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Lima • Delphos • Wapakoneta • Ottawa • www.SuperiorFCU.

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THE
June 2010
BusinessJournal
OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
Internet Service Provided
by North West Net Inc.
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INSIDE
T h e B u s i n e s s J o u r n a l
4 0 5 N . M a i n S t .
D e l p h o s , O H 4 5 8 3 3
P R S T D S T D
U . S . P o s t a g e
P A I D
L i m a , O H
P e r m i t N o . 2 8 6
Jerry Lewis, local McDonald’s Restaurant Owner, was
recently honored by McDonald’s Corporation with the
Golden Arch Award at the 2010 McDonald’s Worldwide
Convention in Orlando, Florida.
The McDonald’s Golden Arch Award is the most pres-
tigious award given to McDonald’s owners and honors the
“best of the best” in the McDonald’s Owner/Operator commu-
nity. Less than one percent of franchise owners earn this honor
of a lifetime. This award recognizes the recipient’s relentless
focus on customer service, outstanding Quality, Service,
Cleanliness and Value, significant community involvement,
exceptional achievements in all areas of McDonald’s Plan
to Win, and contributions to the success of the McDonald’s
brand. In response the award Lewis says, “I am honored and
McDonald’s
®
owner receives
worldwide award
SMS proTECH wins
Cisco Breakaway
Partner of the Year
See McDONALD’S, page 13A
F&M to acquire First Place Bank’s branch
Paul Siebenmorgen, President
and CEO of Farmers & Merchants
State Bank (the “Bank”), today
announced that the Bank has
entered into an agreement with
First Place Bank to acquire the
assets and assume the liabilities of
the Hicksville, Ohio branch offce
of First Place Bank. The branch
has approximately $28 Million in
deposits.
The transaction is subject to
regulatory approval and other cus-
tomary closing conditions. It is
expected that the transaction will
be consummated during the third
quarter of 2010. The fnancial
terms of the transaction were not
disclosed.
Commenting on the transaction,
Mr. Siebenmorgen stated: “We
are very pleased to continue our
expansion with this transaction.
The Hicksville offce will comple-
ment our existing branch network,
including expanding our presence
in Defance County, and allow us
to provide the high level of service
for which our community bank
is known. We look forward to
continuing to serve the Hicksville
community.”
About Farmers & Merchants
State Bank
Farmers & Merchants State
Bank, headquartered in Archbold,
Ohio, currently operates 18 offces
within Defance, Fulton, Henry,
Williams and Wood Counties, Ohio
and DeKalb and Steuben Counties,
Indiana. It is a wholly-owned sub-
sidiary of Farmers & Merchants
Bancorp, Inc., a bank holding com-
pany also based in Archbold, Ohio.
Farmers & Merchants Bancorp,
Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: FMAO)
had total assets of approximately
$850 million as of year-end 2009.
Defance College embarked on its 2009-
10 academic year with a new leader and
increased enrollment. Total enrollment for
fall 2009 exceeded 1,070, the College’s
highest headcount since 1971, and a seven
percent increase over 2008.
Mark C. Gordon was inaugurated as the
College’s 18
th
president in October, and
he has already made signifcant strides in
introducing a number of initiatives to create
additional opportunities for students with
the goal of helping them be successful in the
classroom, in their numerous endeavors, and
in life. Among the projects the College has
begun to implement are Personal Success
Defiance College Board Approves
Construction of New Field House
See DEFIANCE, page 3A
SMS proTECH announced today that it is
the recipient of a Cisco Partner Summit re-
gional award for Cisco Breakaway Partner of
the Year. Cisco unveiled the winners April
28 at its annual channel partner conference
in San Francisco.
“It is an honor to present SMS proTECH
as a Cisco Partner Summit regional award
winner,” said Wendy Bahr, senior vice presi-
dent, U.S. and Canada channels at Cisco.
“The Breakaway Partner of the Year award
recognizes SMS proTECH’s performance
See SMS, page 5A
2A TheBusinessJournal June2010
Come In A Customer ... Leave A Friend
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Minster & Dayton
419-628-3713
June2010 TheBusinessJournal 3A
Business
Journal
THE
of West Central Ohio
Volume 18, No. 6
Publisher Donald R. Hemple
Contributing Writers
Jeffrey Gitomer
Advertising Donald R. Hemple
The Business Journal is mailed to the top business leaders
in the 11-county region of West Central Ohio. Although infor-
mation is gathered from sources considered to be reliable,
the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be
guaranteed. Information expressed in The Business Journal
does not constitute a solicitation for the purchase or sale of
any products.
Copyright, The Business Journal of West Central Ohio, 2006,
All rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written per-
mission of editorial, photographic or other graphic content in
any manner is prohibited. The Business Journal is published
monthly at 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
Contact Us
Telephone 419-999-4762
Don Hemple 419-695-0015 ext. 138
Marilyn Hoffman 419-695-0015 ext. 131
Vicki Gossman 419-695-0015 ext. 128
Stacy Prine 419-695-0015 ext. 129
toll free 800-589-6950
Mail 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833-1598
For information concerning news,
advertising and subscription e-mail us at:
dhemple@delphosherald.com
or bizjrnl@delphosherald.com
www.businessjrnl.com
simple | managed | secure
When We Win, You Win
Cisco Breakaway Partner of the Year
announced at Cisco Summit 2010
1089 Fairington Drive . Sidney, OH 45365
(937) 498-7080 . www.smsprotech.com
A Division of Perry Corporation / An Employee-Owned Company
What can we do for you?
IP Voice and Video . Wireless Mobility . Virtualization
Security . Storage . Hosted IT Solutions . Network
Management . Software Licensing . Technical Services
Plans for each entering student, a national
advisory board program to help guide stu-
dents in their majors, an alumni-student
network, expanded hands-on experiential
opportunities, and a student-run, nonproft
organization.
Defance College’s spirit of service and
social responsibility continues to grow.
Now in its eighth year, the McMaster
School for Advancing Humanity has put
its mission into action. Through service-
based research that requires rigorous aca-
demic work, Defance College students
and faculty are making progress toward the
McMaster School vision of improving the
human condition.
