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BizjrnlJuly2010A

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Lima • Delphos • Wapakoneta • Ottawa • www.SuperiorFCU.

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• Commercial
RealEstate 7
• Economic
Development 9-16
• VanWertHospital
EmergencyRoom 17
• Elder
Care 20-22
THE
July 2010
BusinessJournal
OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
Internet Service Provided
by North West Net Inc.
Call
1-800-899-3447
or visit our office at
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ater Street
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INSIDE
T h e B u s i n e s s J o u r n a l
4 0 5 N . M a i n S t .
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P e r m i t N o . 2 8 6
Lima, OH — Tuttle Construction, Inc. of Lima
and R. D. Jones of Harrod, Ohio have formed a
Joint Venture to provide general construction and
sitework services on the new Vine Street Rail
Separation project in Lima.
The railroad grade underpass in the city of Lima’s
south side will be located on Vine St. between Main
St. and Central Ave. The new grade separation will
prevent trains from blocking access to the city’s
south side, which currently occurs at least twice a
day for 20 minutes.
The railroad underpass will be a three-lane road-
way section, offering enough clearance for safe,
continued traffic. It will provide a safer multiple-rail
crossing for motorists and pedestrians, eliminate
congestion and delay, and reduce motorist traffic
bypassing the affected crossings by using residential
streets.
The underpass will include features such as
renderings of locomotives built in Lima, attractive
lighting, fencing and landscaping.
R.D. Jones & Tuttle form joint venture for
the new Vine Street Rail Separation project
See VENTURE, page 2
Business Journal announces
annual award-headline
The fourth annual business
award program to recognize the
outstanding young leaders of
the region has been announced
by the Business Journal of West
Central Ohio.
Don Hemple, publisher, ex-
plained the awards will recog-
nize the 20 male and female en-
trepreneurs, business executives,
scholars, civic and cultural lead-
ers who define and influence our
communities.
“The 20 under 40 award will
spotlight the business stars of
tomorrow-business people un-
der the age of 40 who exemplify
the enterpreneurial spirit of the
region’s business community,
while balaning bottom line re-
sults with a desire to participate
in community activites,” said
Hemple.
It’s hoped that this award will
become the “Oscars” of the 13-
county regions’s business com-
munity,” continued Hemple.
November 2007 was the first
time for this award, recognizing
the business leaders at a lun-
cheon at the Old Barn Outback.
The Main St. Bistro was the lo-
cation for the 2008 event. Last
year, the luncheon was held at
the Courtyard by Marriott, the
site for the 2010 event.
Honoress for this award will
be nominated by subscribers to
the Business Journal and select-
Only 1 of 4 in Ohio
Apollo Career Center has just been named an
Accredited Test Facility (ATF) by the American
Welding Society - one of only four in the state of
Ohio.
This accreditation means Apollo can test and
upon successful completion, grant American
Welding Society (AWS) certifcation. “If you want
to get a good paying job as a welder in today’s
competitive work environment, it’s important you
obtain this nationally recognized certifcation,” says
Ann Benfeld, Diversifed Industrial Training
Manager, Apollo Adult Education.
When a welder possesses AWS certifcation,
it proves they have the fundamental welding
knowledge leading business and industry not only
needs, but requires. “The welding industry will
remain strong,” says Michael Foos, Manager of
Apollo Career Center named
accredited welding test facility
See AWARD, page 4
Manufacturing Programs,
General Dynamics Land Systems Division.
“Welding is a process that is essential for a broad
spectrum of manufactured products within the United
States. The technology of welding processes will
continue to grow and training will become increasingly
important as employers will look for essential basic
skills in their prospective employees. Certifcations
to recognized industry standards will assist employers
in identifying necessary skills and assist individuals
See APOLLO, page 4
2 TheBusinessJournal July2010
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• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
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offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
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FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
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• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
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DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
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Fostoria, OH 44830
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OHIO
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Findlay’s
Tall Timbers
Distribution
Center
Penn Centre
Logisistics
Southern Tier
Logistics
Ohio Logistics
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Ohio Logistics
Fostoria Division
Ohio Logistics
Willard Division
• Warehousing Space - More than 3.5 million square feet
• Distribution/Shipping/Transportation - We have our own fleet
offering Straight Trucks, Tractor Trailers, Yard Management,
and Brokerage Services
• Foreign Trade Zone FTZ 151 - Opens the Whole World to Your Firm
• Light Manufacturing/Value Added Services - We offer Packaging,
Labeling,Pick and Pack, Distribution, Order Desk Services, Inventory
Control, Serial and Date Control, Assembly/Sub-Assembly,
Cross Docking, Bar Coding, Freight Forwarding, Import/Export Services,
much more.
• Document Services - Our subsidiary -Document Service Company -
offers the most complete Document Management, Archival and
Document Destruction Services in our marketing area.
CORPORATE OFFICE
FINDLAY'S TALL TIMBERS
DIST. CTR., INC. BLDG #1
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
INDUSTRIAL PARK
Distribution Dr.
Allen Twp. Rd. 99
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
WILLARD DIVISION
810 Theo Moll Drive
Willard, OH 45890
FINDLAY’S TALL TIMBERS
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.
BUILDING #2
6000 Fostoria Ave.
St. Rt. 12 East
Findlay, OH 45840
OHIO LOGISTICS
FOSTORIA DIVISION
130 W. Jones Rd.
Fostoria, OH 44830
OHIO LOGISTICS
TRANSPORTATION GROUP
2001 Industrial Drive
Findlay, OH 45839-0952
I-69 LOGISTICS
4861 South 600 East
Gas City, IN 46933
PENN CENTRE LOGISTICS
250 Runville Road
Bellefonte, PA 16823
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NORTHERN KENTUCKY LOGISTICS
6201 Global Distribution Way
Louisville, Kentucky
502-493-3752
Sidney, OH – SMS proTECH an-
nounced today it has won the Customer
Experience Award as part of Microsoft’s
H2 Heartland Area Partner Awards Pro-
gram. The company was chosen out of an
extensive field of Microsoft partners for
delivering market-leading customer solu-
tions built on Microsoft technology.
“The value of Microsoft’s Partner chan-
nel is immeasurable. This award highlights
the partner’s value, dedication, and com-
mitment to our business. The tremendous
contributions and achievements of our
partners continue to be the cornerstone of
Microsoft’s success,” said Jennifer Heard,
Vice President - Central Region SMS&P,
“We have the best partners in the world
– they are the center of our universe and
we can’t do this without them”.
The Microsoft Partner Program Awards
recognizes Microsoft Partners that have
developed and delivered exceptional Mi-
crosoft-based solutions over the past year.
Customer Experience - recognizes a
partner who has provided consistently
exceptional customer satisfaction or an
exceptional engagement framework with
Microsoft through outreach and participa-
tion across a range of activities.
SMS proTECH
Honored as FY10H2
Heartland Area
Partner Award
Winner by
Microsoft for
Customer Experience
This is the first RD Jones/Tuttle Joint
Venture project and the team will be working
with many different entities including The
City of Lima, Norfolk Southern Railroad,
CSX Railroad, URS, Jacobs Engineering,
Poggemeyer Design Group, ODOT, and
American Structurepoint.
Tuttle Senior Project Manager, Rob
Brown stated, “The Tuttle and R.D. Jones
team is very excited to be involved in this
local project, which is partially funded by the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act,
and we are ready to hit the ground running.”
Construction of the new project is sched-
uled to start the beginning of May 2010 and
is expected to be completed by February
2012.
Tuttle
(Continued from page 1)
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 3
Business
Journal
THE
of West Central Ohio
Volume 18, No. 7
Publisher Donald R. Hemple
Contributing Writers
Jeffrey Gitomer
Advertising Donald R. Hemple
The Business Journal is mailed to the top business leaders
in the 11-county region of West Central Ohio. Although infor-
mation is gathered from sources considered to be reliable,
the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be
guaranteed. Information expressed in The Business Journal
does not constitute a solicitation for the purchase or sale of
any products.
Copyright, The Business Journal of West Central Ohio, 2006,
All rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written per-
mission of editorial, photographic or other graphic content in
any manner is prohibited. The Business Journal is published
monthly at 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
Contact Us
Telephone 419-999-4762
Don Hemple 419-695-0015 ext. 138
Marilyn Hoffman 419-695-0015 ext. 131
Vicki Gossman 419-695-0015 ext. 128
Stacy Prine 419-695-0015 ext. 129
toll free 800-589-6950
Mail 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833-1598
For information concerning news,
advertising and subscription e-mail us at:
dhemple@delphosherald.com
or bizjrnl@delphosherald.com
www.businessjrnl.com
Dedicated to Excellence since 1920
Ferguson Construction has built a reputation of excellence and trust throughout our 90 year history
by doing great work. We are excited to have been recognized nationally for our work on a healthcare
project we recently completed in the region. Call us today if you are considering building or renovating,
our goal is to make every project award winning!
Sidney: 937-498-2381
Dayton: 937-274-1173
Columbus: 614-876-8496
Indiana: 812-546-0333
www.ferguson-construction.com
ince 1920
S
National construction award winner
Trust Experience
Trust
Trust Experience
Trust
Industrial & Commercial Roofing
www.CottermanRoofng.com
Minster & Dayton
419-628-3713
Builder confidence highest in over two years
Builder confidence in the market for
newly built, single-family homes rose for
a second consecutive month in May to its
highest level in more than two years, ac-
cording to the latest National Association
of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing
Market Index (HMI), released today. The
HMI gained three points to 22 in May, its
highest point since August of 2007.
“Builders surveyed for the HMI at the
beginning of May were undoubtedly re-
acting to the heightened consumer interest
they had just witnessed as the deadline for
home buyer tax credits arrived at the end
of April,” said Bob Jones, Chairman of the
National Association of Home Builders
(NAHB) and a home builder from Bloom-
field Hills, Mich. “Builders are also hope-
ful that the solid momentum that the tax
credits initiated will continue even now
that those incentives are gone.”
“The really encouraging part of today’s
HMI is that sales expectations for the next
six months continued to gain, despite the
expiration of the home buyer tax credits at
the end of April,” said NAHB Chief Econ-
omist David Crowe. “This means builders
are more comfortable that the market is
truly beginning to recover, and that posi-
tive factors for buying a new home – low
interest rates, great selection, stabilizing
prices, and a recovering job market – are
taking the place of tax incentives to gener-
ate buyer demand.”
Crowe was quick to point out, how-
ever, that while builder confidence has
improved from the depths of the housing
downturn, it is still quite low by historic
standards. “Obviously we still have a long
way to go, and it’s worth repeating that
continued challenges such as the critical
lack of project financing, inappropriate ap-
praisal procedures, competition from short
sales and foreclosures, and the soaring
costs of some building materials are major
obstacles on the path to a healthier housing
market and economy,” he said.
Derived from a monthly survey that
NAHB has been conducting for more than
20 years, the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing
Market Index gauges builder perceptions
of current single-family home sales and
sales expectations for the next six months
as “good,” “fair” or “poor.” The survey also
asks builders to rate traffic of prospective
buyers as “high to very high,” “average”
or “low to very low.” Scores for each com-
ponent are then used to calculate a sea-
sonally adjusted index where any number
over 50 indicates that more builders view
sales conditions as good than poor.
Each of the HMI’s three component in-
dexes posted three-point gains in May. The
component gauging current sales condi-
tions climbed to 23, its highest level since
July of 2007. The component gauging
sales expectations in the next six months
rose to 28, its highest point since Novem-
ber 2009, and the component gauging traf-
fic of prospective buyers improved to 16,
its best showing since September 2009.
The HMI also posted gains in every re-
gion in May. The Northeast, which has the
smallest survey sample and is therefore
subject to greater month-to-month volatil-
ity, rose 14 points to 35, its highest point
since June of 2007. The Midwest posted
a two-point gain to 17, while the South
registered a one-point gain to 22, and the
West posted a seven-point gain to 20.
The really encouraging part
of today’s HMI is that sales
expectations for the next six
months continued to gain, despite
the expiration of the home buyer
tax credits at the end of April.
– David Crowe,
NAHB chief economist
4 TheBusinessJournal July2010
looking for employment,” stresses Foos.
Recently, General Dynamics Land
Systems Division called upon Apollo’s
Adult Education to assist them in training
and testing welders to fll positions that were
going unflled. In fact, less than two weeks
ago Foos told Republican Gubernatorial
candidate John Kasich, Apollo staff and stu-
dents that a welder that works overtime can
make more than $100,000 annually – rare in
today’s economy.
Students completing Apollo’s long-term
welding program will have successfully
demonstrated skills needed for entry level
employment in ARC, TIG, MIG, Pipe and
OXY Fuel welding and cutting applications.
Students will also obtain skills in metal
fabrication, blueprint reading/metallurgy,
mathematics and welding fundamentals/
metrology.
Many of Apollo’s Adult Education stu-
dents choose a career path with a local
union upon graduation. “The welding skill
needed to perform for the Plumbers and
Pipeftter’s must meet the industry’s high-
est standard - with no other skilled trade
coming close to matching this which is
why we value accredited programs such as
Apollo’s,” says Mike Knisley, Business
Manager, Plumbers and Pipeftters Local
776.
An Associated Press article dated May
14, 2010 entitled College isn’t smart for
everyone poses the question do too many
students go to college? The article says “the
notion that a four-year degree is essential for
real success is being challenged by a grow-
ing number of economists, policy analysts
and academics. They say more Americans
should consider other options such as techni-
cal training or two-year schools, which have
been embraced in Europe for decades.”
The AWS Accredited Test Facility pro-
gram establishes minimum requirements for
test facilities, their personnel, and equip-
ment to qualify for accreditation to test and
qualify welders. Accredited Test Facilities
play an integral part in the operation of the
AWS Certifed Welding program and have
proven they have the necessary resources
to test welders to this nationally recognized
and accepted program.
“There’s never been a time where it’s
been more important for Apollo to pro-
vide its students with all of the tools they
need to succeed in a skilled workforce
environment,” says Judy Wells, Apollo
Superintendent.
Some welders who possess welding cer-
tifcations open their own welding business.
Others will weld in outer space, under
water, on race cars or the shipping industry.
Some will take up welding professions such
as supervisors, technicians, instructors, and
inspectors. “This illustrates the importance
of a welding certifcation that is recognized
world-wide to fll the void of highly skilled
and experienced welders,” says Benfeld.
For more information on Apollo’s long-
term and short-term welding and manufac-
turing engineering programs, contact Adult
Education at 419.998.3000
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Sidney Warehousing Inc.
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Sidney, OH 45365
Phone: 937.498.1164 Fax: 937.498.4746
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A Full Service Distribution Center
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www.e-fnb.com
PANDORA · 102 E. Main St. · 419.384.3221

