a television newscaster after college to help pay the bills, she says. Often covering stories at local hospitals, Drenik became familiar with people in the field and eventually left her television job for the health care industry. “The TV position really helped get my name out there,” Drenik says. “I was at the hospital all the time covering stories, building relationships until there was a position available.” The hospital job didn’t pay as well as Drenik hoped and she soon dropped out of the health care industry for a position at Sprint. Though she made more money with the phone company, Drenik came to a revelation of sorts that changed her career path and, ultimately, her life. “I thought, ‘This is not how I want to live my life,’” Drenik says. “Finally, I decided I’m going to go back to where I really felt like I was making a contribution — that’s why I went back to health care.” Now, as director of marketing at Baylor All Saints Medical Center, Drenik says she can’t imagine working anywhere else. At Baylor – where Drenik says she learned the importance of teamwork – Drenik comes up with strategic methods and marketing plans to drive up revenue, she says. Drenik’s recent large project was marketing for Andrews Women’s Hospital, which opened in March. A year before the hospital opened, Drenik compiled information from women’s focus groups to find out what women wanted from their health care. Drenik communicated with patients and benefactors through polls, billboards and letters to spread the word about the hospital and learn more about what the hospital should offer. When the190,000-square-foot hospital opened, Drenik found all her hard work had paid off. “I’m passionate about being involved in the development of the hospital, whether is a new service or a new facility,” Drenik says. “To be on the ground floor and watch the people coming in through those doors – that’s fulfillment.” – Sarah Mason

s a self-professed fan of number-crunching who takes joy in

Who has been your biggest influence?

My mom
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Maui, Hawaii
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Dillon’s Grocery Store
Another profession you would like to try?

Politics
What was your favorite high school subject?

Government
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

American Bandstand
What book would you recommend?

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Nina Simone – Jazz

May 28, 2008

13

14

May 28, 2008

Mark Dungan
Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation vice president

age

37

Hometown

Fort Worth

Ijust turned 2. She’d suffered from cold-like symptoms for several weeks, and suddenly one day she wasn’t putting weight on her legs and stopped walking. Later that night, Dungan and his wife, Lynley Dungan, were in the hospital with Sydney and told she had a tumor nearly the size of a football in her abdomen. It was cancer, a neuroblastoma, and had metastasized until it had destroyed the top of her hips, explaining why she’d stopped walking. Sydney’s parents were told there was only a 15 percent chance she would live another two years. The diagnosis was shocking, but it also served as a turning point in Dungan’s life and career. “We spent about 18 months pretty solidly in the hospital, and as time went on I got more interested in solving the problem that was neuroblastoma,” Dungan says. Dungan had been working with his e-learning company, which provided training to people in various jobs in the energy industry. He kept a blog documenting his family’s journey and fight against cancer, and one night he had a dream that he should ask everyone to donate their lunch money to the Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation. Dungan posted the request on his blog, and within 10 days, more than $175,000 was raised. The Lunch for Life fund-raiser was born, and to date the initiative has raised more than $2 million for the CNCF. Dungan sold his e-learning company and focused on his family and neuroblastoma. In 2004, he was appointed to the board of the CNCF, and in November 2006, he became the vice president. Today, Sydney is in kindergarten and has a younger brother, Graham, and little sister, Ainsley. He says his daughter’s cancer made him realize the limitations that physicians and researchers face. “I couldn’t cure it, but I could find the people who could and support their research,” he says. —Elizabeth Bassett

n the summer of 2003, Mark Dungan’s daughter, Sydney, had

Who has been your biggest influence?

My father, George Dungan
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Carmel, Calif.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Whataburger
Another profession you would like to try?

Pediatric Oncology
What was your favorite high school subject?

Calculus
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

M*A*S*H
What book would you recommend?

Ya Can’t Let Cancer Ruin Your Day by Syd Birrell
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Ingrid Michaelson

May 28, 2008

15

Joseph Fackel
Buxton senior vice president, Northern Division, CommunityID

age

39

Hometown

Rock Island, Ill.

Bcalling his name when he learned about a man named Tom

orn and raised in Rock Island, Ill., Joe Fackel heard Fort Worth

Buxton. “My father-in-law was telling me about this guy who had started this company that was just going crazy,” Fackel says. “He had been reading about some new interesting products they had coming out and he said, ‘You should call Tom.’ So I called Tom.” Buxton obviously liked what Fackel had to say. In June 2002 Fackel, along with his wife and young son, left his home in Atlanta to move to Fort Worth and to a new job at Buxton, a highly-regarded customer analytics company. Fackel’s initial task at Buxton was to confirm whether communities would really be interested in utilizing Buxton’s tools for recruiting retail. After traveling Texas, hosting meetings and presentations about Buxton’s services, Fackel quickly learned the demand would be great. “I could tell by the second meeting that we were really on to something,” Fackel says. “Retail was a mystery to most people. We were able to bring our expertise to these communities so they could understand retail opportunities, and learn how to not waste time and resources choosing the wrong kinds of retail.” Six years later after conducting that initial research for Tom Buxton, Fackel is now Buxton’s northern division senior vice president, having been a part of more than 400 projects across the country in 40 states. “We had a tool, cities had a need, and we were just able to meet that need,” Fackel says. “It’s just been a phenomenal ride.” Fackel carries his same enthusiasm from the office over to his community involvement, as well. He supports many local charities, including the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, The Warm Place and the Leukemia/Lymphoma Society. “I come from a family where giving back to others was important,” Fackel says. “I think any time you can lend a hand, you have an obligation to do that, and that comes from my parents. That was the example that was set for me and I am trying to do the same for my two sons.” – Celestina Phillips

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents, as well as Bob Bolen
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Kauai, Hawaii
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Delivering carpeting and floor covering
Another profession you would like to try?

Teacher
What was your favorite high school subject?

Biology
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Moonlighting
What book would you recommend?

It’s Not About the Bike...My Journey Back to Life by Lance Armstrong
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Disney’s High School Musical

16

May 28, 2008

Alyson Farmer
World Affairs Council, Fort Worth Center executive director

age

31

Hometown

Muskogee, Okla.

Dhas come a long way from her roots as a small town girl from
Oklahoma. At the age of 18, Farmer already had traveled overseas, and by 26, she had backpacked and hostel-hopped much of Europe, including England and Ireland. She went to school in Mexico for a summer right out of high school, and in 2007, Farmer was selected as one of four ambassadors representing Rotary International District 5790 for a month in Peru. “You had to do a presentation about your district and what projects your district was doing,” Farmer says of her time in Peru. “Which meant you had to learn it in Spanish so you could give the presentation in Spanish.” Farmer, a certified meetings professional with a master’s degree in organizational management, decided to make Fort Worth her home after many visits to a childhood friend who was attending Texas Christian University. With extensive contract work in London and Dublin under her belt, she was hired on with Fort Worth Sister Cities before moving on to the World Affairs Council in 2007. “When I got back (from Peru), the World Affairs Council job came open and I knew that was the fit that I had been looking before,” Farmer says. Along with her Rotary Club of Fort Worth involvement, Farmer is a member of the Tarrant County Young Republicans, serves as the membership chair for the Southeastern Oklahoma State University Alumni Board of Directors, and volunteers for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children) of Tarrant County, as well as the HALO Society, an organization that supports CASA. “Some people are good at sports, and some people have families and are really good at being parents,” Farmer says. “It seems my talent, and what makes me feel good, is volunteer work. Volunteering is as much for me as it is for the people I help in the end.” – Celestina Phillips

escribing herself as an “Okie from Muskogee,” Alyson Farmer

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Africa
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Filing abstracts
Another profession you would like to try?

Water engineering
What was your favorite high school subject?

Math
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Murder She Wrote
What book would you recommend?

Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! by Richard P. Feynman
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

The Oak Ridge Boys 1982 Christmas Album

May 28, 2008

17

Neil Foster
GCG Advertising president

age

37

Hometown

Fort Worth

work, only second to says Neil started a at 1996 his way up Ilove myas thecopywriter2007.GCGmyinfamily,”and workedFoster, who to president of firm in “I like to create things, and help people and businesses solve problems in ways they never thought of before,” he says. “Being in a creative business has allowed me to remain a child in certain ways. I get to dream a lot, and use my brain in a challenging way.” Foster’s dreams and creative ideas have led his agency to numerous industry awards and recognitions. In 2003, he established the health care division at GCG to offer more specialized marketing services and resources to the company’s existing health care clients. As a result, in 2004 GCG’s Healthcare Group was recognized and awarded as one of the top health care agencies in the country – the only agency named in the southwest. “Neil communicates with his clients and employees with complete honesty, making recommendations and decisions in the best interest of all parties,” says Allyson Cross, who nominated Foster and who has worked at GCG for five years. “He leads GCG with style and finesse,” Cross says, “knowing that his greatest asset is the talent of his employees. He monitors and advances their professional growth by investing in and expanding each employee’s specific gifts and abilities.” Good leadership, says Foster, has nothing to do with rhetoric. “You have to lead by example. You can’t expect people to put their hearts into something if you’re not. They’ll see right through you.” The father of three boys, Foster is currently working with his children – the oldest of whom is not quite 11 – to establish their own businesses. He serves as dugout coach for Little League Baseball, and he and business partner Scott Turner donate countless hours to the Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation, All Church Home for Children and AIDS Outreach Center. “I’m fairly introspective by nature, so I get a little embarrassed seeing my name or photo in the media,” says Foster. “But I know it is just part of the territory when running a successful business. Preferably, I enjoy being the guy behind the curtain. Guess I’m more of a director than an actor.” —Betty Dillard

Who has been your biggest influence?

Scott Turner and Robert Langford have been mentors. Both my parents. But most of all, I would have to say my wife, Michelle
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Japan
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My first paycheck came from Wolf Nursery. It was tough work, but I always had a great tan since I worked outdoors. And in high school, that was very important
Another profession you would like to try?

