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SOUTH AISLE

I 51 l\l([5 CHURCH, H~O

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Photographed and Updated by Keith & Allison Bamford in November 2007. 2nd Edition August 2008

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A Brief History

The Church was consecrated on Saturday 18 October 1862 by the Right Rev James Prince Lee, the first Bishop of Manchester. The old chapel was deemed to be in existence in 1552 according to a report from Edward VI's Commission for the Visitation of the Chantries of England when the Warden of the Chapelry of Heywood, Bernard Brierly, had to appear before them in Bury and render up to the King the ornaments of the chapel.

Acting on behalf of the parishioners of Heywood, he struck a deal with the Commissioners whereby they relinquished on behalf of the King, all claim to the fabric of the chapel, the communion table and bell for the sum of £5 13s 4d.

The old chantry was rebuilt in 1640 by Robert Heywood of Heywood Hall but as a consequence of the Civil War, it seems it was never consecrated. The Commission of the Long Parliament of 1645 found the Chapel destitute of any endowment except 'The use of £5 to such Minister as doth officiate, being a recent gift given by Mr William Holme, gent., deceased, and remaining in his hands constantly towards the maintenance of a Preacher'. They decided that the Tithes of Heywood, Bamford,. Whittle and Lomax should be annexed to the chapel, valued at £22.

At the Restoration in 1662, the Tithes reverted to the Rector of Bury and Mr Jonathan Schofield, an Independent Minister, probably ceased his ministrations at this time. During this time, it is probable a house with garden and acre of land attached was erected for the use of the Minister at the expense of the inhabitants of the Chapelry on land occupied by the Municipal Buildings (now demolished) at the junction of Longford Street and Bamford Road.

The chapel was extended in 1805 and the last service was held Christmas Day 1859 before demolition and clearance of the site for the erection of the present building.

Nothing remains of the Old Chapelry, the fabric having been rebuilt in 1640 and the Communion Table disappeared in 1860, only the Bell remained which was placed in the turret of the school in Queens Park Road, and now hangs in the church tower.

The building was designed by Mr Joseph Clarke, FSA, London. The structure is described as being a parallelogram, based on 13th century models, an influence seen not only in the building but also in the stained glass. The whole is seen as a product of the influence of the Oxford Movement.

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The builder chosen was a Mr Hughes. The estimated cost, we are informed, was £8,800 (including spire), but the final cost came to some £12,800, £10,000 of

which had been raised by the time the building was ready for use. .

The old churchyard wall was demolished for the re-buildinq of the church. At its opening, temporary steps were erected in Church Street. The wall was rebuilt by public subscription in about 1867 with a drinking fountain at the western most point presented by Thomas Clegg Esq, which now resides in Queens Park.

The building comprises a nave and chancel. A door in the south east corner of the Chancel leads into a choir vestry and toilet. To the north of the Chancel is theLady Chapel and leading from this at the north east corner is a vestry (originally a private chapel). A south porch was added leading to Church Street and to the north a tower with spire rising to 189 feet and forming the principal entrance from York Street. After the Great War a carved oak War Memorial was added at the eastern end of the south aisle.

The tour begins by re-tracing our steps through the south porch and to the steps outside.

In the grassed area by the Church Street steps in the south west corner of the church is the base upon which the sundial stood prior to its damage by vandalism. The shaft and top were then removed inside the building for storage.

The sundial was I'isted along with the buil'ding in 1985. There was a sundial on the east side of the chapel bearing the date 1686, and initials of Robert of Heywood, who was governor of the Isle of Man in 1678, also the initials AB 1807.

The dial was placed in the churchyard in 1845. In re-building the wa'll, the original shaft was found. Mr Walter Whatmough and his brother, Edward, obtained an 'ancient dial' in keeping with the old shaft and erected the two parts together. The inscription of the pedestal reads:

Our next stop is back through the south porch and to the Font.

'THIS DIAL IS RESTORED TO 1HE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF ISAAC WHA TMOUGH,. WHO DIED 26 MARCH 1871, AGED 43 YEARS; AND HIS DEAR WIFE, LUCY, WHO DIED 11 JANUARY 1906, AGED 81 YEARS. I .RECKON ONL Y THE BRIGHT HOURS. S1 LUKE'S DAY 1906.'

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Font

Fonts are traditionally placed at the rear of churches

• because it was symbolic of the beginning of the Christian pilgrimage through life; and

• in days gone by they were often situated near the north door and through baptism the devil was exorcised and escaped through the north door, hence people often refused to be buried on the north side ofa church .

....._-------' The font is made from the same marble as the pulpit. The bowl is octagonal', every other panel containing the symbol of the four Evangelists:

St Luke

The winged ox assigned to him is a reference to his Gospel, which deals with the sacrificial aspects of Christ's life

St Matthew

The symbol of a 'divine man' was assigned to him in ancient times, because his Gospel teaches us about the human nature of Christ.

StJohn

The ancient symbol of a rising eagle was reputedly assigned to St John because his gaze pierced further into the mysteries of Heaven than that of any man.