BLUFFTON · 112 Cherry St. · 419.358.5500

FINDLAY · 1630 Tiffin Ave. · 419.429.6000

Follow us today at www.twitter.com/e_fnb
ed by an independent panel of judges.
Nominations open July 1, 2010, and
must be received by November 8, 2020,
Nominations forms will be published in
the Business Journal the next five months,
July thru November.
The Business Journal will produce and
publish a special supplement to be included
with the December 2010 issue. Photograhs
and profiles will spotlight each honoree.
An award luncheon is planned for noon
at the Courtyard Marriott, Lima, December
1. Sponsorships for this event are avail-
able. Interested corporations and business
should contact Don Hemple, publisher, at
419-695-0015 extl. 138.
Apollo (Continued from page 1)
Award
(Continued from page 1)
July2010TheBusinessJournal 5
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What’s your company’s social media
policy?
Probably shortsighted.
Social media, or social networking
- better defned by the larger players:
Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Flickr, and
YouTube - has become more than a glob-
al phenomenon. When combined with
your online presence and online outreach,
it’s a global business phenomenon, and a
revenue generating phenomenon. If it’s
done right.
Many businesses are using social
media.
Many businesses are not using social
media.
Many businesses forbid social media.
Many businesses are still trying to fg-
ure out what to do.
Wake up and smell the re-tweets!
Social media is not only here to stay, the
few that are heavily involved are (silent-
ly) reaping the benefts.
Why silently? Because they don’t want
their (stupid, chicken, technophobic) com-
petitors to wake up and get on the band-
wagon, or should I say, brandwagon.
NOTICE TO THE SHORTSIGHTED
MANAGEMENT THAT IS AFRAID TO
LET THE NEW WORLD IN: I assume
your healthcare package includes blood-
letting.
REALITY: There’s a huge trust factor
at hand – you can’t treat your salespeople
like children and expect them to act like
adults.
What your management is saying by
restricting social media access is:
• We don’t trust our people to do the
right thing.
Management is also saying:
• This is how we want our young
employees to perceive management.
• We want to create an opening for
competition to steal our customers.
• We want to create an opening for
competition to hire our disgruntled
employees.
• We want to create an opening for a
huge morale issue.
• We want to create a word-of-mouth
issue about our low technology and trust.
• We want to create a perception to
customers of our inferior technology.
And worst of all:
• We want to lose an unbelievable
chance for feedback from customers.
IDEA: If you don’t allow standard
Facebook – allow Facebook Fan or “Like”
pages.
IDEA: Create a social media training
program for what it is, how it works, and
what to do to succeed.
BETTER IDEA: Seek professional
help.
BEST IDEA: When you establish
guidelines, tell employees what they CAN
do, not what they can’t do.
Here’s a simple list of what to do as
you enter the social media world:
• Model after others who are success-
ful.
• Create attraction through value and
valuable information offered.
• Offer value before asking for
money.
• Don’t stick your big toe in the water.
Dive in!
And it’s FREE!
Need more reality?
• There are 450 million people on
Facebook – Who’s your fan? Who likes
you?
• There are 30 million people twitter
– How are you sending value messages
to thousands of customers and prospects
– for free?
• There are 65 million business people
on LinkedIn – What’s your share of con-
nections and leads?
• There are millions of videos posted
on YouTube every day – Why aren’t
some of them yours?
• There are millions of YouTube vid-
eos viewed every MINUTE – Why aren’t
your customers viewing yours?
REALITY 1: The sales pressure is
on for EVERY company in this country.
Maintain volume, improve, survive, make
proft, and hurry up. Go out and make
more cold calls – generate more activity
(whatever that means).
REALITY 2: Social media is the new
cold call, and you are still dialing for
dollars, or pounding the pavement. How
about trying to keyboard for connec-
tions?
REALITY 2.5: Sales management and
senior management better realize this or
they will begin to rot in their own inepti-
tude.
By coincidence, I’m in Kitchener,
Ontario (Canada for the geographically
challenged), to deliver a seminar to group
of tech people wanting to sell better and
sell more – people who are not natural
born salespeople. How did you fnd me?
Eh, on the Internet! Through my email
magazine Sales Caffeine, my Facebook
page, and my tweets.
How are people fnding you?
Who’s your fan?
Who likes you?
Who’s following you?
Who’s re-tweeting you?
Who’s reaching out to connect with
you?
ANSWER: NOT ENOUGH PEOPLE!
And it’s FREE!
And for those about to email me, tell-
ing me you have been cold calling for 20
years blah, blah, blah – go turn on your
laptop. You’re right, cold calls do work.
One out of 100 times.
I came across a piece I think will inter-
est you - a chief marketing offcer’s view
of what to do to be effective on each
of the social media platforms. It’s not
gospel, but it’s a perspective I think is
worthwhile to read. Go to www.gitomer.
com and enter the word CMO in the
GitBit box.
Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible
and The Little Red Book of Selling. President of
Charlotte-based Buy Gitomer, he gives seminars, runs
annual sales meetings, and conducts Internet training
programs on selling and customer service at www.
trainone.com. He can be reached at 704/333-1112 or
e-mail to salesman@gitomer.com
© 2010 All Rights Reserved - Don’t even think
about reproducing this document
without written permission from Jeffrey H.
Gitomer and Buy Gitomer, Inc. • 704/333-1112
Oh no, not Facebook! AHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!
Jeffrey
Gitomer
6 TheBusinessJournal July2010