I would enjoy being on the writing and directing side of the film industry
What was your favorite high school subject?

I liked art best. It was the only subject that didn’t have boundaries
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The Banana Splits – I loved those furry guys.
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

These days, I mostly listen to what my kids like, although I pull out some old 80s vinyl from time to time. New Order 45s bring back some memories.

18

May 28, 2008

Caroline Gary
Federal Medical Center Carswell clinical social worker

age

37

Hometown

Oklahoma City

Galong a natural path into a helping profession. But the

rowing up watching her mother, a nurse, guided Caroline Gary

licensed master social worker never dreamed she would find herself a civil servant with the Federal Bureau of Prisons working to prepare female offenders to return to the community as law abiding and productive citizens through therapeutic programs and services. “However, when I began my work as a prison social worker, I knew it was a perfect fit for me,” Gary says. “My work as a social worker in a prison setting can be very difficult and challenging, yet it is often rewarding to know that your work has the potential to impact the individual, their families, and, ultimately, the community to which they will return.” At the Federal Medical Center at Carswell in Fort Worth, Gary serves as a member of the Health Services Department, helping develop, organize and manage the various support services associated with the psychosocial needs for female inmates. She currently serves as chair of the Compassionate Release Committee, a member of the Interdisciplinary Committee on Patient Care and a member of the Bio-Ethics Committee. She also served as Hospice Program Coordinator and as a liaison between the institution and inmate families, hospital personnel, courts and community agencies. Gary says she is proud to work with the SHARE (Sharing Hope About Recovery Experiences) program – a special outreach program in which inmates hope to convince others to take a different path away from incarceration. “Many of the presenters have been released from prison and have gone on to lead successful personal and professional lives,” Gary says. Nominator Daphne Brookins with TCU Upward Bound says, “Mrs. Gary is a very humble and deserving person and doesn’t even know how many lives she is touching with the community services that she provides. She is passionate about her job and passionate about helping our young women getting their lives on the right track and become successful future leaders.” She is married to Caron Gary. The couple has an18-month-old son, Cole Ellis Gary. —Betty Dillard

Who has been your biggest influence?

My mother. She is my mentor, my biggest supporter and friend
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Anywhere near tranquil water. I would love to travel to Hawaii some day
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Eckerd Drug Store as a pharmacy clerk
Another profession you would like to try?

I love to sing….in another life, I would love to sing professionally
What was your favorite high school subject?

English
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The Carol Burnett Show
What book would you recommend?

The Bible
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

I am a music lover and I am a fan of most music, however, jazz is probably my favorite

May 28, 2008

19

Caroline C. Harrison
Cantey Hanger associate attorney

age

33

Hometown

Lancaster, Calif.

Cimpressive considering the time she dedicates to her career as
an associate in the litigation section at Cantey Hanger LLP. She is the president of the Fort Worth Tarrant County Young Lawyer’s Association, on the board of the Tarrant County Bar Association, is involved in Speedway Children’s Charities, the Fort Worth Young Lawyer’s Association Mentor Program and serves as a volunteer teacher for Junior Achievement. With a 1-year old daughter at home, balancing work, family and philanthropy is vital. “My husband is amazing” Harrison says. “He is so supportive of everything that I do. There’s no way I could pull it off without him.” Notable career highlights for Harrison include a case in 2007 in which she defended Cook Children’s Healthcare System, Cook Children’s Medical Center and four nurses in a $20 million lawsuit, along with Jordan Parker, a partner at Cantey Hanger. After a 12day trial, the jury returned a defense verdict. Harrison has also represented high profile clients including the Fort Worth Independent School District, Atmos Energy, Devon Energy Production and nonprofit organizations including Child Care Associates and the Presbyterian Night Shelter. While most would call it quits after a full work week, Harrison continues to dedicate time to the community. “I’m in a position where I can give back with my time,” Harrison says. “I think it’s important to make time for that. I want to set a good example for my daughter so that she grows up and knows that’s what you should do.” Harrison’s life lesson so far? “I’ve learned a lot of patience. You definitely need to pick your battles,” she says. “It’s not going to do you any good to go into a situation and insist on your position without being open to where the other person is coming from and trying work out some kind of compromise.” —Celestina Phillips

aroline Harrison’s long list of community involvement is

Who has been your biggest influence?

My aunt
Where is your dream vacation spot?

One month on a private island with luxury facilities and a private chef
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Yogurt shop in California called Heidi’s Frogen Yozurt
Another profession you would like to try?

Novelist
What was your favorite high school subject?

Government
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Beverly Hills 90210
What book would you recommend?

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Outkast

20

May 28, 2008

Dak Hatfield
Innovative Developers real estate developer

age

33

Hometown

Norman, Okla.

Dwhen he was well under the age of 40. At 25, Hatfield found-

ak Hatfield established himself as outstanding business leader

ed a company based in Hawaii that provided complete turnkey renovation packages to military bases, including everything from carpet and paint to electrical work and furnishings. He says coming from a family of entrepreneurs, he was always interested in starting his own business. Hatfield also hired and managed more than 20 global sales representatives for his company, some of which already had a few years on him. “There was definitely a bit of apprehension toward the younger guy,” Hatfield says. “But when you’re able to show them that you actually know what you are talking about, you earn their respect. That was one of the major obstacles I had to overcome. Here’s a young guy responsible for millions of dollars. It took a long time for them to see me as someone who could be responsible for their projects.” After two years in Hawaii, Hatfield, a Texas Christian University alum, and his wife moved back to Fort Worth to be closer to family. “Fort Worth had the small town feel that we desired with the big city amenities and opportunities,” he says. Hatfield is now part of the team at Innovative Developers, and works with brokers to seek out land and tenants, as well as spearhead entire developments for land and commercial building. “The way they do business is very community oriented,” Hatfield says. “I have always wanted to become more involved with the Fort Worth community and Innovative Developers allows me to do that.” His affiliations are many, including Young Leaders Council Member of Greater Fort Worth Real Estate Council, TCU Young Alumni Board Member, Chamber of Commerce Vision Fort Worth Member and BOMA member. “I enjoy teaching folks and I also like learning,” Hatfield says. “I’ve still got a lot of learning to do, and the more people that I can talk to and meet, the more information I am able to obtain and relay to others.” —Celestina Phillips

Who has been your biggest influence?

My mom
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Australia
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Mowing lawns
Another profession you would like to try?

Professional golfer or fighter pilot
What was your favorite high school subject?

Anatomy and physiology
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Spent most of his time outside, but didn’t miss a Dallas Cowboys game
What book would you recommend?

I’m more of a magazine and newspaper guy, but would recommend Newsweek and the Fort Worth Business Press
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Hip Hop

May 28, 2008

21

Jennifer Henderson
JODesign president and creative director

age

34

Hometown

Fort Worth

Fsavvy came naturally early on in her life. The president and creative director of JODesign was designing and printing stickers for clients all over the country at the age of 11. “I mass-produced them in my closet,” Henderson laughed. “I even bought ads in the major trade publications.” After obtaining a degree in fine arts from Texas Wesleyan University, Henderson launched her small boutique design agency in 1999 at the age of 25. JODesign has since evolved into a fullfledged advertising firm, handling collateral design, ad campaigns, marketing and public relations for several local and international clients, including Worthington National Bank and Kelly Hart & Hallman. Her work has been recognized with numerous awards, including several ADDY awards from 2004 to 2007, the Graphic Excellence Award in 2005, and a Bronze Quill Award in 2002. Known for working with a strong base of area freelancers, Henderson says she only aims to hire the best, which helps her meet deadlines and keep costs down, a savings she says she passes on to her clients. Henderson also makes internships a priority in her business. “I see a certain spirit in that age group,” she says. “They want to know anything and everything, and for me to have been in that same position when I was college, I think I owe a lot of my success to the people I learned from.” Where Henderson shines as a dedicated philanthropist in her community is in her commitment to provide her award-winning marketing and design skills to a number of local nonprofits, including the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Speedway Children’s Charities, American Diabetes Association and Easter Seals of Tarrant County. “I work 90 to 100 hours a week,” Henderson says. “So I don’t have any time outside of work. How I give is by doing a ton of pro bono work. I will design annual reports, brochures, newsletters, all for free. It’s a lot of donated hours, but that’s where I am talented, and if I can give my talent, that’s what I would rather do.” —Celestina Phillips

or Jennifer Henderson, combining design skill with marketing

Who has been your biggest influence?

Sherrie Drakeford, former director of communications at Texas Wesleyan University who lost her battle with cancer and multiple sclerosis in 2005. Henderson says she taught her how to be a leader, communicator and mentor herself
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Anywhere in the world
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Designing and printing stickers for clients at 11
Another profession you would like to try?

Interior Design
What was your favorite high school subject?

World History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Bionic Woman
What book would you recommend?

How to Succeed in Business Without a Penis: Secrets and Strategies for the Working Woman by Karen Salmansohn
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Jazz

22

May 28, 2008

Ben King
Metro Golf Cars general manager and vice president

age

36

Hometown

Everman, Texas

Fing a paycheck. Working as the general manager and vice

or Ben King, work is more about doing a good job than earn-

president of his family’s business, Metro Golf Cars Inc., King has been around the company since his dad started it in the 1970s. “My dad started the company in 1974 and moved to this location on South Freeway in 1977 and we’ve been here five miles south of Downtown ever since,” King says. “As a family business, I grew up working here earning my first paycheck as a kid sweeping floors.” The company – despite its name – has only about 25 percent of its business associated with golf, King says. “We’ve evolved into a broad array of off-road vehicles that is the main business, but we grew out of the golf side and still have a tie there, but it is not the majority of our business,” King says. King joined the company in 1998. Since then, he started another division of Metro Golf Cars called King Brothers UTV Ranch of Fort Worth. This company sells power sports utility type products, which are growing and gaining momentum. This year, Metro Golf Cars launched another company, Martex Global Enterprise, as the parent company for the firm’s manufacturing of the HuntVe 4x4 electric utility vehicle designed and focused for the hunting industry and hunters. The company is entering into a dealer network for that, too. Last year, King launched a trade publication — Inside UTV — as the publisher and owner through Boot Jack King Publications. The publication goes to 12,000 UTV dealers, he said. “My motivation is less about money and more about wanting to do a good job,” King says. “That self satisfaction is what motivates me at the end of the day.” King is secretary/treasurer for the Mansfield Economic Development Board and serves on the Walnut Creek Country Club membership council, among other civic groups. King and his wife of seven years, Barbara, have a 4-year-old boy, Jack, and an 8-month-old girl, Mary Grace. —Tonie Auer

Who has been your biggest influence?

