P. 1
Draft New York State Solid Waste Management Plan

Draft New York State Solid Waste Management Plan

|Views: 83|Likes:
Published by Watershed Post
The DEC's draft roadmap for solid waste and recycling in New York State. Public comment on this draft will be accepted through August 16, 2010.
The DEC's draft roadmap for solid waste and recycling in New York State. Public comment on this draft will be accepted through August 16, 2010.

More info:

Published by: Watershed Post on Jul 12, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/29/2012

pdf

text

original

DRAFT

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Acknowledgements ..............................................................................................................................................................    3 1.  Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................................................    5 1.1   Goals .........................................................................................................................................................................    6 1.2   Materials and Waste Management in New York State  1987 to Present .................................................................    7 1.3   Materials and Waste Management in New York State 2009 ....................................................................................    9 1.4   Moving Forward: Sustainable Materials Management   Action Plan ......................................................................  1  1 1.5   Conclusion ...............................................................................................................................................................  4  1 2.  Beyond Waste: A New Vision for Sustainable Materials Management in New York State  ...........................................  5  . 1 3.  Materials Management Planning, Roles and Responsibilities .......................................................................................  2  2 3.1    The History of Solid Waste Management Planning in New York State ..................................................................  2  2 3.2   Roles and Responsibilities .......................................................................................................................................  5  2 3.3    Industry Consolidation and Facility Privatization ...................................................................................................  1  3 3.4    Overseeing Privately Operated Waste Management Services ..............................................................................  2  3 3.5    Resources for Implementation  ..............................................................................................................................  3  . 3 3.6    Data Collection and Use .........................................................................................................................................  3  3 3.7   Waste Composition Information  ............................................................................................................................  4  . 3 3.8   Enforcement ...........................................................................................................................................................  5  3 3.9   Inconsistent Implementation ..................................................................................................................................  5  3 3.10   Recycling Markets .................................................................................................................................................  6  3 3.11   Changing Roles—Product Stewardship .................................................................................................................  6  3 3.12   Findings .................................................................................................................................................................  6  3 3.13   Recommendations ................................................................................................................................................  7  3 4.  Greenhouse Gas and Materials and Waste Management .............................................................................................  0  4 4.1    Waste Contributes to Global Warming ..................................................................................................................  1  4 4.2   Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Current Municipal Solid Waste Management in New York State ..............................  0  5 4.3   Findings ...................................................................................................................................................................  1  5 4.4   Recommendations ..................................................................................................................................................  2  5 5.  Product and Packaging Stewardship: An Emerging Materials Management Strategy ..................................................  3  5 5.1  Roles and Responsibilities in the Context of Product Stewardship .........................................................................  7  5 5.2    Products Targeted for Stewardship .......................................................................................................................  8  5 5.3    Findings ..................................................................................................................................................................  8  6 5.4  Recommendations ...................................................................................................................................................  9  6 1    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.   Financial Assistance and Funding Sources ....................................................................................................................  0  7 6.1    DEC Financial Assistance Programs ........................................................................................................................  0  7 6.2       ESD Financial Assistance Programs .....................................................................................................................  4  7 6.3     Financing the Move Beyond Waste ......................................................................................................................  8  7 6.4   Findings ...................................................................................................................................................................  6  8 6.5    Recommendations .................................................................................................................................................  7  8 7.  Materials Composition and Characterization ................................................................................................................  9  8 7.1        Materials Composition .......................................................................................................................................  0  9 7.2      MSW Materials Characterization .........................................................................................................................  5  9 7.3    Non‐MSW Materials Characterization ...................................................................................................................  8  9 8.  Materials Management Strategies ............................................................................................................................  11  1 8.1   Waste Prevention  .................................................................................................................................................  11  . 1 8.2   Reuse .....................................................................................................................................................................  18  1 8.3 Recycling .................................................................................................................................................................  24  1 8.4   Composting and Organic Materials Recycling .......................................................................................................  48  1 8.5      Beneficial Use Determinations (BUDs) ...............................................................................................................  60  1 9.  Disposal .....................................................................................................................................................................  70  1 9.1   Transfer and Processing Prior to Disposal  ............................................................................................................  71  . 1 9.2   Disposal Capacity Overview ...................................................................................................................................  74  1 9.3    Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) ................................................................................................................  77  1 9.4   Landfilling ..............................................................................................................................................................  86  1 9.5   Import/Export for Disposal ....................................................................................................................................  12  2 9.6   Emerging Technologies ..........................................................................................................................................  19  2 10.  Agenda for Action ......................................................................................................................................................  21  2 10.1     Legislative Recommendations ...........................................................................................................................  21  2 10.2   Regulatory Recommendations ............................................................................................................................  37  2 10.3     Programmatic Recommendations  ....................................................................................................................  38  . 2 11.  Implementation Schedule and Projections ...............................................................................................................  44  2  

       
2    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
  The development of Beyond Waste:  A sustainable materials management strategy for New York  State has been a collaborative effort that harnessed the energy and expertise of many people both  within and outside of the New York State Government.  The planning process was launched at the  direction of New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner, Pete  Grannis, and Deputy Commissioner for Materials Management and Remediation, Val Washington.  It  was led by Resa Dimino, Special Assistant in the Commissioner’s Policy Office, with support and  assistance from Sharon Gebhardt, from the Division of Solid and Hazardous Materials’ Bureau of  Program Management.  Staff of the DEC’s Division of Solid and Hazardous Materials, and in particular its Bureau of Solid  Waste, Reduction and Recycling, were essential partners in the development of this plan.  Division  Director Ed Dassatti, Assistant Division Director David O’Toole and Bureau Director Jeff Schmitt  provided valuable guidance and direction,  and the Bureau’s Section chiefs, Sally Rowland, Tom  Lynch, David Vitale, Scott Menrath and Peter Pettit, along with DEC’s regional staff, debated  alternative directions and provided significant input on the substance of the Plan and its  recommendations.  The Section chiefs also drafted key portions of the Plan.  Of particular note,  David Vitale, Scott Menrath, and staff engineers Jaime Lang and Gerard Wagner refined and  analyzed the data presented and developed the assumptions on which the projections and  estimates are based.    The staff of Empire State Development’s Environmental Services Unit, particularly Brenda Grober  and Linda Jacobs Glansberg, contributed to the discussion and to the drafting of the Plan, and  particularly to the sections on economic development, job creation, and financing programs.  The staff of DEC’s Division of Public Affairs provided essential assistance in editing, layout and design  of the plan.  Special thanks go to Bernadette LaManna, Ellen Bidell and BobDeVilleneuve.  External stakeholders also provided important input.  The more than 150 people who attended  stakeholder meetings in February and March of 2008 helped formulate a basic outline and direction.   Members of the Solid Waste Advisory Group, formed by DEC to aid in crafting the Plan, provided  valuable information and guidance based on their own unique experiences, perspectives and  expertise in the management of solid waste.  They also gave generously of their own time and  resources in traveling to Albany to participate in many day long – and longer – meetings over the  course of nearly two years. Their insights were indispensible to DEC staff throughout the planning  process, as dozens of issues and ideas were vetted, fleshed out and debated.             
3    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

The Solid Waste Advisory Group included:  • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •   New York State owes a debt of gratitude to the individuals and organizations who contributed their  time and talents to the production of the SWMP. 
     

Judy Drabicki, Director, DEC Region 6, (Chair)  Hans Arnold, Former Executive Director, Oneida Herkimer Solid Waste Authority  John Casella, Karen Flanders & Larry Shilling, Casella Waste Systems, Inc.  Jeff Cooper, New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse and Recycling   Fred Cornell, Institute for Scrap Recycling Industries  Gavin Kearny, New York City Environmental Justice Alliance  John Kowalchyk, Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation  Robert Lange, New York City Department of Sanitation  Jay Pisco, New York Chapter of the Solid Waste Association of North America  Peter Scully, Director, DEC Region 1  Kate Sinding, Natural Resources Defense Council  Abby Snyder, Director, DEC Region 9  Kevin Voorhees, New York State Association for Solid Waste Management  John Waffenschmidt, Covanta Energy Corporation  Barbara Warren, Citizens Environmental Coalition 

4   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
  New York State’s Beyond Waste Plan (Plan) sets forth a new approach for New York State—a shift  from focusing on “end‐of‐the‐pipe” waste management techniques to looking “upstream” and more  comprehensively at how materials that would otherwise become waste can be more sustainably  managed through the state’s economy.  This shift is central to the state’s ability to adapt to an age  of growing pressure to reduce demand for energy, reduce dependence on disposal, minimize  emission of greenhouse gases and create green jobs.    Accomplishing this change necessitates increased attention to influencing product and packaging  design to foster a system that minimizes waste and maximizes the use of recyclable materials.  This  will require the involvement of all players in the production and supply chain—product  manufacturers, distributors, retailers, consumers, and government.  It will also require increased  investment in our recycling and distribution/reverse distribution infrastructure. Ultimately, it will  result in decreased reliance on waste disposal facilities.    The materials management system envisioned in this plan would capture the economic value of our  materials, conserve their imbedded energy, and minimize the generation of greenhouse gases and  pollution.  The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) projects that  implementing this plan could reduce nearly 23 million metric tons of CO 2  equivalent greenhouse gas  emissions annually, save more than 250 trillion BTUs of energy each year—as much energy as is  consumed by more than 2.5 million homes—and create 74,000 jobs and economic opportunity in  the process. 1     This vision can only be fully realized if the state and local governments obtain and dedicate the  additional staff and resources needed to implement the Plan, if manufacturers take financial or  physical responsibility for the reuse and recycling of the products and packaging they put into the  marketplace, and if private entities embrace their responsibility for proper materials management.   To these ends, this plan recommends a number of potential revenue streams to offset the costs to  the public sector, as well as legislative recommendations to engage the private sector more fully in  moving New York State beyond waste.         

                                                                 
1

 The methodology and data used to derive these figures is provided in Appendix 1 

  5    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

1.1   GOALS  The quantitative goal of this Plan is to reduce the amount of waste New Yorkers dispose by  preventing waste generation and increasing reuse, recycling, composting and other organic  material recycling methods.  Currently, New Yorkers throw away 4.1 pounds of municipal solid  waste (MSW) per person per day, or 0.75 tons per person per year.  The Plan seeks to reduce the  amount of MSW destined for disposal by 15 percent every two years.  Achieving this will require  the engagement of manufacturers through product and packaging stewardship and the  development of additional reuse and recycling infrastructure, as well as a strong partnership with  other states and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).   
Source:  Appendix 1 

  The qualitative goals of this Plan are to:  • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •    
6    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Minimize Waste Generation  Maximize Reuse  Maximize Recycling  Maximize Composting and Organics Recycling  Advance Product and Packaging Stewardship  Create Green Jobs  Maximize the Energy Value of Materials Management  Minimize the Climate Impacts of Materials Management  Reemphasize the Importance of Comprehensive Local Materials Management Planning  Minimize the Need for Export of Residual Waste  Engage all New Yorkers—government, business, industry and the public—in Sustainable  Materials Management  Strive for Full Public Participation, Fairness and Environmental Justice  Prioritize Investment in Reduction, Reuse, Recycling and Composting Over Disposal  Maximize Efficiency in Infrastructure Development  Foster Technological Innovation  Continue to Ensure that Solid Waste Management Facilities are Sited Designed and Operated  in an Environmentally Sound Manner 

1.2    MATERIALS AND WASTE MANAGEMENT IN NEW YORK STATE  1987 TO PRESENT 
DEC’s 1987 Solid Waste Management Plan (1987 Plan) was aggressive for its time.  It set a goal of  reducing, reusing or recycling 50 percent of the  state’s waste stream in ten years and set forth a  solid waste management hierarchy, adopted into  law in 1988, that placed priority on waste  TERMS  prevention, reuse and recycling, followed by  municipal waste combustion (MWC) with energy  recovery and, finally, landfilling as the lowest  A materials management  priority.  Twenty‐two years later, the majority of  approach necessitates a  the materials generated are managed by the  change in terminology.   lowest priority strategy, and the state is still  Materials are not waste  striving to achieve its recycling goals.   

The implementation of the 1987 Plan, the Solid  Waste Management Act of 1988, and local solid  waste management plans established by municipal    planning units, has yielded significant progress.   The state’s recycling rate has grown from  approximately three percent to 36 percent of the  entire materials stream and 20 percent when only  MSW is evaluated 2 .  Many of the state’s  communities have implemented exemplary  integrated materials management systems that  have yielded recycling rates well beyond the  statewide average.  However, the state as a whole appears to be stagnating at levels of MSW  recycling near 20 percent—well below the national average MSW recycling rate reported by EPA at  33 percent.   

until they are destined for  a landfill or municipal  waste combustor.  So, this  plan uses the terms  “materials” and “materials  management” in place of  “waste” or “waste  management” when  referring to activities at the  upper end of the hierarchy.  

The 1987 Plan was drafted to address what was  determined at that time to be a developing solid  waste disposal crisis.  The Plan focused on an  integrated solid waste management approach, to  be implemented by municipal planning units which  favored reduction, reuse and recycling and local  self‐sufficiency in managing the remaining waste  stream. 

                                                                  2 The total materials stream includes municipal solid waste, construction and demolition debris, biosolids (or  sewage sludge) and industrial waste; municipal solid waste includes materials generated by the  residential, commercial and institutional sectors. For a description of each of these streams, see section 7.  For a discussion of the reporting and data on which this calculation is based, see section 8.3.1.  7    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

The 1987 Plan sought to phase out MSW incineration without energy recovery and replace landfills  in the state with a network of 37 municipal waste combustors (MWCs) with energy recovery for  treating the waste remaining after reduction, reuse and recycling.    While at one point 13 MWCs were operational in New York State, only 10 combustion facilities  remain in operation in 2009. The goal of phasing out MSW incineration was accomplished, though  some biosolids (i.e., sewage sludge) are still incinerated without energy recovery.    The 1987 Plan prescribed phasing out landfilling of unprocessed MSW and using landfills only for  discreet streams (i.e., MWC residues, some biosolids, some construction and demolition debris).   Though the number of active MSW landfills has been drastically reduced from 348 mostly unlined  landfills in 1987 to the currently operating 27 lined landfills, landfilling—whether in or outofstate— remains the predominant waste management method.  The 1987 Plan established a framework that  was built around municipal management systems.  However, in recent years, operation of much of  the state’s landfill capacity has shifted to private companies instead of municipalities or planning  units, with 75 percent of the state’s operating MSW landfill capacity operated by the private sector.    The many inactive landfills that have been phased out since 1987, as well as urban redevelopment  sites that contain potentially contaminated “historic fill,” can represent a continuing environmental  liability when left in place or an additional source of solid waste requiring management when  excavated or otherwise disturbed by construction projects.   Twenty years after the 1987 Plan and the Legislature’s enactment of the Solid Waste Management  Act of 1988, New York State finds itself relying on a mix of different, local, solid waste management  systems.  Due to a number of factors, including a period of uncertainty regarding a local  government’s ability to institute waste flow control, some municipalities that had planned or  developed their own integrated systems of solid waste facilities no longer have any involvement at  all in the management of significant portions of the MSW generated within their borders.   The current network of recycling and solid waste collection, transfer and disposal operations  partially comprises local government‐owned and operated facilities and programs, which were  typical in the 1980s, and also includes significant privately controlled waste collection,  transportation and handling infrastructure.    Also important from a public policy and long‐term planning perspective is New York State’s  significant dependence on privately owned facilities in other states for the disposal of more than  16,500 tons of MSW every day (six million tons per year), including virtually all of the solid waste  disposed from the City of New York and much of Long Island’s waste. While the environmental  impact of export has been reduced in recent years   by the movement of waste exports by rail  instead of truck, exports have increased fivefold during the past 20 years—a trend that runs counter  to the self‐sufficiency envisioned in the 1987 Plan.   Waste export leaves many New York communities vulnerable to capacity restrictions and additional  user fees at out‐of‐state disposal facilities.  For nearly a decade, Congress has reviewed legislation  that would allow states to constrain the movement of garbage from other states.  Fortunately for  New York State, no such laws have passed, but the threat of restriction serves as a reminder that the  state’s reliance on export is not without risks.   
8    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

While all of the 1987 Plan’s elements were not realized as  envisioned, thanks to the significant efforts of all New  Yorkers, many of its elements were implemented.   Unfortunately, a reduction in DEC staff dedicated to solid  waste issues, combined with the insufficient allocation of  state and local resources, has resulted in many missed  opportunities to prevent waste and increase recycling.   Nonetheless, the state’s solid waste stream is managed in a  far more cohesive and environmentally sound manner  today than before the development of the 1987 Plan.     

RECYCLING SAVES  ENERGY, REDUCES  POLLUTION AND  COMBATS CLIMATE  CHANGE 
Using recycled aluminum in  place of virgin bauxite:   • reduces the energy  used in production by  greater than 90  percent  decreases air pollution  by 95 percent   decreases water  pollution by 97 percent 

1.3   MATERIALS AND WASTE MANAGEMENT IN  NEW YORK STATE 2009 
Through this planning process, DEC has taken stock of the  current state of materials and waste management in New  York State.  The key findings are provided below.    • Twenty years after the state adopted a solid waste  management hierarchy that places waste  prevention, reuse and recycling ahead of disposal,  nearly 65 percent of the total materials managed in  the state, and approximately 80 percent of MSW,  end up in MWCs and landfills.  Although landfilling should be the management  method of last resort, landfills, either instate or  outofstate, handle the largest proportion of waste  disposed.  While there have been waste prevention successes,  they have been offset by negative trends, such as  planned obsolescence, the growth of convenience  products and advancing technology, and, therefore,  have yielded little or no reduction in the amount of  waste generated in the last two decades.  New York State and its communities have made  significant progress in establishing successful  recycling programs, as evidenced by the rise in  recycling rates between 1987 and 1997, but  progress in the last decade has stalled. 

• •

Substituting recycled paper for  pulp from trees:  • reduces energy use by  23 to 74 percent  (depending on the  paper grade)  reduces air pollution by  74 percent   reduces water  pollution by 35 percent 
(source: Wasting and  Recycling in the US, 2000”  Grassroots Recycling  Network, 2000; p. 25.) 


Recycling one ton of:  • aluminum reduces  GHG emissions by 13.7  tons  office paper reduces  GHG by 4.3 tons  newspaper reduces  GHG by 2.5 tons   steel cans reduces GHG  by 1.7 tons (source: “Solid 
Waste Management and  rd GHG, 3  Edition” USEPA,  2006. 