By utilizing knowledge within their aca-
demic felds, faculty and students research
and design projects to address a need.
In the past eight years, partnerships have
developed in Cambodia and Belize, and a
domestic project in New Orleans was added
three years ago.
The Hench Autism Studies Program also
continues to grow. The program is designed
to serve individuals and families facing
challenges associated with autism with an
emphasis both on academic preparation and
direct service. New to the program this year
is the introduction of a minor in Autism
Studies. Open to students of all majors, the
minor is designed to educate students about
the unique needs of persons with autism.
For the fourth consecutive year, Defance
College has been named to the President’s
Higher Education Community Service
Honor Roll for its commitment to commu-
nity service.
Defance College received word that its
new nursing program has received autho-
rization from the Ohio Board of Regents
and accreditation by the Higher Learning
Commission. Defance offers a Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree completion pro-
gram (1+2+1) in partnership with Northwest
State Community College. Students take
their frst and fourth years at Defance
College and their second and third years
at NSCC. In addition, Defance College
is offering an RN to BSN completion pro-
gram for individuals who have an associate
degree or diploma in nursing.
Eligible military veterans of the post-
9/11 era are able to attend Defance College
tuition-free. The College is a participant in
the Yellow Ribbon program, part of the post
9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of
2008. For more information visit the Defance
College website at www.defance.edu.
Defiance
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(Continued from page 1A)
4A TheBusinessJournal June2010

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As my sales career has evolved over the years,
and I have emerged as a leader (maybe THE
leader) in the sales industry, I’m often asked if I
have any secrets for success or what’s been my path to
personal success.
The answer is pretty simple. There are no
secrets. There’s nothing I do that I consider out of
the ordinary. It’s what I do on a consistent basis that
makes me extraordinary.
I READ. I wake up every
morning, and I read. I read two
pages from some kind of personal
success book that’s more than 50
years old. If you want to know the
best ones that I read, it’s anything
by Napoleon Hill, most often his
earliest writings from The Law of
Success, or the Magic Ladder to Success
– just a couple pages. It’s any-
thing by Dale Carnegie. His public
speaking book. His How to Win
Friends & Infuence People book. His
How to Stop Worrying & Start Living
book. Now, I’ve only been doing
that for 39 years, so I don’t know
if it works yet. I’m going to do it
for another 39 years, and that’s it –
I’m going to quit. That consistency
leads me to new ideas. Every time
I read something old, I come up
with a new idea, which leads me to
my second non-secret:
I CAPTURE AND COLLECT
THOUGHTS AND IDEAS.
When I think of things or things
occur to me, or I read something
that inspires me, the frst thing I
do is go to my computer. I write
this column every week on selling
skills, but I don’t just write the column,
I collect ideas so I can always be ahead.
I’ve written more than 950 columns to
date, but I’ve got 500 more ideas waiting
to be evolved. That leads me to my next
step of success:
I WRITE. When I write everything
down, it clarifes my own ideas, it gener-
ates new ideas, and it creates content for
my speeches, and for my books. My
challenge to you is: If you want to be
a success, you can’t just read, you have
to write.
I SPEAK. The next thing you have
to learn how to do is present - give a
speech in public. The best way to learn
how to present is to join Toastmasters.
If you go to Toastmasters, and give 10
speeches, you can get your Competent Toastmaster
Award (CTM) – it will give you a little more self-
confdence, and the understanding of what makes
a talk a good talk. Most people only talk one on
one, but if you ever present to a group, that’s the
ultimate. Can you sell the entire group? When you
learn to present to a group, selling one on one
becomes a piece of cake.
I POSITION TO WIN WITH “VALUE
FIRST.” The same goes for marketing (attract-
ing people who are interested to buy). I position
myself to be seen and read as a person of value.
My marketing mission is as follows: I put myself
in front of people who can say yes to me, and I
deliver value frst. I promise you will never see
that in a marketing textbook, nor hear it from a
marketing professor.
I STRIVE TO MASTER. There are models
you can use to make sales, and there are all kinds
of processes and strategies that you can use. But
if you don’t have those fundamental elements at
your fngertips - you have to be the master of these
things – not just the Mr. of them, not just the Mrs.
of them – you have to be the MASTER of them.
In order to be that master, you have to study. In
order to be that master, you have to practice them
daily. In order to be that master, you have to have
deep focus, and take that internal daily dose, so
that you can, day by day, become
great.
I LOVE IT. I wake up in the
morning, and I can’t wait to do
whatever it is that I have scheduled
that day. Sometimes it’s give a
speech, sometimes it’s write more
for my books, sometimes it’s inter-
view people, sometimes it’s meet-
ings, and sometimes it’s making
sales to big corporate CEOs. I love
making sales, and I try to do two
or three sales calls every week, so
I can stay at the top of my game. I
don’t just teach sales, I make sales.
IT’S NOT ONE ELEMENT.
But, if you only read, or you only
write, or you only speak, that’s
not quite enough. You have to love what you do,
and you have to believe in what you sell, and you
have to have the right attitude and enthusiasm to
carry you forward. These are the principle pieces
that will lead you to some kind of success. You
see, once you believe in it, once you love it, it’s
not work anymore – it’s the most fun thing you
can do.
I WORK HARD. People ask me, “How’d you
get great at sales?” And I tell them, “Well, I just
worked my rear end off for 20 years, and then, all
of the sudden, I was great.”
The same thing can happen to you, but you
have to love it. If you don’t love what you do, it’s
tough to get beyond the next plateau. I’m chal-
lenging you to go back, and re-read to this formula
– there’s no magic to it, but add passion, and the
results will be incredibly magical.
If you want some ideas for the achievement of
goals, go to www.gitomer.com and enter the word
BEGIN in the GitBit box.
Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible and The Little
Red Book of Selling. President of Charlotte-based Buy Gitomer, he
gives seminars, runs annual sales meetings, and conducts Internet
training programs on selling and customer service at www.
trainone.com. He can be reached at 704/333-1112 or e-mail to
salesman@gitomer.com
© 2010 All Rights Reserved - Don’t even think about reproducing
this document without written permission
from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer, Inc. • 704/333-1112
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June2010TheBusinessJournal 5A










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and achievements as a Cisco channel partner
in our Central Region in 2009.”