My Mother. She has been a living example of integrity, honesty, and true grace
Where is your dream vacation spot?

I hope to go on a Scotland-Ireland golf trip in 2009 with family and friends then I would like to take a trip to Australia and New Zealand in 2010
Where did your first paycheck come from?

I received my first pay check from right here at Metro Golf Cars. I started here with small tasks such as sweeping floors and taking out trash.
Another profession you would like to try?

Teaching. It is a noble profession and I enjoy learning and passing it on
What was your favorite high school subject?

Texas History. I am a proud Texan and still enjoy its history
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Dukes of Hazard
What book would you recommend?

If reading for fun – any book by Vince Flynn.
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

None. I take pleasure in all music that I listen to. If I don’t like it I turn it off

May 28, 2008

23

Gary Lewis
Gus Bates Co. sales associate

age

37

Hometown

Fort Worth

PFrogs take the field at Amon G. Carter Stadium, Gary Lewis
can be found cheering on the purple and white. The sports fan loves his alma mater, where he graduated in 1992 with a bachelor’s degree in marketing, and pretty much all college football. “I love college football. There is just so much excitement and enthusiasm. I think it is the best sport in America,” Lewis says. But, his love for sports extends beyond football to soccer, too. “I play soccer even though I’m not as fast as I used to be,” he says with a smile. “I am the keeper on an indoor team and act as the organizer and coach.” In addition to supporting the Horned Frogs, Lewis has hit the road traveling overseas to watch the U.S. team play in the World Cup in Germany in 2006. This year, he plans to travel to Austria and Switzerland to watch the Euro Cup action. “When I went to the World Cup and heard the national anthem played, it just gives you chills,” he says. With a love of sports and a sense of adventure, Lewis says the best part of his job is the interaction with people. As a sales associate with the Gus Bates Co. in Fort Worth, Lewis joined the family company – his uncle is Gus Bates Sr. – in 1994. “I really like the insurance industry and do a lot of sales,” he says. “We have a range of companies we work with and we do health insurance and employee benefits for companies. I really like meeting new people and talking to my clients.” Problem solving is another task he savors. “I like to figure out how to do things,” he says. “It seems like I get a lot of weird circumstances coming my way, but I like to take the time to figure out how to help people out.” —Tonie Auer

retty much any time the Texas Christian University Horned

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents, Gary and Peggy Lewis. They’re two of the best people that I know, very open minded, very accepting and have never met a stranger
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Brugge, Belgium – as a beer connoisseur it is the ultimate spot for beer
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My dad’s machine shop – working there in the summers
Another profession you would like to try?

I would love to be a college football announcer
What was your favorite high school subject?

Science or history. I like knowing how things work and history is fascinating to see the events that shaped where we are now.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Star Trek, the original series
What book would you recommend?

The Rosetta Stone language CDs – I’ve been doing the Spanish one
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Mariachi music

24

May 28, 2008

Quang T. Le
River Park Medical Clinic internist

age

36

Hometown

Saigon, Vietnam

WDr. Quang T. Le was inspired to pursue the field of medicine. Born in Saigon, Vietnam, as the youngest of eight children, Le said he felt a connection with the doctor who would visit his family to talk about his mother’s condition. “It was what stuck out to me during the time of my mother’s illness,” Le says. “The doctor came in and tried to explain things to us, and that’s what I try to do for my patients today.” Le, who practices internal medicine at River Park Medical Clinic, believes communication not only with the patient, but with the patient’s family is vital, especially when dealing with cases of dementia. He is a frequent speaker at community forums sponsored by the Alzheimer's Association of Tarrant County. His fluency in Vietnamese also helps to serve a fast-growing population in Tarrant County. “I created the forum because a lot of times in my office, the loved one who is affected is there with the family, and it’s hard for them to ask questions,” Le says. “This gives them the opportunity to ask questions, and it’s good for them to be with other people that have the same issues. It’s kind of a support group.” Le says finding balance is what challenges him the most. His profession consumes him, he says, and he finds it difficult to take time for himself even when he is off. But helping families understand and cope with a disease that affects a family member is what Le finds most rewarding throughout his hectic schedule. “When you first go into medicine, you think it’s your job to fix things,” Le says. “I’ve learned that it’s not always about fixing things, but it’s about helping families throughout the entire process.” —Celestina Phillips

hen his mother was diagnosed with gall bladder cancer,

Who has been your biggest influence?

My father
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Antarctica
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Retail at Six Flags Over Texas
Another profession you would like to try?

Arlington Police Academy
What was your favorite high school subject?

Math
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The Cosby Show
What book would you recommend?

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Britney Spears

May 28, 2008

25

Jim Luttrell
Southwest Bank Hulen office president

age

37

Hometown

Arlington

IMobil Corp. as he does the banking industry.

n a way, Jim Luttrell owes his career success as much to Exxon

Nearly 20 years ago, while attending Tarrant County College at night, Luttrell was selling gas at a Pantego station often frequented by local bankers. Somewhat directionless but knowing he didn’t want to sell gas all his life, Luttrell asked one of the bankers about a job. Today, he’s the president of Southwest Bank’s newly opened branch at 2718 S. Hulen St., and is committed to helping small business owners. “What I enjoy about banking is that you get to see what other people do and why they do it,” the Arlington resident says. “Someone works to make money, but it’s also a passion. How someone started a business and how someone keeps a business going, tells you a lot about a person.” The Hulen branch is Luttrell’s first attempt to open a bank, but he’s already earned a reputation throughout Tarrant County for community service. As president of Leadership Arlington, he achieved the largest class in the organization’s history this year when 48 members were chosen to learn the inner workings of the Arlington community. “Jim has led it to levels we’ve been trying to get to for many years,” said Joe Bruner, a former Arlington city councilman and Leadership Arlington’s most senior member, in his nomination. Bruner also says Luttrell helped Leadership Arlington make progress in diversity issues and in establishing a better databasemanagement system. Luttrell also strengthened the organization’s youth leadership training program. Luttrell also serves on the directors’ board of Azleway Inc., a Tyler-based organization that provides housing, school and treatment options for children. He organized Azleway’s fund-raising golf tournaments and its gala dinner. “I loved kids and I want to see them succeed,” says Luttrell, who doesn’t have children of his own. “I want all the Azleway kids to understand that, even though they may not have a mother and father at home or, for some reason, they can’t live at home with their families, there is somebody who does care about them.” – Stephanie Patrick

Who has been your biggest influence?

My grandmother Adela Bookout
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Anywhere in Europe
Where did your first paycheck come from?

McGaw’s Exxon
Another profession you would like to try?

Acting
What was your favorite high school subject?

Lunch
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Dallas
What book would you recommend?

The Bible
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Hip-hip music

May 28, 2008

27

Ryan Matthews
The Staubach Co. associate

age

30
Austin

Hometown

Hof Tarrant County’s biggest land transactions, but Ryan

e handles multimillion-dollar deals and is involved with some

Matthews, an associate for The Staubach Co. in Fort Worth, knows what really drives the real estate industry. “Real estate is as much a people business, as it is finding the right property and crunching the numbers to make a deal work for both parties,” says Matthews, who has been with Staubach for five years and previously worked at Hillwood. “I like dealing with the people and it’s fun to have both sides, both parties, working together.” At only 30, his deals have included everything from a $60 million multitenant office-building disposition to a 25-acre land assemblage in west Fort Worth. And he’s earned recognition as one of Staubach’s top real estate rookies in Dallas-Fort Worth and a top producer in Fort Worth. Matthews credit some of his success to earning a law degree from Texas Wesleyan University. “It gave me a skill set that is beneficial in the commercial brokerage business and something that sets me apart from some of my peers,” says Matthews, who doesn’t practice law but is a member of the State Bar of Texas and the Texas Young Lawyers Association. He’s also earned the praise of his peers. Todd Burnette, executive vice president in Staubach’s Fort Worth office, says Matthews has learned the business quickly. “Not only does he have top real estate skills, with his law background, Ryan is able to guide clients through some of the hurdles that may arise and give them a comfort level that someone else could not provide,” Burnette says. The married father of two also is actively involved with Hearts and Hands Council, which benefits Cook Children’s Medical Center, and is involved with the Texas Christian University Alumni Association and Christ Chapel Bible Church. – Stephanie Patrick

Who has been your biggest influence?

My Dad, he exemplifies how to maintain a balanced life and to always be humble in your victories
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Vallecito Colorado (near Durango) where I can play golf, fly fish the San Juan River and Pine River, and Elk hunt in the San Juan National Forest
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Finish Line Car Wash on Bee Caves Road in Austin
Another profession you would like to try?

Commercial banker; another relationship oriented business that I would find intriguing because you can work with a broad range of industries.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The A-Team and MacGyver
What book would you recommend?