St Mark

A winged lion, the ancient symbol of St Mark, refers to his Gospel, which informs us of the royal dignity of Christ.

It rests on a cluster of 8 marble columns with the capitals decorated with foliage .. The plinth is of marble and octagonal in shape and sits on a stone base, which is also octagonal with a projecting arm at the back as a platform for standing. The top is crowned with a pyramid shaped pine cover, octagonal at the base, surmounted with a finial. Round the top of the bowl is inscribed:

'I ACKNOWLEDGE THE BAPTISM FOR THE REMISSION OF SINS'

A brass plate on the base reads :

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF THOMAS CRABTREE, BORN 1 OCTOBER 1815, DIED 22 NOVEMBER 1885. THIS FONT IS GIVEN TO ST LUKE'S CHURCH, HEYWOOD BY ALICE CRABTREE, HIS WIDOW 1886'

The font was dedicated 16 September 1886. 5

Old Lectern

Next make your way to the west wall and take a look at the old lectern

This was a gift of Captain Shadwell RN CB 1862, a relation of Rector Shadwell. It is no longer in use and may possibly be a piece of furniture from the old chapel. It is made of dark oak and carved. The rotating book rest swivels on a central support which is attached to four arms at the foot of the support.

Towards the centre of the west wall you will come to an old picture.

Picture on West Wall

This is a framed watercolour of the old chapel in 1859.

Next to this you will find the Incumbents Board

Incumbents Board

This was erected in memory of Eric Heywood Fenton LOS, RCSF, JP 1901-1958, a life long member of St Luke's Church. It shows the list of incumbents from 1634.

Heywood chapel, in the Parish of Bury, is known to have existed in 1552. The chapelry became a perpetual curacy in 1719 attached to Bury Parish Church, the Rector eventually being the patron when St Luke's became a Parish in its own right in 1862 - this was relinquished when St Luke's Parish became part of the Parish of Heywood in 1998.

Now walk up the main central aisle and take a look at the War Memorial to the right of the pulpit.

War Memoriall

The cabinet contains the names of those who died in the wars 1914-1918 and 1939-1945. The framed scroll on the south aisle waH contains the Roll of Honour 1914-1918 from St Luke's Church and Schools Heywood. This was found and restored in 1998, and was re-dedicated on Remembrance Sunday 1998.

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There is a prayer desk kept by the War Memorial with a plate inscribed

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN

!i.-J.!"'~'!!!:ILOVING MEMORY OF LANCE

CORPORAL HAROLD PARTINGTON THE DEARLY LOVED SON OF JOHN AND ELLEN PARTINGTON WHO DIED OF WOUNDS RECEIVED A T THE DARDANELLES AND WAS BURIED AT SEA 9 MAY 1915 AGED 18 YEARS "A NOBLE LIFE FOR A NOBLE CAUSE" ,

Now move back towards the centre of the church to look at the pulpit situated at the south side of the chancel steps.

Pulpit

The pulpit is made from marble with coloured marble of red, green and black used in the centre panel, to form a decorated cross. Foliated carving runs around the top edge horizontally and vertically down the entrance which is reached by stone steps. It rests on two marble '

shafts. The capitals are decorated with marble foliage whilst the plinth is stone decorated with foliage resting on a similar stone base. The dedication plate reads 18th October 1862 and it was donated by members of the Sunday School. Inside the pulpit, there is a brass plaque inscribed:

STHIS PULPIT WAS ERECTED IN HONOUR OF GOD AND FOR THE USE OF THE CHURCH OF ST LUKE THE EVANGELIST, HEYWOOD BY CERTAIN MEMBERS OF THE SUNDA Y SCHOOLS IN CONNECTION WITH THE SAID CHURCH THE FEAST OF ST LUKE THE EVANGELIST AD 1862'

Moving to the left of the pulpit, you will find the lectern.

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Lectern

There is a brass plaque with the inscription round the base:

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND .IN LOVING MEMORY OF JAMES ARTHUR BELSHAW OF BARNFIELD TERRACE HEYWOOD. THIS LECTERN 'WAS GIVEN TO ST LUKE'S CHURCH 7 NOVEMBER 1886 BY HIS PARENTS JAMES AND ESTHER BELSHAW'

The lectern is in the form of an eagle with spread wings in brass. It stands on an orb which rests on a shaft which itself rests on a tapering round base supported by 3 spherical feet.

Now we wi.1I look at the screens.

Screens

In the Chancel, there is a wrought iron screen wilth go'ld leaf decoration highlightingl the features along the top of the screen, the central cross" the IHC, .A (alpha) and 0 (Omega). The family of Richard Kay who died in 1888 placed iit iin his memory.

At the entrance to the Lady Chapel on the north aisle, there is an iron screen erected as a bequest of Jane Ell len Whitely who died 16 September 1913 ..

The choir screens are carved oak with leaded glass and were placed north and south of the choir stalls in 1931 lin memory of John Kay, Warden 1880 - 11887.

Let us now proceed up to the Sanctuary.