• • •

9   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• • •

The well‐established recycling industry in New York continues to meet the challenge of  developing new markets for secondary materials.     Virtually all municipal recycling programs eventually depend upon the recycling industry for  the ultimate processing and marketing of recovered materials.     The implementation of source‐separated recycling programs has been inconsistent, not only  from one community to the next, but also in different settings such as schools, businesses,  and public spaces.  The state’s increasing reliance on waste export from many of its densely populated areas is  problematic and potentially unreliable; principles of sustainability and responsibility dictate  that materials be managed in the most efficient and environmentally sensitive manner, with  consideration of the risks and impacts of out‐of‐state transportation.    Materials management can play a significant role in combating climate change; landfill gas is  four percent of the state’s GHG inventory, while USEPA estimates that 42 percent of  national GHG emissions are influenced by the lifecycle impacts of the products and  packaging that become waste.  The continuing reliance on waste disposal—landfills in particular—comes at a significant  environmental and economic cost; landfill gas contributes to climate change, and continuing  to dispose of materials that could be reused or recycled squanders opportunities to create  jobs, conserve energy and natural resources, and reduce air and water pollution.   Reuse provides multiple environmental, economic and social benefits; there is potential to  expand reuse, particularly in key sectors including building deconstruction.  Redistributing consumable food through food banks or as animal feed provides social and  economic benefits, as well as reducing waste.  As for any commodity, recycling markets are variable; however, on average, market values  for conventional recyclables (metal, plastic containers and many grades of paper) have been  consistently strong for the past two decades.  Organic materials represent 30 percent of both the materials generated and the waste  disposed; recycling organics has multiple benefits, including reducing the generation of  greenhouse gases, creating valuable soil amendments, creating jobs and reducing reliance  on waste disposal.   Product and packaging stewardship programs create incentives to reduce waste in product  and package design and to increase recycling.  Pay as You Throw/Save Money and Reduce Trash (PAYT/SMART) programs create a financial  incentive for consumers to waste less and recycle more; based on EPA estimated reductions,  implementation of PAYT/SMART in New York would reduce MSW disposal by nearly three  million tons annually.  Public education and enforcement are critical tools to prevent waste and increase reuse,  recycling and composting. 
10  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• • •

• •

 

• •

Market development attention is still needed for emerging or problematic recyclables,  including organics, plastics, glass and construction and demolition debris.  Construction and demolition (C&D) debris recycling has been inhibited by a lack of markets  for inherently valuable materials, a lack of information on material composition, origin and  destination, and concerns about asbestos contamination.     

1.4   MOVING FORWARD: SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS MANAGEMENT                       ACTION PLAN 
This Plan seeks to fundamentally change the way discarded materials are managed in New York  State by progressively reducing the amount of materials that go to disposal over the ten‐year  planning period.  Together, the recommendations below are intended to respond to the findings  discussed above and achieve the plan’s goals.  Implementing these recommendations will require  allocation of significant resources at the state and local level, as well as the full engagement of the  private sector.  The legislative recommendations below are intended to ensure that the fiscal impact  on government is relieved through product and packaging stewardship or mitigated through the  creation of new revenue generating programs.       1.4.1  Legislative Recommendations 

Moving Beyond Waste will require a new statutory structure that creates a framework for  sustainable materials management.  The Solid Waste Management Act of 1988 envisioned  municipalities working within planning units, acting either as self‐contained entities or through  public/private partnerships, to implement integrated solid waste management programs.  For a  variety of economic and legal reasons, that vision has only been partially realized.  With continued  growth in the amount of solid waste generated, an evolved understanding of the environmental  impacts of waste disposal, and the emergence of new materials management options, there is a  clear need for new priorities.  Moving forward requires an updated statutory framework that sets  the stage for growth and supports the paradigm shift needed to move Beyond Waste.  That  framework should include:  An update to the Solid Waste Management Act:  An updated act should: set recycling and waste  reduction goals; specify what materials must be recycled, where and by whom; enhance DEC’s  authority to enforce recycling requirements; allocate additional resources for planning, education  and enforcement; update procurement and recycling requirements for state agencies and  authorities; require incentive programs (e.g., PAYT/SMART), and enable DEC to account for MSW  transport and enforce transporter violations of source separation requirements.    Product and Packaging Stewardship Programs:  Product Stewardship, also known as Extended  Producer Responsibility, extends the role and responsibility of the manufacturer of a product to  include the entire life cycle, including ultimate disposition of that product or package at the end of  its useful life.  Stewardship encourages manufacturers to embrace materials efficiency and design  for recyclability concepts and helps local recycling programs capture more materials.  
11    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Through stewardship legislation, manufacturers (also known as producers or brand owners) are  required to take either physical or financial responsibility for the recycling or proper disposal of  products or packages.  Instead of requiring local governments to fund collection and recycling  programs for discarded products, stewardship programs incorporate the cost of end‐of‐life  management into the cost of the product, so those costs are borne jointly by the manufacturer and  the consumer, not by local government and taxpayers.  Possible initial product targets for  stewardship programs include: packaging, printed products, electronic waste, pharmaceuticals,  household hazardous wastes, and mercury containing products. The product stewardship  framework approach maximizes efficiency by consistently structuring stewardship programs for  multiple products and avoiding extended debates on the proper structure for stewardship for each  product.    Revenue Generating Programs:  Achieving the goals of this Plan—reducing waste generation,  increasing reuse, recycling and composting and reducing disposal—will require a significant  commitment of resources and greater flexibility in allocating those resources to respond to  emerging issues and critical needs.  Revenue‐generating programs could include: an increase in state  funds allocated for these purposes; solid waste disposal fees, or solid waste facility permit fees.    1.4.2   Regulatory Recommendations 

The regulatory changes suggested below can be made within DEC’s existing statutory authority and  are necessary to support implementation of this Plan and achievement of its goals and  recommendations.  Key regulatory recommendations include:  • Revision of the Part 360 Solid Waste Management Facility Regulations to:    o update requirements for construction and operation of solid waste management  facilities to better protect human health and the environment;  update the beneficial use determination program regulations;   set new requirements for managing the “historic fill” found on many urban  redevelopment sites;   restrict the disposal of recyclable materials for which alternative infrastructure or  product stewardship programs exist.   

o o

o •   1.4.3 

Enactment of a new Part 374‐5 regulation to oversee the collection, handling and recycling  of electronic waste.  

Programmatic Recommendations 

The following recommendations fall within the state’s current statutory and regulatory authority.   Taken together, these activities represent a comprehensive sustainable materials management  program.  The state’s ability to implement these initiatives and achieve the goals of this Plan will  depend on its ability to increase the staff and financial resources available to the program.  A  comprehensive program should include the following key elements: 
12    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

The State Leading by Example:  Agencies and authorities should demonstrate comprehensive waste  reduction and recycling programs by: working aggressively to implement Governor Paterson’s  Executive Order 4 on State Agency Sustainability and Green Purchasing; consistently implementing,  publicizing and enforcing recycling programs at all state facilities and events, and promoting and  demonstrating organic materials composting and recycling.   Public Education:  Public participation in waste prevention, reuse and recycling is key to achieving  sustainable materials management in New York State.  To improve participation, the state will:  launch an aggressive public education campaign to promote waste prevention, reuse, recycling and  composting; develop templates for local governments to use in educational efforts, and publicize  innovative reuse, recycling, composting and other model programs.   Outreach and Technical Assistance:  Municipalities, businesses, institutions and agencies in the state  will need guidance and assistance to develop sustainable materials management programs. To meet  this need, the state will: develop written guidance on waste prevention for specific commercial  generating sectors; encourage the use of food banks and other reuse networks; facilitate forums on  construction and demolition debris management and recycling opportunities; help entities (private  and public) interested in developing organics recycling systems, and provide tools to local  governments to better plan and implement sustainable materials management programs.  Comprehensive Materials Management Planning: The state must allocate additional funding and  resources to plan for and implement sustainable materials management programs.  The state must  refocus on materials management planning by: seeking staff and resources to implement the state  Plan; issuing a technical guidance document to assist local decision‐making, and working with  planning units to craft a new generation of local solid waste management plans that reflect the  broader concepts of materials management, embody new approaches and technologies to reduce  waste, achieve higher levels of recycling, and reflect current market and regulatory conditions.    Combat Climate Change: DEC will: maximize waste prevention, reuse and recycling and minimize  waste disposal; assess the emissions and operations of landfills in New York to ensure they pursue  every possible mechanism for achieving greenhouse gas reductions, and work with other state  agencies and entities to enable landfill gas‐to‐energy projects to connect to the electrical grid in a  cost‐effective and technically effective manner.     Infrastructure and Market Development: Expanding the universe of materials diverted from disposal  will require additional processing, reuse and recycling infrastructure and new or stronger markets  for the materials processed.  To do so, DEC will evaluate and implement, where appropriate,  strategies to promote the establishment of recycling and composting facilities in the environmental  quality review and regulatory process for other solid waste management facilities, particularly  disposal facilities.  Further, the state will allocate additional resources to: develop critical recycling  and manufacturing infrastructure for key recovered materials, including glass, plastics, and organic  materials; expand market development initiatives to target glass, plastic film, plastics #3‐7, compost  and construction and demolition materials; establish a New York State Center for Construction and  Demolition Debris Recycling; encourage and facilitate food scrap recycling demonstration projects;  and expand beneficial use applications for mixed color recovered glass.     
13    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

1.5   CONCLUSION 
The new framework proposed in this Plan seeks to put forward policy and programmatic tools and  options for planning units and communities that will help ensure strong waste reduction, reuse and  materials recovery throughout the state, both in areas where there is a substantial private sector  role and in communities that practice flow control or use other oversight tools. The  recommendations summarized above and detailed in subsequent sections of the Plan include a new  broad policy, expanded financial assistance for progressive solid waste and sustainable materials  management, and education for consumers and businesses to help them reduce their generation of  waste and recycle what cannot be reduced. They also include detailed recommendations for how  planning units can better plan for recovery and offer strategies for developing and/or improving  New York State’s recovery infrastructure.  As a package, these recommendations will lead New York  State on a path Beyond Waste.   
 

 

14   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

2.  BEYOND WASTE: A NEW VISION FOR SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS  MANAGEMENT IN NEW YORK STATE 
  New York State’s Beyond Waste Plan sets forth a new approach—a shift from focusing on “end‐of‐ the‐pipe” waste management techniques to looking “upstream” and more comprehensively at how  materials that would otherwise become waste can be more sustainably managed through the  state’s economy.  This shift is central to the state’s ability to adapt to growing pressure to reduce  demand for energy, reduce dependence on disposal, minimize emission of greenhouse gases and  create green jobs.    This shift is especially critical given American consumption patterns and global resource constraints.   While the United States (US) has only five percent of the world’s population, it consumes 24 percent  of the world’s energy and one‐third of the world’s materials 3 .  According to the Organization for  Economic Cooperation and Development, the US generates more waste per person than any other  country in the world.  Municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in New York State, estimated at 5.15  pounds per person per day in 2008, is greater than the national average, reported by EPA at 4.6  pounds per person per day, and thus well beyond that of other countries.    As developing countries strive to achieve a standard of living comparable to that of the US and other  industrialized nations, the demand for materials and the energy needed to extract and process them  will continue to increase.  It is likely, too, that the costs of energy and material will increase as well.  Unless we change the status quo, the environmental and climate implications of this growing  demand could be devastating, and the economic impact to New York State will be a burden to  individuals, businesses and especially municipalities.  Never has it been more critical to examine the  way we use and dispose of the materials that fuel our economy.  It is simply no longer sensible to  expend energy and resources to extract, transport and process materials only to use them for  minutes and then throw them away.  The change has to start now.  The role of solid waste managers in the global context is significant.  As this Plan clearly  demonstrates, waste disposal facilities contribute to climate change and the related environmental  degradation, while waste prevention and the use of recovered materials in manufacturing reduces  energy consumption, greenhouse gas generation and air, water and land pollution and creates green  jobs.  It is critical to expand the understanding of the role sustainable materials management can  play in improving the environment, locally as well as globally.  Whether in government, private  industry, or as individuals, all New Yorkers must help confront these challenges.  All players in the  materials economy are challenged to continually strive for better planning, smarter design, more  efficient markets, and ever‐increasing levels of materials‐use reduction and recycling.         
                                                                  3 Source: US Geological Survey; http://pubs.usgs.gov/annrev/ar‐23‐107/aerdocnew.pdf  15    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Beyond Waste is a Plan to create a more sustainable materials economy.  This will require fostering  a system where products and packaging are designed to minimize waste and maximize the use of  recyclable materials and where there is infrastructure in place to recover and use those materials.   This system would capture the economic  value of our materials, conserve their imbedded energy,  and minimize generation of greenhouse gases and pollution.  This Plan will lead New York State to  this desired system.  In addition to reducing our reliance on disposal, the New York State  Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) projects that implementing this Plan could  generate more than 74,000 jobs, reduce nearly 23 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent (MTCO2E)  4 greenhouse gas emissions, and save 259 trillion BTUs of energy.   Moving Beyond Waste requires increased attention to influencing product and packaging design,  which will require the involvement of all players in the production and supply chain—product  manufacturers, distributors, retailers, consumers, and government.  It will also require increased  investment in our recovery and distribution/reverse distribution infrastructure. Ultimately, it will  turn the trend on New York State’s ever‐growing waste stream.    Other more traditional tools will be reforged for the task of achieving a true sustainable materials  management approach—a combination of programmatic, regulatory and policy actions that reduce  or eliminate waste or divert materials for reuse, recycling and composting.   To realize this vision,  the state will need to update, strengthen, and expand its regulatory and statutory authority; obtain,  develop and dedicate resources that are not yet inhand; use its substantial purchasing power and  other opportunities to lead by example, and achieve coordinated cooperation from all levels of  government, the private sector and individual New Yorkers.  Accordingly, this Plan identifies what  the state can do now within the confines of existing regulatory structure and fiscal constraints; what  it will be able to do with expanded authority, and what it will do with new resources.  It defines the  steps DEC will take to obtain this expanded authority and additional resources.    What is a sustainable materials economy? In broad terms, a sustainable materials management  strategy involves:  1. Waste Prevention – creating and implementing a combination of policies and programs aimed at  reducing the volume and toxicity of waste generated and disposed, including:   a. packaging reduction through stewardship and other means;  b. product stewardship/ producer responsibility for key material streams;   c. purchasing and practices, both public and private, that advance sustainability goals;   d. community outreach and education; and   e. incentives for waste prevention through volume‐based pricing for waste management  programs, commonly referred to as Pay As You Throw (PAYT) or Save Money And  Reduce Trash (SMART).  2. Reuse – supporting an expanded infrastructure to redirect items that still have a value for their  original intended purpose (e.g., clothing, furniture, building materials, etc.) from those who no  longer need them to individuals and entities that can put them to use. 

                                                                  4  The methodology and data used to derive these figures is provided in Appendix 1  16    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3. Comprehensive Recycling – including more materials and more places (e.g., workplaces, MTA  transit stations, public spaces, public venues, special events); improve education and  enforcement to achieve greater participation and greater capture of targeted recyclables in all  generating sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, institutional, industrial); develop local markets  for both traditional recyclables and new materials targeted, and support a manufacturing base  that can utilize recycled materials.  4. Recovery of Organics (food scraps, non‐recyclable paper and yard trimmings) – creating a  combination of policies and programs to: expand backyard composting; expand on‐site  composting at institutions and large generators and develop greater collection and recovery  infrastructure for commercial, institutional and residential food scraps and yard trimmings.  5. Beneficial Use – developing policies and programs to redirect items that still have value for uses  other than their original intended purpose (e.g., paper for use as animal bedding, glass and tires  for use in civil engineering applications, etc.)  6. Recovery of Energy – promoting a combination of policies and programs to recover energy from  materials that cannot yet feasibly be recycled or composted.  7. Best Residual Management Strategies – advancing policies that ensure adequate capacity of the  most environmentally sound and most sustainable means of disposal for the waste that cannot  be reduced, reused, recycled, composted or otherwise diverted.       

Opportunity Knocks 
Solid waste management in the US has followed a pattern of dramatic change and progress in the  1990s, with the implementation of recycling, composting, and waste prevention programs, followed  by five to ten years of maintaining the status quo.  Even as recycling programs have become more  efficient and have captured more material, greater and greater amounts of non‐recyclable products  and packaging have entered the waste stream.    Nationally, recycling rates have been static or only increased in small increments in recent years,  even for the materials considered the most recyclable—newspapers, steel, aluminum and PET  plastic containers.  Communities in New York State report recovery rates that are stagnant at best  and may be dropping.  Much of the material sent to disposal facilities has a significant value, in terms of both direct market  value and in broader economic and environmental terms.  Though markets have periodically  experienced downturns, markets for traditional recyclables, including paper, metals and some  plastics, have been strong overall and have achieved consistently high values in the last decade.    Perhaps more important, using recovered materials in place of virgin materials saves significant  amounts of energy, conserves water, and reduces pollution.  The closer to home this takes place,  the greater the economic and environmental value to New York State.  In 2008, the 3.7 million tons of MSW materials recycled in New York State helped to avoid more  than nine million metric tons of CO2  equivalent (MTCO 2 E) and conserve 85 trillion BTUs of energy.   Increasing the municipal recycling rate to 30 percent would improve those gains by more than five 
17    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

million MTCO 2 E. Achieving a 90 percent recycling rate statewide would yield impacts of an  additional 23 million MTCO 2 E greenhouse gas emissions reductions and save an additional 259  trillion BTUs of energy 5 .  Waste prevention has an even more significant impact on greenhouse gas  emissions. Reducing materials use, through product and packaging stewardship initiatives and other  means, would avoid the use of energy and the release of even greater amounts of greenhouse  gases.  The state can also fuel economic development and job creation using the materials that are not  currently recycled but ultimately could be with new programs and policy.  In general terms, on a  per‐ton basis, for every job required to operate a landfill or municipal waste combustor (MWC), 10  jobs can be created to process recyclable materials and prepare them for market.  In the case of  organics, four jobs can be created in composting those materials for every one job in disposal.  Once  recycled materials are used in manufacturing, the jobs ratio becomes even greater, and the quality  and pay scales of those jobs is higher.  Remanufacturing industries are the most significant job  creators, with between 28 and 296 jobs—depending on the type of remanufacturing—for every one  in disposal 6 .   A 2008 report by Progressive Investor found that with $236 billion in revenues in 2007, recycling  industries already represent more than two percent of the national gross domestic product.  The  U.S. Recycling Economic Information Study Prepared for The National Recycling Coalition by R. W.  Beck, Inc. (July 2001), found that 174 million tons of material were being recycled per year and  about 1,100,000 jobs were created in the "recycling" sector, including collection, processing, and  manufacturing. This equates to about 6 jobs per 1,000 tons per year recycled.    New York State’s Empire State Development (ESD) Environmental Investment Program has proven  that, in financing recycling‐based businesses, it can create significant jobs and economic benefit.   (For a summary of ESD’s investment results, see Appendix 6.2).  A February 2009 study prepared by  DSM Environmental Services, Inc, for the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC) found that New York  State’s recycling and reuse industries directly support more than 32,000 jobs, with less than 5,000 of  those in collection. A broad‐scale increase in recovery efforts, as outlined in this Plan, could increase  the green jobs related to recycling by more than 74,0007 .      At the dawn of the 21st century, society is confronted by broad and inter‐related social and  environmental challenges topped by global climate change and increased energy demands.  In this  context, it is not enough only to ensure environmentally sound disposal.  Capturing the economic  value and imbedded energy in our materials, minimizing greenhouse gas impacts of our actions, and  maximizing materials and energy efficiency in our systems must be key drivers.     
                                                                  5  These conclusions are based on the results of modeling using data explained in Appendix 1 and summarized  in Section 7, materials composition and characterization, and the Northeast Recycling Council’s  Environmental Benefits Calculator. For more detail, see Section 4. 
6

 Institute for Local Self Reliance, 1997, as published in Wasting and Recycling in the US 2000, Grassroots  Recycling Network, p.27.     An explanation of the methodology and data used to derive these figures is provided in Appendix 1.  18  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7

 

A New Approach for New York State 
As New York State moves forward, it must address new ways to reduce the amount of waste  generated and further reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfills and combustors.   Improvement on the old strategies to promote reuse, recycling and reduction are overdue, and this  Plan maps recommendations for such improvement.  The Plan also aims to tackle the unanticipated  increase in waste from consumer products and packaging—the waste that is undermining and has  essentially nullified all waste reduction efforts to date.  This problem must be confronted head on by  engaging product manufacturers in the end‐of‐life management of their products and packaging.      This Plan begins to address what each of the many players—the state, local governments, planning  units, private sector solid waste managers, product manufacturers, distributors and retailers, and  individual consumers—can achieve collectively and in partnership with other states and the federal  government.  The challenge is significant, and progress will not be measured solely against a single  numerical goal.  Success will be measured by sustained and continual improvement in maximizing  recovery and minimizing waste.  Remaining flexible, committed, and coordinated in these efforts  will help to face that challenge.  Using this Plan to raise awareness of these issues is critical so that  New Yorkers are collectively engaged in the effort and willing to support the funding needed to  ensure its success.  This Plan lays a foundation for the next chapter in solid waste management in New York State.  It  identifies critical areas for local, state and individual action and provides a menu of options that can  help communities on the path toward sustainable materials management.  On the state, regional or  national level, it presents a strategy to engage product manufacturers to make end‐of‐life  management costs a part of their economic equation.  Doing so will begin to turn the tide and  ultimately reduce waste generation.    Recognizing that local governments are often the firewall between waste and the environment, DEC  is committed to partnering with local communities and planning units that grapple with these issues  daily in their efforts to provide safe, affordable methods for solid waste management while  protecting the environment.  Only through leadership by New York in cooperation with committed  planning units can the state successfully implement the goals of this Plan.   