“We are honored to be recognized by
Cisco,” said Barry Clark, president, SMS
proTECH/Perry Corporation. “This award
is the result of the hard work and dedication
of our talented employees who successfully
deliver and support technology solutions to
all of our customers.”
Cisco Partner Summit awards are pre-
sented at three levels: regional, theater and
global. Cisco Partner Summit U.S. and
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performance in a given geographic region of
the United States or Canada.
SMS (Continued from page 1A)
6A TheBusinessJournal June2010
Health/Medical
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Ambulance Facility, Lima, Ohio
Employee health and wellness has been a frequent
topic of conversation with leaders of business and in-
dustry often discussing the costs and benefits of im-
plementing a program in their organization. At Henry
County Hospital the debate is over. Five years ago, the
leadership at Henry County Hospital began planning
strategies to develop a culture of health and wellness.
At the end of the debate of risks, benefits, and costs;
the decision was based on the fact that it is just the
right thing to do. W. Edwards Deming is quoted as
saying the really important things in life are impos-
sible to measure. While objective data is starting to be-
come evident, the benefits of fit and happy employees
truly cannot be measured. Often individuals will ask
me what is the best way to start, profoundly I reply, it
does not matter, just start.
Several years ago health and wellness was defined
as physical fitness, nutrition, and the state of the car-
diovascular system. Today health and wellness ad-
dresses not only the physical and nutritional aspects
of health, but also takes into consideration emotional,
psychological, and occupational needs.
One of the components that contribute to employee
health and wellness in the work environment is the
Occupational Dimension of Wellness. Occupational
Wellness is the ability to balance work and leisure
time. Striving for occupational wellness adds positive
rewards to every employee. It allows everyone to find
personal satisfaction through work and to be willing
to accommodate employee co-workers’ strengths and
weaknesses in a healthy way.
When Occupational Wellness was considered at
Henry County Hospital, one of the first tactics imple-
mented was a Health Risk Assessment. Employees
were offered the opportunity to complete a Health
Risk Appraisal free of charge. A Health Risk Assess-
ment is a questionnaire in addition to blood tests and
vital signs to assess health risks and lifestyle choices.
Over the past three years, the employees at Henry
County Hospital have seen an improvement in can-
cer risk reduction. In 2009, 69% employees were at
risk for developing cancer compared to 78% in 2007.
Each employee who participated received confidential
written feedback to identify areas of excess health risk
and recommend actions. In addition, the leadership is
provided with a summary of health risks which is used
by the wellness team to develop strategies to help em-
ployees with their health and wellness.
Implementing the Health Risk Assessment tool is
just one way Henry County Hospital makes an invest-
ment in employees and creating a culture of health
and wellness. If you are interested in learning more
about employee health and wellness program at Henry
County Hospital contact Gina Hill, Wellness Coordi-
nator, 419-591-3824.
Submitted by Kimberly H. Bordenkircher, Chief
Executive Officer, Henry County Hospital.
Henry County Hospital
offers health and wellness
June2010 TheBusinessJournal 7A
Your Partner For Life
1600 East Riverview Ave.
Napoleon, OH 43545
419-592-4015
8A TheBusinessJournal June2010
Community Health Professionals
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Van Wert - (419) 238-9223
2010 is here, a completely new decade.
What are you going to do differently this
year? What goals will you make for your
health? And how will you ensure that you
actually follow through with your goals?
For starters, life changes begin with bite-
sized steps towards health; you don’t have
to change everything in one day!
These 6 centenarian practices will help
you live to 100. Start small! Just choose
3 life-changing practices to be your goal
for 2010. The trick is to be consistent every
day and work your way up to the full goal.
1. Take a 20-minute walk every day
In my two decades of investigating the
daily activities of centenarians, I found that
every one walked for at least 30 minutes a
day, and most walked more than an hour.
Aside from the proven benefits to your
heart, walking is the perfect gentle exercise
for improving digestion and encouraging
cleansing of the lymphatic system.
Start small: Start with just 5 minutes and
build your way up to 20 minutes or more.
2. Eat 5 vegetables of different colors
every day
The countries with the highest number
of centenarians generally have very little
meat in their diet -- and many more veg-
etables. Numerous studies show that the
different pigments in the skins of vegeta-
bles are powerful antioxidants crucial for
maintaining health, preventing cancer, and
protecting against environmental toxins;
an estimated one-third of all cancer pa-
tients developed their disease as a result of
insufficient whole plant fiber in their diets.
Get started with this rainbow of produce:
Green: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok
choy, and dark leafy greens like kale
Yellow/orange: carrots, squash, pump-
kins, and sweet potatoes
Red: hot red peppers, red bell peppers,
and beets
White/light: cauliflower, maitake mush-
room, and daikon radish
Dark colors: eggplant, seaweed, and
black mushrooms
Start small: Start with just two differ-
ent veggies, learn some recipes, and before
you know it, you’ll be up to five a day.
3. Drink 2 cups of herbal tea a day
In addition to being a delicious, low-
calorie drink, tea is the beverage most
commonly enjoyed by centenarians around
the world. To maintain optimum health,
drink decaffeinated tea with herbs that
help support your liver, lymphatic system,
bowels, urinary tract, and skin by cleans-
ing and preventing a buildup of toxins and
wastes in the body. Some of the best herbal
teas for detoxifying and getting healthy are
ginger, dandelion, chrysanthemum flower,
milk thistle, hawthorn berry, and turmeric.
Green tea also has many health benefits,
and even with its caffeine content, (which
is much less than coffee) is still an excel-
lent choice. A good way to get started is
the Tao Tea collection, powerful herbal
combinations that detoxify, calm nerves,
clear the mind, balance emotions, and ease
digestion.
Go big: This being a relatively simple
practice, you can take on a bigger chal-
lenge: drink tea instead of coffee -- and get
the health properties without loads of caf-
feine. Even black tea has a third less caf-
feine, and beneficial polyphenols to boot.
4. Stop eating when you are three-quar-
ters full.