Sanctuary

The table in the high altar is an undecorated piece of furniture in pine. The altar ornaments consist. of matching stainless steel crosses, 2 candlesticks and 2 vases cast to represent the crown of thorns and nails. They replace silver ornaments stolen durinq the cleaning of the church stone work.

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The work consists of figures of our Lord seated upon a throne in glory and bear.ing an orb, symbol of authority, with i his right hand raised lin blessinq, The figure of Christ. is flanked by the 12 Apostles in an attitude of praise and on the extreme right and left are allegorical angelic figures representing the old and new Church. The dominant figure of Christ is seated under a projectinq canopy. It is an impressive and fine work, artistic both in conception and in execution. There are 3 steps beneath the throne, upon which is inscribed the text JESU R.EX GLOR.IAE. The canopy above is semi-octagonal in form carried upon circular shafts, wreathed with a moulded and carved band, goblets, carved crockets, pendants and terminals, the inner parts being grained with moulded ribs and carved bosses. Behind the figure is a Circular recess, spanned by a pointed arch, working up into the groining, the ground is enriched with a diaper ornament, carved in low relief and richly gilded. In the panels at the sides are grouped the kneeling Apostles bearinq appropriate symbols. They are in high relief on a ground of conventional, flower diaper of effective design, gilded. Over the panels a graceful carved and battlemented cornice is placed, the carved foliated cove being especially noteworthy. Buttresses of massive design are added at the end of the panels supporting the figures representing the old and new Church. They are looking towards the figure of Christ in the centre. From the sloping tablinq of the buttresses pedestals rise upon which the figures rest. and over each figure there is a small carved canopy upon twisted shafts and moulded capitals. The central canopy and terminals of the buttresses rise above the genera,l. line and balance the composition. A moulded retable stands over the place reserved for the altar table, which in recent times has been moved forward to provide access behind to enable the priest to face the people. On the space above iis inscribed the text WE PRAISE TH!EE, 0 GOD, WE ACKNOWLEDGE THEE TO BE TH'E LORD. This is under a projecting moulded and enriched string course. The whole work is extremely artistic and well balanced, with pure Gothic details and some excellent carving and sculpture. The style adapted is late English decorated. The material employed through out is English alabaster, the sculptures being cut. from the purest white blocks, 'I understand these are exceptionally fine specimens of this beautiful material.'

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[As described in Shaw's history of 1932], the reredos is in two parts - the centre portion and the side panels replacing an earlier reredos of 1866. The central portion was unveiled on 29 May 1887, a gift of Thomas Turner of Heywood in memory of his wife Ellen.

The work. was executed by Mr N Hitch of Vauxhall from the designs and under the superintendence of Messrs Joseph Clarke and F Lennox Canning, architects of London.

The completed designs included additional panels, extending the whole width of the East Chancel wall containing sculptured groups representing the saints of the old and new dispensations in high relief and in harmony with the central subjects with an arrangements of tapestries and draped alabaster under, but this work. was deferred and hangings were placed on each side, the gift of Mrs Fielden of Dobroyd Castle. The side panels, as described in the history of 1932.

In 1931 these hangings were removed and placed in the Fenton Chapel vestry. English alabaster panelling was erected on each side of the present alabaster reredos as a memorial to Robert Howe JP CC and of Fanny Howe his wife. It was dedicated on Sunday morning 20 September 1932 by the Rector of Bury, the Revd H C Hornby MC, and bears the following inscription :

ITO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING .MEMORY OF ROBERT HOWE, JP, CC (CHURCHWARDEN, 1915-20 AND 1926-29) AND OF FANNY HOWE, HIS WIFE, SEPTEMBER 1931'

The Organ

The organ was built and installed by Jardine of Manchester in 1867, then consisting of 3 manual and pedal keyboards, 29 stops and 1,798 pipes at a cost of £680. At the time the engine used to supply the bellows with wind was water-powered. This was later replaced by an electric motor to save money.

It was rebuilt and enlarged by Jardine of Manchester in 1887 with 9 stops added, increasing the number of pipes to 2,198 at a cost of £600. The bellows were repaired in 1928.

In 1964 Cowin of Liverpool electrified the action and provided the orqan with a detached console in a new position. At the same time they reduced the organ from 3 manuals to 2, although some of the 1887 pipework was connected to the retained manuals. The organ now consists of 32 stops. Adjustable combination thumb- and toe-pistons were added at this time.

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In 1983 some cleaning, repair and revoicmq work was carried out by Cedric Cheetham and Stanley Jackson. In 2007 the bellows were again repaired, this time by George Sixsmith & Son.

Considering that it is over 140 years old, the organ has had very little work done on it. Although its age inevitably leads to the need for regular repair and restoration, at heart it is a fine instrument, well suited to St Luke's.

You will find the Lady Chapel to the left of the main altar.

The Lady Chapel

The Chapel was formed in 1914 and the present altar was given in 1945 in memory of W H Kay (Warden 1882- 1892 and 1898-1901) and his wife. Up to this time, it was part of the normal

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church building with seats facing inward

towards the sanctuary.