Goals 
The quantitative goal of the Plan is to reduce the amount of waste New Yorkers dispose by  preventing waste generation and increasing reuse, recycling, composting and other organics  recycling methods.  In 2008, New Yorkers threw away 4.1 pounds of municipal solid waste (MSW)  per person per day, or 0.75 tons per person per year.  The Plan seeks to reduce the amount of MSW  destined for disposal by 15 percent every two years 8 .  Achieving this will require the engagement of 
                                                                  8  The referenced per capita waste disposal goal will apply to MSW (i.e., the materials included in the materials  composition analysis provided in section 7.1).  It does not apply to construction and demolition debris,  biosolids, or industrial waste.  19    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

manufacturers through product and packaging stewardship and the development of additional  reuse and recycling infrastructure, as well as a strong partnership with other states and the United  States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).    The qualitative goals of this Plan are to:  • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Minimize Waste Generation  Maximize Reuse  Maximize Recycling  Maximize Composting and Organics Recycling  Advance Product and Packaging Stewardship  Create Green Jobs  Maximize the Energy Value of Materials Management  Minimize the Climate Impacts of Materials Management  Reemphasize the Importance of Comprehensive Local Materials Management Planning  Minimize the Need for Export of Residual Waste  Engage all New Yorkers—government, business, industry and the public—in Sustainable  Materials Management  Strive for Full Public Participation, Fairness and Environmental Justice  Prioritize Investment in Reduction, Reuse, Recycling and Composting Over Disposal  Maximize Efficiency in Infrastructure Development  Foster Technological Innovation  Continue to Ensure Solid Waste Management Facilities are Designed and Operated in an  Environmentally Sound Manner 

The new framework proposed in this Plan seeks to put forward policy and programmatic tools and  options for planning units and communities that will help ensure strong waste reduction, reuse, and  materials recovery throughout the state, both in areas where there is a substantial private sector  role and in communities that practice flow control or use other oversight tools.  The  recommendations detailed in subsequent sections of the Plan include new broad policy, such as an  updated Solid Waste Management Act and a product stewardship framework, expanded financial  assistance for progressive solid waste and sustainable materials management, and education for  consumers and businesses to help them reduce their generation of waste, as well as detailed  recommendations for how planning units can better plan for recovery and strategies for developing  and/or improving our recovery infrastructure.  As a package, these recommendations will lead New  York State on a path Beyond Waste.   

20   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Without additional regulatory or legislative action, the Plan does not and cannot provide new legal  authority beyond that which currently exists.   Rather, the Plan provides a direction and goals for  solid waste management in New York State, alerting planning units, permittees, and the general  public of the lens through which future solid waste planning, decision‐making, and assessment will  be viewed.      TABLE 2.1  BEYOND WASTE GOALS    MSW  Recycling  Rate 20% 30%  50% 75% 90% Pounds/Person  Per day  Disposed     4.1   3.5     2.4     1.2   2018 0.6    
     

2010 2012 2014 2016

 

21   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.  MATERIALS MANAGEMENT PLANNING, ROLES AND  RESPONSIBILITIES 
 

3.1    THE HISTORY OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN NEW YORK STATE 
While the value of solid waste management planning was acknowledged by both the federal and  state governments more than 30 years ago, initial progress was intermittent and overshadowed by  efforts to address the environmental consequences of hazardous waste mismanagement.   The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 required states to develop solid  waste management plans, and the New York State Legislature responded with Chapter 425 of the  laws of 1977, which required DEC to prepare a draft “comprehensive resource recovery plan.”  DEC  prepared and submitted a plan in 1978, but the legislature took no further action until 1980.  Chapter 552 of New York State’s laws of that year acknowledged the development of the draft plan  required by Chapter 425 and recognized the need for solid waste management planning.  It made  DEC responsible for preparing a solid waste management plan and mandated that all solid waste  management projects be in accord with the plan, once completed.  DEC prepared a draft plan in accordance with RCRA and Chapter 552, but in fiscal year ‘80‐‘81  federal funding for the municipal solid waste program was withdrawn, and further development of  the plan ceased.  At the federal and state levels, emphasis and funding were shifted from MSW  management to hazardous waste management programs.    3.1.1   The 1987 Solid Waste Management Plan (1987 Plan) and Updates 

DEC drafted the 1987 Plan in response to several laws and concerns that arose in the 1980s.  First, in  1983, the Long Island Landfill Law mandated the phaseout of landfills in the deep flow aquifer  recharge zones on Long Island, thereby encouraging the transition to “resource recovery” through a  combination of municipal waste combustion (MWC) and recycling, and the development of  infrastructure to transfer waste for long‐haul export.  Across the state, groundwater contamination  and operational deficiencies at many older unlined landfills became a primary concern.  By June  1986, New York State had 358 active landfills, only 47 of which had valid permits, and seven  operating MWCs with another six under construction.  At that time, available disposal capacity in  New York, not including New York City’s waste or the Fresh Kills landfill, was estimated to be four  years.  This all led to the concern of a looming disposal crisis in New York State.    In response, Governor Cuomo called for the preparation of a State Solid Waste Management Plan,  which DEC issued in March 1987.  The 1987 Plan articulated an integrated waste management  system approach to the impending crisis, and implementation of Part 360 finally brought New York  State into compliance with the provisions of RCRA and the state’s own Chapter 425 of the laws of  1977 and Chapter 552 of the laws of 1980.  About the same time, on March 22, 1987, the Mobro 4000 barge set sail from Islip, New York  carrying 3,168 tons of baled MSW destined for a pilot project in Morehead, NC to be converted to 
22    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

methane.  Once in Morehead City, North Carolina officials began an investigation and ultimately  ordered the now infamous “garbage barge” to find another home for its rotting cargo.  This began a  months‐long odyssey that took the barge all the way to Belize and back to New York State until  October 1987, when, under an agreement with the New York City Department of Sanitation, the  garbage was incinerated in New York City and the ash disposed of in Islip.  Although the saga was an  embarrassment, the garbage barge incident was widely publicized across the nation and became  emblematic of what was considered at the time to be a solid waste disposal crisis that lead to  significant improvements in solid waste management.       The 1987 Plan was not intended as a panacea for the state’s disposal problems at the time, but,  rather, represented the beginning of a change in solid waste management practices to meet both  current and future needs.  It was explicitly intended to be the first step of what was envisioned to be  a long‐term, ongoing, solid waste management planning process.  The state was to update the plan  annually (which was subsequently amended in a 1992 law to biennially) to address emerging issues  and recommend actions to improve solid waste management in New York State. This iterative  approach was intended to provide a dynamic solid waste management planning process.   The 1987 Plan contained important goals, including a goal to reduce, reuse, or recycle 50 percent of  the waste stream (using 1988 as a base year) and a recommended hierarchy of preferred solid waste  management methods.  The 1987 Plan set what was seen at that time as visionary and aggressive,  yet achievable, goals for a ten‐year planning period with the intent of using annual updates to adjust  policies, programs, plans and goals to ensure continued progress.   The first update of the State Solid Waste Management Plan, produced in fiscal year 1987/1988,  revised the 1987 Plan to incorporate the requirements and direction embodied in the Solid Waste  Management Act, passed in 1988 (described below).  Subsequent updates of the 1987 Plan did not  directly revise or replace portions of the 1987/88 Plan update.  Instead, each update became a  stand‐alone document that characterized the activities undertaken within the state with respect to  solid waste management during the update period.  In time, as the state’s regulations and local solid  waste management plans (LSWMPs) were developed and implemented, the plan updates became  more of a reporting mechanism of achievements, obstacles encountered and comparisons to the  initial base year of the Plan.  The Plan updates also made recommendations for action.  Because the initial ten‐year planning period ended in 1997, the 1997/1998 update was prepared to  serve as more than a report.  It:  • • • • launched a new five‐year planning period (1998‐2003);  identified objectives for the five‐year planning period;  provided baseline solid waste management data for the new planning period; and  summarized developments and progress in solid waste management since the last update of  the plan. 

Draft Plan updates were prepared for 1999/2000 and 2001/2002.  The 1999/2000 update was  approved and released, but while the 2001/2002 draft update was released for public comment, it  was never finalized.   There have been no updates since. 
23    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.1.2  

The NYS Solid Waste Management Act 

In response to the 1987 Plan, the Solid Waste Management Act (ECL 27‐0106, the Act) was signed by  the Governor, establishing in law the Plan’s preferred hierarchy of solid waste management.  The  hierarchy established the following priorities to guide the programs and decisions of DEC and other  state agencies:  a) First, to reduce the amount of solid waste generated;  b) Second, to reuse material for the purpose for which it was originally intended or to recycle the  material that cannot be reused;  c) Third, to recover, in an environmentally acceptable manner, energy from solid waste that cannot  be economically and technically reused or recycled; and   d) Fourth, to dispose of solid waste that is not being reused or recycled, or from which energy is not  being recovered, by land burial or other methods approved by the department.   In addition to the hierarchy, the Act established:  • • • the structure and expectations for regional solid waste management planning units to  encourage regional cooperation;  the requirements and funding for local solid waste management plans in accordance with  the hierarchy of solid waste management methods;  a mandate that municipalities adopt and implement source separation laws or ordinances  for recyclables from all generating sectors by 9/1/92 (less than five years from enactment);  and  DEC’s role in fulfilling these requirements. 

The Act’s requirements were intended to ensure that both state and local governments work  actively toward establishing environmentally sound solid waste management systems that integrate  the hierarchy of solid waste management methods and emphasize waste reduction and recycling,  using landfills only for materials that could not be managed in a more productive way.    In broad terms, the Act has been a success in spurring the development of municipal recycling  programs across the state and making recycling opportunities available to most New Yorkers.  The  requirement for local governments to establish source‐separation programs has yielded an increase  in the state’s recycling rate.  While the Act’s implementation launched successful waste prevention  and recycling programs and integrated solid waste management systems, it lacks a mechanism for  fostering continual improvement beyond the minimum mandates.  Furthermore, changes in the  marketplace have led to legal and economic realities that, in some cases, undermine the state’s solid  waste management planning constructs.  The roles and responsibilities of the various players in the  solid waste chain must evolve to respond to current conditions.        
24    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.2   ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 
3.2.1   The Role of the State           

Prior to 1987, state government’s role in solid waste management was primarily as regulator,  ensuring the protection of public health and the environment from inappropriate disposal practices.   The state, through DEC, regulated the siting, construction and operation of waste disposal facilities  through permits and upheld the permit conditions through enforcement.  The state, through DEC,  also provided technical assistance and limited financial assistance to local governments.  The most  notable source of financial assistance prior to 1987 was the 1972 Environmental Quality Bond Act,  which provided loans for the proper closure of municipal landfills and grants for MWCs. The state  did not dictate to a community how to dispose of its waste; rather, it ensured that a community’s  waste disposal practices did not impair the environment or threaten public health.    Through the Act, the legislature affirmed the primacy of local and regional governments in solid  waste management while clearly articulating the state’s role. The state was to fulfill its responsibility  to ensure environmentally, economically and technically viable solid waste management programs  by:  • • • encouraging waste reduction and the expansion of materials recovery programs;  establishing clearly articulated, responsive and consistently applied regulatory oversight;  and  providing a full range of technical assistance to local governments. 

DEC is the lead state agency for materials and waste management.  However, other state agencies  have explicit responsibility for certain solid waste related programs.  Empire State Development  (ESD) is charged with the implementation of the state’s Secondary Materials Utilization Grant  Program, through which it invests in projects and companies that use recycled materials.    The Office of General Services (OGS) is responsible for implementing a recycled product  procurement program and establishing recycling programs in state agencies.  The New York State  Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) provides targeted investments in solid  waste and recycling projects that generate energy or achieve energy conservation.    In addition, all agencies have routine and ongoing roles and responsibilities for undertaking proper  environmental stewardship, establishing waste prevention and recycling programs, and responsibly  managing solid waste within their own operations.  The requirements of the Act were bolstered by  Governor Cuomo’s Executive Order 142, signed on January 16, 1991, which required all state  agencies and authorities to implement far‐reaching and aggressive waste reduction and recycling  practices and support recycling markets by buying products made with secondary materials.9   This  order remained in effect until it was superseded by Executive Order 4, signed on April 24, 2008 by  Governor Paterson.  Executive Order 4 challenges state agencies and authorities to set an example  for communities and businesses with regard to sustainability in operations and green purchasing.   The order requires agencies and authorities to appoint a sustainability and green procurement 
                                                                  9  A report on the progress toward implementing EO 142 is provided in Appendix 3.1 and  at http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/bldgAdmin/facmod/3RsAnnualReport07_08.pdf.  25    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

coordinator to lead these efforts. It specifically requires state agencies to implement waste  reduction, reuse, recycling and composting programs and to purchase products that meet key  “green” criteria, including recycled content, waste reduction, recyclability, compostability and  extended producer responsibility requirements.  In the context of solid waste management, the state also performs the following specific functions:   1. Policy Direction: As in other issue areas, the executive branch, through state agency leadership,  develops materials and waste management policy initiatives and provides direction for the  administration of programs to carry out executive policy. To ensure that local solid waste  management plans and programs are consistent with state policy, DEC provides guidance and  direction to local governments by:  Articulating the state’s vision for materials and waste management through the state Solid Waste  Management Plan, making recommendations on how that vision can be achieved and setting the  context for the actions of local governments and other stakeholders.   Reviewing local solid waste management plans (LSWMPs) and solid waste management facility  permit applications to ensure consistency with the state solid waste management hierarchy, which  emphasizes maximizing waste reduction, reuse, and recycling;  Reviewing permit applications submitted by or on behalf of a municipality for most solid waste  management facilities to ensure consistency with the LSWMP in effect for the municipality and  confirming that a comprehensive recycling analysis (CRA) is in place that identifies the materials  available for recycling and the strategies the municipality will implement to reduce, reuse, recycle  and compost those materials;     Reviewing permit applications for most solid waste management facilities submitted by or on behalf  of non‐municipal entities to ensure that the proposed project is consistent with the state solid waste  management policy and includes an assessment of the proposed facility as it relates to the LSWMP  in which the facility is located and the planning units from which solid waste is expected to be  received; and  Placing conditions on permits to prohibit most solid waste management facilities from accepting  solid waste that was generated within a municipality that has not met core planning requirements  by either completing a DEC‐approved CRA or LSWMP or being included in another municipality’s  approved CRA or LSWMP.   2. Technical Assistance: DEC routinely provides technical assistance to local government, the private  sector, and the general public through several methods and means, including: the solid waste  management facility permitting process; public information meetings;  planning and policy  guidance; materials and waste management information and data, and training.  ESD serves as the  state’s repository for recycling market information and assists both public and private sector  recyclers in accessing and developing markets.  In that capacity, ESD has developed a recycling  markets database, available at www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle.       
26    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3. Public Education/Information: DEC provides valuable information and guidance on solid waste  management requirements and issues to the public.  To disseminate information, DEC uses written  materials, its website and other venues, such as conferences, seminars and meetings. (For a list of  available resources, see http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8801.html)  ESD provides tools to  businesses, including Environmental Improvement Resources for Businesses in NYS, a directory of  state environmental assistance programs available  at http://www.nylovessmallbiz.com/growing_/environm.htm.    4. Financial Assistance: Since 1987, DEC has provided nearly $700 million in financial assistance to  municipalities and businesses for reduction, reuse, recycling, composting, recycling outreach and  education, and solid waste management projects.  Funding sources have included: the 1972  Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA); the 1986 EQBA; the Kansas Stripper Well Settlement; the  Petroleum Overcharge Restitution Act; the Solid Waste Management Act; the Environmental  Protection Fund (EPF), and the 1996 Clean Water/Clean Air (CW/CA) Bond Act.  Today, the EPF is the  only ongoing state assistance funding source for solid waste management projects.  Other state  agencies have also provided financial assistance for waste and recycling related projects.    For example, landfill closure projects have obtained loans from the Environmental Facilities  Corporation (EFC) through the State Revolving Fund, and ESD and NYSERDA provide financial  assistance for certain waste reduction, recycling, and organics recovery businesses.  (For more  information on state financial assistance programs, see Section 6.)            5. Statewide Planning: DEC is responsible for preparing and updating the State Solid Waste  Management Plan (State Plan) in accordance with the requirements of Environmental Conservation  Law (ECL) 27‐0103.  The state Plan is intended to provide direction, guidance and information on  solid waste management and identify policy recommendations.  The update process dictated in the  ECL makes the Plan a “living” document that will change as new information becomes available and  as planning units identify both obstacles and opportunities through implementation of their  LSWMPs.  This iterative process is informed by stakeholder input, feedback from planning units,  LSWMP compliance reports and modifications, and other information available to the state.  By  monitoring local program experiences, DEC can gauge progress toward statewide goals and  objectives and identify the need for new programs to help overcome obstacles impeding local  planning objectives.              6. Regulatory Oversight: DEC’s role as regulator is the backbone of its solid waste management  program.  Through regulations and their enforcement, DEC ensures that legal requirements are  upheld and that public health and the environment are protected.  Through its Part 360 regulations,  DEC regulates the construction and operation of solid waste management facilities to ensure they  are protective of public health and the environment. The Part 360 regulations also dictate  requirements for local solid waste management planning. These regulations can be updated  periodically to reflect new legal requirements and developments in the industry.  To enforce its  regulations and permit conditions, DEC places environmental monitors (DEC employees funded by  permittees) at many permitted solid waste management facilities. Where monitors are not  available, DEC staff carry out inspections, compliance counseling and enforcement, sometimes with  the assistance of environmental conservation officers and the State Attorney General’s Office.   
27    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

3.2.2  

The Role of Local Governments 

The implementation of solid waste management programs in New York State has historically been  the responsibility of local government.  The day‐to‐day activities at the core of materials and waste  management (e.g., separation, collection, recycling, transport, storage, transfer, and disposal) occur  at the local level, either by the local governments themselves or through contracts or agreements  with private entities.  As part of that role, municipalities may:  • • • • • • • • • • acquire land for waste management and disposal facilities;   construct solid waste management facilities;  provide or contract for waste and recyclables collection services;  conduct facility siting studies;  manage application processes for state permits;  lead the state environmental quality review (SEQR) process;  operate or contract for the operation of facilities;  ensure compliance and reporting;  enact flow control ordinances (see details below); and  educate the public. 

