P. 1
A Classroom Management Plan

A Classroom Management Plan

|Views: 2,920|Likes:
Published by 112578
This paper demonstrates how to create a successful classroom management plan. The plan and illustrations are geared towards a kindergarten classroom. This is a detailed paper that explains why a management plan is necessary and how to create and incorporate it into the actual classroom.
This paper demonstrates how to create a successful classroom management plan. The plan and illustrations are geared towards a kindergarten classroom. This is a detailed paper that explains why a management plan is necessary and how to create and incorporate it into the actual classroom.

More info:

Published by: 112578 on Jul 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/22/2013

pdf

text

original

Sections

A Classroom Management Plan 1

Running head: A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Assignment 8.2--Submission of the Classroom Management Plan:

A Kindergarten Classroom Management Plan

Peaches M. Hubbard

Jones International University

Professor Pate

EDU523: K-12 Classroom and Instructional Management

June 26, 2010

A Classroom Management Plan 2

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Abstract

Discipline is defined as, training to ensure proper behavior: the practice or methods of teaching

and enforcing acceptable patterns of behavior” (Encarta World English Dictionary, 2009).

In this weeks readings, theme two introduces us to the theories of discipline, in which the

cours textbook offers a defintion of what a model of discipline is. It is defined as, “a set of

cohesive approaches to deal with establishing, maintaining, and restoring order in the

classroom that represent a certain philosophical perspective on a continuum of low to high

teacher control” (Burden, 2009, p.17). Chapter two of the textbook: Creating a Successful

K-12 Learning Community, lists three types of discipline models: The guiding model,

interacting model and the intervening model. Rules should be set into place on the first day

of school and reinforced through out the school year. A teacher must be consistent in how

they deal with discipline in the classroom, fair, and definitive in their explanations of the

rules and how they will be enforced. Theme one also discusses the “Seven Areas of

Responsibility,” which include: selecting a philosophical model of discipline; organizing the

physical environment; managing student behavior; creating a respectful, supportive learning

environment; managing and facilitating instruction; promoting classroom safety and

wellness; and interacting with colleagues, parents, and others to achieve classroom

management objectives (Burden, 2006).

A Classroom Management Plan 3

Table of Contents

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Introduction

Pgs. 4-7

The Ideal Classroom

Pg. 7

Discipline Defined

Pgs. 8-11
Classroom Instructional Mngmt.Pgs. 11-12
Diffusing Disruptive Behavior

Pgs. 12-14

Scenarios Regarding Discipline

Pgs. 14-16

Personal Model of Discipline

Pgs. 17-20

Physical Space

And Instructional ProcessesPgs. 21-23
Motivational Efforts

Pgs. 23-25
Becoming Acquainted with StudentsPgs. 26-30
A Positive Learning EnvironmentPg. 30
How to get Acquainted

Pgs. 30-33

Student Learning Processes

Pgs. 32-33

Effective Instructional Methods

Pgs. 33-34

Incentives and Rules

Pgs. 35-39
Developing Rules and ProceduresPgs. 39-40
Room Management

Pg. 40

Classroom Routines

Pgs. 40-41

Classroom Rules

Pg. 42

Classroom Procedures

Pgs. 42-43

Enforcing Rules and ProceduresPg. 44
Transitions

Pg. 45

Discipline Approaches

Pg. 49

Brainstorming for Resolution

Pgs. 50-53

Challenging Students

Pgs. 54-56

The Needs of Students

Pgs. 57-60

Inclusion and Diversity for All

Pg. 61

Learning Disabilities

Pg. 61

Gifted and Talented Students

Pg. 62

Behavior Disorders

Pg. 62

ADD and ADHD Students

Pgs. 63-64

Challenging Life Situations

Pgs. 65-67

Students from Diverse Cultures

Pg. 67

ESL Students

Pgs. 68-69

Communication With Families

Pgs. 69-71

Teacher-Parent Communication PlanPg. 72
Introductory Letter

Pgs. 73-74

Back to School Night

Pgs. 75-76

Information Sheets

Pgs. 77-78

Open House

Pgs. 79-80

Newsletters

Pgs. 81-83

Phone Calls

Pgs. 84-85

Websites and Emails

Pg. 86

Special Events

Pg. 87

Sending Home Student Work

Pg. 87

Conferences with Families

Pgs. 88-90

My Model of Discipline

Pgs. 91-93

Conclusion

Pg. 94

Illustrations and Examples:

Illustration 1.1:
Classroom Organizational Chart

Pg. 22

Illustration 1.2:
Sample Class Schedule

Pg. 25

Illustration 1.3:
Sample Lesson Plan-
Teaching the Classroom Rules

Pgs. 47-48

Illustration 1.4:
Sample Discipline Response Plan

Pg. 54

Illustration 1.5:
Sam’s Needs Chart

Pg. 59

Illustration 1.6:
Sample Student Behavior Report

Pg. 71

Illustration 1.7:
Sample Teacher Introductory Ltr.Pg. 74

Illustration 1.8:
Sample Back to School Night Agenda Pg. 76

Illustration 1.9:
Sample Family Information Form

Pg. 78

Illustration 1.10:
Sample Open House Flyer

Pg. 80

Illustration 1.11:
Sample Kindergarten Newsletter

Pgs. 82-83

Illustration 1.12:
Sample Guardian Phone Log

Pg. 85

Illustration 1.13:
Sample Parent Teacher ConferencePg. 89

A Classroom Management Plan 4

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

INTRODUCTION

THE IDEAL CLASSROOM

In my own teaching experience I came to several realizations in regards to classroom

management. For example, in my teaching experience I worked as an eighth grade teacher for a

private school. Although they seemed very mature for their age, they are just kids. I realized

that this was their last year before they went off to high school and that although their curriculum

is more challenging some things could be simplified. “Center’s are for preschoolers,” that’s

what the class said, when I introduced them into the classroom. Yet, by the end of the day the

students truly enjoyed the interactivity of centers as well as the research that they were doing.

Circle time is for babies,” said the class. Once a week, I would have the students sit on the floor

in a circle, I brought tea cookies and juice and we cracked open our class literature books a read

a story, which was followed by a class discussion.

My point is that in order to ensure classroom discipline and behavioral policies you do

not have to be an overly strict disciplinary. Sometimes remembering to let students enjoy being

kids and allowing them to explore new things, in a controlled setting, can be extremely

beneficial. An educator must be respected, not by demanding respect, but through teaching and

demonstrating respectful and sincere behavior.

A Classroom Management Plan 5

The course readings discuss creating your own philosophy of discipline. Educator’s must

begin the school year and end the school year with a clear vision of what the classroom dynamic

will be.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Rules should be set into place on the first day of school and reinforced through out the

school year. A teacher must be consistent in how they deal with discipline in the classroom, fair,

and definitive in their explanations of the rules and how they will be enforced. Theme one also

discusses the “Seven Areas of Responsibility,” which include: selecting a philosophical model of

discipline; organizing the physical environment; managing student behavior; creating a

respectful, supportive learning environment; managing and facilitating instruction; promoting

classroom safety and wellness; and interacting with colleagues, parents, and others to achieve

classroom management objectives (Burden, 2006).

The course textbook (Classroom Management: Creating A Successful K-12 Learning

Community) discusses some of the causes of misbehavior and gives tips for preventative

measures. In order to ensure optimal learning in the classroom I believe that the following

elements are needed:

A clean learning environment. I am a firm believer in keeping things tidy, if students are to

demonstrate order in their behavior they must not be amongst clutter. I have seen many

classrooms in which the students are lost in papers and unfinished projects, etcetera. It is

imperative for a teacher to demonstrate a positive behavior in order to have one received. A

classroom should not be bland, yet is should not be overwhelming by adding too much signage

or distractions. For instance, a teacher should have the students clean out their desk at least once

A Classroom Management Plan 6

a week. This reinforces responsibility, promotes tidiness, and limits distractions such as papers,

erasers or extra pencils to play with. Much to their dismay, I always tell my own children that

“everything has a place,” hopefully one day they will appreciate this lesson.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

The course text also mentions organizing the physical environment, “to create an effective

learning environment, you will need to organize several aspects of the physical space” (Burden,

2009, p. 6).

Next, A Classroom Code of Conduct, “Rules are general codes of conduct that are intended

to guide individual student behavior in an attempt to promote positive interaction and avoid

disruptive behavior” (Burden, 2009, p.6). Additionally, Having a Respectful and Supportive

Learning Environment. It is imperative for students to respect the classroom teacher; it is also

just as important for the student’s to respect each other. I believe that is a must for educators to

incorporate social skills building and team building into their classroom curriculum. These skills

will not only benefit them now, but it will benefit them in the future as well. Burden offers three

key ways to help ensure a supportive learning environment; I found number two to be very

beneficial, which is “teachers can focus student attention on appropriate classroom behavior by

helping students assume responsibility for their behavior, by maintaining student attention and

involvement, and by reinforcing desired behaviors” (Burden, 2009, p. 7).