The altar is made from light oak with solid form sides and top with an open back. The front is divided into 3 panels, the central panel bearing a carved cross and the 2 side panels a carved A and O. Ornamental carving runs along the top edge front and sides in a continuous pattern.

The Lady Chapel was furnished by the Mothers' Union. The cross and 2 candle sticks are unadorned and match the altar table in light oak.

To the left of the Lady Chapel you will find the Vestry.

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Vestry (Fenton Chapel]

Originally built as a private chapel and therefore embellished in a more lavish manner, this was added after the initial designs were drawn up and was initiated and paid for by Joseph Fenton of Bamford Hall for his own use, the same family to whom the famous photographer of the Crimean war is related. The walls are of ashlar with marble shafts, the roof is panelled in oak and the floor paved with encaustic tiles. An iron screen was added to the chapel from the church.

The most important feature in this room is the stained glass window on the north wall dated 1862 by J.B. Capronnier of Brussels, whose subject is 'The Agony in the Garden; the Crucifixion; the Resurrection. (see Front Cover)

If you leave the vestry through the Lady Chapel, as you come down the steps take a moment to look at the banner on your right.

Banner

This banner, which became the Sunday School banner, is probably over 100 years old and was originally housed in the Mission Chapel in Hardfield Street until this was closed. It is embroidered depicting The Good Shepherd. Mission Chapels were also to be found in Pine Street and Schofield Street.

The Model

The model has a moving history made over a 16-month period by two widowers Ron Booth and Jack Wilson in 1993.

Ron, a former joiner had lost the use of his hands to arthritis, so Jack Wilson, built the model with Ron's guidance and the project became a great comfort to the two men, following the deaths of their wives, Elsie Booth and Nan Wilson.

Jack, a church warden at St Luke's had met Ron once before through the church and was asked to go and talk to Ron. Jack said "We chatted for four hours and then at the end I said to Ron that we had to do something, and I had the idea to build the model."

Photographs were taken of the church exterior, and the pair used a floor plan to make the wooden model to scale. They worked on it every weekday for 6 months building it on the kitchen table in Ron's home in Barley Hall Street,

The six foot long church is built in sections that slot together. Its doors open on tiny hinges, it is illuminated

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and it's stained glass windows are identical to those in the church - achieved by using enlarged negatives of the windows taken by a friend of both men, Mr Andrew Carson. Even organ music plays when the lights are switched on.

Jack said ;"1 got the last photograph of the final window, but I was going away to Scotland, so I left it with Ron to put in. But after he had put it in, he died."

Ron died on 4 April, aged 81, alone in his home, with his beloved model.

Soon after Ron's death, the model was taken to St Luke's where it is on display. Visitors who appreciate it are invited to make a donation to the Church Restoration Fund.

Moving down the north aisle to the doors, there are 3 brass plaques

Brass Plaques

To the right of the doors, the upper brass commemorates the laying of the first stone of the Church and its commemoration and is inscribed:

'THIS CHURCH OF WHICH THE FIRST STONE WAS LAID BY THE IREVEREND WILLIAM HORNBY, MA, OF HEYWOOD AND VICAR OF ST MICHAEL'S ON WYRE ON THURSDAY IN WHITSUN WEEK AD MDCCLX, WAS BUILT TO THE GLORY OF GOD, DEDICATED TO ST LUKE THE EVANGELIST AND CONSECRATED BY JAMES PRINCE, FIRST BISHOP OF MANCHESTER, ON THE EIGHTEENTH DAY OF OCTOBER MDCCCLXII, AND THE TWENTY SIXTH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA, AND THE PEAL OF EIGHT BELLS CAST BY G MEARS & CO, WHITECHAPEL, LONDON, AND HUNG IN THIS TOWER, WAS GIVEN BY:

JOHN HARGREAVES OF MANCHESTER STREET, HEYWOOD, MANUFACTURER, WILLIAM SMITH & BROTHERS OF THE SUN IRON WORKS, HEYWOOD, IRONMASTERS, JOSEPH FENTON OF BAMFORD HALL, IN THE COUNTY OF LANCASTER, ESQ, THE WORK PEOPLE· EMPLOYED BY WILLIAM SMITH & BROTHERS IN THE SUN IRON WORKS, JESSE LEACH FRCS, OF MOSS HOUSE, HEYWOOD, ESQ, AB.RAHAM STOTT OF CRIMBLE, GEN,TLEMAN, THE WORKPEOPLE EMPLOYED BY JAMES KERSHAW & SONS OF PEEL STREET, HEYWOOD, MANUFACTURES, THOMAS WILD OF MANCHESTER STREET, HEYWOOD, COTTON SPINNER.