What do we do?
Manpower, proudly serving the West Central Ohio Area for over 30 years!
Contact Manpower to see what we can do for you.
1921 Havemann Rd 1706 South Main St 2320 Harding Highway 1576 West Michigan St
Celina, OH 45822 Bellefontaine, OH 43111 Lima, OH 45804 Sidney, OH 45365
419.586.9888 937.592.7220 419.227.1970 937.492.3756
What do you do?
• Temp-to Hire
• Training
• Assessment Services
• Staffing
• Permanent Placement
• Professional/Technical
• HR Services
PERRYSBURG TOWN-
SHIP, OH – Owens Commu-
nity College Board of Trust-
ees has ended its presidential
search and selected Dr. Larry
G. McDougle to serve as the
academic institution’s new
President. Dr. McDougle has
been serving as the College’s
Interim President since Janu-
ary of this year.
The Board of Trustees ap-
proved Dr. McDougle’s ap-
pointment as the fifth Presi-
dent in the 45-year history
of Owens Community Col-
lege during their regular June
meeting. Both the Board of
Trustees and Dr. McDougle
have agreed to a one-year
contract.
According to Owens
Community College Board of
Trustees Chair Dee Talmage,
the Presidential Search Com-
mittee was planning to recon-
vene in June to review addi-
tional applications, however,
after receiving overwhelming
feedback from the College’s
campus community as well as
community members in sup-
port of Dr. McDougle and his
leadership the decision was
made to end the search.
“During the past six
months, Dr. Larry McDougle’s
leadership and experience has
been integral in bringing the
Owens Community College
campus community together
and moving the academic in-
stitution forward during chal-
lenging times,” stated Board
of Trustees Chair Talmage.
She added, “The North-
west Ohio region as well as
the state and country are cur-
rently experiencing economic
hardship and instability that
has not been seen in decades,
which has thrust the role of
higher education into the na-
tional spotlight. Colleges and
universities must continue to
adapt to the changing times
in order to prepare a highly
trained and highly skilled
workforce. Dr. McDougle is
well-respected among educa-
tional and community leaders
nationwide and is commit-
ted to the College’s mission
of serving our students. He
is passionate about making a
difference in the lives of oth-
ers and the right person to lead
Owens Community College.”
“I look forward to con-
tinuing to work with Dr.
McDougle as Owens Com-
munity College works to
meet the educational needs of
students in Northwest Ohio,”
said Ohio Board of Regents
Chancellor Eric D. Fingerhut.
“His experience and commit-
ment to education and to Ow-
ens Community College is
invaluable to the University
System of Ohio.”
Ohio Association of Com-
munity Colleges President
Dr. Ronald Abrams, extended
congratulations to both Dr.
McDougle and Owens Com-
munity College. “Larry is a
true friend and advocate of
community colleges and has
displayed an unwavering
commitment to higher edu-
cation throughout his years
of service,” Dr. Abrams said.
“His measured approach to
leading a community col-
lege, along with his wealth of
knowledge and experience,
will continue to prove ben-
eficial for Owens and the sur-
rounding community.”
“Owens Community Col-
lege has a long and proud
tradition of providing a su-
perior educational experience
through excellence, innova-
tion and collaboration and I
embrace this opportunity to
serve the students, faculty and
staff as the academic institu-
tion’s new President,” said
Dr. Larry McDougle, Presi-
dent of Owens Community
College.
President McDougle add-
ed, “Higher education plays
a vital role in our region’s
economic development, vi-
tality and productivity. In
order for Northwest Ohio to
be successful, businesses,
industry and academic insti-
tutions alike must strengthen
our partnerships to compete
in today’s global economy. I
foresee even more collabora-
tions ahead as Owens Com-
munity College will remain
ambitious in its pursuit of
opening new doors to higher
educational opportunities.”
Since becoming the Col-
lege’s Interim President
in January, McDougle has
worked tirelessly to reach out
and engage Owens faculty,
staff and students, as well as
community and educational
partners, with the purpose of
advancing higher education
for area residents throughout
Northwest Ohio and beyond.
Under his leadership, the Col-
lege has expanded education-
al opportunities to Arrowhead
Park in Maumee and unveiled
a new Learning Center, as
well as opened the doors to
a newly renovated Founders
Hall. The College is currently
in the midst of refurbishing
Heritage Hall at the former
Penta Career Center as part
of Owens’ ongoing campus
expansion initiative.
Other initiatives include
the opening of a new Fac-
ulty Development Center on
Toledo-area Campus, as well
as announcing plans for a new
wind turbine and solar array
on the Findlay-area Campus.
Additionally, Owens recently
began the implementation of
a new Energy Strategic Plan,
which is projected to annu-
ally reduce energy by over
20 percent once the initia-
tive is fully operational, and
further enhanced educational
services for students through
the creation of an OServe
area. In addition, a new Aca-
demic Achievement Scholar-
ship Program was unveiled
in March. The program is de-
signed to provide graduating
high school students achiev-
ing academic excellence at
the highest level the opportu-
nity to pursue a free college
education.
Also under President
McDougle’s leadership, a
thorough analysis of the reg-
istered nursing program, as
well as with all other academ-
ic programs, has and will con-
tinue to take place to ensure
that a situation involving the
loss of accreditation with an
academic program does not
happen again. A new review
process is now in place for
all academic programs. Addi-
tionally, the School of Nurs-
ing is currently working dili-
gently on regaining NLNAC
registered nursing program
accreditation with the over-
all goal of becoming an elite
Owens Board of Trustees Names Dr. Larry G. McDougle President
419-224-6980
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See OWENS, page 22
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 7
Commercial Real Estate
Sidney, Ohio – Industrial Property
Brokers (IPB)/CORFAC International,
a leading full-service commercial real
estate provider serving the Western Ohio
and Eastern Indiana market, along with
Echo Development announces a new ten-
ant in the Echo Business Center at 634
Vandemark Road in Sidney, Ohio.
Allergy and Asthma Centre will occu-
py 1,500 SF of the newly constructed
building in which Area Wireless occu-
pies 2,700 SF. Additional construction
is being planned to accommodate future
tenants in Echo Business Center as well.
Allergy and Asthma Centre is mov-
ing from their Fourth Avenue, Sidney
location into the Vandemark Road build-
ing, which is owned/developed by 75
Development LLC of Troy, Ohio and
designed and constructed by Weigandt
Development, LTD out of Minster, Ohio.
Allergy and Asthma Centre is scheduled
to occupy the space beginning June 14
th
and will begin accepting patients June
21
st
.
Tim Echemann, Principal Broker,
Industrial Property Brokers/CORFAC
International is managing the marketing
of Echo Business Center. “We are thrilled
to have successfully attracted a new cli-
ent to the business park and feel that
Weigandt Development’s design and high
quality management services has made all
the difference,” Echemann stated. Echo
Development is currently fnishing Echo
Drive within the business park that will
eventually connect to Folkerth Avenue to
the east side of the park; this will allow
access directly to I-75. “IPB is also offer-
ing one to fourteen acre sites within the
industrial park for sale or for build to
suit,” added Echemann. Echo Business
Center offers prime building sites for
business and medical offces, retail estab-
lishments and restaurants.
“Due to the success of the quick lease
of this space, we are moving forward
with another spec space and will break
ground with in the next 60-90 days,”
commented Dick Weigandt of Weigandt
Development, LTD. “We are construct-
ing 1,500 SF with an additional 3,000 SF
available for build to suit. This site will
accommodate up to an additional 4,500
SF of space,” added Weigandt.
Along with the Sidney location, Allergy
and Asthma Centre also has locations in
Englewood, Beavercreek and Centerville,
Ohio. “We chose this location because it
offers us more space, additional parking,
a brand new building and is located in an
excellent high traffc area with quick and
easy access to I-75,” commented Joyce
Smith of the Allergy and Asthma Centre.
Industrial Property Brokers/
CORFAC International is a premier
full service real estate company offering
sales, leasing, investment analysis, tenant
representation, and property management
throughout Western Ohio and Eastern
Indiana. The company is located at 213
N. Ohio Ave., Sidney, Ohio and also
maintains an offce in Napoleon (near
Cleveland), OH. For more information
on Echo Business Center, business and
individuals are encouraged to contact
Tim Echemann @ 937-492-4423 or visit
www.industrialproperty.biz.
About CORFAC International
CORFAC International is one of the
largest commercial real estate services
organizations in the world and celebrates
its 21st year in 2010. U.S.-based CORFAC
is comprised of privately held entrepre-
neurial frms serving more than 150 mar-
kets in The Americas and internationally
through alliances with UK-based King
Sturge, BDI in Mexico, Rios Commercial
in Puerto Rico and Panama-based Latin
American Corporate Property Services. In
recent years, CORFAC frms completed
over 9,000 commercial real estate trans-
actions annually, encompassing more
than 300 million square feet and valued
each year in excess of $30 billion. For
more information on CORFAC contact
954-923-6160, info@corfac.com or visit
www.corfac.com.
Industrial Property Brokers/CORFAC International Announces New Tenant
in the Echo Business Center Along with New Construction Planned
AlexanderRealtyServices.Net
Mike Alexander
419-331-8127
rmalex@woh.rr.com
Cindy Alexander
419-234-7208
cindy@cindyalexander
realestate.com
2102 Edgewood Dr., Lima, OH
$287,000
126 Perrysburg Rd., Cairo, OH
$270,000
2102 Edgewood Dr. • Lima, OH 45805
Unique Commercial Listings
• Home3BD/3BA
• Showroom+2offcesuites/1/2BA
• Finishedbasement/1/2BA
• 3cargarage
• Storagebuilding24x40
• 2lotstotal1.31acres-Canbesplit
• PrimelocationlocatednearLimaMall
• Homecanbeusedforlivingquarters
aslongasthereisabusinessonproperty
• House&Buildingcanbemoved
• Halftaxes$1630
• Builtin1989
• OwnerisREALTOR
®
• TotalSq.ft.7056
• Businessopportunity
• TrussManufacturing
• Fullyoperational
• Customerbase
• Generalmanageravailabletocontinueoperations
• Buildingadaptabletootherbusiness
• Homeorproperty(nowrented)
• Trussequipmentincludedinprice
• Realestateonly$200,000
• Halftaxes$829
According to research, those businesses seeking the advan-
tages of being perceived as having greater resources, being a
leader and being more experienced should utilize the strategy
of larger, more colorful, more frequent advertising.
8 TheBusinessJournal July2010
As COOPER TIRE & RUBBER COM-
PANY (NYSE: CTB) increases the pace of
new product development, the company
will enhance its emphasis on global tech-
nology and development resources.
Cooper will increase technical staffing
levels significantly this year in each of its
three technical centers. A total of approxi-
mately 40 employees will be added. This
will include 25 engineers and scientists
to the North America Technical Center
(NATC) in Findlay, Ohio, 13 to its Asian
Technical Center (ATC) near Shanghai,
People’s Republic of China, and several
to its European Technical Centre (ETC) in
Melksham, England.
“To support our strategy of introducing
exciting new products at an ever increas-
ing pace, we are continuing to strengthen
our capability to feed the Cooper innova-
tion pipeline by increasing technology re-
sources in every region of the company,”
said Chuck Yurkovich, Cooper’s vice
president of global technology. “Finding
good technical people and rapidly on-
boarding them will be critical to our pace
of new product development over the next
3-5 years.”
Cooper will be adding engineers in
its performance passenger, light truck/
SUV and commercial truck tire product
development groups, materials engineers
and chemists to its materials development
departments, CAD engineers and CAM
programmers, FEA engineers and soft-
ware developers to the computer aided
engineering discipline, technologists and
test development engineers to its materi-
als laboratories and tire testing labs, and
an additional test driver to its staff at Coo-
per’s test track near San Antonio, Texas.
With the hiring of additional engineers,
scientists and developers, the company
plans to support enhanced product lines and
broaden overall technical capabilities. In a
fast-paced product growth environment,
Cooper is continuing to drive innovation
and product excellence while providing op-
portunities for a new generation of experts
to join a rapidly expanding global organi-
zation that prides itself on manufacturing
quality products.
Cooper Tire continues
tech investment strategy
Cooper Tire names new
director of credit
Defiance College only Ohio college to receive
$50,000 grant from Walmart Foundation and CIC
DEFIANCE, Ohio – Defiance College
is the only college in Ohio among 30 col-
leges and universities across the country
selected to receive grants under the sec-
ond round of Council of Independent Col-
leges (CIC) and the Walmart Foundation’s
Walmart College Success Awards. The an-
nouncement was made this week by the
CIC and the Walmart Foundation. Through
the awards program, CIC member colleges
and universities selected through a com-
petitive application process will receive
substantial grants to help strengthen exem-
plary programs that support the education
of first-generation students. The selected
institutions join 20 colleges and universi-
ties previously awarded grants in the first
round. Of these 50 colleges, Defiance is
the only one from Ohio.
Defiance College will receive a $50,000
grant to further its efforts to provide special
individualized attention to first-generation
students in order to help them achieve suc-
cess in college.
“We are thrilled to be a recipient of this
grant and to receive national recognition as
a leader in the effort to assist first-generation
students,” said Mark C. Gordon, president
of Defiance College. “At Defiance College
we focus on working with each student as
an individual, providing a broad range of
support, mentoring, advice, and assistance.
This grant will enable us to work even more
intensively one-on-one with a group of first
generation college students to further im-
prove their chances of success in college.
I am particularly proud of the numerous
ways that our faculty, administrators, staff,
coaches, and alumni are all willing to work
together to help these students reach their
potential.”
Defiance will use the grant monies to