Any Legal Thriller by John Grisham, I don’t think he has written a bad book
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Blurting out bits of songs that I heard on the radio or TV a day or two earlier

28

May 28, 2008

Hunter T. McLean
Whitaker, Chalk, Swindle & Sawyer partner

age

39

Hometown

Fort Worth

LMcLean to a law career. But those around him say it’s his
strong sense of integrity and healthy doses of family and community values, which make him someone to admire. “He’s very active in Christ Chapel Church and is a deacon at the church,” says John Allen Chalk Sr., of the Fort Worth law firm Whitaker, Chalk, Swindle & Sawyer LLP. “Not only that, Hunter takes charge of a lot of our projects within the firm and has really taken the lead in developing better communication skills with clients.” McLean also is known for mentoring younger attorneys in his firm and, as an active partner, he’s established a thriving law and litigation practice involving business and employment issues, real estate, construction, oil and gas, and intellectual property cases. The American Arbitration Association recently honored McLean for his construction law experience. “I would like to be able to touch the lives of people in this community,” he says. “After you are through, dead and gone, the only lasting impact you have are the relationships and times with the people you come across; all the material things don’t matter.” A 2006 graduate of Leadership Fort Worth, McLean’s other community involvements include being a fellow of the Tarrant County Bar Foundation and the Texas Bar Foundation and serving as president of the Inwood Road Homeowners Association and the gas committee of Overton Park Neighborhood Association. But family is most important to McLean. “My kids are 9 and 5 and, while they are young and even all the way through into high school, my priority is to be a good father to them,” he says. “That’s hard to do because it takes a lot of time, but I want to invest that time.” – Stephanie Patrick

ike most lawyers, a strong sense of justice drew Hunter T.

Who has been your biggest influence?

My Father
Where is your dream vacation spot?

France with my wife
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Fort Worth Trap and Skeet Club in middle school
Another profession you would like to try?

Physician
What was your favorite high school subject?

Math
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Happy Days
What book would you recommend?

Wild At Heart by John Eldredge
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Playing old jazz records (vinyl)

May 28, 2008

29

Niraj Mehta
Associates of Internal Medicine internist Plaza Medical Center program director of internal medicine residency

age

33
Austin

Hometown

Whis immigrant parents, he says. It was in those lessons that

hile growing up, Dr. Niraj Mehta learned family values from

he developed a desire to dream and that helped shape his personal work ethic, Mehta says. Today, Mehta is a physician and community leader who uses his leadership, experiences, background, passions and strengths to help teach medical students and residents to improve our community. Part of his personal objectives includes providing internal medicine care as a primary care physician and to educate medical students and Internal Medicine residents in a hospital and ambulatory setting. Currently, Mehta is the program director of Internal Medicine at Plaza Medical Center. “He gives so much time and energy to the professional development of students, interns, residents and the internal medicine residency program at Plaza,” says Monica Mehta, who works at Texas Health Resources. “He will do what it takes to make his students and program successful – whether it is on the clock or not.” He is also proficient in the languages of Gujarati, Hindi and recently started a Spanish learning program. For a man whose life is dedicated to developing future doctors, his desires include nurturing and reaching more youth as a future ninth grade Biology teacher. “Their minds are still impressionable and their dreams haven’t been put on the back burner yet,” he said. A personal goal would be for him to explore becoming a boxing trainer, he says. “Only recently have I come to appreciate the stories, politics and culture of boxing,” Mehta says. “I’m hooked.” Someday, he hopes to find the time and energy to take a trip away from the day-to-day medical duties in Fort Worth and find a quiet spot down under in Australia. – Darwin Campbell

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents. Immigrant parents who sacrifice all they know to come over for the Dream — it helps instill a certain ethic.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Australia.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Garnett Lewis Cleaners — my parents’ dry cleaners in Austin
Another profession you would like to try?

Teaching ninth grade Biology or a boxing trainer
What was your favorite high school subject?

Math
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

MacGyver — The man could do anything with a paperclip and some dynamite.
What book would you recommend?

A New Earth by Ekhart Tolle. As its subtitle professes, if you allow it, it will help awaken your life’s purpose.
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Part Snoop Dogg; Part Garth Brooks

30

May 28, 2008

Mike Micallef
JMK Holdings Management Co. president

age

32

Hometown

Fort Worth

For Mike Micallef, life has been more than a dream or destination.
The Fort Worth native grew up on steady diet of history and parental values that helped him see the value of hard work at an early age, he says. His greatest influence came from his father, Al Micallef, who not only taught him a great deal about life but also encouraged him to mow lawns during the summer months, he says. Micallef later earned his first paycheck working for Texas Outdoors at the ripe age of 14. After graduating from Texas Christian University in 1999, Micallef spent two years at Tsunami Partners, a hedge fund where he managed various equity investments. He also spent two years in Chicago working in a turnaround situation at K&M Plastics, a plastics blow molding company mainly serving the water treatment and industrial equipment industries. Since June 2005, Mike has been president of JMK Holdings Management Co.’s four nonmanufacturing businesses, Reata Restaurant Group, Flight Services, Sierra La Rana and C F Ranch. “I nominated Mike because I have worked with and around the Micallef family for almost eight years and I’m very impressed with what he has been able to accomplish,” says Julie Hatch, who works at Creative Communications. “Mike looks for solutions whenever there are challenges, and when you run a four story restaurant that takes up a city block there are challenges.” As well as finding solutions, Hatch says Micallef is willing to take risks. For example, Reata taking over the Backstage Club at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo this year, she says. “The Backstage Club has been run by the same family for decades and that really took courage to take that on, but he is willing to do it,” Hatch says. However, despite his success, Micallef has not forgotten home. It is truly where his heart is. “Fort Worth is special,” he said. “The reason why Fort Worth is special is because it still feels like a small town where relationships are important.” – Darwin Campbell

Who has been your biggest influence?

My father – Al Micallef
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Fishing for Sailfish off of Guatemala or Panama
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Aside from mowing lawns, it was from Texas Outdoors during the summer when I was 14 and 15.
Another profession you would like to try?

Fishing Guide
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Seinfeld
What book would you recommend?

Charlie Goodnight, Cowman and Plainsman by J. Evetts Haley
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

I don’t really have one. I spend a lot of time driving and end up listening to XM, mainly ESPN Radio.

May 28, 2008

31

Colin L. Murchison
Jackson Walker associate

age

31

Hometown

Fort Worth

CJackson Walker LLP, but he also has a strong volunteer spirit

olin Murchison is making a name for himself as an attorney at

and genuine love and desire to improve lives and conditions in the community, says Jaymie Bell, who nominated Murchison. Murchison is a director on the American Red Cross Chisholm Trail Chapter, a director on the Tarrant County Adult Protective Services Community Board and a director on the Trinity Valley School Alumni Board. “Colin has been a tremendous asset to the American Red Cross Chisholm Trail Chapter and its lifesaving mission,” says Jason A. Smith, chief executive officer of the American Red Cross Chisholm Trail Chapter. “As a fund-raiser, working specifically with potential estate donors, and as an attorney, he’s brought energy, vision and a willingness to reach out on our behalf. His time and talent have made the local Red Cross stronger.” Much of what Murchison is today has come from a host of influences including his parents and what he learned early in life on his first job, he says. Murchison is also a member of the Tarrant County Probate Bar, the Tarrant County Young Lawyers Association and the State Bar of Texas. He is also certified by the State Bar of Texas as an Attorney Ad Litem and a Guardian Ad Litem. He has put all his knowledge from his law practice to work to help better the lives of the elderly and disabled persons with his service as a volunteer for the Tarrant County Adult Protective Services Community Board. Despite a demanding schedule, Murchison enjoys watching American Idol and dreams of cooking up special recipes as a chef. He also loves dove hunting, but his idea of a dream vacation is simply enjoying time on the family’s ranch in Coleman, Texas, with his wife and their two dogs. – Darwin Campbell

Who has been your biggest influence?

Without question, my parents.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

My family’s ranch in Coleman, Texas, with my wife and our two dogs.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My first paycheck came from Lee Todd when I spent a summer in high school working on his Beefmaster Cattle ranch.
Another profession you would like to try?

Chef.
What was your favorite high school subject?

Baseball — I was not very studious in high school!
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Bosom Buddies
What book would you recommend?

The Time it Never Rained by Elmer Kelton
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Not missing an episode of American Idol.

May 28, 2008

33

Jim Morse
Worthington National Bank senior vice president

age

39

Hometown

Brownfield, Texas

Conly hard-working, but is able – courtesy of his positive atti-

olleagues and business associates of Jim Morse say he is not

tude – to inspire others. Morse says his character and moral values were formed at an early age in Brownfield, Texas. “It is where I spent a good deal of early childhood and accepted Christ as my Savior,” he says. As he grew, he became involved with the jazz band in school. But it was his interest in finance that led him into the banking business after graduating from Trinity High School in Euless and Texas Tech University in Lubbock. Now at Worthington National Bank in Arlington, where he is senior vice president, Morse maintains his interest in music as president of Symphony Arlington. He is also a member of the Downtown Arlington Rotary Club and McKinney Bible Church. “Jim is the most hard-working and committed salesperson in the Worthington National Bank organization,” says nominators Jennifer Henderson and Kelly Shafer. “His positive attitude is contagious and his is actively involved in helping the community.” For his photo shoot, Morse chose a trumpet, a second degree black belt and a Spanish dictionary. He said the props reflected a lot of his current and past accomplishments, challenges, and hopes and communicates a positive message for generations to come. “These have been disciplines and passions that continually bring new ideas, possibilities and challenges for me – really without a quantifiable finish line or destination,” he said. “They are life-long pursuits. The more I learn, the more I realize the more there is to learn. They are an endless road of self-expression, creativity and learning that I’m slowly relinquishing the idea of mastering – just learning to savor the journey of being better today than I was yesterday and not compare myself with others.” – Darwin Campbell

Who has been your biggest influence?

Spiritually — Jesus Christ; Earthly — my grandparents, L.J. and Nora Richardson
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Lugano, Switzerland
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Six Flags Over Texas
Another profession you would like to try?

Independent record producer
What was your favorite high school subject?