JULIUS SHADWELL, BA PERPETUAL CURATE JOHN JAMES MELLOR, CHURCHWARDEN JOHN TURNER, SIDES MAN

JOSEPH CLARKE, FSA,. ARCHITECT'

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The brass below this is inscribed:

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF OUR BELOVED SOVEREIGN KING EDWARD VII THE EIGHT BELLS OF THIS CHURCH WERE RE-CAST AND RE-HUNG BY THE CONGREGATION: AND FRIENDS AND ARIE NAMED 'THE ROYAL PEAL' EASTER 1911"

J P WILSON MA, RECTOR

FRED GREENHALGH

JAMES ASHTON CHURCHWARDENS

To the left of the door the brass plate is inscribed:

'ST LUKE'S PARISH CHURCH HEYWOOD THE ILLUMINATED TOWER DIALS AND CAMBRIDGE CHIMES WERE ADDED BY THE BEQUEST OF JOHN THOMAS WILSON OF THE TOWN WHO DIED JULY 221894'

R W PERRY CIRCUIT RECTOR

JAMES LAWTON MAYOR

JOHN PARTINGTON VALE COTTAGE SILVESTOR UTTON CHURCHWARDENS CHRISTMAS DAY 1894

There is a further brass which commemorates 3 curates of the Church who were re-interred after the demolition of the old building. Unfortunately this is hidden under the carpet in the Chancel, but the inscription reads:

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF REV JOSEPH BLAND CHAPELRY OF HEYWOOD WHOSE MORTAL REMAINS ALONG WITH THOSE OF THE REV JAMES BARTON, PERPETUAL CURATE 1742-1774, AND THE REV RICHARD LONGFORD, PERPETUAL CURATE 1774-1804, WERE RE-INTERRED BENEATH THIS CHANCEL ON THE REBUILDING OF THIS CHURCH IN 1862. THIS MEMORIAL WAS PLACED AND THE CHANCEL RETILED BY JOSEPH JAMESON, OF HEYWOOD HALL, THE YOUNGEST SON OF THE ABOVE REV J B JAMESON 1881'

Leave the church by the North porch, before starting down the steps turn left towards the access ramp. On that landing iis the door to the ringing room for the church bells. The bells can be viewed and heard on request, but we are pleased to provide details as follows»

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Bells

lin the mid-Nineteenth Century when it was decided to replace St Luke's Chapel with a new building, requests were made for donations towards the building costs and the landowners of the time offered sums of money and a "bell" therefore ensuring St. Luke's had a ring of bells. A peal of eight bells was cast by Messrs Mears and Co. of Whitechapel, London and was opened and dedicated

"To The Glory of God on Whit Thursday, May 28th, 1863."

Details of the bells inscriptions were:-

Treble: "One was given by Thomas Wild"

Second: "One was given by the workpeople of James Kershaw and Sons" Third: "One was given by Abraham Stott"

Fourth: "One was given by Jesse Leach"

Fifth: "One was given by the workpeople of William Smith and Brothers" Sixth: "One was given by Joseph Fenton"

Seventh: "One was given by William Smith and Brothers

Tenor: "Of this peal of eight bells, one was given by John Hargreaves".

In November 1910 it was suggested the bells be recast as a memorial to the late beloved sovereign, King Edward VII. The old bells were rung for the last time on Sunday January 1 st 1911.

In addition to the existing inscriptions, a new inscription was added to the tenor bell:

"This peal of bells was recast and rehung in the year 1911 as a memorial of King Edward VII, of beloved memory who reigned from 1901 to 1910".

o ever, this was not quite the end of the story with regard to this recasting, as jus I after the first World War in 1920 one Sunday evening there was a great crash (according to Ernest Brearley who started ringing in 1919 and rang until his 90th birthday in 11988). On investigation it was found that the tenor bell had cracked. So once again, in 1921, the bells were recast by Gillett and Johnston, seemingly free of charge. The final weight of all the current bells is 78 cwt. 1 qr. 171b with the tenor bell weighing 21cwt 9qr 91b (1109kg), note E-f1at.

Since then one further major project has taken place in the tower and that was the lowering of the bells in 1971. The bells were lowered 20 feet from 68 feet to 48 feet above ground level. This reduced the sway of the tower by some two thirds making it a lot easier to ring the bells.

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The bells remain a popular hobby today with many ringers notching up peals which usually take about 3 hours. Some peals are for specific events like the Centenary of the Church and the opening of the bells, others are more personal events like Silver Wedding Anniversary celebrations and some are just for fun!

In the ringing room, certain momentous occasions are marked by the recording of these peals on Peal Boards, a selection of which are shown below.

The bells are currently rung for Evensong each Sunday and practice night on Monday evening 7.30 to 9.00pm.

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STAINED GLASS WINDOW INDEX

WINDOW

1. East

2. South Aisle
Sunday School (Boys)
3. South Aisle
Starky Memorial
4. South Aisle
Smith Memorial
5. South Aisle
Crabtree Memorial
6. South Aisle
Robert Hall Memorial
7. West Wall South West Corner
Kershaw Memorial
8. Great West Window
Fenton Window
9. The Secret Window 10. West Wall North West Corner The Leach Memorial

11. North Aisle Wolstenholme Memorial

12. North Aisle

Jesse Leach Memorial

13. Lady Chapel North Wall Sunday School (Girls)

14. Lady Chapel East Wall Freemasons Window

15. 'Fenton Chapel' Clergy Vestry (J.B. Capronnier of Brussels)

SUBJECT

New Testament

Events in the life of Christ

St Luke instructing Theophilus

St Paul

8t Peter

St Stephen

St Philip

Christ blesses the children

Old Testament subjects

Small light containing St Luke's Evangelistic symbol

The Holy Family visits the Temple The wedding at Cana, Lazarus

St Barnabas

St Luke (?)