implement parts of its innovative individu-
alized approach in which students work
with a team to create and refine their own
Personal Success Plans for their college ex-
perience. Participating students will also
receive added services, including expanded
faculty and peer mentoring, targeted work-
shops, and focused cultural activities. The
grant will also enable Defiance College to
provide a broader level of support to an ex-
panded group of incoming students whose
backgrounds show the kinds of risk factors
that have traditionally made college success
particularly challenging.
“As the federal government and phil-
anthropic leaders call for increased degree
completion in higher education, small and
mid-sized private institutions are an under-
utilized resource in this effort,” said CIC
President Richard Ekman. “Private colleges
also enroll comparable or higher percent-
ages of lower-income and first-generation
students to public institutions and they re-
quire far less subsidy by state governments
to succeed in meeting these national goals.
Most importantly, small and midsized pri-
vate institutions have moved beyond a focus
on access to a record of unequalled success
in retaining and graduating low-income and
first-generation students.”
The selected institutions are expected to
work together as a network to assist first-
generation college students, learn from one
another, and serve as models for other col-
leges and universities.
The Council of Independent Colleges
(CIC) is an association of more than 600 in-
dependent, liberal arts colleges and univer-
sities and higher education affiliates and or-
ganizations that work together to strengthen
college and university leadership, sustain
high-quality education, and enhance private
higher education’s contributions to society.
To fulfill this mission, CIC provides its
members with skills, tools, and knowledge
that address aspects of leadership, financial
management and performance, academic
quality, and institutional visibility. The
Council is headquartered at One Dupont
Circle in Washington, DC. For more infor-
mation, visit www.cic.edu.
The Walmart Foundation funds initiatives
focused on education, workforce develop-
ment, economic opportunity, environmen-
tal sustainability, and health and wellness.
From Feb. 1, 2009 through Jan. 31, 2010,
Walmart and the Walmart Foundation gave
more than $512 million in cash and in-kind
gifts globally, $467 million of which was
donated in the U.S. To learn more, visit
www.walmartfoundation.org.
Defiance College, chartered in 1850, is
an independent, liberal arts institution in
Northwest Ohio offering more than 40 un-
dergraduate programs of study as well as
graduate programs in education and busi-
ness. Defiance College has received national
recognition for its educational experience of
service and engagement. The college web-
site is www.defiance.edu.
FINDLAY, OHIO - COOPER TIRE &
RUBBER COMPANY (NYSE:CTB) to-
day announced the appointment of Craig
Durliat as director of credit for the North
American Tire Division.
In this role, Durliat will be responsible
for the administration and maintenance of
the credit and accounts receivable func-
tions. He will work with Cooper custom-
ers, the sales team, the marketing and ad-
ministrative management team and credit
managers, in both the domestic and inter-
national marketplace, to develop new and
existing accounts.
Durliat began his career at Cooper in
1994 as an accountant in the cost account-
ing department and has held various posi-
tions of increasing responsibility in both
cost and operations accounting. He most
recently served as director of financial
planning and commercial analysis from
2007 to the present.
He earned a bachelor’s degree in ac-
counting and mathematics from Ohio
Northern University, Ada, Ohio, and a
master’s degree from the University of
Findlay, Findlay, Ohio.
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 9
Economic Development
We invite you to find a new “Center” for your company –
Henry County!
Henry County’s central location puts you in the middle of not only Northwest Ohio, but the entire
Midwest. For more information on what Henry County can offer you, your company and your
employees, contact CIC Director Ralph Lange at (419) 592-4637 or online at www.hencoed.com
French company investing in Henry Co.
33 New jobs being added
at Liberty Township plant
For the past four years, efforts have been
under way at the Henry County Community
Improvement Corporation (CIC) to recruit
new investment and new jobs from a corpora-
tion based in France. Ralph Lange, executive
director, undertook an initiative to convince
the company to expand its North American
operations in Henry County.
Railtech Boutet USA is expanding its Lib-
erty Township plant near Napoleon, Ohio and
adding new equipment and new technology
to the facility. The expansion would add ap-
proximately 28,000 square feet to the 37,000
square foot plant.
During the past year, the company has
added a new production line. This investment
has resulted in new technology being posi-
tioned at the plant. In addition, it is providing
new capacity that is allowing the facility to
manufacture product that was previously im-
ported from Europe.
Plant consolidation
Railtech is also closing a manufacturing
plant in Paducah, Kentucky and consolidat-
ing operations in Henry County. A new pro-
duction facility is being constructed at the
Liberty Township site that would allow the
plant to manufacture products previously
made in Kentucky.
These products include a line of hydrau-
lic maintenance equipment sold to railroads
across the country. This includes special-
ized grinders, rail saws, and other equipment
needed for rail repair and maintenance. Ac-
cording to the company, 33 new jobs will be
added at the plant, and the project will assist
in retaining 28 positions.
Railtech is investing approximately $2.4
million in the Liberty Township plant.
“Our business has been growing steadily,
and it is likely that we will add more than the
33 new jobs as revenues continue to increase
and additional shift activity is planned,” stat-
ed Oliver Dolder, executive vice president
and chief operating officer, Railtech Interna-
tional – North America. “We still have eight
acres of land at the Liberty Township site that
provides opportunity for future growth. We
may complete another acquisition that we
will move to Liberty Township or use this
land for future expansion.”
Industry growth
Business at the Railtech plant in Liberty
Township has been growing at a rate of 10%
per year during the past five years. Increased
spending on rail repair, US government
stimulus funding, and plans for higher speed
passenger rail investments in this country
will keep the business in a growth phase
for years to come. Higher speed passenger
rail service will require the elimination of
rail joints on tracks across the country. Rail-
tech’s welding product enables railroads to
remove these joints and replace them with a
fully integrated weld. The business will have
close to 65 employees following its current
expansion with annual revenues approach-
ing $33 million.
Henry County CIC was in competition
for this expansion with several other states.
At one point in the process, an effort was or-
ganized to have French class students at Na-
poleon High School write letters – in French
– to the senior management at Delachaux
S.A. Group inviting the company to expand
its business in Henry County.
The French Tie
Since winning new investment and new
jobs from Railtech, Henry County CIC has
increased its efforts to recruit additional
high technology rail-related businesses from
France. In mid-May, Henry Country hosted
two officials from the French embassy trade
office in Chicago, who got a chance to meet
with local business leaders and learn about
opportunities in several communities around
the county.
Leo Le Brun, senior trade advisor (build-
ings infrastructure railway) and Tim Artz,
trade advisor (industrial equipment) met with
officials from Henry County along with lo-
cal business leaders. The trip included a visit
to Deshler located seven miles from CSX’s
new North Baltimore intermodal facility. The
French representatives got a chance to meet
with CSX management in North Baltimore.
The French trade representatives also met
with Koester Corporation, a firm that re-
cently relocated to Napoleon. They also met
with Campbell Soup Company management
and toured the Napoleon facility. They spent
time with Railtech management to learn more
about the business and its direction.
Railtech Boutet USA is a subsidiary of
Railtech International. This division is a
railway welding supplier specializing in
the manufacturing of railroad track welding
products. The business supplies products for
the repair of railroad track for both urban sub-
way and rail systems and track used by other
major railroads across the United States and
in countries around the world.
10 TheBusinessJournal July2010
The strategic answers are here.
Wood County
Economic Development
Commission
639 S. Dunbridge Road, Suite 2
Bowling Green, OH 43402
www.woodcounty.com
Wood County central to global marketplace Connect with Mercer County
It seems every place in the Midwest markets itself as the “Crossroads” of one thing or
another. Wood County, Ohio, through the marketing efforts of the Wood County Economic
Development Commission (WCEDC), has experienced a successful run (attracting over
$3 Billion worth of private sector investment) over the past 2 decades as the “Crossroads
of North America.” This is based on Wood County being home to the confluence of the
nation’s longest north-south Interstate highway (I-75 running from the upper peninsula of
Michigan to Florida), and its two longest east-west spans—Interstate 80 and 80 which both
run coast to coast. Indeed, this ease of movement of raw materials, finished products, and
people has led WCEDC Executive Director Tom Blaha to reference Wood County as a “vir-
tual metropolitan area,” containing a consuming market of 18 million people within a 2 hour
drive radius, and 2/3 of the U.S. and Canada’s population within a one day truck drive. He
calls it “virtual” because it contains all the benefits of a literal metropolitan area, but without
the pollution, congestion, crime, and high prices one normally associates with metropolitan
areas. A sort of “best of both worlds.”
The announcement two years ago by CSX Transportation of their $175 million North-
west Ohio Intermodal Hub in southern Wood County (Henry Township, west of the Village
of North Baltimore), adds the entire world to this equation. Wood County’s intermodal hub
is part of CSX’ $842 million National Gateway project which will link America’s heartland
with the global marketplace via double stacked container trains, through maritime ports on
both U.S. coasts. Representatives of the Ports of Baltimore (MD), New York/New Jersey,
and Virginia (Norfolk-Hampton Roads) have already visited Wood County to make pre-
liminary overtures about expediting the movement of imported goods and components into
the Midwest, and the export of U.S. goods and agricultural commodities out to the world
from the 500 acre site currently under construction along SR 18 in southern Wood County.
Transportation experts conjecture that with the opening of the new, improved Panama Canal
serving the modern class of deeper draft container ships, that it will become more cost ef-
ficient to move goods to and from the Pacific Rim through these ports as well.
While creating between 100 and 200 jobs directly on-site, CSX and the WCEDC expect
the efficiencies created to attract logistics parks, distribution centers, and sub-assemblers
to the adjoining area. The far-sighted Henry Township trustees have already put zoning in
place directly across (south of) SR 18, which could lead to the creation of thousands of jobs
by private sector businesses which will be attracted by the efficiencies and cost savings of-
fered by this unique intermodal nexus.
Our communities are proud of their rich history and heritage while evolving into modern ar-
eas with diverse shopping, manufacturing, housing and cultural opportunities. Mercer County’s
communities provide a business and family-friendly haven to set down roots. The pride and
work ethic demonstrated by our pool of employees is unsurpassable. With the help of such a
dedicated workforce, many of our existing businesses that began with humble beginnings have
become quite successful in Mercer County, thus expanding many times and creating new jobs.
Many out-of-state visitors comment on our safe and clean neighborhoods, excellent schools,
and our many recreational activities & opportunities that exist in the region. Our communities
boast parks, scenic bike and foot paths, ball fields, golf courses, and of course Grand Lake.
Mercer County offers many incentives for business looking to locate here, or our existing
businesses wishing to expand. We have a very active Revolving Loan Fund which has enabled
companies to create over 900 jobs since its inception. We have numerous acres of prime land
and commercial buildings waiting for you. Our workforce is widely known for its abilities and
willingness to get the job done. The result of significant tax reform in the state has substantially
lowered the cost of doing business – with the lowest taxes in the Midwest. Couple local & state
incentives and Mercer County’s business climate looks like the place you should be for business
growth. There are many programs we can connect you with to grow your business including:
Community Development Block Grants, 166 Direct Loans, Research & Development Invest-
ment Loan Fund, New and Incumbent Employee Training Grants, Job Creation Tax Credit, Lo-
cal tax exemptions and Roadwork Development (629) Funds. Additionally, the Mercer County
Revolving Loan Fund enables new and existing businesses the ability to acquire gap financing
at low, fixed rates.
Whether you are an aspiring entrepreneur or current business owner, Mercer County pro-
vides the perfect location to build a profitable business. We have hundreds of acres of land
available located at strategic locations throughout the County ranging from 2 acres to 150. All
sites are competitively priced, have utilities in place, and are within 50 to 60 miles of commer-
cial airports located in Ft. Wayne, Indiana and Dayton, Ohio.
Contact the Mercer County Community Development Department and/or our Villages for
assistance. We are confident that our team will help you on your way to prosperity.
For more information on Mercer County visit www.mercercountyconnect.com or contact
Jared C. Ebbing, Community/Economic Development Director of the Mercer County Com-
munity Development Department, located at 102 N. Main Street, Room 102, in the Courthouse,
Celina, Ohio 45822. 419-586-4209.
Together, we can…….
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 11
It takes an idea. business-related experience. and a lot oI heart to begin making a dream a reality.. and that may be in you!