Lastly, another key factor that the textbook mentioned, in successfully managing a

classroom is “interacting with colleagues, families, and others to achieve classroom

management objectives” (Burden, 2009, p. 7). “It takes a village to raise a child” (African

A Classroom Management Plan 7

Proverb, et, al). A student needs to feel comfortable in their learning environment; they also

need to know that the adults that are guiding them are on the same page.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Having family support is a key element and benefit to student learning, it also aids the

teacher in ensuring that the days lessons are being reinforced at home. It is just as important for

colleagues to support each other. Children can easily pick up on agitation between teachers or

administrators. Therefore, each individual must act as a learning team to work to support the

student academic achievement, growth and development.

When incorporating a respectful and supportive learning environment for students it is

equally important to promote classroom safety and wellness, as discussed on page 7 or the course

textbook. In order to create a successful learning environment students must feel safe and

welcomed. This will open student’s minds to learning and be respectful. The textbook mentions

“students need to feel physically and emotionally safe before they can give their full attention to

the instructional tasks. Strategies used to manage student behavior, create a supportive

classroom, and manage and facilitate instruction all contribute to classroom safety and wellness”

(Burden, 2009, p. 7). It is important for educators to understand that they are the facilitators, and

creating a successful learning environment is up to them. The article Top Six Ways to Being a

Successful Teacher, offers these ways to classroom success: “a sense of humor, a positive

attitude, high expectations, consistency, fairness and flexibility” (Kelly, 2010).

A Classroom Management Plan 8

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

DISCIPLINE DEFINED

Discipline is defined as, training to ensure proper behavior: the practice or methods of

teaching and enforcing acceptable patterns of behavior” (Encarta World English Dictionary,

2009). In this weeks readings, theme two introduces us to the theories of discipline, in which the

cours textbook offers a defintion of what a model of discipline is. It is defined as, “a set of

cohesive approaches to deal with establishing, maintaining, and restoring order in the classroom

that represent a certain philosophical perspective on a continuum of low to high teacher control”

(Burden, 2009, p.17). Chapter two of the textbook: Creating a Successful K-12 Learning

Community, lists three types of discipline models: The guiding model, interacting model and the

intervening model.

The discipline model that I align my teaching style with is the Interacting Model, which

is a medium control approach. The interacting model focuses on disciplining students through

discussion, counseling, and teaching problem-solving skills. I am a proponent of formative

learning and assessment strategies; the interacting model of discipline shares the same

characteristics as this model. The teacher is a facilitator whom demonstrates the behavior that

they would like their students to exhibit. Burden also provides fourteen proponents of the three

discipline models.

A Classroom Management Plan 9

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

The key author’s that are aligned with the interacting model of discipline are: Rudolf

Dreikurs, author of Logical Consequences; Linda Albert, author of Cooperative Discipline; Jane

Nelsen, Lynn Lott, and H. Stephen Glenn, author of Positive Classroom Discipline; William

Glasser, author of Non-coercive Discipline (Reality Therapy and Control Theory); Richard

Curwin, Allen Mendler, and Brian Mendler, author of discipline with Dignity and Spencer

Kagan, author of Win-Win Discipline (Burden, 2009, p. 19).

The paper Classroom Management/Discipline Models (Durken, 2010), offers a greater

insight into the interacting model of discipline. The paper provides examples from William

Glasser and Alfred Alder. Glasser tends to focus on understanding that we all have a choice in

our behavior and that students can choose what there behavior will be (Durken, 2010). Alder’s

philosophy mimicked Glasser’s, they both believed that the student controls their own behavior,

yet Alder elaborates by stating that students act out or change their behaviors according to their

social orientation.

My goal post graduation is to work with kindergarten students. At this age it is critical to

start building self-esteem as well as promoting friendship and understand cooperation and getting

along with others. Therefore, I have chosen to discuss the author Linda Albert, the author of

A Classroom Management Plan 10

Cooperative Discipline. Linda Albert’s background in education is as a teacher, counselor,

columnist and author. The article Linda Albert: Cooperative Discipline, give insight into the

model of discipline that she created. Cooperative discipline is defined as, “an approach designed

to help students feel capable and connected, which will encourage them to contribute to their

class and be successful.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

It creates a class code of conduct that allows optimum opportunity for success.

Cooperative discipline also establishes a partnership with students, parents and teachers” (Bross,

Coe, Hipwell, Jenkins, 2001). The key concepts for Albert’s model are based on the three C’s,

being capable, connecting with others, and having the student’s be a contributing member to the

class.

In the paper Crisis Intervention Programs, cooperative discipline is defined as, “a way to

influence students so they will make good choices and demonstrate good social skills through

encouragement, intervention, and collaboration (Baltimore County Public Schools, et al). This

model promotes a learning dichotomy. In other words students are taught they that it is okay to

make mistakes. The student’s response to the situation will ensue their consequence. The notion

perceived by this model is that each student is responsible for his or her own actions.