Jazz band
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Highlander
What book would you recommend?

The Bible
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Any ballad by Luis Miguel or blues by John Coltrane

34

May 28, 2008

Stephanie Pratt
XTO Energy supervisor of acquisition technicians

age

33

Hometown

Eldon, Mo.

Xcians, loves every minute of the tense job she has.

TO Energy’s Stephanie Pratt, supervisor of acquisition techni-

In her position, Pratt and her team of eight research natural gas and oil wells, crunch the numbers and determine if a particular property is a good deal, or a bad deal, as a potential XTO purchase. “It’s kind of a like a rush,” Pratt says. “You’ve got a huge project, short timeframe, you work really hard and when it’s done you think, ‘Wow, we just purchased a million-dollar deal or a billiondollar deal.’ And it’s exciting.” Pratt has worked with the Fort Worth-based energy company for 10 years, having started as a production clerk before moving to acquisitions and quickly rising through the ranks to her current position. The Missouri-native hadn’t planned on her current career while at school in her home state, she says, “but it didn’t take long after coming here that I knew this is where I want to be. The company environment is beyond belief – it’s an amazing company.” For the past five years, Pratt has raised thousands of dollars annually for the American Heart Association, having raised more than $7,000 in 2005, when she says she was the No. 4 fund-raiser in Tarrant County. Pratt is also a board of directors member of the Fort Worth Desk and Derrick Club, an area chapter of the nationwide group that promotes the energy industry. Fellow XTO employee Tena Pruitt, who has worked with Pratt for more than five years, described her as “organized, professional and fun.” “I’ve been working with her for about five and half years and God, I can say a lot of great things about her,” says Pruitt, executive secretary to the executive vice president of acquisitions. “She and I are great friends but on as a business level we work great, too.” Pruitt says Pratt’s sense of organization is invaluable to her department, and Pratt implemented a bar-code system to ensure all records are accounted for – essential to a company that deals in billions of dollars worth of property and resources. – John-Laurent Tronche

Who has been your biggest influence?

My brother
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Destin, Fla.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Ozark Sun, a T-shirt shop at Lake of the Ozarks, Mo.
Another profession you would like to try?

Ice skating
What was your favorite high school subject?

Social Studies
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Beverly Hills 90210
What book would you recommend?

The Bible
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Old country, like Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash

May 28, 2008

35

Clare Pritchett
Fort Worth Museum of Science and History director of the capital campaign

age

37

Hometown

Fort Worth

Ctaking foreign trips and speaking to ambassadors to organizing trips
and events for 800 people. Pritchett worked for President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush for almost 10 years before moving back to her native Fort Worth. During her time at the White House, Pritchett was director of White House Visitors Office and director of First Lady Operations among other duties. “It was amazing, such an honor,” she says. “I started while he was governor, never knowing what kind of train I was getting on. It was probably people believing in me more than I believed in myself.” Currently, Pritchett is director of the capital campaign at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, which Pritchett says is similar to working for the Bush family. “I’m accustomed to working with high-profile people,” she says. “Now, instead of asking for peoples vote I’m asking for people’s funding.” She is also active with the Junior League and served on the Trinity Valley Alumni Board and is involved with the Kappa Alpha Theta Foundation of Fort Worth Executive Committee to raise money for Court Appointed Special Advocates of Tarrant County. Pritchett has also been a volunteer with the I Have A Dream Foundation to bring a national author to its Reading Rocks event. It all boils down to believing in the job or cause you are doing, Pritchett says. Being organized, setting goals and making things move forward it what she says makes her a successful person. “What I would hope people would say about me is that I’m a hard worker, a quiet leader and fairly humble,” she says. “I’m usually in the background and prefer it that way, but it is nice to be recognized sometimes.” Pritchett says growing up in a home with six siblings taught her to “quietly get things done, work well with people and always have a cooperative spirit.” “We certainly learned to work together and share,” Pritchett says. “The first time I was ever by myself with my parents was when they were driving me to college.” – Crystal Forester

lare Pritchett has had many remarkable experiences in her life from

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents and six siblings
Where is your dream vacation spot?

82 degrees under a shady tree on a lounge chair
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Kimbell Museum selling tickets for the Courtauld impressionist show
Another profession you would like to try?

Something related to homes or gardens
What was your favorite high school subject?

French
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Bewitched
What book would you recommend?

Same Kind of Different as Me by Denver Moore and Ron Hall — my copy is with a friend right now
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Bee Gees

36

May 28, 2008

Susan Roberts
Sanford, Baumeister, & Frazier PLLC partner

age

38

Hometown

Abilene

Spublic accountant is also licensed to drive a motorcycle. She

usan Roberts is not your traditional tax adviser. This certified

and husband, Jay, share their Harley Davidson, and when she’s not working her adding machine, you may find her on the open road. As a tax partner with Sanford, Baumeister and Frasier, Roberts helps high-net-worth individuals and businesses with effective tax planning. Roberts’ jovial personality has also led her to marketing her firm’s services to new clients. She says she finds her work extremely fulfilling. “You can make it what you want it to be,” Roberts says. “It’s a field that can be extremely flexible.” In nominating Roberts, Bryan Thomas of OmniAmerican Bank praised her love of teaching people. It should be no surprise that one of Roberts’ volunteer roles involved teaching a parenting skills curriculum for the Parenting Center to parents who were court-mandated to attend classes. “This was before I had kids,” Roberts says. “But I use a lot of what I learned with my children Molly and George, and it works.” Roberts is active in the Women’s Chamber of Commerce and the Fort Worth chapter of the Texas State Society of CPAs, which honored her in 2006 as the Young CPA of the Year. Roberts says her choice of three unusual props showcase different facets of her life. “My grandfather used this adding machine in his grocery store in the early 1900s,” she says. “It’s now in my office, as a symbol of my career.” The sea shells represent her love of the beach and the ocean. The “laughter in a can,” she says, reflects her personality. “Ask anyone in my office, and they’ll tell you that I laugh loudly, and often,” Roberts says. “Laughter is the remedy to just about anything in life.” – Laurie Barker James

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents, Herman & Norma Schaffer – married for 45 years, they enforced educational principles, instilled morals and taught me my work ethic
Where is your dream vacation spot?

The white sand beaches on the island of Roatan, part of Honduras. We also look forward to diving the Great Barrier Reef someday
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Taylor Medical Supply, in Abilene, Texas, where I served as a delivery girl and a sales clerk
Another profession you would like to try?

I would follow in my father’s footsteps and go into medicine. I would also enjoy the most challenging and rewarding career of all, that of a “stay at home mother.”
What was your favorite high school subject?

Mi clase favorito en esquela secondaria fue Español.
What book would you recommend?

The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko or Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Shhh- it’s anything from the 80s

May 28, 2008

37

Cathy Reagan Sheffield
Harris Methodist Health Foundation director of finance and gift planning

age

38

Hometown

Mandan, N.D.

Cmost people still have an hour before their alarm rings. Her sunny
morning nature has been a gain for the Optimist Club, one of Sheffield’s long-time volunteer commitments. The Fort Worth Aerospace Optimist Club convenes early in the mornings, Sheffield’s favorite time for a meeting. “They do a lot of good work in our community” she says. “Their national philanthropy is childhood cancer.” Sheffield’s volunteer work focuses on organizations helping children. She is on the board of Camp Sanguinity, a summer camp for children with cancer and blood disorders. “My husband Scott and I serve as counselors for the week-long camp, held near Meridian, Texas,” she says. The camp allows medically fragile kids to have a “regular” summer camp experience. Ann Clinkscales, who nominated Sheffield, says Sheffield’s volunteer activities extend beyond assisting local children’s charities. “She also devotes her time to mentoring fund-raising professionals and speaking at fund-raising programs nationwide,” says Clinkscales, who works at Clinkscales Consulting. Sheffield works with the Harris Methodist family of hospitals. She says she’s honored to work with people who choose to support the mission of the hospitals by including the Harris Methodist Health Foundation in their estate plans. “The people who make planned gifts have made Harris Methodist a part of their family,” she says. “God has blessed me with a rewarding career that allows me to work with generous people who are committed to improving the lives of others and our community.” Raised in North Dakota, Sheffield says she loves living in Fort Worth. “North Dakota was a great place to grow up, and working in Washington, D.C., brought me some once-in-a-lifetime opportunities,” she says. “But since moving to Fort Worth 11 years ago, I have developed amazing friendships with people throughout the community.” – Laurie Barker James

athy Sheffield is a morning person, who’s up and running when

Who has been your biggest influence?

My maternal grandparents, who taught me the value of faith and inspired me with their unconditional love and commitment to each other.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

A Holy Land tour of Israel, Jordan and Egypt
Where did your first paycheck come from?

I was the NBC Peacock mascot for a local affiliate station in North Dakota
Another profession you would like to try?

Restaurateur/chef
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Miami Vice
What book would you recommend?

The Bible, Night by Elie Wiesel and Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall and Denver Moore
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Meat Loaf (the singer, of course!)

38

May 28, 2008

Colby Siratt
Montserrat, WDS Partners and Innovative Intermodal partner

age

32

Hometown

Bedford/Colleyville

Cbut when they came to him in 2001 with their start-up practice, he left a position at Ernst and Young to do the financial paper work for the Siratt family’s real estate practice, Montserrat, and freight company, WDS. “I was really enjoying what I was doing, but then my family started asking me to come over and needed more help with the business,” Siratt says. “So I left to come here (with the family) and I haven’t regretted it since.” Working at the family businesses gave Siratt more flexibility in his job, he says, he was able to stay close to home with his wife, who was pregnant with twins at the time. As a certified public accountant, Siratt says he enjoys doing the “boring work,” such as reading over spreadsheets and compiling financial paperwork. Siratt says he’s a piece of the business puzzle at his family’s practices. Each has their own role and according to Siratt, each member manages to see eye-to-eye on most decisions while not interfering with each other’s duties. “I think they see me as the person that taps the brakes – they’ll get really excited about an idea and all gung-ho about it and I’m the one to say, ‘Well, let’s step back and look at it from different angles,’” Siratt says. “I guess that’s very accounting-like.” Choosing to work with his family is one of the best decisions Siratt’s made in life, he says. Though he’s sure at some point growing up his brother used to “torture” him, Siratt says he’s enjoyed being with his siblings and parents on and off the jobsite. – Sarah Mason

olby Siratt didn’t originally intend to work with the family –

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Australia or New Zealand
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My dad
Another profession you would like to try?