The OSU Extension Economic Development Office of Van Wert County will help you begin the process
through Starting Right` pre-business planning sessions; access to federal. state and local resources;
business counseling; and by offering low-interest gap financing for those business start-up or expansion needs.
Contact us today at 419.238.2999 to schedule an appointment. Check us out on the web: vanwertcounty-edg.com.
                       
Paulding County Economic
Development, Inc.
“To assist Business, Industry and Local
Government in developing job opportunities
and prosperity in Paulding County”
Tax & Financial Incentive
Programs
101 E. Perry St.
Paulding, Ohio 45879
Ph. 419-399-8282
Fax 419-399-8284
E-Mail:pced@bright.net
Tony Langham,
Director
Logan County Community
“Achieve high level performance
at the highest point in Ohio, Logan County.”
Improvement Corporation
100 S. Main St.
Bellefontaine, OH 43311
Natalie Comer, Director
937-599-2037 ncomer@logancountyohio.com
www.logancountyohio.com/cic
Residential Construction Permit Trends. Nationwide, there was a significant drop
between 2005 and 2006 in the number of residential units built. After a building boom
peaking in 2004, construction activity in Northwest Ohio has fallen to about 2,700 units.
Average valuation has generally been below the state and national averages in the
last few years.
Figure 8: Number of New Residential Building Permits, 1995-2006
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
U
n
its
In
d
e
x
(1
0
0
=
2
0
0
0
)
Northwest Ohio Ohio United States
Northwest Ohio 104.4 101.2 97.2 105.2 110.4 100.0 117.0 107.0 129.7 156.1 127.7 82.3
Ohio 90.1 99.1 93.5 96.6 112.3 100.0 100.4 103.0 106.6 103.9 95.9 69.2
United States 83.7 89.5 90.5 101.3 104.5 100.0 102.8 109.8 118.6 130.0 135.4 115.5
EDR 2 Units 3,372 3,267 3,140 3,398 3,565 3,229 3,779 3,455 4,188 5,040 4,124 2,657
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Figure 9: Valuation of New Residential Building Permits, 1995-2006
$0
$20,000
$40,000
$60,000
$80,000
$100,000
$120,000
$140,000
$160,000
$180,000
$200,000
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
V
a
lu
a
tio
n
Northwest Ohio Ohio United States
Northwest Ohio $91,070 $102,429 $100,561 $98,587 $110,758 $115,062 $116,375 $123,195 $121,844 $111,586 $137,429 $143,392
Ohio $97,631 $101,477 $103,158 $112,629 $114,542 $123,703 $129,223 $133,435 $141,455 $154,250 $164,891 $171,982
United States $90,661 $94,118 $97,843 $102,506 $108,952 $116,654 $119,903 $125,417 $132,168 $141,261 $152,764 $158,418
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

7
Residential Construction Permit Trends. Nationwide, there was a significant drop
between 2005 and 2006 in the number of residential units built. After a building boom
peaking in 2004, construction activity in Northwest Ohio has fallen to about 2,700 units.
Average valuation has generally been below the state and national averages in the
last few years.
Figure 8: Number of New Residential Building Permits, 1995-2006
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
U
n
it
s
In
d
e
x
(
1
0
0
=
2
0
0
0
)
Northwest Ohio Ohio United States
Northwest Ohio 104.4 101.2 97.2 105.2 110.4 100.0 117.0 107.0 129.7 156.1 127.7 82.3
Ohio 90.1 99.1 93.5 96.6 112.3 100.0 100.4 103.0 106.6 103.9 95.9 69.2
United States 83.7 89.5 90.5 101.3 104.5 100.0 102.8 109.8 118.6 130.0 135.4 115.5
EDR 2 Units 3,372 3,267 3,140 3,398 3,565 3,229 3,779 3,455 4,188 5,040 4,124 2,657
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Figure 9: Valuation of New Residential Building Permits, 1995-2006
$0
$20,000
$40,000
$60,000
$80,000
$100,000
$120,000
$140,000
$160,000
$180,000
$200,000
A
v
e
r
a
g
e
V
a
lu
a
t
io
n
Northwest Ohio Ohio United States
Northwest Ohio $91,070 $102,429 $100,561 $98,587 $110,758 $115,062 $116,375 $123,195 $121,844 $111,586 $137,429 $143,392
Ohio $97,631 $101,477 $103,158 $112,629 $114,542 $123,703 $129,223 $133,435 $141,455 $154,250 $164,891 $171,982
United States $90,661 $94,118 $97,843 $102,506 $108,952 $116,654 $119,903 $125,417 $132,168 $141,261 $152,764 $158,418
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

7
12 TheBusinessJournal July2010
Copyright ©2009 GreaterFindlayInc. All Rights Reserved
Greater Findlay.
Greater Opportunities.



Discover why so many successful companies are located here.

There are many compelling reasons why seventeen
Fortune 500 companies have selected to build
their business in the Greater Findlay region.
Well-Educated Workforce, Workforce
Training and Support Systems, A Global
Business Community, a Foreign Trade
Zone, a Port Authority, Available Sites &
Buildings, and a Great Quality of Life.
For a decade, Greater Findlay, Ohio has ranked
in the top 20 Micropolitan Areas in the
U.S. for new and expanding facilities.

greaterndlayinc.com
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
PUTNAM COUNTY
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT
CORPORATION
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
115 North Fair Avenue, Suite E,
PO Box 145
Ottawa, OH 45875
• Privatenon-profitcorporationwith
activitiesdirectedbycountywide
21memberboardofdirectors
• 7IndustrialParksestablishedin
county
• Uniqueincentivesofferedbythe
CICarebuildtosuitbuildings,CIC
ownedleasetopurchasebuild-
ingsandonespecificsiteof2,500
availableacreswithrailaccess
Multiple economic development proj-
ects are in the forefront of business ex-
pansion in Putnam County, according to
Martin Kuhlman, Putnam County Com-
munity Corp director.
The purchase of W.C. Woods by Whirl-
pool in Ottawa has created 135 new jobs,
with a possible 150-200 additional jobs in
the future.
Also in Ottawa, Silgan Plastics is un-
dertaking a $5-6 million project adding
180,000 square feet of warehouse space.
This project could add 100 new jobs to
the Putnam Couny business.
Two projects in Kalida will add 15 new
jobs and 35,000 square feet to existing
business. More than $3,000,000 is being
invested in these two projects.
At the north end of Putnam County,
the development of a new facility that
will create 125 new jobs is the highlight
of activity in the village. Numerous other
projects being developed adding at least
150 new jobs is the result of rail acces-
sibility.
Putnam County
Economic
Development
Logan County
Despite being one of the smallest counties
in Ohio, Paulding County boasts industrial
parks in the villages of Paulding, Antwerp
and Oakwood to further economic develop-
ment.
The widening of Ohio 24 from two-lane
to four-lane highway can potentially bring
in new business to the county, according to
Tony Langham, Economic Development Di-
rector of Paulding County.
The interchanges at 24 & 49 and at 24 &
127 are generating interest in this area. A
variety of different businesses have shown
interest either for expansion or start-up op-
erations.
The development of wind turbines from
alternative wind energy companies have
projects in two locations in the county; Blue
Creek and Latty townships in the southern
portion of the county, and Benton and Har-
rison townships in the west.
With a location that is within 600 miles
of 60% of the nation’s population, Paulding
County is strategically located. Now we have
a 4 -lane highway to connect to this radius.
“We offer a superb quality of life, small-
town atmosphere, rural living and a work-
force with a strong work ethic”, stated Lang-
ham.
Paulding County
Economic
Development
A business incubation program creates jobs in a community, enhances the entrepre-
neurial climate, retains businesses, builds or accelerates growth in a local industry and
helps to diversify our local economy. In 2006 there were over 1100 business incubators
in the United States. That number has continued to grow. In the late spring of 2010 Lo-
gan County will have its first incubator program in downtown Bellefontaine.
An incubator is an environment that allows small businesses to grow and nurture
during their early years of existence. The Peak Performance Entrepreneurial Center is
slated to open later this summer in downtown Bellefontiane and will provide an array of
business assistance services, shared resources, and networking opportunities. Incubator
programs are designed to offer below-market rent with basic utilities and a common
area to be used for private meetings as well as a workstation with copier, fax machine,
etc. Eventually we anticipate adding a common receptionist for all incubator tenants.