The children cry 'Hosanna'

Solomon and Hiram King of Tyre

Crucifixion

The Four Evangelists

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1. THE EAST WINDOW

New Testament - Events in the life of Christ

This magnificent window, dedicated on 15 August 1875, was executed and installed by Messrs Hardman at a cost of £825, the money having been raised by the congregation. It is referred to as the 'New Testament Window', as the whole subject matter concerns itself with events in the life of Christ, and is intended to be a focal point reminding us that Christ came into the world as an expression of God's love.

F rom the left :

The 1st light portrays the birth of Christ, above portrays Mary's visit to her cousin Elizabeth after the visit of Gabriel, and below the scene where Mary is told by Gabriel that she has been chosen to bear God's Son is portrayed.

The 2nd light describes events in the childhood of Jesus - in the middle Jesus at the age of 12 is seen in the Temple, above this is a scene of Jesus growing up as a carpenter's son, and below shows the Holy family as it escapes into Egypt.

The 3rd light depicts the events of Maundy Thursday - in the centre is the Last Supper, above is the betrayal of Jesus by Judas, and below is the washing of the disciples' feet.

The 4th light portrays the Crucifixion. In the centre is the Crucifixion itself, above depicts Christ bearing the sins of the world upon his' shoulders, and below portrays the agony in the Garden.

The 5th light moves to the burial of Jesus - in the centre Jesus is laid to rest in the tomb, above shows the anointing of his body on the Sabbath, and below shows the weeping Mary Magdalene before the sealed tomb as the soldiers stand guard.

The 6th light witnesses the events of the Resurrection - the centre shows Christ rising victorious from the tomb, above shows Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene, and below shows the scene where the women are told that Christ is risen.

The ih li.ght is the scene of the Ascension where the centre shows Christ ascending from the Mount of Olives, above depicts the Holy Spirit descending on the Apostles, and below is Christ's charge to Peter to 'feed my sheep'.

The tracery above the seven lights is filled with angelic figures representing the Celestial Choir, above is the Holy Spirit in the traditional form of a dove.

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2. THE SOUTH AISLE - Sunday School (Boys) St Luke instructing Theophllus

TO VIEW THIS WINDOW YOU WILL HAVE TO WALK ROUND THE BACK OF THE WAR MEMORIAL.

The window was executed by Messrs Clayton and Bell at a cost of £45 10s - the dedication reads:

'DEDICATED TO THE GLORY OF GOD BY TEACHERS AND SCHOLARS OF ST. LUKE'S BOYS SUNDAY SCHOOL AD 1873'

The subject matter is St. Luke instructing TheophHus. The figure of the Evangelist is seated at a desk on which lies Luke's Gospel with pen in his right hand and the left stretched out towards Theophilus.

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3., THE SOUTH AISLE- Starky Memoirial St Paul

The window was executed by Messrs Clayton and 8ell- the dedication reads:

liN MEMORY OF JAMES STARKY WHO. DIED NOVEMBER 17TH 1846 AGED 86 YEARS'

"The subject matter is St Paul's encounter with Christ on the road to Damascus.

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4. THE SOUTH AISLE .. Smith Memorial St Peter

The dedication reads:

lTO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN PIOUS MEMORY OF HANNAH THE BELOVED DAUGHTER OF WILLIAM AND MARGARET SMITH OF HEYWOOD WHO WAS BORN IN 1845 AND DIED 1846.

THIS WINDO'W WAS DEDICATED AD 1873'

Wiilliam Smith was the owner of Sun Iron Works in Heywood.

The subject of this window is the condemnation of Ananias, who sold a field in aid of the needy but retained some of the money ..

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5. THE SOUTH AISLE- Crabtree Memorial St Stephen

The window was executed by Messrs Clayton and Bell and the dedication reads:

ITO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN PIOUS MEMORY OF ANN THE BELOVED WIFE OF EDWIN CRABTREE BORN 1840 DIED 1871

ALSO HIS MOTHER BORN 1808 DIED 1861'

This window shows the stoning of Stephen who was one of the seven deacons chosen at the request of the apostles to see to the needs of the idows.

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6. THE SOUTH AISLE- Robert Holt Memorial St Philip

You will find this window beyond the porch to the south west corner of the Church. The ded ication reads :

'TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF ROBERT HOL T ESQ OF CHAMBER HOUSE WHO DIED MARCH 23 1825 IN HIS 89,TH YEAR'

This window portrays the story of St. Philip in Acts 8. The left hand light shows the angel bidding Philip to 'get up and go towards the south'; in the centre Philip baptizes the Ethiopian Eunuch, and in the right hand light Philip and the Eunuch are shown rising from the water, with the Spirit of the Lord snatching Philip away. St. Philip can be seen above.