Something that almost all centenarians
have in common is that they eat less. Many
centenarians had very modest means, and
as a result, they were eating less than av-
erage. They often stopped eating once
they were three-quarters full. Many stud-
ies show that less food -- calorie restric-
tion -- increases life span in animals. For
example, excess animal protein increases
the risks of cancer and kidney disease; ex-
cess fat leads to obesity and a higher threat
3 healthy life-changing goals for 2010
See HEALTHY, page 10A
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Going up? 7 pointers
to lift a bad mood
By Dr. Maoshing Ni
No one can live a long and healthy life without
the will to go on; sometimes mood swings can make
us feel that life is too much for us.
A bad mood not only gives you a gloomy out-
look, it also lowers your immune function, leading
the way to illness. Here are some suggestions to lift
your mood, your spirit, and your health.
1. A Laughing Matter
“Laugh Therapy,” pioneered by Norman Cous-
ins, has turned out to have real substance. Research
has discovered that laughter and joy boost immune
functions, especially the production of the natural
killer cells that help defend the body from illness
and cancer.
Laughter also increases the release of endorphins
- compounds that give you a sense of well-being - in
your brain. Without a doubt, joyful people liver lon-
ger and healthier lives. So read your favorite comics,
watch your favorite comedies, and laugh it up!
2. Amino Acid for Restored Mindset
When an imbalance or deficiency is creating
a bad mood, the Europeans use supplements of a
natural compound found in human cells to regulate
mood and restore a healthy mindset. SAMe (S-ade-
nosyl-L-methionine) is produced from methionine,
an amino acid that plays a role in the production of
uplifting neurotransmitters like serotonin and dop-
amine.
One study indicated that SAMe worked on pa-
tients who had unsuccessful results with conven-
tional antidepressants. To get a boost from SAMe,
take a supplement combining it with vitamins B6
and B12.
3. Hands-On Healing
Human touch increases the production of endor-
phins, growth hormone, and DHEA, all of which
lengthen your life span and lower the negative im-
pact of stress. Studies have found that patients who
are regularly touched recover faster than those who
are not touched. So give someone a hug and feel
both of your moods improve.
4. Boost Your “Youth Hormones”
You don’t need pills to flood your body with a re-
juvenating flood of growth hormones. Research has
found that doing squats and leg presses will great-
ly increase your natural production of the “youth
hormone”. Increased growth hormone translates to
an elevated mood, among other physical benefits.
Keep it up with weight training, knee bends, push-
ups, and rowing.
5. Take a Bracing Breath
Breathing correctly is important for dispelling the
toxins and wastes from your body; in fact, it is esti-
mated that we expel only about 30 percent of toxins
in our bodies through the bowels and bladder-the
rest is all respiratory. Breathing is also a great way
to clear your mind, boost your energy, and improve
your mood. Practice deep, slow, rhythmic, breath-
ing daily with mind-body disciplines such as tai chi,
yoga, qigong, and meditation.
6. Smell the Joy
Research has shown that smell has a definite im-
pact on our bodies and minds. When you stimulate
the olfactory nerves inside your nose, you activate
the limbic system of your brain, which is associated
with moods and memory. This concept is instru-
mental to aromatherapy, a natural health tradition
that makes use of the healing powers of plants with
strong scents.
Aromatherapy recommends treating depres-
sion with jasmine, eucalyptus for exhilaration, and
grapefruit to increase alertness and joy. Just put a
dab of the essential oils from these plants on your
temples, back of your neck, or acupressure points.
Another option? Boil the herb in water and inhale
the steam through your nose.
7. Feel Fine with Flowers
There is a reason that flowers are the traditional
get-well gesture. Colorful flowers have a power-
ful influence on moods; they can uplift a patient’s
mood and even combat stress. One study found that
during a five-minute typing assignment, people sit-
ting next to a flowering bouquet were more relaxed
than those who sat near foliage-only plants.
I hope these tips help the good feelings flow! I
invite you to visit often and share your own per-
sonal health and longevity tips with me.
10A TheBusinessJournal June2010
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of heart disease and stroke. Eating in this
way also improves your overall digestion,
allowing you to absorb the nutrients from
your food.
Start small: Follow the three-quarters
rule for just one meal a day. See if you no-
tice a difference between that and eating to
full capacity.
5. Commit to a cardio workout.
In many years of clinical practice and re-
search, I have never met a centenarian that
lived a physically inactive life. Cardiovas-
cular exercise is critical to attaining your
health goals and the key to a healthy heart.
Effective moderate exercises include gen-
eral calisthenics, racket sports, swimming
(with moderate effort), cycling (at a moder-
ate speed of 10 miles per hour or less), ca-
noeing, and rowing (at a speed of about 2 to
3 miles per hour). A gentler overall workout
is tai chi, which is also easier on the joints
and balances your energy. Find a tai chi
teacher or a DVD that can help you learn.
Grow your longevity by exercising for 30
minute-session, 4 times or more per week.
Start small: Begin by exercising only
five minutes a day, but do it every day. In-
crementally increase the time by five min-
utes each week. By week 6, you’ll be up to
30 minutes.
6. Breathe your way to 100
In many cultures that have a thriving
population of centenarians, it is a custom to
practice mediation and other special breath-
ing methods every day. Breathing correctly
is important for dispelling the toxins and
wastes from your body; in fact, it is esti-
mated that we expel only about 30 percent
of toxins in our bodies through defecation,
urination, and perspiration -- the rest is all
respiratory. And yet, many of us have for-
gotten how to breathe and take shallow
breaths from the top of the lungs, accumu-
lating toxins and wastes in the body. Prac-
tice deep, slow, rhythmic, breathing daily
to detoxify and de-stress: three times a day,
close your eyes and breathe slowly for 10
counts.
Go big: One of the most effective ways
to reduce stress, protect your heart, and
lengthen your years is to meditate. Find a
meditation practice that works for you and
begin with 5 to 10 minutes a day. For a
guided practice designed to help you live to
100, click here.
I hope these tips bring you many healthy
years! I invite you to visit often and share
your own personal health and longevity tips
with me.
-Dr. Mao
Healthy
(Continued from page 8A)
June2010 TheBusinessJournal 11A
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Why we must reduce health care costs
By Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D.