Some local responsibility is specifically assigned under state law, most notably the Act’s  requirements for localities in the state to have mandatory source separation laws or ordinances in  place and to develop and maintain LSWMPs if they seek permits for solid waste management  facilities.  Under the Act (through amendments to General Municipal Law 120‐aa), municipalities  were to require source separation of recyclables in all generating sectors (e.g., residential,  commercial, institutional and industrial) no later than September 1, 1992.  Thus, the law placed the  responsibility for mandating, designing and implementing recycling programs on local governments  and the planning units they created. Some local governments do not have the expertise or resources  to adequately carry out all of the functions dictated in the act and have relied on support from the  private sector (see section 3.2.3).  The Act also encouraged local governments to join together to form solid waste management  planning units and create LSWMPs to guide their programs and ensure alignment with the state’s  solid waste management hierarchy10 .  Most of the 64 planning units in the state function on the  county level, but several upstate and western New York planning units include multiple counties or  solid waste management authorities, while some downstate units are organized on the city level (in  New York City and Nassau County) and the town level (on Long Island).  

                                                                  10  A planning unit must consist of a county; two or more counties acting jointly; a local government agency or  authority established pursuant to state law for the purpose of managing solid waste; any city in the  county of Nassau, or two or more other municipalities which DEC determines to be capable of  implementing a regional solid waste management program.    28    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Since 1990, 60 of 64 planning units have had DEC‐approved LSWMPs, and two of the remaining four  have had CRAs approved by DEC.  The planning periods for the LSWMPs have varied from 10 years  to 20 years.  As discussed more fully later in this section, LSWMP implementation has been  inconsistent across the state.     As evidenced by the data in Table 3.1, New York State is at a critical point in local solid waste  management planning, with more than 70 percent of the planning units in the state required to  submit new or modified plans in the next two years.  In at least eight planning units, one or more  municipalities have ceased active participation and have not joined another planning unit or  developed a CRA. While the lack of a CRA makes them technically out of compliance with the state’s  regulatory requirements, these requirements are only enforceable in conjunction with a permit  action or condition.  For a profile of each planning unit, see Appendix 3.3.      TABLE 3.1 
LSWMP Status  Never Approved  Expired  Expiration 2009  Expiration 2010  Plans Expiring after 2010  Total  Number 4 7 4 30 19 64 Percent of Total  6%  11%  6%  47%  30%  100% 

  3.2.3   The Role of the Private Sector 

For more than a century, there has been a vibrant private recycling industry focused on the recovery  of paper and metals.  This vital role continues today with a greatly expanded menu of materials  processed by private companies into marketable commodities and products.  Virtually all municipal  recycling programs eventually depend upon the recycling industry for the ultimate processing and  marketing of recovered materials.   The recycling industry has developed and implemented  innovative strategies for the processing and marketing of materials from such sources as electronics  scrap, tires and end‐of‐life vehicles.      Beyond the recycling industry, the role of the private sector has grown during the last two decades  as companies increasingly provide integrated solid waste management services to planning units,  including collection, processing and disposal of both recyclables and waste. In support of those  functions, private companies have made significant investments in collection, transportation and  disposal capacity in New York State. In fact, private companies manage most of the waste in the  state, either in their own facilities or by operating municipally owned facilities, and they are the  primary mechanism for transporting waste and materials both in and out‐of‐state.   
29    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

As such, their role is a significant one, and their engagement is critical to the state’s success in  moving Beyond Waste.  Local government interaction with and oversight of private sector collectors, processors and facility  operators varies throughout the state.  Some communities heavily regulate the activity of the  private waste industry, using tools such as flow control, contracts, registration, permitting, and  enforcement, while others provide little oversight.    Although the state’s oversight of private waste collection services is minimal—only transporters of  industrial waste, regulated medical waste, and septage are regulated by 6 NYCRR Part 364—DEC  regulates solid waste management facilities, whether they are operated by public or private entities,  through the  NYCRR Part 360 regulations.   To ensure compliance with regulatory and permit  requirements, some private operators of permitted solid waste management facilities are required  to fund a DEC monitor to oversee their operations.    In addition to day‐to‐day waste management activities, local governments also increasingly rely on  private consulting and engineering firms to support their programs and facilities through planning,  design, and construction.  Furthermore, private companies are also consumers of products and  packaging and generators of waste.  In their role as consumers, businesses and industries can help  to drive the market toward less wasteful and more recyclable products and packaging.  For example,  many large companies have begun to  require minimal packaging and  that products and packaging  be developed without the use of toxic and hazardous chemicals.  In the role of waste generator,  businesses and industries must institute source separation programs in conformance with local laws  or ordinances and should simultaneously work to instill a recycling ethic among the work force.        3.2.4   The Role of New York State’s Residents 

No integrated solid waste management program can succeed without the active engagement of the  citizens of the state. Indeed, every New Yorker is affected by and involved in materials and waste  management.  For waste reduction, recycling and organics recovery programs to succeed, the public  must participate.  The choices New Yorkers make in what they buy, how they use it and how they  dispose of it can have significant impacts on materials management—waste‐preventing purchasing  sends a signal to companies that consumers don’t want waste; getting maximum use and reuse out  of household items reduces materials use, and choosing to recycle or compost reduces waste.  Members of the public can also play an important role in local materials and waste management  planning and can influence the direction taken by their local elected officials.  The local planning  process encourages ample public involvement and participation.     

   
   

30   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.3    INDUSTRY CONSOLIDATION AND FACILITY PRIVATIZATION 
As anticipated and encouraged in the ECL, the private sector has played an increasingly significant  role in providing solid waste management services to planning units.  The implementation of  integrated solid waste management systems has also created enhanced opportunities for increased  involvement of the private sector in various aspects of materials and waste management.    At the same time, a national trend of significant consolidation within the solid waste collection and  disposal industry emerged.  Fewer large companies have grown to dominate the industry, limiting  the competition in what was once a very diverse field of players.  However, as companies grow,  their investment capability also grows, facilitating greater expansion, better facilities, advancement,  and opportunity.    As a result, the industry has established:  • • more technologically advanced and consistently operated and maintained facilities; and  greater long‐term investments in recyclables processing, waste processing and disposal  infrastructure.         

Privatization of solid waste management facilities (i.e., private ownership or operation of facilities  that provide a public service) has also become much more commonplace  during the last 20 years— so much so that it is now sometimes difficult for local government‐owned solid waste facilities to  compete.  Privatization can be an attractive option for planning units because it allows them to  provide various services for their constituency without incurring the long‐term indebtedness and  risk associated with a large capital project or the ongoing operational costs and management  burden associated with operating municipal programs.  However, full privatization without the  necessary safeguards obtained through competitive negotiated procurement can have negative  consequences, essentially placing the municipality in a position of dependency on a private company  in a monopoly situation, thereby limiting its options.    Recognizing both the positive and negative potential of privatization, some local governments have  used a hybrid approach whereby the materials and waste management infrastructure is owned by  the public sector, and operations are contracted out to the private sector. New York City’s LSWMP  rests on this public/private partnership approach for its recycling and waste transfer facilities.  This  type of structure reduces the risk to the public entity by ensuring the capacity is always available,  while offering the benefits and efficiency of private operations.    Whether privatizing an entire system or just facility operations, local governments can maximize the  benefits of privatization and minimize the risk of monopoly by using competitive procurement  procedures, developing rigorous contracting processes and carefully negotiating compensation  rates.         
  31    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.4    OVERSEEING PRIVATELY OPERATED WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES 
There are several tools available to local governments to help ensure that solid waste services  provided by the private sector are consistent with and supportive of waste reduction, reuse,  recycling and organics recovery goals and the solid waste management infrastructure developed by  the locality.  Those tools include flow control legislation, registration or permitting programs, and  contractual requirements.  Flow control refers to laws or ordinances enacted by local governments to direct or otherwise  regulate the movement of solid waste generated within their jurisdiction by designating transfer,  recycling, disposal, or other facilities at which the material will be managed.  Flow control can be an  important financial and planning tool to ensure delivery of sufficient solid waste to satisfy debt  payments for capital intensive facilities and to generate revenue that can support waste reduction  and recycling initiatives.  It also ensures that materials are directed to a facility that the municipality  determines is safe and approporiate for handling its waste.  While implementation of flow control  ordinances has been hampered by legal challenges, in 2007 the US Supreme Court held, in United  Haulers v. Oneida Herkimer Solid Waste Management Authority, that flow control ordinances are  constitutional if used to support an integrated solid waste management program. (For a full  discussion of flow control, see Appendix 3.2.)  Many communities in New York State require companies that collect solid waste to register or  obtain a license or permit to operate within their jurisdictions.  The requirements for licenses,  permits or registrations can include provisions that:  • • • • require that collectors provide recycling services;   restrict the co‐mingling of recyclables with other waste;  include reporting on material origin and destination; and  establish other initiatives that support the municipality’s goals and programs. 

As with any permit program, it is important for communities to maintain an active and visible  Enforcement component.  Using contractual structures, such as districting, local governments can bid out the recycling and  solid waste collection services in a defined area and, as a condition of the bid, set requirements that  support the locality’s goals, such as designating certain materials for recycling collection, requiring  education and outreach, directing that certain solid waste management facilities be used, and  requiring reporting.    In other states, communities can use franchise agreements to structure recycling and waste  collection service agreements with private sector operators.  In these cases, the franchise can be bid  out for a neighborhood or area, can require that certain services be provided, and can specify the  facilities to be used for recycling or disposal.  Franchises are similar to contract structures and  districting, but enable municipalities to bid for the service and allow the contractor to bill the  generator directly in accordance with the terms of the franchise.  Municipalities in New York State  cannot enter into franchise agreements without explicit state legislative authority. 

32   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.5    RESOURCES FOR IMPLEMENTATION 
DEC provides technical and planning assistance, as well as financial assistance, for capital and  education costs related to waste reduction and recycling programs, household hazardous waste  management, landfill closure projects and landfill gas management programs.    For the first ten‐year solid waste management planning period (1987 ‐1997), the state’s program  interacted regularly with planning units to support the development of their initial LSWMPs.  During  that time, DEC provided significant technical assistance to planning units and their consulting  engineers on available technologies, data, tools, and concepts.  For example, DEC worked with  NYSERDA and the New York State Association for Solid Waste Management (NYSASWM) to  distribute modeling software to local solid waste management officials throughout the state and  trained them in the fundamentals of using it.    The majority of LSWMPs were approved and implemented in the late 1990s.  Unfortunately, in the  last decade, solid waste management planning program staff were reduced, and programs and  technical assistance efforts became more limited.  At the same time, a number of LSWMPs expired  without the submittal of replacement LSWMPs for review and approval.   While the state’s financial assistance programs have been significant, the available funding has not  been sufficient to address the need, particularly in the last decade.  Waste reduction and recycling  related programs have been chronically underfunded, with $6 to $10 million awarded annually and  a waiting list of pre‐applications for projects consistently totaling between $20 to $35 million. There  has been no funding for the development or modification of LSWMPs since the $7.5 million in  funding provided in 1988 was exhausted in 1992.  (For more on state investments, see section 6.) 
 

3.6    DATA COLLECTION AND USE 
For the past 20 years, DEC has relied on planning units to aggregate, analyze and report recycling  data, and for some composting and disposal data, for waste from all generating sectors within their  planning unit.  Data collection has been a great challenge for planning units, especially with respect  to commercial and institutional waste. For the most part, data collection for municipally collected  residential waste has provided basic, usable planning and tracking information.  However, in sectors  and regions with predominantly private collection, data has been weak.    Even so, the data provided by planning units was considered the best available and was used for  both state and local planning and reporting purposes.  In an effort to avoid double counting  materials already reported by planning units, DEC did not include individual recycling and  composting facility report data in the state’s recovery rate calculations. However, through 2001, the  state’s recycling rate included data provided by the American Forest and Paper Association and the  Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for non‐municipally generated materials, as well as  disposal data provided by facilities in the state.  Since that time, recycling rate calculations have  been based solely on information provided by the planning units.    Additional analysis of reported planning unit data compared to reported recycling and solid waste  management facility data performed as a part of this Plan’s development indicates that, in 
33    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

aggregate, the planning unit reports have been underreporting material processed at private  recycling and waste transfer and disposal facilities. Furthermore, reported data for yard trimmings  has been inconsistent in terms of both accuracy and units. This has likely resulted in a number of  data gaps over the years, especially with respect to commercial and institutional wastes.  The data  presented in this Plan is more accurate than previously reported information, as discussed more  fully in section 8.3.1. As the state transitions to the new goal structure—a reduction in per‐capita  waste disposal—discrepancies  must be resolved to ensure the best data is gathered and used for  analysis and measurement.    Additional attention to the issue of the collection and use of data is critical to the state’s ability to  measure progress in moving Beyond Waste.  It is important to evaluate one community against the  next and to evaluate the state’s progress in comparison to other states.  DEC will continue to work  with the USEPA and regional organizations (e.g., the Northeast Waste Management Officials  Association, NERC) to develop consistent measures of success.   
 

3.7   WASTE COMPOSITION INFORMATION 
To plan for greater levels of recovery, it is important to understand what materials are available in  the waste stream.  Comprehensive waste composition analyses can be expensive but are an  essential tool for gaining that understanding. New York State has not conducted a statewide waste  composition analysis but, rather, has relied upon planning units to aggregate specific waste  composition and generation data as part of their planning efforts.  For their part, few planning units  have had the resources to perform a field analysis, so most LSWMPs employ USEPA’s national  estimate of waste composition for projections and planning or rely on outdated waste composition  studies that do not capture the changes in materials use and packaging trends that have had  significant impacts on waste composition in the last two decades.  Furthermore, few composition  analyses represent the entire waste stream, including residential, commercial, and institutional  waste.   There are, however, a couple of exceptions.  Most notably, New York City (NYC) has conducted two  in‐depth waste composition analyses on its residential stream, one as part of its original LSWMP in  1990 and one in 2004‐2005.  Onondaga County Resource Recovery Authority conducted waste  composition analyses in 1987, 1993, 1998 and 2005. Through these studies, both NYC and Onondaga  County were able to learn what portion of targeted materials was not being captured completely  and what materials are generated in sufficient quantity to warrant new programs or market  development attention.  These studies and those compiled in other states form the basis of the  composition analysis presented in Section 7.  However, a fuller data set, covering the entire state  and all of the waste streams, would provide the basis for better planning on both the state and local  levels.       
34    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.8   ENFORCEMENT 
While the statutory and legal basis for mandatory recycling envisioned by the New York State  Legislature when the Act was created has been partially realized, the intended result—the   statewide implementation of recycling programs across the residential, commercial, industrial and  institutional sectors—has not been achieved. It is noteworthy that nearly 20 years later, some  municipalities (representing more than three percent of the state’s population) still do not have  local laws that comply with the basic source separation requirements of Section 120‐aa of Article 6  of the General Municipal Law (GML 120‐aa). Of those local governments that do have recycling laws  or ordinances in place, much of the focus has been on residential recycling programs, and the  requirements established by the legislature in GML 120‐aa have been for the most part ignored as  they relate to commercial, industrial and institutional generators. In addition, there has been little  effort on the part of many municipalities which do have local laws in place to enforce those laws in  instances where there is non‐compliance in any category of generators.  As state solid waste planning staff and resources have diminished, DEC’s oversight of LSWMP  performance and updating has suffered.  Nonetheless, the regulatory tools to create a vibrant and  meaningful state and local solid waste management planning program remain in place to be more  fully used and enhanced.  Most particularly, the LSWMPs must have relevance and rigor beyond the  permitting of facilities.  
 

3.9   INCONSISTENT IMPLEMENTATION  
Several planning units have established and implemented integrated solid waste management  systems with aggressive waste reduction and recycling programs that demonstrate the capability  and promise of the originally envisioned system.  Still, there is a great disparity in the scope and  performance of integrated waste management programs across the state, and progress on recycling  has varied dramatically by planning unit and municipality (See Figure 8.1 in Section 8.3).  The  experience of the higher performing programs has simply not transferred throughout the state.  For  example, in 2008, on a per capita basis, reported MSW recycling rates ranged from 764 pounds per  person per year of paper and containers to 17 pounds per person per year.    While some of the differences in performance can be attributed to specific regional circumstances,  such as proximity to markets and possibly to data collection anomalies, these variables cannot  account for the full breadth of the disparity in programs statewide.  Much of the disparity is the  result of a lack of uniformity in local implementation of LSWMPs and enforcement of the LSWMPs  and their recycling requirements.  DEC generally lacks enforcement authority over LSWMPs.  While  the permitting of solid waste management facilities provides some legal opportunity to enforce  consistency with related LSWMPs, the fact that some facilities serve municipalities located in  numerous LSWMPs and the lack of specific enforcement guidance have reduced use of this  authority.  
    35    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.10   RECYCLING MARKETS 
Like any commodity market, markets for most recyclable materials have fluctuated dramatically in  the past two decades.  No year illustrated this point as well as 2008, when many recyclable materials  experienced both record high and record low market values.  That fluctuation is a reminder that  recycling markets are global in nature and subject to external factors well beyond the control of  local solid waste managers or companies.  Fortunately, New York State’s recycling programs have  weathered dramatic market fluctuations and, for the most part, programs have successfully  endured.  The state, primarily through the efforts of ESD, has worked to both develop and  strengthen recycling markets for various materials.  (ESDs efforts are discussed in Section 6 and  Appendix 6.2.)  Planning units can help to stabilize markets by providing a consistent supply of clean,  uniform recyclable materials and entering into long‐term supply agreements with local or regional  markets. For more on recycling markets, see Section 8.3. 
 