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7. THE WEST WALL- Kershaw Memorial Christ blesses the children

The dedication reads:

"IN MEMORY OF ROBERT KERSHAW OF PEEL STREET HEYWOOD WHO DIED JUNE 18 1846

AND OF MARY HIS WIFE WHO DIED AUGUST 17 1859'

The subject of this window is Our Lord blessing the children. In the central light, Jesus holds an infant in his arms whilst laying his hand on the older ones in the group, with St. John in the background. On the right and left are mothers bringing their children to Jesus, with figures of the disciples present, the whole forming one large 'group.

The tracery lights are occupied by angels bearing scrolls.

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8. THE WEST WALL - Fenton Window Old Testament Subjects

To view this magnificent window fully, you need to walk up the middle of the nave. This, the opposite window to the East Window which depicts the revelation of God through His Son Jesus Ghrist, is a representation of the Old Testament revelation. The window was a gift of Mr Joseph Fenton, a local banker, of Bamford Hall and it was uncovered on 9 July 1876 .. The work was executed by Messrs Hardman and Co and consists of 6 lights, each light having 3 subjects.

From the left :

The 1st light portrays at the bottom Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, the central subject is of Cain slaying Abel, and at the top is a scene representing Noah and his sons building the ark.

The 2nd light portrays at the bottom Abraham offering his son Isaac as a sacrifice, in the centre the two spies sent by Moses into Canaan are shown bearing on their shoulders the grapes of Eshcol, and at the top the dying Jacob is shown blessing his sons.

The 3rd light portrays at the bottom Pharaoh setting Joseph on the throne of Egypt, in the centre the Passover meal is represented, the participants ready to leave Egypt, and above the subject is Moses lifting up the brass serpent in the wilderness so that all who look upon it might be cured of snake bites and live (a parallel with the sacrifice of Good Friday).

The 4th light portrays from the bottom Joshua in full armour surrounded by the Israelites offering him their loyalty, the central portion shows the table which God gave instruction to be constructed and laid with incense dishes, bowls and flagons of gold for drink offerings and bread of the Presence: two priests are engaged changing the bread and behind the table is the Menorah. Above this is said to be the finest picture in the whole window, the High Priest with censer entering the Holy of Holies on the Day of Atonement, in the background is the Ark of the Covenant.

The 5th light at the bottom shows David, the shepherd boy about to slay Goliath the Philistine giant. In the centre, the scene shows the Prophet Elijah meeting the widow of Zaraphath, and above is a scene showing Samson bound by the new cords tied by his countrymen and delivered to the Philistines.

The 6th light at the bottom conveys an understanding of the resurrection from the tomb: it is a depiction of Jonah being released from the belly of the fish. At the top, Elijah ascends in the Chariot of Fire to heaven and in the centre panel is Elisha, with the aid of Elijah's mantle, touching the water of the Jordan caus:ing the waters to part so that he could re-cross the river.

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The tracery at the head of the window shows a small circle over the centre mullion representing the whole burnt offering, alluding to the sacrifice of Christ. In the large circle over this there are 5 subjects. The quatrefoil In the centre contains a representation of the Ark of the Covenant overshadowed by Cherubim. The 4 trefoils surrounding the centre lig'ht are Enoch's translation, Daniels' vision, Melchisidec, King of Salem, and Solomon and Sheba kneeling. In the large circle over the three lights on the left are 4 trefoils depicting the Gathering of Manna, Esdras (reading), the fiery furnace, and the finding of the cup in Benjamin's sack. Over this large circle is an elongated quatrefoil where Naaman the Syrian is represented washing in the Jordan. In the corresponding quatrefoil on the right hand side is Gideon and the fleece. In the 4 trefoils in the large circle over the 3 left lights are Judith with the head of Holfernes, the judgement of Solomon, the Shularnite bride of Solomon, and Esther.

9. THE SECRET WINDOW

To view this truly SECRET window fully, you need to be at the altar. Right up in the apex is a small light. almost hidden, and difficult to see with the naked eye. It contains a winged ox which is the Evangelistic symbol of S1. Luke and one of the four creatures of Revelation 4.

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10. THE WEST WALL - The Leach Memoria'i The Holy FamUy visits the Temple,

The wedding at Cana, Lazarus

The dedication reads:

'IN MEMORY OF MARTHA THE MOTHER OF JESSE LEACH FRCS OF MOSS HOUSE WHO DIED JULY 27 1856 AGED 76,

OF EMMA HIS WIFE WHO D.IED JUNE 10' 1861 AGED 51

AND OF SARAH HIS SISTER WHO DIED MAY 41854 AGED 50'

The window was executed by Mr Waites of Newcastle and given by Jesse Leach of Moss House, Heywood Hall! Road, in Jully 1866 in memory of his wife, mother and sister.