Health care costs continue to rise, with no
end in sight. But many people aren’t aware
of what accounts for those costs and where
the money goes. However, such awareness
is key to finding ways to bring costs down.
Where does the money go?
Here are the major categories of health
care costs in the U.S. as reported in 2007:
Hospitals: 32%
Health insurance administration and
profits: 13%
Medications: 10%
Physician income: 9%
Physician expenses: 7%
Clinical laboratory services: 5%
Private health insurance
The overhead costs and profits of private
health insurance is just one of the reasons
for my disappointment that a health reform
bill, now being considered in Congress,
will likely have no type of public insurance
option. In contrast to these large costs for
private insurance, administrative overhead
for Medicare is only about three percent. Of
course, anyone who has tried to deal with
private insurance companies can express
plenty of other objections about them. It is
evident that their total attention is to bottom
line profit rather than to any real interest in
providing for the health of their policy hold-
ers.
New medications and increasing lon-
gevity
Scientific advances have led to the avail-
ability of many new medications that may
prolong life or at least reduce suffering.
Medications are likely to become an even
larger fraction of the health care budget be-
cause of their high development costs, the
extraordinary effectiveness of some, and
the increasing longevity of individuals.
Although many patients take these largely
insurance-covered costs in stride, they still
contribute significantly to the overall cost of
health care.
Nonetheless, some savings are possible.
If physicians were more aware of the costs
of drugs, they might be able to prescribe
equally effective, less costly alternatives.
Physicians tend to prescribe the newest drug
for high blood pressure, for example, even
though it is more expensive and no more
effective than earlier medications. Not in-
frequently a physician may acquiesce to
a patient’s request to get a drug they have
heard about in a television ad-for example,
the highly touted Plavix which is far more
expensive and not necessarily any better
than aspirin in many situations.
Physician income reasonable
It seems reasonable to me that we physi-
cians share about nine percent of the pie. Al-
though physician incomes have not fallen,
studies show that on average they need to
spend more working time to maintain such
incomes. However, what is not evident from
the nine percent figure is the unfair dis-
crepancy in reimbursements, which pay big
bucks to specialists for procedures and far
less to the internist or general practitioner
who carries out the evaluation and long term
management of patients. Interventive cardi-
ologists may deny it, but it’s easy to under-
stand how their income from an angioplasty
procedure may lead them to recommend it
even though angioplasty prolongs life no
more than non-invasive medical treatment in
people with stable coronary heart disease.
Physician expenses and insurance
claims
Physician expenses include obvious
things such as rent and salaries for a recep-
tionist and nurse, but physicians also spent
10 to 15 percent of their gross income for
billing and collection, preparing a variety of
insurance forms (often requiring hiring an
additional person), and an average of three
hours a week on the phone or corresponding
with insurance claims adjusters. The cumu-
lative cost of the time physicians spend in
these interactions with insurers is estimated
at $23 to $31 billion annually. The costly
and time consuming tasks of paperwork and
completing multiple insurance forms weigh
heavily in physician dissatisfaction and ear-
ly retirements.
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12A TheBusinessJournal June2010
By Dr. Maoshing Ni
There is a lot of recent buzz in the news
about removing the salt from some of Amer-
ica’s favorite snacks and restaurant meals.
The Institute of Medicine is urging the gov-
ernment to put legal limits on how much
sodium can be put in foods, beverages, and
meals for the sake of America’s health. While
your tastebuds may cringe at this idea, a na-
tional standard for sodium content may just
save your heart. Read on to find out why less
salt equals more years!
The research is in
Americans are consuming unhealthy
amounts of sodium in their food. There is
overwhelming evidence that dietary salt is
the major cause of elevated blood pressure,
which is a major risk factor for heart disease,
stroke, congestive heart failure, and kidney
disease. Analysts say that broad-reaching re-
ductions in sodium intake could potentially
prevent more than 100,000 deaths a year.
In response to the Institute of Medicine’s
recent findings, some food companies have
already pledged to modify their products to
include less sodium. Their goal is to reduce
the sodium content of the food supply in
gradual increments, so that consumers don’t
notice the change as their taste sensors adjust
to less salt.
Some more food for thought: Recent stud-
ies show that a high salt intake is related to
osteoporosis, is linked to the severity of asth-
ma, and is probably a major cause of stomach
cancer.
How much is too much?
The average American consumes about
one and a half teaspoons of sodium (about
3,400 milligrams) a day, far exceeding the
national dietary recommendation of no more
than 2,300 milligrams, or one teaspoon a day.
Many people are under the impression that
sodium reduction is only necessary for people
who have hypertension or high-risk groups
for developing hypertension (such as African
Americans and older adults.) The truth is, no
one is immune from the detrimental health
effects of excessive sodium intake. Consider
this: More than half of Americans have either
high-blood pressure or pre-hypertension.
While the government begins to cut the salt
in consumer goods, here are a few unusual tips
to help you lay off the salt on your own:
1. Swap the everyday salt for other tasty
seasonings
One way to cut the sodium without sac-
rificing taste is to swap the salt for delicious
seasonings. Spice up your dish and get some
powerful health benefits at the same time by
using vinegar, garlic, onions, scallions, leeks,
ginger, peppers, dill, oregano, rosemary,
thyme, basil, coriander, fennel, anise, and
cardamom.
Squeeze fresh lemon or lime juice on a
dish to brighten the flavor. For example, you
can roast your vegetables by tossing them
with olive oil and some lemon juice.
You’ll be less likely to notice a difference
in taste if you cut back on salt gradually, over
a few weeks. Within a few weeks of cutting
back on salt, your taste palette will become
more refined; over time, you will come to en-
joy the delicious subtleties of these herbs and
spices -- and you won’t even miss the salt!
2. Look out for hidden salt
You may think the salt shaker is to blame,
but actually, the majority of the salt we con-
sume comes from packaged, processed foods
and from restaurant meals (including fast
food).
Some packaged foods that tend towards
high levels of sodium include processed
snack foods, canned beans, canned soups,
breads and cereals, and frozen entrees. Also,
preserved foods like pickles and olives are
usually very high in sodium. Choose prod-
ucts that say they’re sodium free, very low in
sodium, light in sodium, or unsalted.