3.11   CHANGING ROLES—PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP 
As the state transitions to a materials management system that relies more heavily on product  stewardship (also known as extended producer responsibility), there will be a greater role for  private sector players that are somewhat new to materials management, most notably brand  owners (also referred to as producers or manufacturers) and retailers.  The precise roles of brand  owners and retailers will be determined by the structure of the state’s product stewardship laws,  but it is fair to presume that an enhanced role for both of these types of companies will be realized.   Brand owners will be required to either develop or finance materials management programs for  their products.  Retailers may be required to collect or aggregate materials from consumers.  (For  more on potential roles and structures of product stewardship programs, see Section 4 and  Appendix 4.2.) 
 

3.12   FINDINGS 
State agencies must lead by example and demonstrate progressive materials management  strategies and sustainable operations.  The state must strengthen its efforts to direct policy, provide technical and financial assistance,  perform outreach and education functions, and ensure a strong and enforceable regulatory  structure.   

The state must refocus on solid waste management planning by: 

o o

seeking staff and resources to implement the state Plan; and   working with planning units to craft a new generation of LSWMPs that embody new  approaches and technologies to reduce waste and achieve higher levels of recovery  and that reflect current market and regulatory conditions.   

36   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

DEC must uniformly apply planning requirements statewide under new and existing  authority to ensure that LSWMPs and CRAs represent concerted efforts to reduce waste and  increase recycling and are aggressively implemented.  DEC must work to improve data collection to better measure progress in moving Beyond  Waste.    The state must allocate additional funding and resources to plan for and implement  sustainable materials management programs and to provide necessary oversight and  enforcement. 

• •

 
3.13   RECOMMENDATIONS 
As we move Beyond Waste, the state and its solid waste management planning units must  implement the wide range of actions listed below.  Fully realizing these recommendations will  require additional resources—both financial and human—at the state and local level.     
 

3.13.1  

Programmatic Recommendations  

•Work aggressively with New York State agencies and authorities to implement Governor  Paterson’s Executive Order 4, which requires agencies and authorities to set an example of  sustainable operations, including minimizing waste and maximizing recycling of materials and  organics; work with the Pollution Prevention Institute 11  to evaluate products for consideration  as EO4 “green products.”  •Expand the local solid waste management planning technical assistance program, and provide  guidance and tools to help municipalities, advocates, and other stakeholders address  challenging planning issues, including:    o o o o o o recycling market development and stabilization;  flow control or other private sector oversight programs (e.g., hauler licensing or  reporting);  recycling and waste composition data collection and use;  technology transfer and data/information sharing;  incentives, education and enforcement; and  program implementation uniformity.      

                                                                  11  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund. For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/.  37    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

•Require planning units to evaluate and implement, where feasible, the following programs,  policies and initiatives as they develop new LSWMPs, modify existing LSWMPs, and otherwise  plan for and implement programs:  education, and enforcement;   incentives, including variable rate pricing structures (e.g., PAYT/SMART Program);   public space, event, institutional and commercial recycling;   additional materials for recovery, including food scraps and other organics; and  long‐term recycled material supply agreements and/or processing contracts with  multiple market outlets.  Evaluate current planning unit membership and structure to ensure that original structures  are functioning, and, if not, support efforts to adjust structures or create new planning units  to best carry forward the next stage of planning and program implementation.  o o o o o Assist planning units in analyzing infrastructure needs for greater materials recovery in their  service area as appropriate.    Develop an on‐line reporting system to collect more timely and accurate recycling and  disposal data from solid waste and recycling facilities and planning units; work with industry  to develop methods to gather data on materials recovery that is not currently reported.  Develop guidance for planning units on performing waste composition and characterization  analyses to ensure consistency in analyses undertaken across the state so that the  characterization data can support state and local planning; identify funding sources to  incentivize local waste characterization efforts.    Develop critical recovery infrastructure through inter‐agency collaboration (with ESD,  NYSERDA, and EFC) or public‐private partnership, including the following suggested  facilities:  o organic material recycling facilities across the state;  o new or upgraded material recovery facilities in select areas of the state;  o regional glass processing facilities across the state; and  o plastics recovery capacity in the state for processing both rigid plastics #1‐7 and film  plastics.   Network with other agency stakeholders to facilitate immediate response to disasters and  to mitigate the impacts of disasters through better planning.  

• •

38   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

3.13.2   •

Regulatory Recommendations  Develop a regulatory approach to ensure consistent implementation of the requirements to  source separate recyclables, particularly in areas served by private collection companies.  

3.13.3   • • •

Legislative Recommendations  Increase DEC’s authority to enforce state and local source‐separation requirements.  Advance a comprehensive and integrated financial assistance program to support  development and implementation of LSWMPs. (For more detail, see Section 6.)    Develop a targeted funding program for specific priority areas identified by the state as  having the greatest potential for advancing the state’s goals in moving Beyond Waste.  The  fund must be flexible enough to allow funding to planning units, the private sector, state  agencies or a combination of the three.    Require local governments to be members of a planning unit and make local solid waste  management planning mandatory and enforceable, notwithstanding the facility permitting  process.    Authorize municipalities to franchise solid waste management services.  Expand the Waste Transporter Program to place specific requirements on transporters of  MSW, C&D debris and historic fill to: enforce source separation requirements, account for  wastes that are not currently tracked, and ensure that communities who export comply with  source separation requirements and disposal restrictions. 

• •

       

39   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

4.  GREENHOUSE GAS AND MATERIALS AND WASTE MANAGEMENT 
 

CLIMATE CHANGE IS THE MOST PRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE OF OUR TIME…BY TAKING  ACTION, WE SEND A SIGNAL THAT NEW YORKERS WILL DO OUR SHARE TO ADDRESS THE  CLIMATE CRISIS AND WE WILL DO IT IN A WAY THAT CREATES OPPORTUNITIES FOR  INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO FLOURISH.                                              David Paterson  Governor  August 6, 2009 

WE ARE AT A CHANGE MOMENT, A PIVOT POINT IN WORLD HISTORY.  WE CAN EITHER HOLD  FAST TO OUTMODED NOTIONS THAT IMPERIL THE FUTURE OF OUR PLANET, OR WE CAN STAND  UP AND TAKE ACTION TO SAVE IT.  Pete Grannis  Commissioner, NYS DEC  May 20, 2008 
 

Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH4) and other “greenhouse gases” (GHGs) prevent heat from  leaving the earth’s atmosphere, causing the planet’s temperature to warm in the same way as glass  allows heat to build up in a greenhouse. While GHG is naturally present in the atmosphere, a  number of human activities, primarily the burning of fossil fuel, have led to higher than normal  concentrations of the gases. As a result, the greenhouse effect is enhanced and Earth’s temperature  is rising with the potential to change the planet’s climate.    Scientific evidence suggests that a changing climate poses a serious threat to environmental  resources and public health in New York State, nationally and globally. Climate change will  affect air  quality, water quality, fisheries, drinking water supplies, wetlands, forests, wildlife, and agriculture.  The Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment (NECIA) prepared by the Union of Concerned Scientists,  concludes that flooding from climate change‐related severe weather events and rising sea levels  threaten communities and infrastructure in floodplains and along coastlines.   Scientists have already observed significant warming in New York State’s climate due to increased  concentrations of GHGs in the atmosphere. Since 1970, the northeast United States has been  warming at a rate of 0.5° F per decade. Winter temperatures have risen even faster, at a rate of  1.3°F per decade from 1970 to 2000. Temperature increases in the metropolitan coastal areas of the  state have been more dramatic.  As outlined in the NECIA, scientists have concluded that New York  State’s climate has already begun to take on the characteristics of the climate formerly found in the  states to the south.      
40    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

The scientific literature confirms that large and rapid reductions of GHG emissions will help to  mitigate the impacts of climate change, but to do this, we will need to adopt thoughtful new  approaches to the way we use and produce energy.  Indeed, mitigating the impacts of a warming  climate represents one of the most pressing environmental challenges for the state, the nation, and  the world. New York State is now updating its Energy Plan to facilitate more aggressive reductions of  GHGs.  In August 2009, Governor Paterson issued Executive Order 24, establishing a state goal of  reducing GHG emissions 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050.    Achieving these goals will require a fresh look at materials and waste management strategies.  In  addition to the direct emissions of GHGs from solid waste management facilities, the way materials  are managed also has GHG impacts.  Overall, waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting are  better performing materials management strategies from a GHG reduction perspective and also  conserve energy and offer other environmental and economic benefits compared to disposal.  Maximizing the deployment of these strategies will help the state meet its GHG reduction goals.  To  manage the waste that remains after comprehensive waste prevention, reuse, recycling and  composting are in place, municipal waste combustion (MWC) offers significant GHG reduction  advantages compared to landfilling.  
 

4.1    WASTE CONTRIBUTES TO GLOBAL WARMING 
According to USEPA, on a life‐cycle basis, 42 percent of the national GHG inventory is influenced by  the energy and fuel consumed in the production, use and management of the materials that  become waste. 12     The most obvious and well‐documented contribution to GHG from the management of waste is  from the uncaptured emissions of methane from landfills—as organic materials break down in a  landfill’s anaerobic environment they generate methane, a GHG 23 times more potent than CO 2 .   USEPA estimates that, nationally, landfill methane emissions represent 1.8 percent of GHG  emissions. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA) statewide  GHG Inventory for 2006 estimates that MSW contributes 9.8 million tons of CO 2  equivalent (CO 2 E)  to Earth’s atmosphere.  This represents 3.8 percent of the state’s GHG emissions, second only to  fuel consumption as a single source of emissions.    In addition to direct emissions, the transportation and handling of solid waste also generates GHGs.   And the GHG implications of waste go beyond waste handling considerations.  More than 70 percent  of MSW  comprises products and packaging, the production, distribution and disposition of which  generates GHGs.  Every step of the process—mining, harvesting, manufacturing, and distribution— consumes energy and generates pollution.  In fact, for every ton of MSW, 71 tons of industrial  discards are produced. 13   Thus, to the extent that waste can be reduced through extended use of 
                                                                  12  Opportunities to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Materials and Land Management Practices  US‐ EPA, September 2009 
13

 Office of Technology Assessment, Managing Industrial Solid Wastes from Maufacturing, Mining, Oil and Gas  Production and Utility Coal Combustion (OTA‐BP‐0‐82), February 1992, pp. 7, 10.  41  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

products and materials and through various recovery strategies, they will not have to be replaced  with new materials requiring  an equivalent demand on resources and the environment.  Through  changes in product design and packaging, many materials might not be generated in the first place,  a particularly relevant concept for things that currently go from store shelves almost immediately to  the garbage bin upon purchase—packaging, single‐use products and other items of limited value.    In its report, Solid Waste Management and Greenhouse Gases: A Life Cycle Assessment of Emissions  and Sinks, USEPA describes the life‐cycle impacts of waste:    For many wastes, the materials in MSW represent what is left over after a long series of steps:  (1) extraction and processing of raw materials; (2) manufacture of products; (3) transportation  of materials and products to markets; (4) use by consumers, and (5) waste management.   Virtually every step along this “life cycle” impacts GHG emissions. Solid waste management  decisions can reduce GHGs by affecting one or more of the following:   (1) Energy consumption (specifically, combustion of fossil fuels) associated with making,  transporting, using, and disposing the product or material that becomes a waste.    (2) Non‐energy‐related manufacturing emissions, such as the CO2  released when  limestone is converted to lime (e.g.,in steel manufacturing).   (3) CH 4  emissions from landfills where the waste is disposed.   (4) CO 2  and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from waste combustion.   (5) Carbon sequestration, which refers to natural or human‐made processes that remove  carbon from the atmosphere and store it for long periods or permanently.   The first four mechanisms add GHGs to the atmosphere and contribute to global warming. The  fifth—carbon sequestration—reduces GHG concentrations by removing CO 2  from the  atmosphere.  This USEPA assessment also notes that the end‐of‐life management of different materials has  varying implications for GHG generation related to energy consumption, methane management, and  carbon sequestration.  According to USEPA, composting can result in carbon storage in the soil, so  that composting one ton of food scraps results in a net GHG reduction of 0.185 tons of CO 2 E, while  landfilling that material would increase GHGs by 0.74 CO 2 E.  Recycling a ton of aluminum yields an  estimated net reduction of 13.7 CO 2 E as compared to aluminum production from virgin materials,  while landfilling that material would yield an increase of 0.037 CO 2 E.  Table 4.1, excerpted from the  NERC’s Environmental Benefits Calculator (EBC) and derived from EPA’s Waste Reduction Model  (WARM), provides a generic comparison of the GHG impact of managing various waste materials  using different techniques.    The most significant GHG impacts during the life cycle of products and packaging result, not from  disposal, but during production of the products and packaging that eventually become waste.   According to the US Department of Energy Energy Information Administration, industry worldwide  uses more than 50 percent of the energy consumed.  Within that sector, virgin raw materials  industries are among the world’s largest consumers of energy.  In the US, the four largest material 

42   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

industries—paper, metal, glass and plastic—consume more than 20 percent of the energy used  nationally for all purposes. 14    Waste prevention and recycling can significantly reduce industrial energy consumption.  For  example, a life‐cycle study on the paper industry found that recycling paper and using that recycled  paper in production reduces the GHG impacts of paper manufacturing by two to six times  (depending on the paper grade) as compared to virgin manufacturing and landfilling or MWC. 15    Using recycled materials in paper production can also reduce demand for virgin timber, conserving  trees that absorb CO 2 . 16  The potential for positive impacts of material recovery and reuse in the  metals industry is even greater.  When manufacturing aluminum, 95 percent of the GHG emissions  can be avoided by substituting scrap aluminum for virgin feedstock. 17   The GHG reductions related  to manufacturing with recycled materials in place of virgin are so substantial that the emissions from  transportation of materials for recycling are not a significant factor in the overall carbon footprint of  recycling.  The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), established by the United Nations  Environmental Programme and the World Meteorological Organization, recognizes the important  link between materials use and global climate change in its Fourth Assessment Report, stating:  Changes in lifestyles and consumption patterns that emphasize resource conservation can  contribute to developing a low‐carbon economy that is both equitable and sustainable.   In its Pathways to a Low Carbon Economy report, McKinsey & Company identified recycling as a low‐ cost carbon abatement strategy.  In fact, recycling and landfill gas‐to‐energy projects are listed as  products with a negative abatement cost; that is, their implementation actually saves money or  generates revenue.    This Plan considers impacts to the climate within the discussions of the various waste management  options and planning recommendations.  An important element of the Plan is its attention to the  opportunities for saving energy and reducing climate impacts from a life cycle perspective. This  concept forms the basis for proposed strategies to reduce waste, increase the reuse and recycling of  discarded materials to capture their material properties and embedded energy, and recover organic  materials to avoid the generation of methane in landfills and provide benefit to soils.    In this way, the Plan and its recommendations are linked to a larger vision for a sustainable New  York State, where all resources are conserved to the maximum extent feasible, GHGs are reduced,  and our unique natural environment is preserved for future generations. 
                                                                      14  Energy Information  Administration; http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs2002/data02/pdf/table1.1_02.pdf) 
15

 Paper Task Force Recommendations for Purchasing and Using Environmentally Preferable  Paper; www.edf.org .      conservatree.com      www.world‐aluminum.org   43  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

16 17

 

4.1.1  

Waste Prevention and Reuse 

Avoiding the production of a product or package or reusing it in its original form, and thereby  preventing waste altogether, offer the most significant GHG reductions in that they eliminate the  need to extract resources, turn them into products and materials, transport them to market, and  dispose of them as waste.  For example, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection changed  its practice of distributing printed phone directories and now provides them in an electronic format.   In so doing, the agency eliminated the use of approximately 1.3 tons of paper each year. 18   In  addition to saving money on purchases and disposal, the move reduced GHG impacts by 12.8 tons of  CO 2 E annually.  By contrast, recycling that same amount of material would have reduced only 3.7  tons of CO 2 E, combusting it would have reduced .66 tons of CO 2 E, and landfilling those materials  would have resulted in an increase of 2.59 tons of CO 2 E annually.                                 
 

 

                                                                  18  http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/html/at_agencies/govt_case_studies_waste.shtml#9   44    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

   TABLE 4.1

 Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions from MSW Management Options (CO2E/Ton)  Material  Aluminum Cans  Steel Cans  Copper Wire  Aluminum Scrap  Metal  Ferrous Scrap Metal  Glass  HDPE  LDPE  PET  Corrugated Cardboard  Magazines/Bulk Mail  Newspaper  Office Paper  Phonebooks  Textbooks  Dimensional Lumber  Fiberboard  Food Scraps  Yard Trimmings  Grass  Leaves  Branches  Residential Mixed  Paper  Mixed Paper, Office  Mixed Metals  Mixed Plastics  Mixed Recyclables  Mixed Organics  Carpet          Whole Computers  Clay Bricks  Fly Ash  Tires 
 

Reduction /Reuse  ‐8.37  ‐3.22  ‐7.47  ‐8.37  ‐3.22  ‐0.58  ‐1.82  ‐2.31  ‐2.13  ‐5.65  ‐8.74  ‐4.94  ‐8.08  ‐6.40  ‐9.26  ‐2.04  ‐2.24  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  ‐4.06  ‐56.48  ‐0.29  NA  ‐4.05 

Recycling ‐13.80  ‐1.81  ‐5.01  ‐13.80  ‐1.81  ‐0.28  ‐1.42  ‐1.72  ‐1.57  ‐3.14  ‐3.10  ‐2.82  ‐2.88  ‐2.68  ‐3.14  ‐2.48  ‐2.49  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  ‐3.57  ‐3.45  ‐5.31  ‐1.54  ‐2.91  NA  ‐7.30  ‐2.29  NA  ‐0.88  ‐1.86 

Composting  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  ‐0.20  ‐0.20  ‐0.20  ‐0.20  ‐0.20  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  ‐0.20  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA 

Combustion   0.06  ‐1.55  0.06  0.06  ‐1.55  0.05  0.91  0.91  1.08  ‐0.66  ‐0.48  ‐0.76  ‐0.64  ‐0.76  ‐0.64  ‐0.79  ‐0.79  ‐0.18  ‐0.23  ‐0.23  ‐0.23  ‐0.23  ‐0.66  ‐0.61  ‐1.08  0.98  ‐0.60  ‐0.20  0.38  ‐0.20  NA  NA  0.08 

Landfilling   0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.34  ‐0.33  ‐0.90  1.78  ‐0.90  1.78  ‐0.53  ‐0.53  0.69  ‐0.35  0.15  ‐0.59  ‐0.53  0.19  0.39  0.04  0.04  0.08  0.15  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04  0.04 

  A negative sign (‐) indicates a net reduction in GHGs or a positive impact on climate change. 