Food and wine critic
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

The A-Team
What book would you recommend?

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Flight of the Conchords

May 28, 2008

39

Donnie Siratt
Montserrat, WDS Partners and Innovative Intermodal partner

age

38

Hometown

Fort Worth

ASiratt is no exception. Straitt joined forces with his father Don

s a member of what he calls an entrepreneurial family, Donnie

Siratt after college to manage WDS Partners, a Xerox equipment delivery company. The family later sold the company in 1997, a move which left Donnie Siratt in the dark, wondering where his next paycheck was going to come from. “When we first sold the trucking company, we were all nervous, but also had the feeling – ‘Well, no problem, we’ll just go start another company with each other,’” Siratt says. It wasn’t long before the family banded together again on another business venture, selling and developing pieces of property in Parker County called Covered Bridge Canyon. Following soon after that was a gated community on the edge of Fort Worth, Montserrat. It was natural for the family to work together again, Siratt says. Siratt spearheaded the business, learning what he could about developing and real estate from friends after he earned a Realtor’s license, he says. Starting a real estate business wasn’t like work originally, Siratt says, it was something he and his family wanted to do for and with each other. “We really planned and developed it around what we wanted,” Siratt says. “We weren’t sure what the demand was going to be for what we were doing, but it turned out it was what everyone else wanted – it just took off.” With houses sprouting up like daisies, the Siratts were so successful they purchased 70 more acres off the Montserrat neighborhood, on which Siratt looks forward to seeing more houses and families join the community. Construction couldn’t contain the Siratts however. Shortly after the Covered Bridge Canyon project started, the Siratts established WDS Logistics, a regional version of WDS, delivering Xerox and specialty electric equipment. The family also started Innovative Intermodal, a railway cargo container company – which was a logical step, Siratt says, as WDS required special carrying cases for shipping. As a father of three, Siratt looks forward to passing on the family tradition of entrepreneurship and watching his children realize and work on their passions. – Sarah Mason

Who has been your biggest influence?

My dad
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Australia
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Gymnastics coach at YMCA
Another profession you would like to try?

Sports Illustrated swimsuit photographer
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Gilligan’s Island
What book would you recommend?

Twelve Mighty Orphans: The Inspiring True Story of the Mighty Mites Who Ruled Texas Football by Jim Dent
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Broadway show tunes

40

May 28, 2008

Marc Sloter
Merrill Lynch Fort Worth financial adviser

age

37

Hometown

San Antonio

MEl Congregation. Growing up in San Antonio, Sloter says his

arc Sloter is the youngest president ever at Fort Worth’s Beth-

relatives were active in their synagogues. “Temple was a big part of my life growing up,” he says. “The presidency was something I aspired to, but not necessarily at age 37.” Richard Minker, Beth-El’s past president, says, “Marc epitomizes what 40 Under 40 is about: being successful in your career, being an exemplary family person, while giving back to your community.” As a financial adviser at Merrill Lynch, Sloter helps individuals develop a portfolio that meets their long-term financial goals. And his abilities as a banker led to one of his most satisfying volunteer roles. “I spent seven years on the Women’s Haven Board,” he says. The organization asked him to be part of the year-long process that ultimately merged the Women’s Haven and The Women’s Shelter of Arlington into SafeHaven. Much of Sloter’s volunteerism revolves around children and families. This includes his work with SafeHaven, Beth-El Congregation and Big Brothers, Big Sisters, where he and wife Jude mentored a brother-and-sister pair. “I want to share the opportunities I have been given in my life, and help others realize the opportunities available to them,” he says. Sloter chose a camera as his prop because of his love of photography. He’s not behind his camera as much these days, but Sloter says his passion for photos dates back to his teens. “I turned a closet into a darkroom when I was in middle school,” he says. As for his personal and professional success, Sloter credits his supportive family, which includes children Mollie, Caroline and Stewart. “With my busy work and volunteer schedule, I don’t see my family as often as I’d like,” says Sloter. “But I cherish my time with them.” –– Laurie Barker James

Who has been your biggest influence?

No one person. I’ve learned from so many including my parents, grandparents, children, brother, bosses, clients, friends and of course my wife, Jude
Where is your dream vacation spot?

A Las Vegas where I have the advantage – I love the lights, sounds and excitement
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Three T Company – I packaged office furniture for a whole summer in a warehouse without air conditioning
Another profession you would like to try?

Portrait photographer
What was your favorite high school subject?

Trigonometry
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

M*A*S*H
What book would you recommend?

I Knew You Could by Craig Dorfman
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

I still enjoy my heavy metal from the 80s

May 28, 2008

41

Yi-Jiun Su
University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of physics

age

39

Hometown

Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Mnomenon. Physics professor Yi-Jin Su, who researches auroras

ost people see the Aurora Borealis as a mysterious cosmic phe-

like the “Northern Lights,” has a far more down-to-earth take on the light displays. Auroras are simply produced by the collision of charged particles. “We know that the particles originated from the sun, and were attracted to the latitudes in the polar regions,” she says. Su specializes in space science and auroral physics. As a woman in the traditionally male field of physics, she’s faced her share of obstacles. Su’s undergraduate teacher told her that he thought “girls were stupid,” she says. When she did well on her work, he accused her of cheating. But she says these obstacles made more determined to succeed. “I should thank the professor who discriminated against me,” Su says. “He made me work much harder.” She came to the United States in 1994 to attend graduate school in Alabama. There, she met her husband, Ron Caton. “Fortunately, or unfortunately, he’s also a physicist,” she says. The couple celebrates their sixth anniversary this year. Su is an expert on a subject that boggles the average Texan. To encourage the general public’s interest in auroral physics, Su volunteered to speak at the opening of University of Texas at Arlington’s Planetarium. Additionally, she speaks to young women about the excitement she finds in the field of science. “Recently, I spoke with a class for gifted female students, encouraging them to pursue higher education in science,” she says. Su is simply repaying the favor done for her by another influential woman, professor Ling-Hsiao Lyu, whom Su met at Taiwan’s National Central University. “She told me to improve my English,” Su says. “International conferences and communications within the field of space physics are always in English, and she told me to improve my skills to be successful.” – Laurie Barker James

Who has been your biggest influence?

Professor Ling-Hsiao Lyu at National Central University in Taiwan
Where is your dream vacation spot?

I’ve been fortunate to travel to some pretty nice places, but I don’t think I’ve found my “dream vacation spot” yet
Where did your first paycheck come from?

As a graduate research assistant at National Central University in Taiwan
Another profession you would like to try?

I always enjoy learning new things, but I can’t think of any profession better suited to me than research scientist
What was your favorite high school subject?

Mathematics
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

A Japanese cartoon named Candy-Candy, the story of an optimistic girl who grew up in an orphanage. She tried to make everyone around her happy, no matter how terrible the circumstances
What book would you recommend?

Other than professional reading, I have enjoyed the Chinese martial arts novels by Jin Yong. I recommend his novels to western readers who would enjoy learning about Chinese culture.
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

I enjoy singing 70s-90s Taiwanese pop songs when no one is around

42

May 28, 2008

Grace Taylor
Helen Painter Group, Realtors realtor, associate

age

25

Hometown

Fort Worth

GPainter, is a fourth-generation real estate agent. Surprisingly, it’s

race Taylor, great-granddaughter of local real estate legend Helen

not a career that Taylor expected. “I worked for the company in high school as an administrative assistant, and it was my favorite job,” Taylor says. “I got into real estate not knowing what to expect, and it’s been the best thing for me.” In 2008, the Helen Painter Group celebrates its 50th year in business. Lara Conn, who works for Commerce Title/Hal Swell Fee Attorney and nominated Taylor, says she was the youngest person to receive one of the company’s Top Producer awards. But for Taylor, customer service, not total sales, is most important. “Helen Painter was known for her commitment to customer service,” she says. “I try to uphold her reputation of impeccable integrity.” Taylor is involved in several community organizations, including Fort Worth Vision and the Junior League. “The Junior League contributes to the bigger picture in Fort Worth,” Taylor says. “They impact organizations and lives which I had no idea about until I became a member.” While it seems unusual for someone to recognize two sets of parents, Taylor, whose parents are divorced, sees her nontraditional family as a blessing. “All four parents are unparalleled in character and they’ve each had a unique influence on me,” she says. Taylor calls her dad “the greatest man alive.” “I have his business sense and his crazy sense of humor,” she says. She calls her mom “incredible” and says that “she taught me to be open-minded about life.” As far as her step-parents go, she is a big fan of both. “My dad’s wife, Cathy, is the definition of class, and she’s been the most amazing person to learn from,” Taylor says. “My mom’s partner of 16 years, Kathy, is always a voice of reason. I am so fortunate to have her in my life.” – Laurie Barker James

Who has been your biggest influence?

My parents – all four of them
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Anywhere I can get lost in the culture, walk safely around alone, and meet new people.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My first actual paycheck came from the tanning salon where I worked at age 14 in San Diego.
Another profession you would like to try?

I’ve always loved acting, but could never bring myself to be a “starving actress” going from audition to audition.
What was your favorite high school subject?

Speech, though I would have rather been playing volleyball or running track.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

America’s Funniest Home Videos
What book would you recommend?

The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman – It really teaches you a lot about the relationships you have with the people around you.
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Buena Vista Social Club.....I love Cuban music!