Your best bet is to become a label reader
and look at the sodium content of foods. You
may be surprised by what you find -- one cup
of soup could have your daily allowance of
salt for the whole day!
3. Eat out less
Since restaurant meals and fast food are
one of the major contributors to excessive
sodium consumption, eat out less. Don’t
be afraid to request nutritional information
about menu items to see the sodium levels;
most fast food restaurants are required to pro-
vide this information. At restaurants, ask your
server which foods the restaurant prepares
without adding salt, and order those items.
Better yet, fall in love with cooking your
own meals and purchase more wholesome
foods, like fresh meats and vegetables and
unprocessed grains. Then you know exactly
how much salt you are using. When you cook
fresh food from scratch, you will inevitably
cut back on your consumption of processed
foods -- one of the best things you can do for
your long-term health, waistline, and overall
appearance.
4. What about sea salt?
The common table salt that we use to en-
hance flavors has been refined to nothing but
sodium chloride and is devoid of all other es-
sential minerals. Sea salt, on the other hand,
contains close to sixty trace minerals that are
essential for the formation of vitamins, en-
zymes, and proteins that keep our bodies go-
ing. However, although sea salt offers some
nutritional benefits, it is still sodium, so use
in moderation! If you have hypertension or
are at-risk, it is best to skip the sea salt alto-
gether.
If you do decide to add salt responsibly
to your meals, I suggest using only unrefined
sea salt such as that found in the salt beds of
Brittany, which has a slightly gray hue. You
can find this in specialty food stores, some
health food stores, and online.
And keep in mind that it is important to
balance salt intake with potassium to ensure
proper nerve and muscle function; potassi-
um-rich foods include leafy vegetables, soy,
whole grains, potatoes, bananas, and most
fruits.
Healthy kidneys regulate and maintain
just the right amount of sodium, potassium
and other essential minerals in the body by
excreting the excesses and retaining what
the body may be deficient in. It is therefore
critical to support healthy kidney function.
Chinese medicine has long regarded the kid-
ney organ network as fundamental to health
and wellness. The traditional formula used to
support healthy kidney function is Enduring
Youth.
I hope you have found ways to cut the salt!
I invite you to visit often and share your own
personal health and longevity tips with me.
Less salt equals more years
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Kevin McGraw recently achieved Field Testing Technician
certifcation with the American Concrete Institute. This certif-
cation requires demonstration of knowledge and skills in a range
of testing techniques for fresh concrete.
Quality Ready Mix supplies advanced performance concrete
to commercial, industrial, residential, agricultural and institution-
al clients throughout nine counties in West Central Ohio. Owned
& operated by the same local family for three generations, they
serve clients from four batch locations: St. Marys, Wapakoneta,
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For additional information, contact Teri Hirschfeld, Director
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After serving four years in
the military, Lewis started his
McDonald’s career more than 30
years ago making McDonald’s
World Famous French Fries. He
realized that through McDonald’s
he could do two of the things he
loved the most, serve customers
and give back to the commu-
nity in which he lived and did
business. After moving through
the management program Jerry
had the opportunity to build his
first McDonald’s Restaurant in
Bluffton, OH in 1987.
Today, Jerry Lewis is the
owner of seventeen McDonald’s
Restaurants in Lima, Delphos,
Van Wert, Beaverdam, Bluffton,
Ada, Ottawa, Hicksville, Carey
and Upper Sandusky. He employs
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(Continued from page 1A)
Safety…is No Accident. Smith-Boughan, a prominent Mechanical Contractor
in Northwest Ohio believes that working without incident or injury is obtain-
able. Creating a culture of “zero tolerance” for unsafe practices, they empower
their people to make smart choices that are necessary to ensuring a safe work
environment. Driven from the top, their program is integrated across all busi-
ness units. They are able to present opportunities for shared benefts, including
quality control, job effciencies, cost savings, and enhanced relationships with
clients.
Since 1937, Smith-Boughan has been bringing their projects in On-Time,
Under-Budget, and Safely. For the past seven years they have worked con-
tinuously without a lost time incident and to date have accumulated 1,121,948
hours. Every year they are recognized by various associations for their safety
excellence. In 2009, The Mechanical Contractors Association of America and
The West Central Ohio Safety Council along with the Ohio Bureau of Workers’
Compensation recognized Smith-Boughan for achieving safety excellence with
a zero lost workday cases incidence rate, 84% better than the MCAA average.
Every project develops a Site-Specifc Safety Plan based upon the scope
of work and Client, Federal, State and Smith-Boughan Safety Requirements.
On-site project supervisors conduct a daily Task Safety Analysis which outlines
signifcant tasks to be executed. Issues such as the potential hazards associ-
ated with the task, required personal protective equipment, appropriate hazards
controls, permits and emergency procedures are outlined.
Educating employees about working safely is top priority for Smith-Boughan
according to company President Sam Halker. “Our people are our most impor-
tant asset and their safety is of utmost importance to me,” he stated.
Smith-Boughan has been an industry leader for over 73 years, providing a
complete range of mechanical services including: engineering, fabrication, and
construction of Plumbing, HVAC and Industrial Process Systems. In addition
they also provide ongoing maintenance and support services available 24 hours
a day to residential, commercial, institutional, and industrial clients.
Buckle up and Drive Carefully. Your Family and Ours Depend on You.
1,121,948 Hours… That is A Lot of Hours!
Worked without a Lost Time Incident
Contact: Brandi Trueblood
brtrueblood@sbmech.net
419.999.3706 ext. 214
14A TheBusinessJournal June2010
LEIPSIC, Ohio, May 3, 2010 -- PRO-TEC Coating
Company, a 50/50 joint venture between United States
Steel Corporation (NYSE: X) and Kobe Steel, Ltd.,
of Japan, announced today that its president, W. Paul
Worstell, has elected to retire effective June 1, 2010,
after 40 years of service in the steel industry.
Worstell will be succeeded as president of PRO-
TEC by Bryan P. Vaughn, who most recently served as
plant manager of U. S. Steel Canada’s Hamilton Works
in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. PRO-TEC is a provider
of world-class coated fat-rolled steel primarily to the
quality-critical automotive industry.