There are three different subjects in each of the three lights,. aU of which involve some event in the life of Christ. Beginning on the left hand side, the first light. depicts the boy Jesus visiting the Temple with the Blessed Virqin and St Joseph.

The second .Iight

depicts the first

miracle or s.ign

performed at the

marriage feast in Cana of Galilee; and the third light contains a depiction of the raising

. of Lazarus, brother to

I Mary and Martha and dear friends of Jesus

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11. THE NORTH AISLE - Wol.stenhoilme Memorial St Barnabas

The window was executed by Messrs Clayton and Bell and was given by Miss Wolstenholme in memory of her parents in 1878. The dedication reads:

ITO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF THE PARENTS OF ESTHER

ELDEST DAUGHTER OF SAMUEL WOLSTENHOLME OF HEYWOOD 1878'

Events in the life of St. Barnabas are depicted in this window. The first light represents the scene when Paul and Barnabas were commissioned with the laying on of hands in Antioch; the central light is the scene in Lystra when the priests of Jupiter brought oxen and garlands and would have done sacrifice to Barnabas and Paul; and in the third light Barnabas is represented preachinq, Above shows Barnabas holding a scroll.

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12. THE NOIRTH AISLE - Jesse Leach Memorial St Luke (?)

The ded ication reads :

"TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND

THE MEMORY OF JESSE LEACHI JP SURGEON OF MOSS HOUSIE HEYWOOD WHO DIED FEBRUARY 27 1879 AGED 66 YEARS.

THIS, WINDOW IS ERECTIED BY IHIS NEPHEW ABRAHAM LEACH JUNIR SURGEON OF OLDHAM 1881'

The subject of this window has been a matter of some conjecture because there is no reference to a name in any previous description. Hence any conclusion must be dedllced from the scenes depicted in glass. Both men named in the dedication .. ere surgeons, however, and there is a fair chance that the malin character of the , 'ndow is Sf. Luke, patron saint of doctors, surgeons and artists.

If it is assumed thiis is the case, the subjects of the three lights would make some sense as they can be i d e n t l f l e d as originating from his Gospel and the Book of Acts. In the left hand light it seems to be Jesus on the shore of Galilee beckoning to attract the attention of two Apostles, possibly Peter and Andrew. The centre light appears to be depicting: the end of the Journey on the road to Emmaus after th e resu rrection, where at the end of supper Jesus was recognised; and the right hand liqht depicts a martyrdom - possibly John the Baptist or James the brother of John.

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13. LADY CHAPEL- Sunday School (Girls) The children cry 'Hosanna'

The window was executed by Messrs Clayton and Bell. with a dedication reading:

'DEDICA TED TO THE GLORY OF GOD BY TEACHERS AND SCHOLARS OF ST. LUKE'S GIRLS SUNDA Y SCHOOL AD 1873'

There are two lights in this window whose subject is the children crying 'Hosanna' in the Temple. The whole lis surmounted by the Agnus Dei in the trefoil.

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14. LADY CHAPEL EAST WALL - Freemasons Window Solomon and Hiram King of Tyre

The window was executed by Messrs Shaw of Uppermill, Saddleworth and given by the Heywood Masonic Lodge of 'Naphtali'. The dedication reads:

'GLORIA IN EXCELSIS OED!

IN COMMEMORATION OF THE LA YING OF THE CORNER STONE OF THIS CHURCH .BY

ALBERT ROYDS ESQUIRE, R.W. DEPUTY PROVINCIAL GRAND MASTER OF EAST LANCASHIRE, ASSISTED BY THE PROVINCIAL GRAND OFFICERS AND THE LODGE NAPHTALI383, A.L. 5860, AD 1862'

Is this the same Albert Royds who has a street named after him in Rochdale and associated with the Masonic Church of St. Edmund Falinge, Rochdale?

The various Masonic

symbols and historical

subjects can be seen in this window. The figure in the centre light represents Solomon, King of Israel. He is holding a scroll containing the plan of the

.Temple under construction.

On his right stands Hiram, King of Tyre. On each side are ililustrated the various moral precepts inculcated by Masonic art, which mark the prime duty of a Mason to their fellow man in giving bread to the hungry and drink to the thirsty. Above are angels bearing shields with Masonic devices and appropriate inscrlptions.

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1,5. FE.NTONCHAPEL - Cruclifixion (Jean Baptiste Capronnier of Brussels] The Four EvangeUsts

You will find this window on the North WaH in the vestry located to the left of the Lady Chapell as you face the attar. There are three liqhts, the centre one portraying the crucifixion of Christ, with Mary, St John, and Mary Magdalene Ikneeling, crying at Christ's feet; the left light portrays the Agony iin the Garden, and the right hand light portrays the triumph of the resurrection. The trefoils in the tracery above portray angels, each holding a scroll! inscribed with a text reference.

There is no dedication on the large window, but it is signed by . Jean Baptiste Capronnier of Brussels, 1862.. It was he who executed this window at the behest of Joseph Fenton, who insisted on bui,lding an additional chapel, at his own expense for his private use.

Other windows in the Fenton Chapel

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