May 28, 2008

43

Greg Trevino
Texas Christian University director of Inclusiveness and Intercultural Services

age

34

Hometown

Corpus Christi

AChristian University, a member of TCU’s Hispanic Alumni

s a director of Inclusiveness and Intercultural Services at Texas

Association, supporter of Rose Marine Theater and manager of Idea Consulting, almost every minute of Gary Trevino’s day is dedicated to understating cultural diversity. Even leisure activities involve culture appreciation; one of Trevino’s favorite books touches on the theme of immigration and when Trevino plans a trip abroad, he’s often accompanied by peers or students as part of a cultural diversity leadership excursion. “Some of this is part of my job, but when you’re able to find things you love to do and surround yourself with people who have a positive influence on you it makes it easy,” Trevino says. “It’s not as overwhelming as you might think.” Trevino’s department schedules international trips, seminars on the TCU campus and social events that encourage intercultural communication. The key is to start the discussion now, Trevino says, so students understand and know how to work around differences with their peers before they step into the workplace. “In addition to helping the students there is also promoting inclusion locally,” Trevino says. “To make not only TCU but the entire Fort Worth community more culturally accepting is important – it’s something I try to strive for in my daily life and in my job.” Trevino says he fell into the position of director, as he was recommended to the job while he worked in TCU’s Advancement Office. Though it was a life change Trevino hadn’t expected, his job has become a life passion. “Now I just can’t see myself doing another thing,” Trevino says and laughed, “except of course being a front man to a band.” Throughout the six years he’s served in Intercultural Services, Trevino noticed a change in the student body. “We didn’t challenge things too much; we know that things were done in a certain way and that’s what we went on,” Trevino says. “This generation asks ‘why is that how we do that?’” Trevino, excited by the inquisitive mind of the Millennial’s, says he looks forward to working with this new group and helping them reach their positive potential. – Sarah Mason

Who has been your biggest influence?

Dr. Cornell Thomas
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Cinque Terre, Italy
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Corpus Christi National Bank
Another profession you would like to try?

Lead singer in a rock bank
What was your favorite high school subject?

History
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Miami Vice
What book would you recommend?

Rain of Gold by Victor Villaseño
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Pop songs – Justin Timberlake

44

May 28, 2008

Rick Wegman
HGC Real Estate Services partner

age

36

Hometown

Stuart, Fla.

Rick Wegman could easily be described as a renaissance man.
In his adulthood, the 36-year-old Texas Christian University graduate has been a clinical psychologist, a co-owner of a shoe store and a self-described “unimpressive but lucrative” Hollywood actor. But, as a partner in HGC Real Estate Services LLC, he is greatly impacting the Tarrant County housing market. He and John Giordano lead the full-service real estate agency which began as a way to market HGC Residential Development’s custom homes, and Chamberlain Heights, the company’s 23-unit town home development. Wegman also is a partner in C.W.I, the group’s latest venture, which is an interior design/decorating company. “Our company is in the busiest time we’ve ever had,” says Wegman, who also is a former top producer for Coldwell Banker. “By the grace of God, and the Barnett Shale, it will continue expanding.” If it does, the credit will go to Wegman, whom business partner Rob Cocanower calls a “sales machine.” “I’ve never seen anyone who can put so much energy into what he’s doing,” Cocanower says. “He can do anything and always does it well. “It’s a travesty that he hasn’t been named a 40 Under 40 before.” Wegman says he simply has a passion for real estate. “I love that there is a lot of emotion involved,” Wegman says, who also is president of Monticello Neighborhood Association. “I love seeing a project to completion and it’s a lot of fun to see people making their homeownership dreams come true.” His current community involvements also include the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity Alumni Board of Directors, annual support of the Fort Worth Zoo and TCU. He’s previously participated on the Directors Council of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. – Stephanie Patrick

Who has been your biggest influence?

My son
Where is your dream vacation spot?

St. Barts
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Assistant to the assistant to the assistant greens keeper at a golf course
Another profession you would like to try?

Musician. Although I have no talent for it
What was your favorite high school subject?

Acting
What was your favorite show growing up?

Monday Night Football
What book would you recommend?

The Prophet
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

80s metal

May 28, 2008

45

46

May 28, 2008

Mindia Whittier
Concussion senior account executive

age

33

Hometown

Amarillo

Ming a positive impact on all she comes in contact with, she says.

india Whittier not only loves life but believes in living it and mak-

Those who know Whittier praised her as a great ambassador for Concussion, where she is a senior account executive, because of her outstanding character and strong work ethic. Amy Yanez, who also works at Concussion and nominated Whittier, describes her as a “Superwoman.” “Mindia has proven herself over and over again since she was 19 years old and worked at the Fort Worth Zoo,” Yanez says. “Even at the age of 19, her work ethic was impeccable. Not only is she one of the smartest women I know, but she is easy to work with and an excellent manager of people.” Whittier has worked as a marketing professional for 14 years with senior-level experience in corporate and nonprofit environments. At the Fort Worth Zoo she spearheaded multiple award-winning advertising campaigns and met annual fund-raising goals of $1.5 million, she says. She holds a bachelor’s degree in advertising and public relations from Texas Christian University, and a master’s degree in strategic communication and leadership from Seton Hall. Whittier’s avocation is raising her 3-year-old son and supporting child-centered issues. She is currently the board president of Alliance for Children, an agency that provides hope and healing to Tarrant County’s child abuse victims. She also serves on the board of the Back to School Roundup, which equips low-income children with essential supplies to succeed in the classroom. In her off time, she is a competitive cyclist and trail runner for Broken Films Racing. She was ranked fourth overall for category in the 2007 Texas Mountain Bike State Championship Series, and she has completed four half-marathons. “It helps me recharge mentally so I have more to give as an employee, a wife and a mom,” Whittier says. “I race with my best friends, so I get exercise and girlfriend therapy in one. Best of all, it’s a form of training I can do without sacrificing time with my son.” – Darwin Campbell

Who has been your biggest influence?

My grandmother. She was a strong person, independent and very active – especially outdoors. Her actions inspired me to become engaged in organizations where I can advocate on behalf of children.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Crested Butte, Colo. – Trail 401 is the ultimate single-track.
Where did your first paycheck come from?

My first real paycheck was from the Fort Worth Zoo.
Another profession you would like to try?

There’s so many. Professional mountain biker. Chef. Columnist. Organic gardener. Motivational speaker. Billionaire philanthropist.
What was your favorite high school subject?

My favorite subject was English. I was also on the debate team and copy editor of my high school paper.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

I can’t believe I’m admitting this, but it was Facts of Life. I related to the character Natalie. She had a healthy self-image and wanted to be a writer.
What book would you recommend?

Same Kind of Different as Me by Denver Moore and Ron Hall
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

Electronic dance music

May 28, 2008

47

Chris Wilkie
First Command Educational Foundation deputy executive director

age

29

Hometown

Fort Worth

Cative streak.” The 29-year old completed his doctorate at age 24,

hris Wilkie is described as a “multitalented, multitasker with a cre-

and his diverse career has taken him from the field of public health to the world of financial literacy. Wilkie is currently the deputy executive director of First Command Educational Foundation. According to Bill Stringer, who nominated him, Wilkie has “given more time, effort and skill to North Texas than men twice his age.” As the “second in command” at FCEF, Wilkie oversees daily operations and managing scholarship distribution, educational programming and development efforts. FCEF educates 4,000 individuals annually and awards $230,000 in scholarships. Additionally, Wilkie is the CEO of Results Consulting, which assists nonprofits with technical assessment issues, strategy and grant writing. Wilkie’s commitment to the community also extends to his volunteer activities. “It’s essential for each of us to be involved in our communities,” he says. “If everyone did a small part, we could accomplish so much for others.” A member of the External Grievance Committee for the Tarrant County HIV Administrative Agency, Wilkie is also active in the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce and serves as a guest lecturer for local universities, colleges and nonprofits. According to Wilkie, his grandfather’s spirit is his life’s guiding force. “His image can be found in everything I do,” he says. “I’m trying to balance a successful career in today’s cut-throat business world with gentle dedication to my spouse, Christina, and my little girl, Mayson. It’s the yin-yang reality of my existence.” As for his choice of reading material, Wilkie says the “simple truths” of Dr. Seuss are something that’s “missing in many households across America.” “Oh the Places You’ll Go! teaches all the life lessons you will need to succeed both personally and professionally in today’s world,” he says. – Laurie Barker James

Who has been your biggest influence?

My grandfather, William Tom Carter, passed when I was a young boy. I have memories of him but it is really the “image” of him – a strong, independent, successful man dedicated to his family.
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Antarctica
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Eckerd’s Pharmacy – as a pharmaceutical technician
Another profession you would like to try?

Lawyer – I love a solid, healthy debate.
What was your favorite high school subject?

Anatomy and Physiology - unless athletics counts.
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Tom and Jerry – I loved my weekend morning cartoons because I played soccer as a child and had little time in the evenings for TV.
What book would you recommend?