“Under Paul Worstell’s steady leadership, PRO-
TEC has risen to prominence in the steel-coating
industry as well as in the business world, winning the
U.S. Department of Commerce’s prestigious Malcolm
Baldrige National Quality Award in 2007,” said U. S.
Steel Senior Vice President-North American Flat-Roll
Operations Michael S. Williams, who also serves as U.
S. Steel’s Senior Management Committee Member for
the PRO-TEC joint venture. “Paul has earned a reputa-
tion for excellence in both operations and management
during his long career with our company. His drive to
make our facilities and the products they produce the
best they can be will certainly be missed. We wish Paul
and his family all the best in his retirement.”
Worstell, 61, began his career as a management
trainee at U. S. Steel’s Mon Valley Works - Edgar
Thomson Plant in Braddock, Pa., in 1970. For the next
26 years, he held increasingly responsible supervisory
and management positions at Edgar Thomson Plant as
well as Mon Valley Works’ fnishing facility, Irvin
Plant, located in West Miffin, Pa.
In 1996, Worstell was named general manager of
PRO-TEC, and in December 1998, he was appointed to
his most recent position of president.
A native of Canonsburg, Pa., Worstell holds a
bachelor’s degree in business economics from Mt.
Union College in Alliance, Ohio, and earned a master’s
degree in business administration from the University of
Findlay in Findlay, Ohio.
Worstell serves on the Board of Trustees of the
Ohio Manufacturers’ Association, the Ohio Partnership
for Excellence, the Blanchard Valley Regional Health
Center, Black Swamp Area Council Boy Scouts of
America and the University of Findlay College of
Business Advisory Board. He has served as a lecturer at
the University of Findlay, Mt. Union College and Ohio
Northern University on topics of leadership. Worstell
also serves as an examiner for the Ohio Partnership for
Excellence. Since PRO-TEC’s receipt of the Malcolm
Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) in 2007,
Worstell has been a keynote speaker at many MBNQA-
related conferences around the United States discussing
the topics of leadership and best practices.
In his new position, the 52-year-old Vaughn brings
29 years of well-rounded steelmaking experience to
PRO-TEC.
“Bryan is ideally suited to assume the leadership
of this important joint venture,” said Williams. “His
diverse and extensive operations experiences combined
with his strong leadership abilities will beneft every
associate employed at PRO-TEC.”
Vaughn began his U. S. Steel career as a manage-
ment associate in 1981 at the former Geneva Works in
Utah. During a 14-year period, he advanced through
increasingly responsible positions at Geneva Works
as well as in purchasing at the company’s Pittsburgh,
Pa., corporate headquarters and casting at Mon Valley
Works’ Edgar Thomson Plant.
After serving as a research consultant at U. S. Steel’s
Research and Technology Center near Pittsburgh,
Vaughn transferred to Gary Works in Gary, Ind., in
1997 to fll the role of division manager-steel production
and casting, south. Three years later, he advanced to the
same position for north steel production and casting. In
2003, he was named division manager of sheet products
for the facility.
In June 2006, Vaughn returned to the Pittsburgh
area to serve as plant manager of Mon Valley Works’
Irvin Plant and was responsible for overseeing all roll-
ing and fnishing operations at that facility as well as
the company’s Fairless Plant, a galvanizing plant near
Philadelphia. He assumed his most recent position in
November 2007 after U. S. Steel completed its acquisi-
tion of Canadian steelmaker Stelco Inc.
A native of Denver, Co., Vaughn graduated from
the Colorado School of Mines in 1980 with a bachelor’s
degree in metallurgical engineering. He earned a mas-
ter’s degree in business administration at the University
of Utah in 1991. Vaughn and his wife, Sandy, will
relocate to the Leipsic area.
Pro-Tec coating company president to retire
June2010 TheBusinessJournal 15A
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Ohio Logistics
Fostoria Division
Ohio Logistics
Willard Division
• Warehousing Space - More than 3.5 million square feet
• Distribution/Shipping/Transportation - We have our own fleet
offering Straight Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Yard Management,
and Brokerage Services
• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
Cross Docking, Bar Coding, Freight Forwarding, Import/Export Services,
much more.
• Document Services - Our subsidiary -Document Service Company -
offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
Document Destruction Services in our marketing area.
CORPORATE OFFICE
FINDLAY'S TALL TIMBERS
DIST. CTR., INC. BLDG #1
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Distribution Dr.
Allen Twp. Rd. 99
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
WILLARD DIVISION
810 Theo Moll Drive
Willard, OH 45890
FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
BUILDING #2
6000 Fostoria Ave.
St. Rt. 12 East
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
FOSTORIA DIVISION
130 W. Jones Rd.
Fostoria, OH 44830
OHIO LOGISTICS
TRANSPORTATION GROUP
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45839-0952
I-69 LOGISTICS
4861 South 600 East
Gas City, IN 46933
PENN CENTRE LOGISTICS
250 Runville Road
Bellefonte, PA 16823
SOUTHERN TIER LOGISTICS
736 Addison Road
Painted Post, NY 14870
419-425-4906 • FAX: 419-425-1704 • E-mail:info@ohiologistics.com • www.ohiologistics.com
Providing Logistics Solutions
OHIO
LOGISTICS
I-69
Logistics
Findlay’s
Tall Timbers
Distribution
Center
Penn Centre
Logisistics
Southern Tier
Logistics
Ohio Logistics
Ottawa Division
Ohio Logistics
Fostoria Division
Ohio Logistics
Willard Division
• Warehousing Space - More than 3.5 million square feet
• Distribution/Shipping/Transportation - We have our own fleet
offering Straight Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Yard Management,
and Brokerage Services
• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
Cross Docking, Bar Coding, Freight Forwarding, Import/Export Services,
much more.
• Document Services - Our subsidiary -Document Service Company -
offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
Document Destruction Services in our marketing area.
CORPORATE OFFICE
FINDLAY'S TALL TIMBERS
DIST. CTR., INC. BLDG #1
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Distribution Dr.