Managing the Classroom Instructional Environment

The paper My Personal Philosophy on Discipline in the Classroom, discusses the goal of

Ms. Albert’s model of discipline, which focuses on the teacher and student’s working together to

create a classroom code of conduct. Therefore, if students misbehave, they are able to recognize

A Classroom Management Plan 11

what they have done wrong because they had a part in creating the rules (Gowett, 2008). Linda

Albert’s model of discipline looks into the needs of the student, why did the student misbehave?

And, what does the student want. These two questions are used to figure out how to assess a

student’s behavior and resolve the conflict.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Albert’s model is based upon the theories and model of Rudolph Driekurs, who was a

psychiatrist and educator. He proposed that there are four distinct reasons that students

misbehave: (1) To gain attention. (2) To have power over others. (3) To plot revenge and (4) and

lastly, avoidance of failure (Albert, et, al).

For example, an encyclopedia reference demonstrates Rudolph Driekurs model, as

follows: “If they (students) do not receive the attention they crave through their actions (good or

bad, e.g. doing well on a paper or throwing a tantrum), they move onto seeking power (e.g. they

may refuse to complete a paper). If their power struggle is thwarted, they seek revenge. If even

revenge does not achieve the desired response, they begin to feel inadequate” (New World

Encycolpedia, 2008). Albert mentions that when students misbehave, most teachers discipline

them without explanation or discussion. Albert mentions a key to managing classroom

instruction, which is to make the student a partner in the discipline program as well the student’s

guardian(s).

The benefits of Albert’s model of cooperative discipline model is that is teaches student’s

responsibility, mutual respect, social skills and team work. In the article Cooperative

A Classroom Management Plan 12

Alternatives to Discipline, the author mentions that cooperative discipline derives it’s inherent

attributes from constructivism. Some people feel that in a constructivist classroom, student’s are

out of control and that there are no rules and boundaries. This truly is not the case; the article

mentions key points regarding constructivism.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

“[Constructivist teachers are highly active in their efforts to facilitate children's self-

regulations. Their activity, however, does not take unilateral forms, to enable children to

construct convictions and follow their own social and moral rules that are independent of adult

coercion. Children's self-constructed social and moral rules are rooted in their everyday personal

experiences. These personal experiences with peers and adults lead them to construct cause-

effect relations between their actions and the reactions of others]” (DeVries and Zan, 1994).

The downsides to cooperative discipline include: cooperative discipline can take up

important class time in trying to resolve behavior concerns. Educators must use time

management skills effectively. Another negative aspect of collaborative discipline is

maintaining respect. Initially when the school year begins students are eager to work on the

classroom rules, yet as the school year progresses, students may not be as receptive to the rules.

Therefore, teacher must be clear and concise in their needs for classroom behavior. Teachers

must be repetitive and enforce the classroom rules fairly and consistently.

Diffusing Disruptive Behavior

A Classroom Management Plan 13

“Student behavior must be dealt with immediately”, say’s Linda Albert. The author

suggests three strategies for diffusing disruptive student behavior. All of the strategies are used

to target an area of the four reasons of misbehavior created by Dreikurs. The first strategy is

based on attention; educators must give the student the attention that they are trying to acquire,

even if the student is not seeking the attention from them. A majority of the time, when a student

is seeking attention from their peers they will act out.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

To diffuse this situation the author suggests that a teacher should look directly at the

student to let them be aware that they are doing something off beam. The author also suggest to

stand close to the student and proceed with the lesson by redirecting a lessons question to the

student or pose a question by using the students name. In addition the author suggests giving

praise to the other students who are following the lesson and staying on task (Albert, et, al). The

author goes on to suggest other helpful tips to diffusing misbehavior, such as: giving a student a

choice in their punishment, refraining from direct confrontation and harsh punishment in the

classroom, positive reinforcement, and acknowledging successful behavior vs. only

acknowledging misbehavior.

I believe that Albert’s model is very complimentary to my own personal beliefs regarding

discipline. I mentioned that my goal is to work with kindergarten students post-graduation, and

I believe that Albert’s model works extremely well with this age group. In most cases of harsh

punishment, students are scared into making affirmative decisions, but are they truly learning the

lesson? Students must learn from their misbehaviors, teachers and parents ask students all the

time “Did you learn your lesson”? Although a child may reply “yes,” is that he truth? In most

A Classroom Management Plan 14

cases the student is only telling you want you want to hear in an attempt to avoid more

punishment. It is imperative for educators to give explanations as opposed to barking out orders;

to focus on the needs of the students, as opposed to only focusing on their misbehavior; and to

truly understand the underlying reasons as to why students act out, as opposed to having an

indifferent attitude and only caring about ones own beliefs of right and wrong.

A CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->