Peak Performance Entrepreneurial Center (The PPEC) is a cooperation between LFH
Properties and Investments, The Logan County Community Improvement Corporation
and the Downtown Bellefontaine Partnership.
The Entrepreneurial Center will provide assistance to all entrepreneurs with an em-
phasis on research and development and manufacturing businesses. Those who offer
a product or service, have the potential to help create new jobs, show growth potential,
and enhance our overall economic development efforts are considered candidates for
the incubator.
According to the National Business Incubator Association, in one year incubation
programs in North America assist more than 27,000 companies and provide employ-
ment for over 100,000 workers. In 2005, a $17 billion annual revenue was generated.
Are you a start-up or early stage company interested in more information on the in-
cubator program and if it might be right for you? Contact Natalie Comer at the Logan
County CIC ncomer@logancountyohio.com or 937-599-2037. Visit us on the web at
http://www.logancountyohio.com/cic/ppec.htm
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 13
Come
Grow
with Us!
For more information, call Jeff Loehrke 419-523-5020
GreaterFindlayInc.’s Technology Infrastructure Committee (TIC), Benton Ridge Telephone
Company and local municipalities have worked collaboratively to submit a grant proposal to
enhance broadband connectivity throughout Hancock County.
The $175,000 Rural Utilities Service Technical Assistance Grant would provide funds for a
specialized economic development study. The results of the in-depth review will directly im-
pact our region’s ability to expand broadband and other critical infrastructure, facilitating local
entrepreneurship and implementing regional economic and community development strategies.
The research area includes the towns and villages of McComb, Van Buren, Arcadia, Vanlue, Mt.
Blanchard, Arlington, Rawson, Mt. Cory and Jenera.
As a direct result of this study, the TIC and other supporting agencies recognize that not only
new job creation opportunities result, but our region will strengthen its business attraction, reten-
tion and expansion efforts as well. The wealth created by these new and expanded jobs along
with the related investment will lay the foundation for self-sustaining, redeveloping, and thriving
rural communities.
For more information about the grant or GreaterFindlayInc. and the Technology Infrastruc-
ture Committee, call 419-422-3313 or visit www.greaterfindlayinc.com.
Dale Carnegie Training Offered
Special Rate for Chamber Members!
The Findlay-Hancock County Chamber of Commerce has partnered with Dale Carnegie
Training to bring the world famous Dale Carnegie Course to the Findlay area! Beginning this
year, you can participate in the course that Lee Iacocca credited for changing him from a “shrink-
ing violet” to the influential businessman he became. And you won’t have to travel to Columbus,
Cleveland, or Toledo to do it! And, it is available to Chamber members at the lowest tuition cost
in the country!
Normally, pricing for the Dale Carnegie Course is $1795 per person. Chamber of Commerce
members will save $795 a person and will only pay $1000 per person. This course will be offered
from 8 am to 4 pm one day a week for six weeks (approximately 50 hours of training). We need
to have at least 20 participants in order to make this great opportunity happen.
For almost 100 years, Dale Carnegie has been helping people to “Win Friends and Influence
People”. Founded in 1912, Dale Carnegie Training has evolved from one man’s belief in the
power of self-improvement to a performance based training company with offices worldwide.
Dale Carnegie Training focuses on giving people in business the opportunity to sharpen their
skills and improve their performance in order to build positive, steady, and profitable results.
The Dale Carnegie Course is accredited and graduates can receive 3 undergraduate credit
hours. The course is also eligible for Continuing Education Units.
To introduce you to what the Dale Carnegie Course does and how it works, please come to a
free preview session! This session will be held at the GFI Boardroom at 8am, June 23rd.
For further information or to RSVP for the free preview, please contact Chris Harben at dale-
carnegie@woh.rr.com or at 419-618-7488.
Applications Available for 2010 Hancock Senior Leadership Program The Hancock Senior
Leadership Program is now accepting applications for its 2010 class. The nine-week Senior
Leadership Program, now in its second year, is designed for retirees and semi-retirees in the
community.
This community awareness program is cosponsored by the Hancock County Agency on Ag-
ing and the Chamber of Commerce. Retirees offer a wealth of experience, leadership and vital-
ity to their communities while enriching their own lives. Senior Leadership Programs provide
seniors with knowledge of community needs, new friendships and volunteer opportunities.
Senior Leadership classes begin Tuesday, September 14 and end Tuesday, November 9. Each
class day will be on a Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration forms are available online at
www.greaterfindlayinc.com, and are due by August 15 to The Senior Center or to the Chamber
of Commerce. For more information please email the HSL facilitator, Maile Doyle at mdoyle@
woh.rr.com or contact John Urbanski at the Hancock County Agency on Aging, 419-423-8496.
2011 Community Map Project
A Great Marketing Opportunity GreaterFindlayInc.’s Chamber of Commerce is pleased to
announce that Village Profile™ will return to our area to produce our new 2011 Chamber City/
County map and Community Website program.
Village Profile™ has been producing community publications for the Chamber since 2006.
The 5,000 maps are on target to print this winter, and will be distributed in and around the Cham-
ber service area to visitors, and individuals or businesses inquiring about relocation.
The Chamber is taking part in the Village Profile™ Mobile Map Publishing Program™, the
only one of its kind available to Chambers of Commerce. In addition to the printed version, the
map and all advertisements will be online at Village Profile™ Community Profile Network®
website (www.villageprofile.com) soon after they are published, and will also link from the
Chamber’s website.
The community map is interactive, which means it can be wirelessly accessed at www.vp-
mobile.us via laptop and desktop computers, PDAs, smartphones, web-enabled cellphones and
most other mobile devices, and allows users to link directly to advertisers’ websites, as well as
direct-dial advertisers in real time.
The Village Profile™ Web site garnered over 13 million hits in 2009 and 2,140,912 page
views -- nearly 1.7 million of which were unique page views. The vpmobile.us site totaled
6,445,900 hits in 2009. Since 1996, the site has seen over 230,000,000 hits from Internet locales
around the world and from all manner of users. This considerable traffic will prove beneficial to
the entire GreaterFindlayInc. community.
Businesses interested in taking advantage of these exclusive advertising benefits should call
Village Profile™ representative Ann Hatley at the Chamber at 419-422-3313 to reserve ad space
now.
Certified Networker Course Previews
Certified Networker of Ohio will be offering FREE course previews at GreaterFindlayInc. on
Friday, June 25 and Friday, July 16. Both sessions are from 11a.m.-1p.m., and are limited to 14
people. To register, email debby@certifiednetworker.com.
GreaterFindlayInc. and Benton Ridge Telephone Company
Submit Hancock County Broadband Connectivity Grant
• DEVELOPEDSITES,ZONEDINDUSTRIAL
• EXCELLENTHIGHWAY,AIRRAIL,TRANSPORTATIONLINKS
• SKILLED,DEPENDABLE,LABORFORCE
• TAXINCENTIVES,ENTERPRISEZONE
• ABUNDANTSOURCEOFEXCELLENTQUALITYWATER
• NEWWASTEWATERTREATMENTPLANTCAPACITY
• NATIONALLYRECOGNIZEDMODERNHOSPITAL
• 50MILESTODAYTONINTERNATIONALAIRPORT
• STATE-OF-THE-ARTFIBEROPTICSCAPABILITIES
• HOMETONATIONALLYRECOGNIZEDINDUSTRY
• HOMEOFGRANDLAKEST.MARYS-LARGESTINTERIORLAKEINOHIO
• DOWNTOWNHISTORICMIAMI&ERIECANAL/LOCK13RENOVATIONS
• NATIONALLYRECOGNIZEDSISTERCITYPROGRAMS
• COMMUNITYCOMMITMENTTONEWSCHOOLFACILITIES
• WRIGHTSTATEUNIVERSITY-LAKECAMPUS
• HOMETO3JAPANESEINDUSTRIALPLANTS
Contact:
CityofSt.MarysDevelopmentOffice
101EastSpringStreet
St.Marys,Ohio45885
419-394-3303,ext.3117
E-Mail:tfleagle@cityofstmarys.net
Web:www.cityofstmarys.net
ConsideringExpansion?

