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School of Fish

School of Fish

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Published by Kids Art Classroom
K-1st grade art lesson with a focus on the way fish swim in schools. Your students will practice (non-messy!) finger printing as well as make a collage. This lesson shows how everything is unique, even though it may be created using the same technique. Lesson comes with supply list, step by step instructions with pictures, suggested resources and art standards (national). You also get a list of the elements of art and much more to make this lesson enjoyable for all.
K-1st grade art lesson with a focus on the way fish swim in schools. Your students will practice (non-messy!) finger printing as well as make a collage. This lesson shows how everything is unique, even though it may be created using the same technique. Lesson comes with supply list, step by step instructions with pictures, suggested resources and art standards (national). You also get a list of the elements of art and much more to make this lesson enjoyable for all.

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Kids Art Classroom on Jun 28, 2010
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A splash of creativity!

“A great lesson for showing how everything is unique, even when in a group of many.” - Jeanette

1st Grade • Time: • Prep: 10 Minutes • Execution: 45 Min • Clean Up: 5 Min Your Supplies • 11 x 18 Construction Paper • Brown for the seafloor • Two shades of green for the seaweed • Blue for the ocean background • Glue Sticks • Paper plates (to squirt the paint on) • Scissors Elements in this lesson • Color • Shape • Form Suggested Resources • The book “Rainbow Fish” by Marcus Pfister • Any other large pictures of fish. schools of fish. and examples of an underwater scene . and based on our interpretation of the State of California Standards for Art Curriculum. practical application for your children. and fun expressions that your parents will be proud to hang at work or at home. Our Lesson • Title: School of Fish • Grade: Kindergarten. Every lesson by Kids Art Classroom is grounded in the elements of art.Getting Started Our lessons have a special focus on educational standards.

What do you see? Teachers are encouraged to create the lesson and have an example of their own – but we know how sometimes that won’t be possible. .

While Showing Your Example – Ask: • What do you see? (here are some prompts) – Tell me about the colors. show. . and engage the children in images of schools of fish. – The book “Rainbow Fish” by Marcus Pfister should help the children become more involved. – Read. what do they look like. do they look like “forms” (seaweed. – Do any of the shapes look like they are real. – Describe the shapes. what do they feel like. – Explain why fish swim in schools. fish). • Teacher’s Notes: – Talk about how the seaweed looks like it is moving in the “water” (This is because the seaweed is curvy).

” What is at the bottom of the ocean? Lots of sand! Let‟s make the seafloor. Very carefully holding the brown paper on one side.Let‟s make the seafloor • Have each child select a piece of blue construction paper and lay it down at their workstation landscape style – “this is our ocean. We are going to tear the paper from left to right. Remember – its not supposed to be perfect. and end up with a jagged layer of sand. Take a piece of brown construction paper. begin to slowly tear the paper. from the left side to the right. Glue down the brown strip of sand to the bottom of your blue piece of paper. this will be your seafloor. • • • Glue Stick • .

Now let‟s add seaweed • Starting with one of the green sheets of construction paper. cut out a long wavy shape that looks something like the example to the right. Use the same technique to cut out a few more from each shade of green paper (you can have as little or as much seaweed as you want!) • Apply some glue to one side of a piece of seaweed Then plant the seaweed by lightly pulling back the top of the unglued seafloor. and tuck the bottom of the seaweed behind the seabed Then press down and upwards on the piece of seaweed to glue it in place Keep planting the “seaweed” until your seascape has the desired amount of seaweed Glue Stick • • • .

dip your index finger in the pink paint (not the thumb this time. and make a small dot on each where you want their eyes to be Now lets create some bubbles. Dip one side of a Q-tip in the small glob of blue paint. dip it into the white paint and lightly stamp some air bubbles on the paper. • • • • • • . because the tails should be smaller than the fish bodies) Using the same dotting technique from before.Fish! • Carefully place your thumb into the paper plate with the white paint. to give them a tail Wipe your finger off once you have given tails to all of your fish Now you need to make sure to give your fish some eyes. and make thumbprints on the blue paper where you want your fish to swim Now wipe your thumb on a wet paper towel Your fish need tails so they can swim around! To do this. press your finger onto the paper on the edge of each fish. Using the other (dry) side of your Q-tip.

What did we learn? Let’s Share! • Have your student artists share their art – • What they saw • What they felt. shape Fish: color. Elements Used Bubbles: color Seaweed: color. or imagined • What they learned. shape Sea: color Seabed: color . and applied • Ask about the parts of the seascape • Ask where they are going to put the art to remember about how their fish swam around in their very own „School of Fish‟.

Examples of such would be cubes. This is also determined by how much light is reflected or absorbed by any surface. they form shapes. space. ovals and squares. Values mean the various intensities of the tones or colors. Hue means the shades (Red. FORM: A form always has three dimensions. This is represented as an enclosed area that is defined by color. TEXTURE: Texture is the feeling and visual feel of the fabrics. which are hue. . VALUE: The value refers to the changes in the base color. colors. and room accessories. yellow or pink). There are two types of : Optical (visual) texture. pyramids. COLOR: Always has three characteristics. When lines form together. texture and value. value and the intensity. and texture which you can touch (tactile). value. length. You need butter. rectangles. color. SHAPE: A shape always has two dimensions. texture and form. This could be the highlights. width and height.Elements of Art The elements of art are like ingredients when you cook. value refers to the lightness or the darkness and intensity refers to the brightness or dullness of the work of art. mid tones or even shadows in any painting or sculpture. shape. To create art you need elements. flour. Shapes can be geometrical. eggs and chocolate chips to bake chocolate chip cookies. LINE: Describes how the artist has used the lines in many different aspects and describes the various types and styles of lines used in the artwork and how this influences the viewer's point of view. form. line. length as well as width. spheres or even cylinders.

0 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT • Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts • Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world. noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.org/ .kennedy-center. APPLICATIONS • Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers • Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas. Performing.0 AESTHETIC VALUING • Responding to. objects in nature.gov/be/st/ss/vamain. and the environment.Art Standards* 1. including their own. 3. 4. Analyzing.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION • Creating.asp National Standards for visual arts: http://artsedge. using a variety of media to communicate meaning. according to the elements of art. assess. and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts • Students perceive and respond to works of art. 2. the principles of design.0 ARTISTIC PERCEPTION • Processing.ca.0 CONNECTIONS. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations. *Note: The standards above refer to the California Standards for Visual Arts California Standards for visual arts: http://www. RELATIONSHIPS.cde. 5. and derive meaning from works of art. events. Analyzing. and Participating in the Visual Arts • Students apply artistic processes and skills. and aesthetic qualities. and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts • Students analyze.

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