45   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

This plan proposes new product and packaging stewardship programs as a key means of achieving  waste reduction.  In stewardship programs, the producer of a product or package must take either  financial or physical responsibility for managing that product or package at the end of its useful life.   This reduces GHGs in two ways.   First, product and packaging stewardship programs create a  financial incentive for producers to use fewer materials and use materials that are more easily  reused or recycled.  Second, stewardship has the potential to increase the recycling and diversion of  products that are currently going to disposal.  For example, Washington State estimates that a  product stewardship program for recycling carpet in that state could reduce GHG emissions by up to    0.9 million metric tons of CO2E in 2020 (assuming 80 percent recycling). 19     4.1.2   Recycling 

Recycling products, packaging and other materials is, generally speaking, the third best way, after  reduction and reuse, to manage materials at the end of their useful life.   From a GHG emissions  perspective, this management strategy has significant advantages compared to land filling and  combustion techniques.  Recycling avoids the emissions related to energy consumption and  manufacturing associated with the extraction, production and transportation of virgin materials  used in original production.  For example, recycling just one aluminum can conserves enough energy  to power a television for three hours.  Further, recycling avoids production of the GHG emissions  associated with handling and disposing of these materials through conventional waste management  practices.    Of all the materials readily amenable to recycling, metals offer the most significant potential for  GHG emission reductions, in large part due to the energy intensive process of mining and preparing  virgin metals for production.  Recycling paper is also particularly important from a climate  perspective because of the energy intensive virgin production process and the benefits of reducing  demand for pulp and, in some cases, leaving trees standing to absorb carbon. 
 

4.1.3  

Composting and Organics Recycling 

From a climate perspective, recycling food scraps, through composting or anaerobic digestion, also  has advantages compared to landfilling..  As outlined in Table 4.1, the EPA WARM model predicts a  slight advantage for composting food scraps compared to combustion and a slight advantage for  combustion of yard trimmings compared to composting.  EPA has acknowledged that WARM does  not give credit for the GHG savings due to use of the compost product.  EPA is currently developing  models to quantify these savings.  Given the substantial volume of organic materials currently  managed in landfills— organics make up 30 percent of waste generated statewide—recovering  organics is a key solid waste management strategy to combat climate change. 

                                                                  19  Washington Climate Action Team, Leading the Way: Implementing Practical Solutions to Climate Change.  46    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recognizing this important connection, in 1999, the European Union issued a landfill directive to  reduce land disposal of biodegradable materials. 20   Implementing the directive resulted in a 30  percent reduction in methane emissions (below 1990 levels) by 2002.  To comply with this directive,  communities in Europe have transitioned to systems that foster greater organics recovery through  composting and anaerobic digestion, deployed mechanical biological treatment (MBT) systems to  stabilize waste prior to land disposal, or combusted waste for energy recovery.      As the impacts of this policy and additional research in the field suggest, by diverting the materials  that would generate methane in a landfill setting, a well‐run composting operation will avoid potent  GHG emissions. 21   Anaerobic digestion systems intentionally generate methane but capture the gas  for energy recovery, which serves the dual purpose of destroying the methane and offsetting the  generation of energy from fossil fuels.  The production and capture of methane through the process  of anaerobic digestion is far more efficient than recovering gas from a landfill because digestors use  closed systems that are designed to maximize gas production.  Critical to this analysis is the fact that organics recovery facilities generate a valuable soil  amendment as an end product that can supplement fertilizers, thereby reducing the GHG impacts of  the agricultural sector.  The compost product that results from organics recovery is considered a  “carbon sink”  because it returns that carbon to the soil for the long term.  The organic matter  inherent in compost is crucial for moisture retention, erosion control, and the microbial activities  that promote plant growth.  Because of these properties, compost also reduces the need for  manufactured fertilizers.  A recent report from the California Air Resources Board found that  agricultural use of compost is a cost‐effective way of reducing agricultural GHG emissions while  building the nutrient base of the state’s soils.22  It is important to note that many of the currently  available models that compare the GHG impacts of various waste management techniques  undervalue the contribution of composting by not considering the additional benefits derived from  the use of the compost product.    Still, the extent of the GHG reductions gained by recycling organics relate primarily to the avoidance  of disposal.  Composting reduces GHG emissions as compared to landfilling in almost any instance— methane is such a powerful GHG that its avoidance dwarfs any emissions from transportation or  other factors.  As compared to MWC, composting offers a GHG reduction, but it is not as substantial  as  landfilling.  Therefore, when comparing composting to combustion, transportation distances  could be a more significant factor from a GHG perspective. 23   Obviously, avoiding transportation 
                                                                  20  Council Directive 99/31/EC, http://eur‐ lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:31999L0031:EN:NOT  
21 22

 Greenhouse Gases and the Role of Composting, US Composting Council.   Recommendations of the Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee (ETAAC):  Final  Report: Technologies and Policies to Consider for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in  California;  www.arb.ca.gov/cc/etaac/ETAACFinalreport2‐11‐08.pdf   This statement is based on information presented in Section 8.4, Composting and Organics Recycling.  For a  full discussion and the results of modeling using the Northeast Recycling Council’s Environmental Benefits  Calculator, see that section.  47  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

23

 

impacts by managing materials closer to the point of generation is always a better environmental  and economic choice.   
 

4.1.4  

Municipal Waste Combustion 

Waste prevention, reuse, recycling, and composting offer significant climate benefits, further  justifying their preferred status in the waste management hierarchy. For residual waste that is not  or cannot be prevented, reused, recycled or recovered, disposal methods must be employed.  When  viewed through a climate lens, disposal in MWC (also known as waste‐to‐energy, energy from waste  or incineration) offers advantages over disposal in landfills.  This is primarily because treatment  through combustion facilities: reduces the amount of waste sent to landfills for disposal and the  methane generated by landfilling; recovers metals that would otherwise be wasted; produces  electricity more efficiently than landfill gas‐to‐energy facilities, and offsets fossil fuel electricity  generation. 24   Still, the energy produced at combustion facilities is less than that conserved through  waste prevention and recycling.  A 2009 study found that the energy generation potential, per ton  of MSW handled at combustion facilities, is less than one‐quarter of the energy generation potential  of recycling. 25     One study estimates that the GHG impacts of landfilling,  during a 30‐year  period, are significantly  greater than those from combustion—45 times greater in landfills with gas collection and energy  recovery and 115 times greater in landfills without gas collection and destruction. 26   While the gross  GHG emissions of MWC are higher than fossil fuel‐generated electricity, with the average emission  rate from MWCs in the US at 2,988 lbs./MWh of CO 2  as compared to 1,672 lb/MWh for oil, 2,249 for  coal, and 1,135 for natural gas, common carbon accounting practices discount the biogenic portion  of MSW by approximately 65 percent of total emissions.  Once that adjustment is made, the CO 2   emissions from MWC average 1,045 lbs./MWh, less than those from oil, coal or natural gas. As we  move Beyond Waste and more biogenic materials (food scraps and paper) are diverted to  composting and recycling it may justify a reduction in the discount factor thereby changing the  relationship of MWC emissions to oil, coal and natural gas. Specific estimates of GHG emissions from  MWC depend on the design and operation at a given location.      4.1.5   Landfilling 

Landfills represent the largest contribution to GHGs of any waste management technique.  Landfills  produce methane, a potent GHG, as a result of the decomposition of organic material within the  oxygen‐starved (anaerobic) conditions of a landfill environment.  Methane emissions also increase 
                                                                  24  Modern Waste‐to‐Energy as an Energy and Environmental Management System, Brian Bahor, Covanta  Corporaqtion, Keith Weitz, RTI International Inc. 
25

 Assessments of Materials Management Options for the Massachusetts Solid Waste Master Plan Review,  Tellus Institute, for the MA DEP, December 2008.    Greenhouse Gas Dynamics of Municipal Solid Waste Alternatives, by Alan Eschenroeder, Harvard School of  Public Health, 2001.      48  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

26

 

ozone in the troposphere, which causes radiative forcing that exacerbates global climate change. 27    Capturing that methane, to the greatest extent possible, must remain a priority to limit the GHG  impacts of the state’s primary waste disposal method.  In addition to methane, the gas produced from waste decomposing in a landfill contains non‐ methane organic compounds (NMOCs) such as benzene and toluene, as well as carbon dioxide,  particulate matter and other pollutants. Indeed, landfill gas collection systems are typically installed  to control odors and other pollutants.  Nonetheless, methane and carbon dioxide usually make up  more than 90 percent of the total gas produced.  If the methane is captured to generate electricity,  it offsets fossil fuel consumption.  Landfill gas collection is now common in New York State, and  conversion of landfill‐gas‐to‐energy is growing, particularly at the larger landfills.  In New York State  in 2008, approximately 10.5 billion cubic feet of landfill gases were destroyed through flaring at  active landfills, and 14 billion cubic feet were used to generate energy.  Implementation of  landfillgas‐to‐energy projects has been inhibited by significant costs and engineering hurdles, most  commonly involving the process for connecting the landfill’s energy generation to the local electrical  grid systems.  According to  USEPA, landfill GHG emissions are a function of several factors, including: (1) the total  amount and age of waste in MSW landfills, which is related to total waste landfilled annually; (2) the  characteristics of landfills receiving waste (e.g., composition of waste‐in‐place, size, cover system,  climate); (3) the amount of methane that is recovered and either flared or used for energy purposes,  and (4) the amount of methane oxidized in landfills instead of being released into the atmosphere.    The rate of landfill gas generation is also related to waste composition.  The composition of waste  affects not only the volume but the timeframe in which landfill gas is generated.  For example,  according to the US Composting Council, food scraps break down quickly and can begin generating  methane in days or weeks, often before capture systems can effectively manage the gas.  Beyond understanding the factors that influence GHG production at landfills, measuring the precise  impacts is difficult and controversial for two key reasons.  First, the global warming potential of  methane gas differs depending on the time horizon used.  IPCC protocol dictates the use of a 100‐ year time horizon for the global warming potential of GHGs; using this method, methane is 21 times  more potent than CO2.  However, unlike other common GHGs (CO2  and N 2 O), methane has an  accelerated decay rate, so when viewed within a 20‐year time horizon, it is 72 times more potent  than CO 2 .  Using this method, the contribution of landfill gas to the national GHG emissions  inventory increases from 1.8 percent (based on 100‐year time horizon) to 5.2 percent. 28     Second, there is significant variation in reported landfill gas capture efficiencies.  Most models use  USEPA’s default estimated national average of 75 percent collection efficiency.  The actual amount  depends on the landfill size and age, gas collection efficiency, “tightness” of the landfill liner and  cover systems, organic/inorganic waste proportions, electrical efficiency, and other factors.   According to a 2007 study by SCS engineers, landfill gas collection efficiency can range from 55 to 99 
                                                                  27  As defined by the IPCC, radiative forcing is a measure of how the energy balance of the Earth‐atmosphere  system is influenced when factors that affect climate are altered. 
28

 Institute for Local Self Reliance, 2008.  49  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

percent, depending upon the landfill’s design and operation. 29   Other studies have predicted lower  capture efficiencies, in some cases well below 50 percent.  As mentioned above, efficiency can be  low early in the landfill’s life, which is not always considered in these assessments.  Higher collection  efficiencies are most often predicted for modern state‐of the‐art landfills that have been designed  and constructed from the ground up with liner systems and gas collection systems that were  installed as early as possible in the landfill unit’s operating life.  Most landfill operators estimate methane gas generation using  USEPA’s LandGEM model and derive  collection efficiency based on the actual volume of gas collected as a percentage of what the model  predicts is being generated. 30   However, the generation of methane will vary based on several site‐ specific factors, such as rainfall, waste composition, temperature, and specific facility design.  Given  the size and physical variations of the many landfills in New York State, differences in actual  performance as compared to the default parameters used in LandGEM can result in significantly  differing estimates of GHGs.  Several industry initiatives are underway to better measure actual  methane generation and fugitive landfill gas emissions to verify capture efficiency. Technology for  both quantifying and capturing GHG from landfills continues to evolve.    The level of GHG emissions from the 1,600 inactive landfills in New York State is also largely  unknown and has not been evaluated through any modeling or extensive investigation. However,  DEC staff have found high methane concentrations in tests of sub‐surface gas in New York State  landfills where waste had been in place for decades.  Evaluating and addressing the GHG emissions  from these older landfills may be an important strategy to combat the climate change impacts of the  state’s waste legacy.    Despite the difficulties in measuring methane and the lack of information about its continued  production at abandoned landfills, it is clear that mitigating and avoiding the impacts of methane  generation at landfills can play a strategic role in the stabilization and reduction of atmospheric GHG  concentrations and must be a priority for New York State.   
 

4.2   GREENHOUSE GAS IMPACTS OF CURRENT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE  MANAGEMENT IN NEW YORK STATE 
Using the best available data, including facility reports on tonnage, and the NERC EBC model to  estimate GHG emissions, estimated GHG reductions from the state’s existing MSW management  system are represented in Table 4.2, as are projections of the impacts of implementing this Plan to  reduce reliance on disposal.  These estimates are based on MSW materials only, which collectively  represent approximately one‐half of the total material stream in New York State.  It does not include  construction and demolition debris, biosolids, or industrial wastes.  (For an explanation of each of  these categories, see Section 7; for a full discussion of the reporting and data on which the current 
                                                                  29  Current MSW Industry Position and State of the Practice on LFG Collection Efficiency, Methane Oxidation,  and Carbon Sequestration in Landfills, July 2007. 
30

 Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) Version 3.02 User’s Guide, EPA May  2005, http://www.epa.gov/ttncatc1/dir1/landgem‐v302‐guide.pdf   50  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

estimates are based, see section 8.3.1; for an explanation of the NERC EBC calculator and the data  used to derive these estimates, see Appendix 1.)   
TABLE 4.2 ANNUAL GHG REDUCTIONS AND ENERGY SAVINGS OF VARIOUS SCENARIOS  MSW  Recycling Rate  Current  30%   50%  75%  90%  Pounds/Person Per day Disposed  4.1 3.5 2.4 1.2 0.6 GHG Reduction (Million MTCO 2 E)  9.2  14.3 21.7 28.4 32.0 Energy Savings (Trillion BTUs)  85  156 234 294 344

 

4.3   FINDINGS 
• Waste contributes to climate change in a number of ways, including: direct emissions of  GHGs from solid waste management facilities, most notably methane emissions from  landfills and, more significantly, life‐cycle impacts of the products and packaging that  become waste, including their production, distribution and use.   Mitigating and avoiding the impacts of methane generation at landfills can play a strategic  role in the stabilization and reduction of atmospheric GHG concentrations and must be a  priority for New York State.   An analysis of the climate impacts of waste management supports the existing solid waste  management hierarchy, which places a priority on waste prevention, reuse and recycling   compared to disposal and states a preference for treatment through MWC with energy  recovery  compared to disposal in a landfill.  Waste reduction, reuse, recycling and composting provide significant benefits in combating  climate change by eliminating or diverting the materials that may generate methane in a  landfill and by providing valuable materials for industrial feedstocks that will help  manufacturers reduce demand for energy and reduce pollution in the production process.  Diverting food scraps from landfills to composting or anaerobic digestion is the most reliable  method of methane abatement from landfills.  While landfill gas capture and destruction  systems are an important and necessary tool for controlling emissions, even the best  performing systems do not completely capture landfill gas.  Thus, a preventative approach  that focuses on minimizing the generation of methane via composting or more efficiently  capturing methane for energy via anaerobic digestion, will provide a greater impact on GHG  emissions.  Advanced landfill gas collection systems are critical elements of good environmental  management.  These systems help to mitigate the contribution of landfills to climate change  and also help to control odors, capture VOCs and prevent other hazardous chemical releases  to the air.  Most of the active landfill capacity in New York State has such systems in place.   
51    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT


 

Capturing landfill gas to generate energy is an important strategy to help reduce reliance on  fossil fuels for electricity generation.   

4.4   RECOMMENDATIONS 
The overall goals of moving Beyond Waste require materials management strategies that serve to  combat climate change. As such, the recommendations summarized below are, in large part,  discussed in more detail in other sections of the Plan and in Sections 10 and 11 (Agenda for Action  and Implementation Schedule).  • Maximize Waste Reduction, Reuse  and Recycling: Sections 8.1, 8.2, and 8.3 detail a host of  legislative, regulatory and programmatic recommendations that collectively will maximize  reduction, reuse and recycling.       Implement Product and Packaging Stewardship Programs: As further discussed in Section 5,  product and packaging stewardship are important policy tools to reduce materials use,  increase recycling, and reduce disposal.  Their implementation will help to reduce GHGs to  combat climate change.    Divert Organics from Landfills to Composting or Recycling:  Section 8.4. includesdetailed  recommendations to maximize the recycling of organics and thereby avoid the generation of  methane in landfills.   Ensure that Landfills in New York State Pursue Every Possible Mechanism for Achieving GHG  Reductions:  DECs Part 208 and 360 regulations and the financial incentives provided by the  carbon market have resulted in the installation of landfill gas collection and destruction  systems at most active MSW landfills. DEC will continue to assess the emissions and  operations of facilities and markets in New York State to ensure that landfills maximize gas  collection and destruction.   Maximize Conversion of Landfill Gas to Energy: DEC will continue to work with other state  agencies and entities involved in the electrical grid system’s governance and operation to  minimize the costs to connect, while still ensuring sound engineering.    
 