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss
Musical guilty pleasure:

100 percent driven by mood – for production at work it’s opera; at night for the baby it’s Patsy Cline’s Walking After Midnight

May 28, 2008

49

Randy Woods
Jefferson Bank Fort Worth bank president

age

37

Hometown

Burleson

DTexas, he and his father-in-law often discussed his career path.
His father-in-law, a banker, was a big influence on him, Woods says. Just out of college, Woods got his first job at a finance company doing consumer work, and he says he didn’t like it as much as he thought he would. “I consider myself a numbers person, and I’ve always been interested in finance. The thing I like about banking is it’s a mix of finance and sales,” Woods says. “My father-in-law was a banker, and I found the whole finance side of it very intriguing.” Woods, formerly of PlainsCapital Bank, is now president of the Fort Worth banking center of Jefferson Bank and has moved into a role he enjoys more and wants to continue in his career by building relationships in Tarrant County and expanding the core base of business at his bank. “I think he took over president of our Fort Worth bank a year ago and has done a masterful job of hiring a really strong team, of capturing new customers, and one year into this his bank is making about $100,000 a month,” says Mark Warren, president and CEO of Jefferson Bank. “He turned [Jefferson Bank] into a profitable operation with good size really quickly.” On a day-to-day basis, Woods focuses on loaning money to middle-market businesses in Fort Worth. The businesses usually focus on distribution, processing and different types of real estate. Woods also works on generating deposits at the bank and spends time calling on existing customers and meeting with new or potential customers. While competition is a challenge considering the growing number of banks in Fort Worth and Tarrant County, Woods hopes to continue reaping the rewards of his job, one of which, he says, is watching local businesses grow and expand. – Leslie Wimmer

uring Randy Woods’ first years at the University of North

Who has been the biggest influence in your life?

God
Where is your dream vacation spot?

Maui, Hawaii
Where did your first paycheck come from?

Payless Cashways, a lumber company
What is another profession you would like to try?

Fishing guide
What was your favorite high school subject?

Economics
What was your favorite TV show growing up?

Miami Vice
What book would you recommend?

A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton G. Malkie
What is your musical guilty pleasure?

To attend small concerts, country music

50

May 28, 2008

Tim Love
The Fort Worth Business Press would like to thank Chef Tim Love for providing the hors d’oeuvres for the 40 Under 40 pre-party at Neiman Marcus. Love is the owner of The Lonesome Dove Western Bistro, which opened in 2000 in the Fort Worth Stockyards. According to the restaurant’s Web site it has “a menu influenced by all of the ingredients and cultures that have been a part of the West since the first adventure began on the Goodnight-Loving and Chisholm Trails – with an added level of modern sophistication.” The foundation of Love’s food is steak and wild game, including Texas steer, buffalo, antelope, red deer and wild boar. In April 2007, Love opened The Love Shack, serving hamburgers, sausages, fries and onion rings in a casual setting. He has been featured on the Food Network’s Iron Chef America and Challenge: Hawaiian Luau Beach BBQ.

Jefferson Bank
congratulates 40 under 40 honoree

Randy Woods,
Fort Worth Bank President

MEMBER

Jefferson Bank 100 East 15th St, Suite 120 817-338-7309 Fort Worth, TX 76102 www.jeffersonbanktexas.com

Congratulations to all the 2008 40 Under 40 honorees from your friends at Coors

Pre-Party

1

2

The Fort Worth Business Press hosted a pre-party celebrating the 40 Under 40 recipients at Neiman Marcus.
1 Cathy R. Sheffield and Scott Sheffield 2 Sunny Drenik and Greg Jaryga 3 Lauren Matthews and Ryan Matthews

3

4

4 Jocelyn Foster, Grace Taylor and Lara Conn 5 Jennifer Fackel and Joe Fackel 6 Norma Schaffer and Susan Roberts 7 Chris Wilkie and Christina Wilkie 8 Linley Dincan and Mark Duncan

5

6

Photos by Glenn Killman

7

8
May 28, 2008

53

Props
Adam Blake p4 A banner from the TCU Entrepreneurship Program. “I learned a lot through the Entrepreneurship Program that has helped build my business.” Ethan Boothe p5 His great-grandfather would wear this Stetson hat on nice occasions, and Boothe said it reminded him of his heritage and their way of life. “Character was always such a big deal to them, and I think it’s because everything was so hard up there, you had to rely on other people.” Brandon Brewer p6 “A picture of my three perfect and miraculous boys, all born within 15 months of one another. Yes, my wife an exhausted saint. A bike because not only is cycling fun, but riding has meant freedom to me since I was a kid. And a Texas Tech shirt. I’m a long suffering fan who wears my Red Raider heart on my sleeve, or in this case, my chest.” Anthony Burks p7 He chose to bring a hard-hat and blueprints because it represents his company as well as his desire to develop and construct people’s lives in a positive way. S. Benton Cantey V p9 He brought a needlepoint Auburn University pillow that his mother made for him because “I am an avid fan of Auburn University football.” Kelly Campbell p10 “My prop revolved around art, which I am an avid collector. It included my first piece of original art that I purchased at Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival several years ago. I also had a book about one of my favorite artists Ellsworth Kelly.” Melissa Cawyer p11 She chose her props to depict the balance of family, work and extra curricular activities. Sunny Drenik p13 She brought a driver from her golf club collection. “I live, breath and die by golf. Golf's really the only sport in my mind.” Mark Dungan p15 The photo of a child with cancer represents the work Mark Dugan does to advance cancer research at the Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation as well as his family’s personal encounter with neuroblastoma. “About five years ago my daughter was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, and that changes your life pretty drastically. . . . I’ve got the best job in the world now.” Joe Fackel p16 The University of Missouri is Joe Fackel’s alma mater and he is excited the school’s emergence as a legitimate contender for the Big 12 football championship. Plus he met his wife there, he adds. Alyson Farmer p17 The album was a family favorite growing up, and the song “Christmas Carol” taught the importance of giving without expecting recognition, says Alyson Farmer. Neil Foster p18 He chose to bring a large pencil because it represents writing, which is "what I enjoy most about my job." Caroline Gary p19 She is a soprano in the Mount Olive Baptist Church Senior Choir therefore chose to use her choir robe and hymnal. “I am a lover of music, all music, however, gospel music gives me the most comfort, peace and rejuvenation, which I need often to uplift me following my most difficult day in my line of work,” she says. Caroline Harrison p20 Although Caroline Harrison’s home is now in Tarrant County, her football loyalties still lie in the San Francisco Bay area that she grew up in. Therefore, she brought a San Franscisco 49ers football helmet. Dak Hatfield p21 He chose a globe because he says he loves to travel and believes every corner of the earth has much to offer in life, and all should seek knowledge outside of their immediate influences. Jennifer Henderson p22 She says she has a love-hate relationship with tennis, and although she seems to always get hurt, she gets right back out there and keeps playing. Ben King p23 He chose his golf bag and golf clubs for the history associated with his company’s origins — with the golf industry, he says. Gary Lewis p24 He chose his soccer jersey and gear because he loves to play soccer as a keeper and he loves the US team. Jim Luttrell p27 He chose to use building plans, a hammer and tape measure because he says, “you need the right plan and the right tools to be successful.” Ryan Matthews p28 “I picked a TCU Football hat as my photo prop because I bleed Purple.” Niraj Mehta p30 Dr. Mehta chose a tennis racquet because he says he has played since middle school, it's a great stress reliever and he enjoys the game. Hunter T. McLean p29 “Duck hunting has been a passion of mine for a long time,” says Hunter McLean. “I never grow tired of it. It is a challenging sport and one that you can enjoy with friends. Each time you learn something new, something you could have done better. You also get to do it in some of the most beautiful settings. There is nothing like watching the sun rise over water with whistling wings overhead.” Mike Micallef p31 Mike Micallef used a rope as a prop. “Its significance for me is that the English translation for Reata is a rope or lariat,” he says. “I also compete in some team roping but not actively.” Colin L. Murchison p33 “I enjoy all hunting seasons but there is nothing that beats those first few weekends of dove season in Texas,” Colin Murchison says. “It is never really the hunting that I look forward to but it is the cooking, college football, card playing and camaraderie that goes on when the dove aren’t flying that makes it one of the best weekends of the year.” Jim Morse p34 He used a trumpet, second degree black belt and a Spanish dictionary for his prop. Stephanie Pratt p35 She brought a motorcycle helmet “because I grew up watching my brother and father race motorcycles, and now my eldest son is beginning to race,” she says. Clare Pritchett p36 She brought Legorreta + Legorreta, a book about the architects for the new Fort Worth Museum of Science and History building. “My job is raising money for the new building so that is my life right now,” she says. Susan Roberts p37 “I chose an antique adding machine, sea shells and ‘laughter in a can,’ which represent my professional self, my leisurely self and my personality,” says Susan Roberts. Cathy Reagan Sheffield p38 She chose to use her luggage and passport. “I love to travel,” she says. Donnie Siratt p39 He brought a photo of his children. “The most important thing in my life is my family, and particularly my kids now – that’s what we do everything for,” he says. Colby Siratt p40 He chose to use three stuffed animals named Boo (the bear), Ducky and Blankie. “They’re the animals that my kids sleep with every night,” Siratt says. “It represents our kids and our time together as a family – night is our special time together.” Marc Sloter p41 He chose to use a camera for his photo shoot. “Cameras have been a big part of my life since I was a child,” he says. Yi-Juin Su p42 She chose to bring auroral posters as her prop. “The auroral posters represent my research work,” she says Grace Taylor p43 She brought a pineapple as her prop. “The Pineapple is the international symbol for home, hearth and hospitality – and it’s also our company logo,” she says. Greg Trevino p44 “The props I brought were a golf club with my TCU Horned Frog head cover and my iPod,” Greg Trevino says. “I’m an introvert so after going through a day full of meetings, events or other things that have me running around it’s nice to look forward to a relaxing time on the golf course or listening to my music to recharge my batteries. Plus music helps motivate or inspire me with my work and personal life so I always seem to carry my iPod with me.” Rick Wegman p45 He brought his 8-month-old son, Jack, because he is the most important thing in the world to Wegman, he says. Mindia Whittier p47 She chose to use running shoes and a jogging stroller in her photo. “Running literally supports every area of my life,” she says. “Pushing the jogging stroller is a great example of how to balance work and home with multitasking because the extra resistance even counts as an endurance workout.” Chris Wilkie p49 “Mayson’s favorite toy (the Fisher-Price Baby Grand Piano) meets my work life; it’s all about creating balance and sanity,” says Chris Wilkie. Randy Woods p50 He chose to bring a golf club “because I really enjoy playing golf,” he says.