ST.MARYS,OHIO,ANINVESTMENTINPRIDE
14 TheBusinessJournal July2010
Owens Community College Harnesses Solar Energy
FINDLAY, OH - Owens Community
College will soon be harnessing the sun’s
energy in addition to generating wind power
as the academic institution announces plans
for the installation of the first solar array on
the Findlay-area Campus. Both alternative
energy resources will be installed concur-
rently in late June.
The solar array will be used for educa-
tional training within Workforce and Com-
munity Services’ Photovoltaic Installation
Program as well as for future academic
curriculum programming in the School of
Technology. Both alternative energy re-
sources will be located adjacent to the Col-
lege’s Community Education and Wellness
Center.
“The installation of a state-of-the-art
solar array to complement the new wind
turbine brings alternative energy education
to the forefront in the Hancock County re-
gion,” said Dr. Michael Bankey, Owens
Vice President of Workforce and Commu-
nity Services. “Owens Community College
is committed to providing students access
to innovative learning opportunities and
expose the surrounding communities to the
growing fields of solar and wind power.”
The 1.7-kilowat solar array will fea-
ture eight panels and be used for hands-on
learning as well as to convert sunlight into
electricity for regular operational purposes
within the Community Education and Well-
ness Center. Photovoltaic cells within each
panel will absorb the sun’s rays and create
a current of power which will be directed to
an inverter. The inverter will then convert
the DC voltage, produced by the panels, to
AC voltage.
According Bankey, the new solar array on
Findlay-area Campus will be different than
the alternative energy technology located on
the Toledo-area Campus in order to show-
case different renewable energy equipment
and installation techniques for students.
“The solar array on the Findlay-area
Campus will feature a small inverter for
each solar module, which is an innovative
installation technique. The other solar array
design uses a single inverter for an entire
group of solar panels,” explained Bankey.
“Owens is planning to offer the new Find-
lay-area Campus Photovoltaic Installation
Program to area residents in the coming
months.”
Individuals attending Owens’ Photovol-
taic Installation Program will receive in-
struction within the areas of electricity and
photovoltaic systems and theory. Course
content includes system sizing and construc-
tion, codes and standards, interconnection
safety, troubleshooting, and maintenance.
Installation practices related to project man-
agement, adapting mechanical and electrical
design, and system commissioning are also
highlighted.
In addition, the hands-on course will in-
clude the design and installation of a grid-
tied photovoltaic system and maintenance
on the new solar array system at the Col-
lege’s Findlay-area Campus. Various invert-
ers, photovoltaic modules, batteries and data
information systems will also be installed
and operated as part of the class.
Students successfully completing the
Photovoltaic Installation Program will qual-
ify to test for the North American Board of
Certified Energy Practitioner (NABCEP)
PV Entry Level Certificate of Knowledge
program. With additional work experience
students will qualify to take the national
certification test as a photovoltaic system
installer. Superior Energy Solutions LLC in
Ottawa will oversee the process of install-
ing both the new solar array and the wind
turbine.
One of the fastest-growing higher educa-
tional institutions in Ohio, Owens Commu-
nity College is a fully accredited two-year,
state-assisted institution of higher education
that has served Northwest Ohio since 1965.
With a commitment to providing small
classes, personal attention and unmatched
affordability, the College serves the diverse
academic needs of credit and non-credit stu-
dents on the Toledo-area and Findlay-area
campuses. Owens offers associate degrees
that transfer to baccalaureate degrees in
the Arts and Sciences and over 130 techni-
cal program areas in Agriculture, Business,
Health Sciences, Public Safety and Emer-
gency Preparedness, Skilled Trades, and En-
gineering and Transportation Technologies.
Owens students also can earn the first two
years of a bachelor’s degree with a smooth
transfer to any area four-year college or uni-
versity. For more information, visit www.
owens.edu.
LET THE STRENGTH
OF OUR PEOPLE
PLACE AND
PARTNERSHIP
WORK FOR YOUR
COMPANY.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT:
ALLEN ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT GROUP
144 SOUTH MAIN STREET
SUITE 200
LIMA, OHIO 45801
PHONE: 419.222.7706
WWW.AEDG.ORG
WAGNERM@AEDG.ORG
A REGIONAL WORKFORCE OF OVER 220,000 SKILLED
AND TALENTED EMPLOYEES ARE READY TO GO TO
WORK. THE BOOK “WHAT AMERICA DOES RIGHT’ NAMES
THE WORKFORCE AT THE LIMA PROCTER AND GAMBLE
PLANT AS ONE OF THE 15 BEST HIGH PERFORMANCE
ORGANIZATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. THE STRENGTH
OF THE MIDWESTERN WORK ETHIC IS AT THE HEART OF
THE PEOPLE OF LIMA AND ALLEN COUNTY.
ALLEN COUNTY LEADERSHIP TAKES AN ACTIVE ROLE
IN ASSISTING BUSINESS GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT.
TAX INCENTIVES, TRAINING ASSISTANCE, LOW
INTEREST LOANS, SITE LOCATION ASSISTANCE AND
INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES ARE A FEW OF THE
SERVICES PROVIDED BY COOPERATIVE PUBLIC SECTOR
PARTNERS THROUGHOUT ALLEN COUNTY.
THE STRENGTH OF PLACE
THE STRENGTH OF PEOPLE
THE STRENGTH OF PARTNERSHIP
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 15
Mercer County
Community Development
101 North Main Street
Celina, Ohio 45822
www.mercercountyconnect.com
facebook: mercerconnect
Jared Ebbing, PE
Community/Economic
Development Director
419-586-4209
fax: 419-586-1714
email: Jared.ebbing@mercercountyohio.org
INDUSTRIAL SITES INCENTIVES WORK FORCE INNOVATION COMMUNITIES RECREATION
For more information about our programs, services, and incentives, visit our website at
www.mercercountyconnect.com
16 TheBusinessJournal July2010
ASUCCESSFUL, LEANBUSINESS
Like a shark, a lean and continuously improving
manufacturer never stops moving, learning or attacking.
MAGNET is an Ohio Department of Development Edison Technology Center serving the motor vehicle and parts manufacturing industry. MAGNET is a provider of Manufacturing
Extension Partnership (MEP) services through the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the United States Department of Commerce.
WWW.MAGNETWORK.ORG
MAGNET teaches manufacturing employees how to swim at the top of the food chain.
Contact Cynthia Leis at cynthia.leis@magnetwork.org or 419.339.0170.
Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network
The experienced professionals at the Manufacturing
Advocacy & Growth Network (MAGNET), have helped
hundreds of manufacturers of all sizes in all industries
get into this predator’s lean, efficient shape through
customized employee training programs including:
� process improvement, quality and lean
� product design, engineering, and development
� sustainable manufacturing
� supply chain optimization
� and workforce and organizational
development.
MAGNET experts work
side-by-side with
manufacturing clients
to implement strategies
and improve operations that will:
� lower your costs and inventory
� shorten your lead times
� optimize your labor and materials
� and improve your quality.
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 17
Van Wert Hospital Emergency Room
K
L
K & L
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18 TheBusinessJournal July2010
It’s All in the Planning:
Business Plans Kit For
Dummies®, 3rd Edition
Reveals Five Simple Ways
to Start Your Venture Off
on the Right Foot
Whether you’re an
entrepreneur who’s just
getting started or an expe-
rienced professional look-
ing for ways to give your
current company a boost,
you can write a business
plan that works. Business
Plans Kit For Dummies®,
3rd Edition tells you every-
thing you need to know to
get started.
Hoboken, NJ (May
2010)—For anyone think-
ing of starting a business,
it’s the best of times and the
worst of times. (Apologies
to Charles Dickens!) We’re
living in an era of great
change, which by defnition
is ripe for entrepreneurial
ventures. And yet—thanks
to economic pitfalls, shift-
ing markets, and tougher-
than-ever competition—the
prospect has never been
more daunting.
But there is some good
news: whether you’re look-
ing to turn your entrepre-
neurial dreams into reality
or re-evaluate or expand a
company that’s been in exis-
tence for decades, a smart
business plan can make all
the difference. (Yes, even
established businesses need
to revisit their plans every
six months!)
That’s the word from
Dr. Steven D. Peterson,
Peter Jaret, and Barbara
Findlay Schenck, coau-
thors of Business Plans Kit
For Dummies, 3rd Edition
(Wiley Publishing, Inc., May
2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-
43854-1, $34.99). They say
that writing a business plan
is the frst step in turning an
idea into a thriving business,
starting a new division of an
existing company, or simply
breathing new life into one
that may need a push to get
through a tough time.
It makes perfect sense.
Not only does writing out
your idea force you to think
more clearly about what
you want to do, it gives
the people you work with
a defned road map as well.
An effective plan provides
the navigation chart that
you’ll use to get where
you want to go Without
one, businesses tend to fnd
themselves adrift.
Peterson, Jaret, and
Schenck’s book and
CD-ROM kit provides
small business owners with
all the ins and outs of con-
structing a great business
plan. It offers a wealth of
expert guidance and friend-
ly tips to help you develop
and implement a strategic
plan to help your business
succeed in any economy—
from describing and defn-
ing your business to mar-
keting strategies that work
to clear explanations of
business fnances.
If you’re ready to get
down to business on well,
your business, here’s a good
starting point. Read on for
fve helpful hints excerpted
from Business Plans Kit For
Dummies, 3rd Edition:
Take your time and get
it right. Whether you are
starting a new business or
re-evaluating an existing
one, time is of the essence.
(And it’s most likely not
something that you have
in abundance.) It can be
tempting to rush through
the tedious planning process
in your excitement to get to
this new phase of your busi-
ness life. Don’t. The time
you spend on planning at
the outset will save you far
more time later on once you
are up and running. And as
you will fnd, your time will
be even more precious once
your plan is in action.
Don’t skimp on the
research phase. When you
commit to writing a new
business plan, you must
remember that it should be
based on more than just
your great idea. An effective
plan depends on a complete
and accurate understand-
ing of your market, your
customers, your fnancial
situation, and your busi-
ness environment. You may
even fnd that your research
will teach you things you
didn’t know, and it may
change the course of your
plan altogether. If you take
the time to do the research,
you’ll set yourself up for
long-term success.
Involve the right people
in the planning process. If
you’re a current business
owner trying to re-energize
your business, then the ulti-
mate success of your plan
depends on the dedication
and motivation of your
team. Remember that you
can’t do it all on your own.
Involving your team in the
planning process will be
a great source of insight
for you as you decide what
will work and what won’t
by getting advice from the
very people who are the
closest to the processes in
your business. Good plans
should guide and inspire.
If your team is involved
with the planning, they will
feel more invested in the
outcome, and that will help
to propel your new business
plan toward success.
Temper those blue-sky
“someday” fantasies with
clear goals and solid time-
lines. Most business plans
(or re-plans!) start with an
idea: a dream to do some-
thing new and exciting and
different. During those ini-
tial planning stages, you
have big ideas, lofty goals,
and the possibilities seem
endless. It’s easy to get lost
in the “someday” and the “in
the future” of it all and for-
get that in the beginning, you
have to make actual progress
that garners immediate, sus-
tainable results to get your
business off the ground.
In other words, make
sure your plan includes
measurable outcomes and
feet-to-the-fre timelines. In
addition to making things
easier (and much more like-
ly to get done), it will also
keep you motivated during
tough times. When you see
goals being met and things
being crossed off your to-do
list, it will help you to keep
moving forward, even when
you hit the rocky patches.
Write a plan that people
will read. (Don’t get carried
away with big words!) A
business plan works only if
people use it, so you need
to create a plan that is con-
cise, complete, and read-
able. Don’t weigh it down
with big words, unfamiliar
terminology, or lofty goals.
Inevitably, the only person
that will impress is you! In
fact, it will be much more
impressive if you can con-
struct a plan that people are
interested in (bonus points if
they read it cover to cover!)
and that motivates them to
want to be involved.
Just remember, “Rome
wasn’t built in a day.” It
may sound cliché, but it
is so true. Take your time
with your business plan.
Have patience and don’t
get ahead of yourself. The
time and attention spent
on a well-executed plan is
a solid investment in your
future. We promise you,
you’ll thank yourself later.
It’s All in the Planning: Business Plans Kit For Dummies
®
, 3rd Edition
Reveals Five Simple Ways to Start Your Venture Off on the Right Foot
BusinessJournal
THE
OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
Coming in the August edition of ...
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July2010 TheBusinessJournal 19
BusinessJournal
THE
OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
BusinessJournal
THE
OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
Proudly Presents
20
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UNDER
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405 N. Main St. • Delphos, OH 45833-1598
• 419-999-4762 • 419-695-0015 ext. 138
• 1-800-370-2351
email: dhemple@delphosherald.com
The FourTh AnnuAl AwArds honoring The
region’s 20 MosT inFluenTiAl Men And woMen
Now Accepting Nominations.
If you know an individual you feel should be considered for
this year’s recognition or if you would like to be considered
yourself, please fill out the Men/Women Who Mean Business
Nomination Form and either mail, fax or email to us.
To be eligible all of the following requirements must be met. An individual must:
1. Work in the 13 counties of West Central Ohio that include the counties of: Allen,
Auglaize, Defiance, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Shelby, Van
Wert, Henry and Wood.
2. Be an extraordinary entrepreneur, business executive, scholar, civic, or cultural lead-
er.
3. Be making a notable impact on their business or industry and their community
NOMINATION INFORMATION
Nominator Name*
Nominator Title
Nominator Address 1
Nominator City, State, Zip
Nominator Company
Nominator Phone* Fax
Nominator Address 2
Nominator Email*
NOMINATEE INFORMATION (please submit photo, digital preferred)
Nominee Name*
Nominee Title
Nominee Address 1
Nominee City, State, Zip
Nominee Company*
Nominee Phone* Fax
Nominee Address 2
Nominee Email*
*In the space below, describe why you feel the individual should be considered for Woman/Man Who Mean Business recognition