 

52   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

5.  PRODUCT AND PACKAGING STEWARDSHIP: AN EMERGING  MATERIALS MANAGEMENT STRATEGY 
 

To accomplish the goals of this Plan, which are largely focused on reducing the amount of waste  destined for disposal, the state will need to fundamentally change the way materials that become  waste are managed.  While more waste reduction is certainly possible under the current approach  to waste management, which relies almost exclusively on local government planning and resources  and a mix of public and private facilities, the system has a critical inherent limit—it can only manage  those materials and products that end up in the waste stream.  To overcome this significant  limitation and reach new levels of sustainability in light of critical energy and GHG imperatives, the  state must work to change the waste stream at its source. Manufacturers, distributors, retailers and  consumers of products and packages that now end up in the waste stream must become involved  for such a fundamental shift to occur.  Product stewardship is a tried and promising vehicle for this  kind of change and this kind of broad involvement.  Product stewardship, also known as extended producer responsibility, extends the role and  responsibility of the manufacturer (also known the producer or brand owner) of a product or  package to cover the entire life cycle, including ultimate disposition of that product or package at  the end of its useful life.  In these programs, manufacturers often in cooperation with their  distribution networks and retailers, must take either physical or financial responsibility for the  recycling or proper disposal of products or packages.     Product stewardship can be a powerful driver for the reduction of waste volume and toxicity.  By  placing responsibility for end‐of‐life management on the manufacturer, these programs ensure that  end‐of‐life impacts of the product or package are considered during the earliest stages of design.  As  such, stewardship programs create incentives for manufacturers to redesign products and packaging  to be less toxic, less bulky and lighter, as well as more recyclable.  (For examples, see Text  Box/Sidebar Product Stewardship at Work.)  Reducing material use and toxicity and increasing  recycling results in significant environmental, economic, energy and GHG reduction benefits.  Collection in product stewardship programs must be free and convenient to the consumer to  encourage participation. Instead of requiring local solid waste managers to fund collection and  recovery programs for discarded products, in product stewardship programs, manufacturers cover  the cost of recycling or disposal.   Pilot projects have found that to maximize recovery,  manufacturers must provide an incentive to drive collection of certain products.  For example,  mercury‐containing thermostat stewardship programs have been most successful when a bounty is  offered to the consumer who is otherwise prepared to discard a thermostat.  In stewardship  systems, the costs of recycling or end‐of‐life management, including any necessary incentives, are  internalized into the cost of the product and borne jointly by the manufacturer and the consumer,  not by local taxpayers and ratepayers.  This ensures that consumers get proper price signals— materials that are easier to recycle or dispose of at the end of life should be less expensive.      

53   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Stewardship programs reduce the financial burden on local solid waste management programs.   Today, local taxpayers or ratepayers are required to pay for whatever winds up on the curb, with  little or no ability to influence the design of the products or packaging to reduce management costs  or improve recycling options.  The costs are borne locally for production decisions made remotely,  usually without consideration of end‐of‐life management implications.  The European Union, many Asian countries and many Canadian provinces rely on product  stewardship programs to manage significant and diverse waste streams, including packaging,  electronics and vehicles.  In the US, 29 states have at least one legislatively mandated product  stewardship program in place, primarily targeting products considered to be toxic or hazardous,  including electronic waste, mercury switches, mercury‐containing thermostats, and rechargeable  batteries.    Product stewardship is a centerpiece of the Beyond Waste Plan because it represents a paradigm  shift that can help New York State overcome many of the critical hurdles that have hindered further  success.  In addition to influencing the design of products and packaging to reduce materials use and  improve recyclability, it can garner resources to optimize collection and recycling systems and  improve efficiency.  Ultimately, product stewardship will reduce the amount of waste disposed of  and help New York State move Beyond Waste.    Product stewardship represents the latest evolution of materials management policy from earlier  statutes that regulate whole classes of materials (e.g., the Federal Resource Conservation and  Recovery Act and the state Solid Waste Management Act), to laws that impose   specific  requirements on a product‐by‐product or product category basis.  The first product‐based law in  New York State was the Returnable Container Act (also known as the Bottle Bill).  A similar deposit‐ based system for lead‐acid batteries followed suit, and subsequent product‐specific programs, such  as the waste tire abatement program, have assessed fees on product sales to address remedial  issues.  More recently, New York State enacted legislation requiring retailers to collect cell phones  and plastic bags from their customers at no cost.    These product‐specific laws are considered predecessors of modern product stewardship programs  because they establish requirements to collect and manage materials outside of the taxpayer and  ratepayer‐funded system.  However, they do not represent true product stewardship because, in  the case of the cell phone and plastic bag laws, the manufacturers or producers are not required to  participate, and in the case of the bottle bill, collection and recycling is incentivized through deposits  on beverage containers with no formal obligation for the manufacturer to manage the empties or  opportunity to internalize end‐of‐life costs. (A recent amendment provides for the collection of  unclaimed deposits by the state, though the recycling will still be done through local planning units.)    
         

54   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

THE NEW YORK PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL 
Recognizing the potential of product stewardship to bring necessary change to the way  materials are managed in New York State, in 2009, the NYSASWM created the New York  Product Stewardship Council (www.nypsc.org).  The council’s mission is to promote  product stewardship as the priority policy for solid waste management, thereby shifting  our waste management system from one focused on government funded and ratepayer  financed waste diversion to one that relies on product stewardship  to reduce public costs  and drive improvements in product and packaging design that promote environmental  sustainability.  The New York Product Stewardship Council works to implement the principles of product  stewardship in New York State and the nation by:  •

Developing and recommending workable product stewardship policies and  providing educational tools to individuals, organizations, institutions, local  governments, the State Legislature and elected officials.   Providing effective leadership and guidance on product stewardship initiatives.   Coordinating and participating in product stewardship initiatives locally, regionally  and nationally.   Working with manufacturers and their trade associations to develop and  implement workable product stewardship initiatives.   Educating manufacturers, the public, elected officials and other decision‐makers  on the benefits of product stewardship.   Providing a forum for the exchange of information regarding existing and  proposed product stewardship programs.   Evaluating and, where necessary, recommending improvements to product  stewardship programs once they are instituted.  

• • • • • •

 

     

55   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP AT WORK 
The implementation of Germany’s stewardship program (the Duales System  Deutschland, or Green Dot) resulted in a decrease in packaging of 14 percent between  1991 and 1995; during that same period, US packaging increased 13 percent.  (Source: 
Summary of Germany’s Packaging Take‐Back Law; Clean Production Action, September  2003;  http://www.cleanproduction.org/library/EPR_dvd/DualesSystemDeutsch_REVISEDoverview.pdf) 

  In Belgium and other European countries, amounts of packaging have remained fairly  constant despite a substantial increase in the gross domestic product; thus, stewardship  has helped to “decouple” economic growth from packaging growth. (Source: Implementation of 
the European Packaging Directive in Different European Member States, Joachim      Quoden, Packaging Recovery  Organization Europe; Presentation at the Fourth National Product Stewardship Forum, June 4, 2008.)   

 

 

 

 

Electronics product stewardship programs in Europe and Asia have included directives to  phaseout many hazardous constituents in those products.        The product stewardship approach that is core to Xerox’s business model—leasing  copiers—resulted in the company implementing significant design changes to enable  easy disassembly and the reuse and refurbishing of component parts; in 2004, 90 percent  of Xerox‐designed product models introduced were designed for reuse  .(Source: DEC 
Environmental Excellence award information; http://www.dec.ny.gov/public/36178.html)           

 

Automobile product stewardship programs in Europe and Asia have led to the  standardization of materials, allowing for greater levels of recovery and much less auto      shredder residue requiring disposal. (Source: web report)    In 2009, the State of Washington’s electronics product stewardship program will save  Snohomish County $368,000 in annual electronic waste (e‐waste) program operating  costs and generate $180,000 in revenue per year for providing some of the e‐waste  collection infrastructure/services for manufacturers, for a net gain of $548,000 per year  for that county. (Source: Proceedings from the Product Stewardship Policy Summit, November 20, 2008; New York  State Association for Solid Waste Management and NYSDEC.) 

 

                                                                                                                                              
56    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

5.1  ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE CONTEXT OF PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP 
 

5.1.1   

 The Private Sector’s Role 

In product stewardship programs, the primary responsibility for managing products or packaging at  the end of their useful life is placed on the entity with the most control over the item’s design—the  manufacturer, producer or brand owner. This means that the manufacturer must provide or arrange  for collection, reuse, recycling and/or disposal of the product or packaging targeted. Product  stewardship programs allow for flexibility so that manufacturers can, for example, design the  collection system that works best within their business model or work collaboratively with other  manufacturers, distributors or retailers.    While collection and recycling of the products targeted are the key elements of product  stewardship, public education, reporting, consumer convenience, and standards for performance  are also critical elements of these programs.   Public education is needed to garner participation in  any recycling or end‐of‐life management program. Manufacturer reporting requirements on key  program elements ensure transparency in the product stewardship program and provide measures  for success and accountability.  Convenience standards (e.g., requiring that collection options are  available in each county of the state) ensure that any consumer  who wants to participate has a  reasonable opportunity to do so.  Performance standards (e.g., requiring manufacturers to collect a  certain amount of the targeted product) create an incentive for manufacturers to develop effective  programs and promote them widely to encourage participation.  Retailers also often play an important role in product stewardship programs.   Because they  communicate directly with the consumer at the point of sale, engaging retailers is critical to  promoting product stewardship programs and ensuring that citizens are aware of their recycling  options.  In some product stewardship programs, retailers also provide collection services, either on  behalf of a manufacturer or as the result of statutory requirements to do so.   
 

5.1.2   

 The Local Government Role 

Many product stewardship programs allow for local government participation; however, local  government collections are generally not required.  Communities that have or seek to establish  collection infrastructure for a targeted product can usually participate as a partner in a  manufacturer sponsored program.  For example, in Washington State’s E‐Cycle electronic waste  product stewardship program, manufacturers have entered into contracts with local government  collection centers to meet their stewardship obligations.  In the few stewardship programs that  require local government collections, the costs of those collections are paid by manufacturers and  consumers, not taxpayers. 
        57    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

5.1.3   

The State Government Role 

The state’s primary role in product stewardship programs is to enact product stewardship legislation  and then, through an appropriate state agency, promote participation in programs, provide  oversight and ensure accountability.  In most cases, manufacturers are required to register with the  state and regularly report on their programs.  The state must compile and analyze the information  provided by manufacturers and enforce compliance with key program requirements, including  registration, reporting and compliance with convenience and/or performance standards.  Often, the  state must also enforce other elements of product stewardship programs, including, for example,  disposal bans for targeted products and operating standards for collection, handling and recycling  facilities. In many product stewardship programs, the state is required to produce periodic reports  on program implementation, thereby helping to keep the public informed and the participants  accountable. 
 

 5.1.4   

The Role of New York State’s Citizens 

No product recycling or end‐of‐life management program can succeed without the participation of  the consumer.  Just as most New Yorkers have become familiar with recycling programs and  understand the wisdom of recycling, once they are introduced to the concept and logic of product  stewardship, it should not be difficult to persuade them to participate.   
 

5.2   PRODUCTS TARGETED FOR STEWARDSHIP 
DEC will pursue product stewardship for several individual product categories.  The initial high‐ priority targets are described in more detail in this section.  The list of potential products targeted  for stewardship was developed through internal research and feedback from stakeholders  throughout the development of this Plan.    5.2.1  Electronics 

When DEC prepared the 1987 Plan, it did not anticipate the onslaught of electronic devices that  would,  during the next two decades, take the world into the digital age.  The sale of electronics in  the US (including televisions, cell phones, computers, printers and peripherals) has increased from  61 million units in 1987 to more than 426 million units in 2007.  This growth in sales, coupled with  rapid technology development that leads to more immediate obsolescence and technological  incompatibility, has facilitated the dramatic growth of the electronics waste stream.    USEPA estimates that the amount of electronic waste entering the waste stream almost doubled  between 1999 and 2007, from 7.7 to 14.9 pounds per person per year. 31  While the amount of  electronics collected for recycling has increased somewhat in the last few years, the diversion rate 

                                                                  31  Electronic Waste Management in the Unites States, Approach 1; EPA 530‐R‐08‐009; USEPA, July 2008    58    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

has remained small.  USEPA estimates that 10 percent of electronics generated were ultimately  recycled in 2000 as compared to 13.6 percent in 2007. 32    The proliferation of electronic waste or “e‐waste” has created a new challenge for waste managers.   The presence of certain hazardous constituents in electronics makes their proper management  essential to protecting the environment. For example, televisions and computer monitors with glass  screens (CRTs) contain four to eight pounds of lead, while those with flat panel screens often  contain mercury.  Electronic components can contain a variety of hazardous chemicals and  compounds, including brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and toxic metals.  In New York State, used electronic equipment such as monitors, televisions, computers, printers,  keyboards, etc., may be collected and managed via two different regulatory approaches described  below.  The goal of both approaches is to promote the collection and recycling of used electronic  equipment.  Like other wastes with hazardous constituents, electronic waste generated by households is exempt  from regulation as hazardous waste and can be handled, at this time, in the MSW stream.  Many  communities in New York State and across the nation have included electronic waste in their  household hazardous waste (HHW) collection programs.  In 2008, 38 communities in the state  received state financial assistance to collect nearly 3.5 million pounds of electronic waste or .18  pounds per capita representing a fraction of a percent of estimated generation.  In the communities  that held collections, rates varied from a low of less than one‐tenth of a pound to a high of 3.8  pounds per capita.  While collection of used electronic equipment for recycling has increased significantly during the last  decade, communities in New York State are capturing only a small fraction of the used electronic  equipment available for collection.  Like other HHW campaigns described below, collection events  tend to be infrequent, in some cases inconvenient, and some areas of the state are not served at all.    In recent years, several manufacturers and retailers have begun to voluntarily take back used  electronic equipment.  In 2009, large retailers like Best Buy offered electronics recycling to their  customers, as did major manufacturers, including Dell, Apple and Hewlett Packard.  Voluntary  programs operated by manufacturers and retailers have not been well promoted or consistently  offered.  In some cases, companies only take back their brand or equipment that’s being replaced  through a purchase.  In other cases, there is a charge for collection.    Used electronic equipment that is generated by businesses and institutions and, therefore, does not  enjoy the household exemption, may be considered hazardous waste because it contains lead,  mercury, and cadmium, which can be toxic if released into the environment when disposed.  Under  current regulation, if the metals in used electronic equipment are ultimately reclaimed, used  electronics can be considered “scrap metal” for the purposes of the regulation and can be exempted  from management as a hazardous waste.  To qualify for the exemption,  non‐household generators 
                                                                  32  Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2007 Facts and Figures; EPA 530‐R‐08‐010; USEPA, November  2008.    59    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

and handlers of used electronic equipment must notify DEC prior to  sending it for dismantling or  recycling.    The potentially significant environmental impacts of improper disposal, coupled with the difficulty in  developing effective collection for recycling, have put electronics at the top of the list for product  stewardship.  Many European and Asian countries, several Canadian provinces, 19 US states and the  City of New York have already enacted legislation to create electronics product stewardship  programs.  E‐waste is the vanguard product for product stewardship.  Recognizing this, Governor  Paterson introduced the Electronic Waste Reuse and Recycling Act in 2008.  The legislation would  ensure that all New Yorkers have access to free and convenient recycling for a broad range of  electronics.  (For more information, see http://www.nypsc.org/content/epr‐legislation.)  The presence of recyclable and reusable materials in waste electronics, such as ferrous and non‐ ferrous metals, precious metals, plastics, and even glass, makes their recycling an important and  appropriate management option.  Electronics recycling is a growing industry segment, with  approximately 45 dismantlers/recyclers operating in New York State in 2008.33   To ensure that this  industry grows in a manner that is consistent with the state’s goals for protection of environmental  and public health, DEC is currently developing regulations to set operating standards and  requirements for these facilities.    
  

5.2.2 

Pharmaceuticals  

Recent scientific studies have revealed that  numerous pharmaceuticals are present in rivers and  streams as well as in the drinking supplies of a number of American cities.  This condition has likely  existed for some time, but only recently have testing methodologies been developed to detect  pharmaceuticals in water bodies.  While the concentrations of pharmaceuticals found in water are  far below typical medical doses, studies have found problematic impacts on wildlife.  The EPA has  acknowledged the ecological impacts and the potential for human health concerns and confirmed  that pharmaceutical discharges to waterways are a serious concern.     A 2009 study identified several pharmaceutical substances in the tissue of fish caught near  wastewater treatment plants in five US cities, and a nationwide study conducted in 1999 and 2000  by the United States Geological Survey found low levels of drugs such as antibiotics, hormones,  contraceptives and steroids in 80 percent of the rivers and streams tested throughout the US.   Documented impacts include the feminization of male fish (producing eggs) when exposed to  hormones and reduced fertility or irregular spawning in certain aquatic organisms exposed to other  drugs such as anti‐depressants and beta‐blockers. Scientists also believe that long‐term exposure to  low levels of antibiotics might result in the evolution of, or selection for, drug‐resistant microbes and  bacteria.    One source of  pharmaceuticals in the state’s waterways is e wastewater discharge from hospitals,  institutions and individuals that for years have been instructed to dispose of their unwanted  pharmaceuticals by flushing or pouring them down the drain.  Proper disposal of unused and  unwanted pharmaceuticals is a critical strategy for avoiding unnecessary discharges of 
                                                                  33  Recycling Economic Information Study, NERC, February 2009.  60    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

pharmaceuticals into wastewater treatment systems and ultimately into waterways.  Other sources  include direct discharges from manufacturing facilities and excretion of unmetabolized medications  through the human body. DEC is currently addressing these other sources through its inter‐divisional  pharmaceutical work group.   Several communities and pharmacies in New York State have voluntarily established take‐back  programs for unused and unwanted pharmaceuticals.  Some communities have included  pharmaceuticals in their HHW collection events, while pharmacies and certain other communities  have established stand‐alone pharmaceutical take‐back events.  While these events have been very  successful and popular with New Yorkers, they are limited in their reach because they are available  only to a small number of communities, and they are infrequent.  DEC expects the public demand for collection events to grow, but there are significant and costly  regulatory hurdles that make it unlikely that a broad‐scale, effective program will be developed  without legislation.  Pharmaceutical collection events must follow specific protocols to ensure  that pharmaceuticals collected, particularly controlled substances, are not misused or misdirected.   Depending on the actual structure of the event, requirements can include the presence of a  pharmacist and law enforcement personnel.    Other states have demonstrated the viability of several collection methods, including dropoffs in  clinics and pharmacies (Washington), mail‐back programs (Maine, Wisconsin), and dropoff at police  stations (Kentucky).  However, sustainable funding for these programs remains a challenge.  In  Washington and Maine, legislation was introduced in 2009 to formalize and expand their pilot  collection programs through product stewardship, requiring pharmaceutical manufacturers to  absorb the cost of collection and safe handling.  Product stewardship programs exist in some  European countries and Canadian provinces.  In British Columbia, for example, more than 90  percent of pharmacies collect unwanted pharmaceuticals from consumers.  The safe management  and destruction of those pharmaceuticals is financed by pharmaceutical producers.  DEC has developed a webpage—www.dontflushyourdrugs.net—and other educational materials  about proper management of pharmaceuticals.  DEC currently recommends that consumers place  unused, unwanted or expired drugs in the trash, taking care to destroy or disguise them to avoid  misuse or misdirection (for full instructions, see the webpage).  Pursuant to the Drug Management  and Disposal Act passed in New York State in 2008, the educational materials developed include a  notice that must be displayed in all pharmacies and retail stores that sell medications, including  over‐the‐counter drugs, vitamins, and supplements.  This information is intended to provide New  Yorkers with an interim strategy to more appropriately manage their unused and unwanted  pharmaceuticals while a more comprehensive and environmentally protective pharmaceuticals  collection program is developed.     
        61    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