Allen Twp. Rd. 99
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
WILLARD DIVISION
810 Theo Moll Drive
Willard, OH 45890
FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
BUILDING #2
6000 Fostoria Ave.
St. Rt. 12 East
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
FOSTORIA DIVISION
130 W. Jones Rd.
Fostoria, OH 44830
OHIO LOGISTICS
TRANSPORTATION GROUP
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45839-0952
I-69 LOGISTICS
4861 South 600 East
Gas City, IN 46933
PENN CENTRE LOGISTICS
250 Runville Road
Bellefonte, PA 16823
SOUTHERN TIER LOGISTICS
736 Addison Road
Painted Post, NY 14870
419-425-4906 • FAX: 419-425-1704 • E-mail:info@ohiologistics.com • www.ohiologistics.com
Providing Logistics Solutions
OHIO
LOGISTICS
I-69
Logistics
Findlay’s
Tall Timbers
Distribution
Center
Penn Centre
Logisistics
Southern Tier
Logistics
Ohio Logistics
Ottawa Division
Ohio Logistics
Fostoria Division
Ohio Logistics
Willard Division
• Warehousing Space - More than 3.5 million square feet
• Distribution/Shipping/Transportation - We have our own fleet
offering Straight Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Yard Management,
and Brokerage Services
• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
Cross Docking, Bar Coding, Freight Forwarding, Import/Export Services,
much more.
• Document Services - Our subsidiary -Document Service Company -
offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
Document Destruction Services in our marketing area.
CORPORATE OFFICE
FINDLAY'S TALL TIMBERS
DIST. CTR., INC. BLDG #1
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Distribution Dr.
Allen Twp. Rd. 99
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
WILLARD DIVISION
810 Theo Moll Drive
Willard, OH 45890
FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
BUILDING #2
6000 Fostoria Ave.
St. Rt. 12 East
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
FOSTORIA DIVISION
130 W. Jones Rd.
Fostoria, OH 44830
OHIO LOGISTICS
TRANSPORTATION GROUP
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45839-0952
I-69 LOGISTICS
4861 South 600 East
Gas City, IN 46933
PENN CENTRE LOGISTICS
250 Runville Road
Bellefonte, PA 16823
SOUTHERN TIER LOGISTICS
736 Addison Road
Painted Post, NY 14870
419-425-4906 • FAX: 419-425-1704 • E-mail:info@ohiologistics.com • www.ohiologistics.com
Providing Logistics Solutions
OHIO
LOGISTICS
I-69
Logistics
Findlay’s
Tall Timbers
Distribution
Center
Penn Centre
Logisistics
Southern Tier
Logistics
Ohio Logistics
Ottawa Division
Ohio Logistics
Fostoria Division
Ohio Logistics
Willard Division
• Warehousing Space - More than 3.5 million square feet
• Distribution/Shipping/Transportation - We have our own fleet
offering Straight Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Yard Management,
and Brokerage Services
• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
Cross Docking, Bar Coding, Freight Forwarding, Import/Export Services,
much more.
• Document Services - Our subsidiary -Document Service Company -
offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
Document Destruction Services in our marketing area.
CORPORATE OFFICE
FINDLAY'S TALL TIMBERS
DIST. CTR., INC. BLDG #1
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Distribution Dr.
Allen Twp. Rd. 99
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
WILLARD DIVISION
810 Theo Moll Drive
Willard, OH 45890
FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
BUILDING #2
6000 Fostoria Ave.
St. Rt. 12 East
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
FOSTORIA DIVISION
130 W. Jones Rd.
Fostoria, OH 44830
OHIO LOGISTICS
TRANSPORTATION GROUP
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45839-0952
I-69 LOGISTICS
4861 South 600 East
Gas City, IN 46933
PENN CENTRE LOGISTICS
250 Runville Road
Bellefonte, PA 16823
SOUTHERN TIER LOGISTICS
736 Addison Road
Painted Post, NY 14870
419-425-4906 • FAX: 419-425-1704 • E-mail:info@ohiologistics.com • www.ohiologistics.com 419-425-4906 • FAX: 419-425-1704 • E-mail: cbills@ohiologistics.com • www.ohiologistics.com
NORTHERN KENTUCKY LOGISTICS
6201 Global Distribution Way
Louisville, Kentucky
502-493-3752
FINDLAY, Ohio – As Friends Business
Source continues to grow its team of sales
professionals, a new leader has emerged from
within. Effective April, 2010, Stacey Wolke
has been promoted to Sales Manager.
“I have worked with Stacey for many
years now and am pleased to extend this op-
portunity to her,” states Betsy Hughes, Vice
President of Sales for Friends. “She truly
knows this industry and is a huge asset to this
company.”
Stacey began with Friends in 1999 as a
Mid-market Inside Sales Executive. As her
career developed, she built and maintained re-
lationships with office managers, and helped
establish the Mansfield territory for Friends.
In 2003, Stacey was promoted to an outside
sales position. She has consistently exceeded
her sales goals within the past ten years. She
took her position as a Corporate Sales Execu-
tive to new levels with accomplishments like
receiving the Vice President Sales Award for
all four quarters during 2008 and 2009.
Now, as a Sales Manager, Stacey has high
hopes for the future of Friends. “I feel that my
experience in selling and technology will be
of help to my team as we move to the next
level in sales!” affirms Stacey.
“I would like to aim for Friends’ growth
in our home markets. It would be great to be-
come the first thing people think about when
they hear ‘Everything for People @ Work’.”
Stacey is now coaching, delegating and
prioritizing for a team of six outside sales
representatives. As she measures customer
service standards and development, she sees
the need for more hands on deck.
“In five years I would hope to have grown
our team from our original six to hopefully a
team of at least 10 to 15 sales reps,” Stacey
says in regards to her aspirations. “I think that
in five years we will have seen an increase
in our reach into lower Michigan and maybe
even into Indiana.”
Friends Business Source is one of Ohio’s
largest independently owned office supply
dealers. For over 45 years, Friends has been
partnering with companies throughout Ohio
and into southeastern Michigan to maintain
the best service and supply of office related
products. They specialize in office supplies,
office furniture, business machines, educa-
tional services, coffee-trend supplies, promo-
tional products and janitorial supplies. As a
single source supplier, Friends truly has ev-
erything for people at work.
Friends
business
source
continues
the growth
16A TheBusinessJournal June2010

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