Please fill out the form or email your nomination to dhemple@delphosherald.com (Please include photo)
20 TheBusinessJournal July2010
Elder Care
Van Wert County Hospital
For all your Surgical Needs:
Affordable and close to home
General y Vascular y Cardiothoracic y Ear, Nose and Throat
Gynecology y Orthopedic y Endoscopy y Ophthalmology
Convenient Pre-Admission Testing and
Easy Online Pre-Registration
Van Wert County Hospital
1250 S. Washington Street y Van Wert, Ohio 45891
www.vanwerthospital.org
Assisted living communities have become
increasingly dedicated to innovation and an
emphasis on hospitality in order to remain
competitive during challenging economic
times. Understanding the resulting assisted
living trends will be helpful to families that are
in the process of exploring the various options
available for aging loved ones.
Assisted Living Trend #1: Wellness Pro-
grams to Enhance & Promote a Healthy
Lifestyle
In 2009, the age of residents moving into
assisted facilities nationwide averages 84.6
years. As seniors continue to wait longer and
longer to leave their homes and move into se-
nior living communities, the industry seeks to
extend their length of stay by promoting health
and wellness among their residents. Nearly ev-
ery major competitor has developed a multi-
dimensional program to include a variety of
exercise classes and/or access to neighbor-
hood fitness clubs, healthy meal options as
well as spiritual and educational opportuni-
ties. Amenities and services that reflect this
emphasis on wellness include the availability
of on-site massage therapy, exercise equip-
ment made specifically for seniors, computer
training with specialized equipment and large
screens as well as flexible hours for dining
to accommodate medical appointments and
activities. The success of such programs im-
proves the general health and well-being of
current residents and attracts new residents
who are increasingly dedicated to maintaining
their active lifestyles.
Assisted Living Trend #2: Larger Apart-
ments and Increased Apartment Amenities
Between 2006 and 2009, the number of
apartments in assisted facilities has decreased
from a nationwide average of 63 to 54. This
statistic reflects a trend in combining two apart-
ments in order to accommodate residents who
prefer larger living spaces. Whereas studios
used to be the most common type of assisted
living apartment, one-bedroom units are now
more preferable and allow residents to keep
more of their furniture and belongings that
make their new apartment feel like home. In
addition, many couples currently moving into
assisted facilities prefer separate bedrooms for
improved sleeping. Amenities frequently in-
clude spacious walk-in closets, 9-foot ceilings,
balconies and/or patios to accommodate pet
owners as well as enhanced kitchenettes with
microwaves and small refrigerators.
Assisted Living Trend #3: Increased
Flexibility in Financing Assisted Living
In light of current economic conditions,
an increasing number of assisted communi-
ties are participating in Medicaid. According
to a collaborative research project conducted
in 2009 by the Assisted Living Federation of
America, nearly half of responding assisted
care providers have licensed up to 25% of their
apartments for Medicaid. Other communities
that may not accept Medicaid are partnering
with companies that provide financing options
such as a line of credit to facilitate move-ins
prior to home sales. These types of options are
very helpful to seniors who are reliant on the
equity in their homes in order to afford assisted
care. Given the number of veterans currently
moving in to assisted facilities, providers are
also dedicated to publicizing and promoting
the Veteran’s Aid & Attendance program. For
more information about eligibility require-
ments for this program, visit the Veteran Aid
website. Finally, it’s never been a better time
to ask assisted living communities about waiv-
ing entrance fees, locking in current rates and
receiving assistance with moving expenses!
Trends in Assisted Living
One Source
For all your electrical needs.
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Contact us for your
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For more
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Providing
Healthcare
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July2010 TheBusinessJournal 21
419-222-7723 or 1-800-653-7723
Committed to helping older adults and their families
SERVING: Allen, Auglaize, Hancock, Hardin,
Mercer, Putnam & Van Wert counties
www.aaa3.org
200 E. High St.
2nd foor
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For services
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Call for more information or to arrange a personal tour.
•All private rooms •Highest level of quality care
•Specially-trained staff •Choice of nutritional meals daily.
•Meaningful and varied activities everyday to stimulate the senses and be fun
•Temporary or long term • Medicare & Medicaid Certified
* by Ohio Dept. of Health
Therapy Solutions, Inc.
Pediatric Therapy - Hand Therapy
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Find Out How A Therapist Can Make Your Day Better!
Therapy Solutions
Van Wert County Hospital
140 Fox Road, Suite 101,Van Wert, Ohio 45891
(419) 238-8626
www.vanwerthospital.org
On-site Rehabilitative
Care for your Loved One
For more information call 419-224-9741
and ask for David Watkins, Amy Menchofer or Randall Cox
Lima
Convalescent
Home
Services Available
On-site Rehabilitative
Care for your Loved One
ur rehabilitation team includes specially
trained nurses, physicians, physical and occu-
pational therapists, speech-language pathologists and
other skilled providers who all share a common goal:
to help our clients heal physically and emotionally,
and to achieve maximum recovery.
Typically those who come to Lima Convalescent
Home for rehabilitative care include people
in need of:
• Orthopedic rehabilitation following surgery
• Musculoskeletal rehabilitation following
a stroke, injury or illness
• Speech-language pathology, including
communicative devices, swallowing
deficit evaluation and rehabilitation
• Physical therapy, including strength
and balance training
• Occupational therapy, including fine
motor skill retraining and adaptive
equipment
O
• I.V. Therapy •No Fee for Filing of Insurance Forms
• Speech Therapy •24 Hour- 7 Days a Week Admission
• Physical Therapy •Nutritional Counseling
• Occupational Therapy •Special-Care Unit for Alzheimer’s/Dementia
• Skilled Nursing Services •Medicare/Medicaid Certified
• Hospice Support
Lima
Convalescent
Home
For more information call 419-224-9741 and ask for
David Watkins, Amy Menchofer or Randall Cox
Services Available
On-site Rehabilitative
Care for your Loved One
ur rehabilitation team includes specially
trained nurses, physicians, physical and occu-
pational therapists, speech-language pathologists and
other skilled providers who all share a common goal:
to help our clients heal physically and emotionally,
and to achieve maximum recovery.
Typically those who come to Lima Convalescent
Home for rehabilitative care include people
in need of:
• Orthopedic rehabilitation following surgery
• Musculoskeletal rehabilitation following
a stroke, injury or illness
• Speech-language pathology, including
communicative devices, swallowing
deficit evaluation and rehabilitation
• Physical therapy, including strength
and balance training
• Occupational therapy, including fine
motor skill retraining and adaptive
equipment
O
• I.V. Therapy •No Fee for Filing of Insurance Forms
• Speech Therapy •24 Hour- 7 Days a Week Admission
• Physical Therapy •Nutritional Counseling
• Occupational Therapy •Special-Care Unit for Alzheimer’s/Dementia
• Skilled Nursing Services •Medicare/Medicaid Certified
• Hospice Support
Lima
Convalescent
Home
For more information call 419-224-9741 and ask for
David Watkins, Amy Menchofer or Randall Cox
Our rehabilitation team includes specially trained nurses, physi-
cians, physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathol-
ogists and other skilled providers who all share a common goal:
to help our clients heal physically and emotionally, and to achieve
maximum recovery.
Typically those who come to Lima Convalescent Home for rehabilita-
tive care include people in need of:
•Orthopedicrehabilitationfollowingsurgery
•Musculoskeletalrehabilitationfollowingastroke,
injuryorillness
•Speech-languagepathology,includingcommunicativedevices,
swallowingdeficitevaluationandrehabilitation
•Physicaltherapy,includingstrengthandbalancetraining
•Occupationaltherapy,includingfinemotorskillretraining
andadaptiveequipment • I.V.Therapy•SpeechTherapy
• PhysicalTherapy
• OccupationalTherapy
• SkilledNursingServices
• HospiceSupport
• NoFeeforFilingofInsurance
Forms
• 24Hour-7DaysaWeek
Admission
• NutritionalCounseling
• Special-CareUnitforAlzheimer’s/
Dementia
• Medicare/MedicaidCertified
Medi-which? Medicare and Medicaid can
be confusing programs, especially for those
who are new to navigating the eldercare
solution landscape. Whether you’re consider-
ing elder care at home or are thinking about
placing Dad in a nursing facility, you’ll need
to learn more about how these programs
work. Here are 4 myths about Medicare and
Medicaid:
Myth #1 - When Medicare money runs
out Medicaid kicks in.
Medicare is an entitlement program, which
means everyone receives benefts regardless
of income. Medicaid is a health insurance
program for low-income or needy people. If
Medicare runs out, your loved one may-or
may not-meet your state’s eligibility require-
ments.
Myth #2 - Medicare pays for home care
and nursing home care.
This is one of the most common-and
costly-misperceptions about Medicare. In
fact, Medicare pays only for rehabilitation or
Elder Care Solutions -
Medicare & Medicaid Myths
See SOLUTIONS, page 22
22 TheBusinessJournal July2010
Making health care easier.
PHC-0308G
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There are plenty of reasons Paramount leads the way in health care plans.
We offer a wide choice of innovative products for big savings for you and your
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skilled care for up to 100 days and only after
your loved one has been in the hospital for at
least three days. That means you won’t be able
to rely on it to cover a long-term professional
elder care solution.
In many cases, you can’t depend on
Medicare to cover professional elder care at
home either. It will only pay the cost if your
parent meets conditions, including the need for
occasional care or physical therapy.
Myth #3 - Medicaid application is a rou-
tine process.
Medicaid is administered by each state.
As a result, the application process varies-so
Auntie in Maine may go through a different
process than Dad in Utah.
No matter where your parent lives, they
will need to prove they are eligible for benefts
that cover their elder care solutions. Check
with your state to fnd out exactly what you’ll
need to prove eligibility. In general, your par-
ent might expect to show:
Paystubs (if applicable) ^6.
Bank statements ^6.
Insurance policies ^6.
Proof of age and citizenship ^6.
Proof of income, such as social secu- ^6.
rity
Application can be a time-consuming pro-
cess. Even if your parent isn’t currently eli-
gible, know what documents the state requires
and where you can fnd them.
Myth #4 -A parent can transfer assets to
become eligible for Medicaid.
When it comes to elder care solutions,
many families mistakenly believe that the
senior parent can qualify for benefts by trans-
ferring assets to family. In a transfer, the prop-
erty is given to the recipient for less than fair
market value.
In fact, there’s a penalty for transferring
assets. This includes transfers to siblings and
children. There are exceptions for transfers
to a spouse or disabled children. The state
will examine any transfers made during the
“look-back” period, which can be as long as
the 5 years before the patient enters long-term
care. Using a formula, the state will determine
that your parent must wait a certain number of
months or years to become eligible.
Myth #5 - Applicants must sell their
homes to qualify for Medicaid.
Not necessarily. Requirements vary, but
in general the home doesn’t count as an asset
unless it’s worth over $500,000. In some
states, that limit is $750,000. The home also
won’t count if a healthy spouse, a child
under 18, or a disabled child still lives there.
Additionally, some states won’t consider the
home a countable asset if the patient’s residen-
tial care is temporary and he or she will return
to their home.
Whether you’re considering elder care mat
home or admitting your parent to a care
facility, planning a smart eldercare solution
includes educating yourself about Medicare
and Medicaid.
Gregory Weldy is an expert on guiding families through the tough
choices and challenges of caring for aging parents. He has written an
amazing Free report called, “Nursing Home Nightmares: Challenges of
Caring For An Aging Parent”. To claim you FREE copy, visit: http://www.
BestElderCareAtHome.com
Solutions
(Continued from page 21)
July2010 TheBusinessJournal 23
school for nursing in Ohio and beyond.
President McDougle brings to Owens more
than 40 years of experience in higher education
as a faculty member and administrator in Ohio,
Indiana, Illinois and South Carolina. President
McDougle was named the fourth President of
Northwest State Community College in 1991
and retired as President Emeritus in 2003.
During his tenure, Northwest State doubled in
size, both in terms of enrollment and physi-
cal plant. Additionally, President McDougle
served as Academic Dean of Instruction in the
Community and Technical College of the Uni-
versity of Toledo from 1984-91.
Since his retirement, President McDougle
has been a part-time faculty member in the
University of Toledo Higher Education pro-
gram, which is designed to prepare students
for positions as college administrators. His
professional background also includes serving
as a tenured Professor at Indiana University,
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and
the University of Toledo.
President McDougle has received many
honors to include an Honorary Doctor of Edu-
cational Leadership in 1998 and the Distin-
guished Alumnus Award in 2009, both from the
University of Findlay. In 1996, he received the
Philip J. Rusche Distinguished Service Award
from the University of Toledo College of Edu-
cation and Allied Professions. Two years later,
President McDougle was awarded the John C.
Hoyt Outstanding Employment and Training
Leadership Award from the Toledo Area Pri-
vate Industry Council.
In addition, he is the author of more than
60 articles, which have been published in a
variety of professional journals, and has been
invited to make presentations at more than 150
state, regional and national conferences.
Nationally, President McDougle has held
Board of Directors-level positions with the
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA),
the Membership Advisory Council of NFPA,
the Midwest Society for Human Resources/
Industrial Relations Chapter of the Midwest
Business Administration Association and the
Membership Committee of the American Tech-
nical Education Association (ATEA). In Ohio,
he has served on the Ohio Board of Regents
Advisory Committee on Service Achievement
and has been a member of the Board of Trust-
ees for Mercy College of Northwest Ohio, the
Northwest Ohio Regional Economic Develop-
ment (NORED), the Regional Growth Partner-
ship (RGP) and the Henry County Business
Advisory Council.
President McDougle earned a doctorate in
higher education from the University of To-
ledo. The Napoleon resident holds a master’s
degree in physics from Kent State University
and a bachelor’s degree in math-physics from
the University of Findlay. President McDougle
succeeds Dr. Christa Adams, who retired Jan.
1, after having served as President of Owens
Community College since July 2001.
One of the fastest-growing higher educa-
tional institutions in Ohio, Owens Community
College is a fully accredited two-year, state-
assisted institution of higher education that
has served Northwest Ohio since 1965. With
a commitment to providing small classes,
personal attention and unmatched affordabil-
ity, the College serves the diverse academic
needs of credit and non-credit students on
the Toledo-area and Findlay-area campuses.
Owens offers associate degrees that transfer
to baccalaureate degrees in the Arts and Sci-
ences and over 130 technical program areas in
Agriculture, Business, Health Sciences, Public
Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Skilled
Trades, and Engineering and Transportation
Technologies. Owens students also can earn
the first two years of a bachelor’s degree with
a smooth transfer to any area four-year col-
lege or university. For more information, visit
Owens (Continued from page 6)
24 TheBusinessJournal July2010

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