5.2.3 

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) 

Most residents of New York State generate waste in their homes which contains some of the same  chemical components as the hazardous waste generated by industry.  Termed household hazardous  waste (HHW), this material includes:  • • • • • • • • Old “legacy” products that are no longer produced because of the hazards they pose, such  as leaded paint, banned pesticides, and PCB ballasts  Household pesticides  Oil‐based paints, varnishes and stains  Organic‐based solvents and cleaners  Harsh cleaners, including masonry washes and toilet cleaners  Pool chemicals   Reactive chemicals, such as bleach, ammonia and peroxides  Mercury‐containing products, such as fluorescent light bulbs and electronic waste 

Often, HHW is stored within the household for extended periods or is mixed with other solid waste  intended for disposal.  DEC estimates that, of the approximately 14.6 million tons of MSW disposed  of annually in New York State, less than half of one percent, or approximately 58,000 tons, is HHW.    Commercially and industrially generated hazardous wastes are subject to stringent management  and disposal standards that are designed to be protective of human health and the environment.   However, all household waste, regardless of its hazardous characteristics, is excluded from the  regulatory definition of hazardous waste and is currently exempt from state and federal hazardous  waste regulations, though some of these wastes are banned from disposal under state law and Part  360 regulations.   The effects of improperly discarded HHW on the environment and human health are hard to  quantify but could be significant.  Sanitation workers can be injured if a discarded chemical  container opens suddenly during collection.  If incompatible HHWs are released in a waste collection  truck during compaction, the resulting reaction can cause an explosion, fire or release of toxic  vapors.  When HHW is deposited in a landfill, liquids can seep down through the layers of waste and  become leachate, which must be collected and treated so that it does not contaminate  groundwater, soil, or surface water.  Wastewater treatment plants that accept leachate are not  designed to treat many of these hazardous constituents. Many hazardous products easily evaporate  and contribute to air pollution or, if poured onto the ground or into a storm sewer, can contaminate  groundwater or a nearby stream, river or lake.    To address the potential hazards posed by HHW, communities around the state and the country  have organized programs to collect, package and transport HHW to hazardous waste treatment,  storage, recycling or disposal facilities.  HHW programs reduce environmental threats by providing a  collection and management system, informing residents about how to properly manage HHW and,  most important, how to avoid using hazardous products at home.   
62    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Collection of HHW is not mandatory in New York State and, consequently, is not available universally  across the state.   To encourage these programs, DEC provides reimbursement for 50 percent of the  costs for eligible expenses for community HHW collections through the Household Hazardous Waste  State Assistance Grant Program.  (For details, see Section 6.)  In 2008, approximately 1.5 percent of  the state’s population participated in a HHW collection event or program.  The participation rate in  those municipalities where collection programs were available was approximately three percent of  the local population.  This is consistent with national data that indicate that the most active  programs serve no more than five percent or at the very most ten percent of the service‐area  population annually. 34   However, it is important to note that most people do not generate HHW on  a regular basis and, therefore, do not need to participate every year.  The popularity of these  programs indicates a higher level of engagement than the numbers suggest.    Furthermore, teaching residents how to reduce or avoid generating HHW is an integral component  of all HHW collection programs in New York State.  HHW prevention techniques include: the  substitution of less toxic products; purchasing only the amount of a product that is needed, and  using all of the product for its intended purpose.  Although education is an integral component of all  collection programs, its benefits are difficult to calculate and often overlooked when assessing the  value of HHW programs.  Data for 2008 indicate that during that year, approximately 13.7 percent of the HHW generated, or  approximately 0.08 percent of the residential waste stream, was collected through HHW programs.   From 2000‐2008, HHW collection programs in New York State collected and properly managed a  total of approximately 58,000 tons of HHW.  It is important to note that these figures include  materials that have been traditionally collected in HHW programs but may  no longer be considered  hazardous, such as latex paint.    In New York State, HHW programs either involve scheduled collection days or established collection  and storage facilities.  • Collection Days: Many communities collect HHW through a collection day or a series of  collection days, when residents are encouraged to bring materials to a central location for  proper management.  Broome County was among the first communities in the country to  organize HHW collection days in 1982.  Since then, the number of HHW collection days  conducted in New York State has grown substantially.  In 2008, there were 146 collection  days sponsored by 55 municipalities.   

Collection and Storage Facilities: An HHW collection and storage facility occupies a fixed site and is  traditionally open on a regular schedule. 35  The first HHW facility in New York State began operating  in 1988 in the Town of Southold.  There are currently 12 HHW facilities in the state, one of which is  privately owned.  While several of these facilities only serve as storage and aggregation points for  materials collected  on collection days, the majority are open for routine collection of HHW.  They  operate, on average, in excess of 30 days per year, with half open more than 100 days per year.  
                                                                  34  Handbook on Household Hazardous Waste; What is Household Hazardous Waste?; Dave Galfin and Phillip  Dicker, 2008; page 25. 
35

 HHW collection and storage facilities are regulated under 6 NYCRR, Subparts 360 and 373‐4.  63  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

Generally, these facilities achieve greater participation at a lower per‐ton cost than individual  collection days.  (See Table 5.1.)    TABLE 5.1: COST AND PERFORMANCE OF HHW COLLECTIONS IN NEW YORK STATE 
HHW Collection Days  HHW Collection & Storage Facilities  2008  $500  $1,140  $200  4.8%  33.1%  1.3%  2000‐2008 (avg)  $533  $2,438  $133  5.3%  26.2%  0.9% 

 
Average Cost/Ton  High Cost/Ton  Low Cost/Ton  Average Participation  High Participation  Low Participation 

2008  $760  $2,740  $220  2.3%  25.9%  0.2% 

2000‐2008 (avg.)  $593  $3,638  $184  1.9%  16%  0.3% 

Source:  Based on reports provided to DEC by municipalities. Average participation represents the percentage of the  population in the area served that participated in the HHW program   

The low participation rates reported in Table 1 are generally attributed to the limited availability of  collection events or locations.  As Table 5.1 demonstrates, however, participation at permanent  collection facilities is greater than at collection day events.  This increase can be attributed to  permanent HHW collection facilities hosting multiple collection days year‐round while HHW  collection events are usually offered one or two days per year.  These events are generally hosted in  a central location in the municipality sponsoring the collection event.  If a resident misses an event,  the waste must be properly stored for up to  six months or a year until the next event is offered.   However, this is problematic for people who must dispose of items right away because of personal  circumstances, such as moving. While not an ideal solution, the HHW collection programs offered  throughout the state provide a necessary service to residents and opportunities for outreach, and  help protect the environment of New York State.      The cost per ton for management and disposal of HHW through community programs has dropped  significantly as the experience and the number of programs has grown.  Nonetheless, in 2008, the  average cost for HHW programs (reflecting both events and facilities), including disposal, education  and outreach, was still $640 per ton.  The cost for disposal of hazardous waste has always been  considerably higher than the cost for disposing of MSW, and these costs reflect that fact.  At this  cost, if all HHW generated annually in New York State was collected through current collection  programs, the total costs would be $37.1 million annually or $1.90 per person per year in New York  State. 
64    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Several Canadian provinces, including British Columbia and Ontario, have implemented product  stewardship programs to finance effective collection networks for some or all of the materials that  make up the HHW stream.   While HHW programs are extremely popular and have long been seen as a cornerstone of an  integrated materials management program, they are also expensive.   The Beyond Waste Plan seeks  to more efficiently and cost‐effectively capture a greater portion of the HHW stream.  For these  reasons, the products that become HHW are key targets for product stewardship.  The existing  program structure and state financial assistance represent an interim strategy to address this  important stream until a stewardship program is established.   
 

5.2.4 

Packaging and Printed Products 

Packaging continues to constitute a significant portion of the overall MSW stream—more than 30  percent of waste generated nationwide.  Printed products, such as books, magazines, phone books,  newspapers and advertising circulars represent another 10 percent of the MSW stream.  Some of  these products are unnecessary and unwanted.  For example, phone books are often delivered to  users, sometimes multiple copies, without the user having requested them or given the opportunity  to refuse delivery.  While changes such as lightweight packaging and downsizing newspapers have  taken hold in recent years, overall the changes have not yielded a reduction in the amount of  packaging and printed materials generated.  In fact, the amount of packaging generated in the US  annually has actually increased by 15 million tons since 1990. 36    While much packaging and printed material is readily recyclable, each year new materials and  packages enter the marketplace with little or no regard to their compatibility with community  recycling programs.  As a result, even with effective recycling programs in place in the last 20 years  for many packaging materials and a national recycling rate of  more than 30 percent, EPA estimates  that the amount of packaging going to disposal was the same in 2006 as in 1990—47 million tons.   Clearly, conventional approaches to recycling are not reducing the amount of packaging heading to  disposal facilities in the state.  As the primary parties responsible for providing recycling programs, New York State’s municipalities  spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year to educate their residents and to collect and process  recyclable materials.  Even more local tax and rate‐payer resources are spent to dispose of the non‐ recyclable packages and printed products.    Most communities in New York State offer recycling for basic packaging and printed materials.   Common recyclables include metal and glass containers, plastic bottles (numbers 1 and 2),  corrugated cardboard, newspapers and magazines.  However, on a statewide basis, community  programs typically capture less than 50 percent of the materials targeted, and few programs have  added other packaging materials such as rigid plastic packaging to the core list.    To increase recycling and reduce dependence on disposal, manufacturers must embrace materials’  efficiency and design for recyclability concepts, and recycling programs must capture more of the 
                                                                  36  Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 2006 Facts & Figures; US EPA.  65    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

material targeted and  include additional materials. Packaging stewardship is a tool for achieving  these ends.  First, it provides an incentive for waste prevention.  When manufacturers must pay for  the amount of packaging they use, they have a financial incentive to use less.  Programs with more  substantial fees have experienced greater levels of waste prevention/materials‐use reduction.   Second, it generates much needed revenue for community recycling programs.  Third, it improves  recycling by allocating resources for critical education programs, infrastructure improvements and  market development. In Ontario, Canada, the packaging stewardship program yielded a ten percent  increase in the recycling rate in the first three years.  And fourth, it incorporates the cost of recycling  or disposal into the cost of the product, sending an important signal to the consumer—packages  that are easier to recycle should be less expensive.    To stem the rising tide of packaging and printed material waste and to finance local recycling  programs, the European Union and many Canadian provinces have turned to stewardship programs.   While the programs differ in many ways, most packaging stewardship systems have the following  components:  • Fees: Manufacturers or brand owners pay into a fund based on the amount of packaging  they use or the volume of printed materials they distribute and the cost to recycle those  materials or otherwise manage them at the end of their useful life.    Funding: Most packaging stewardship programs use proceeds to cover the costs of  collection and recycling or disposal of the packages/materials covered.  Many also allocate  funds for market development, infrastructure improvements, education or other methods  to improve materials recovery and efficiency in the system.  Third‐party Organization or Authority: Packaging stewardship programs tend to be run by  independent or quasi‐governmental organizations or authorities that assign fees, collect and  redistribute funds, and identify and fund system improvements and market development  projects.   

 

5.2.5    

   Product Stewardship Framework 

In many Canadian provinces, multiple product stewardship programs are implemented through a  single piece of legislation that establishes the structure of product stewardship in the province and  creates a process and criteria for identifying products for stewardship.  Known as product  stewardship framework, this approach maximizes efficiency by structuring stewardship programs in  a consistent manner and avoiding the inevitable, lengthy process and debate that would accompany  the creation of a brand new program for another product.    Given the many years it often takes to build momentum to pass a law, it makes better sense to  adopt a thoughtfully crafted and fully vetted framework for stewardship rather than pursue  stewardship programs for individual products in a series of legislative efforts  during the course of  what would likely take decades.    For these reasons, California, Washington, Oregon and Minnesota all introduced product  stewardship framework legislation in 2009.  Framework legislation sets criteria for identifying  products to target for stewardship, defines a legislative or regulatory process for adding products 
66    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

that meet the criteria, and defines the structure of stewardship programs in the state. The  legislation is based on the Principles of Product Stewardship, which have been endorsed by product  stewardship councils in New York State, California, the Pacific Northwest, the Midwest, Texas and  Vermont (See Appendix 5.1).  In support of this approach, the Association for State and Territorial  Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) issued a product stewardship framework policy  document that provides greater detail on the various options in pursuing a framework approach  (See Appendix 5.2). Several communities in New York have endorsed the product stewardship  framework by passing local resolutions.   
 

5.2.6      

Other Targeted Products 

In addition to the products and categories outlined above, DEC has identified the following potential  products for stewardship programs:  • Mercury Containing Thermostats: Thermostats represent a small waste stream that contains a  significant amount of mercury, a powerful neurotoxin.  Each thermostat contains an average of  4 grams of mercury, equaling the total amount of mercury in nearly 800 compact fluorescent  light bulbs.  Despite their significant potential for environmental harm and the existence of a  voluntary program organized by the Thermostat Recycling Corporation, the recycling rate for  mercury‐containing thermostats is very low. The Product Stewardship Institute organized a  stakeholder dialogue in 2004 to address this critical stream.   Subsequently, California, Montana,  Iowa, Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Vermont passed legislation creating mandatory  product stewardship programs.    Paint: Paint is a large component of the materials captured at most HHW collection events and  facilities, but most paint used today is latex, which is not, in fact, hazardous.  Managing paint  through the HHW stream is expensive and not effective in capturing substantial volumes for  recycling.  The Product Stewardship Institute has developed an agreement among many  stakeholders to create an industry‐funded paint stewardship organization.  In 2008, the  organization launched a pilot project in Minnesota in preparation for a larger‐scale program.  In  addition, in 2009, Oregon passed legislation to establish the first statewide paint product  stewardship program.   Automobiles: Many countries in Europe and Asia have implemented stewardship programs for  automobiles to achieve several aims: increase recycling rates; eliminate the use of certain  chemicals and materials, and create incentives to design for disassembly, reuse and recycling.   Industry sources report that these programs have led to the development of automobiles that  are more easily recycled and less toxic and have yielded higher recovery rates and less  automobile shredder residue. Because of the clear waste management benefits, stakeholders in  the development of this Plan have recommended that New York State target automobiles for a  stewardship approach.   Carpets: Carpets were an early target for government stewardship programs for two reasons.   First, they are bulky and expensive to dispose.  Second, some carpet manufacturers had already  launched voluntary stewardship and take‐back programs.  In 2002, state and federal  governments joined with industry to develop a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for 
67    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Carpet Stewardship.  The MOU established goals for reduction, reuse and recycling carpets for  the ten‐year period from 2002‐2012.  To date, 12 states, NERC, and USEPA have signed the  agreement, as have the major carpet and rug manufacturers and their trade association.  • Office Furniture: Office furniture has a high reuse potential if designed properly but is bulky and,  therefore, costly and difficult to manage through traditional waste management systems.  Office  furniture reuse and refurbishing operations exist in New York State on a limited scale.   Stewardship could foster more of this valuable activity.  Roofing Shingles: Asphalt roofing shingles are a valuable recyclable material, though New York  State lacks a recovery infrastructure and market for recycled shingles.  A stewardship approach  could provide financing for the infrastructure needed to reclaim these materials.  Batteries: Most rechargeable and button batteries contain hazardous components.  Alkaline  batteries, on the other hand, do not contain hazardous components but consist of valuable  materials that can be recycled.  Rechargeable and button batteries can be included in HHW  collections but these programs are expensive for municipalities and taxpayers.  There is a  national voluntary manufacturer's collection program available for rechargeable batteries, but  there is limited participation.  Alkaline batteries can also be collected by municipalities, but  there are few markets  or collection programs.   

 

5.3    FINDINGS 
Product stewardship creates an opportunity to fundamentally change how materials are managed in  New York State by more equitably sharing costs and responsibilities among manufacturers,  governments and consumers.  As such, it is a priority for the state and a cornerstone of the Plan to  move Beyond Waste.                           
68    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

5.4  RECOMMENDATIONS 
The state will pursue product stewardship by:  • • • Establishing product and packaging stewardship as a preferred approach to implement the  solid waste management hierarchy  Seeking legislative authority to implement stewardship programs and build toward a state‐ wide framework legislation  Exploring regional or national approaches to product stewardship through the NEWMOA,  the Association of Territorial and State Solid Waste Management Officials (ATSWMO), the  national Product Stewardship Institute and other multi‐state organizations  Working with the New York Product Stewardship Council, NYSASWM, and other  stakeholders in the state to develop consensus and support to move a product stewardship  agenda and with the New York State Pollution Prevention Institute 37  to provide assistance to  manufacturers to design and implement product stewardship programs in accordance with  applicable interstate models or state legislation    

 

                                                                  37  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund.  For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/  69    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.   FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND FUNDING SOURCES 
 

Replacing town dumps with double‐lined landfills and municipal waste combustors (MWCs) and  implementing waste reduction, reuse and recycling programs has come at a substantial cost.  The  gains New York State has made in materials and waste management during the past 20 years have  been fueled by significant investment from all stakeholders, including state and local government, as  well as the private sector.  Achieving the goals of this Plan will require additional investment and  new funding sources.  Such investment will reap significant benefits in terms of environmental  protection, energy conservation, greenhouse gas reduction, job creation and economic opportunity.  This section describes the state’s financial assistance programs that most directly support materials  management programs and summarizes existing and potential funding sources.  State funding  awarded through ESD has been matched or exceeded by private investment, and state funding  awarded through DEC has been matched by municipal investment.   These funds have been  supplemented by programs in other agencies, including EFC and NYSERDA, that have provided  grants for discreet materials and waste management projects.   In addition to the state investments described below, New York State’s local governments have  allocated significant resources to building the current integrated waste management system in New  York State.  A 2009 survey conducted by NYSASWM found that 11 of the state’s planning units (not  including New York City) have made capital investments of more than $526 million in local  infrastructure during the past 20 years. Even with conservative assumptions about investments  made by the other 53 planning units, it is clear that local investment is on a par with, if not greater  than, state investments to date. In addition to capital expenditures, local governments spend  millions every year to maintain and operate these systems.   
 

6.1    DEC FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS  
Since 1987, DEC’s financial assistance to municipalities for solid waste related projects has totaled  nearly $700 million.  All of this has been through reimbursement grants for eligible expenses and  require a match of local funding, in most cases 50 percent of the project cost up to a maximum  allowable amount.   The landfill closure and landfill gas programs combined have provided the greatest financial  assistance to municipalities ($319.8 million), followed by the aggregated waste reduction and  recycling programs ($208.7 million).  Table 1 provides a breakdown of DEC’s financial assistance for  solid waste‐related projects since 1987 by general program area.    While each program was individually established to address a specific area of concern, collectively,  they have addressed the major solid waste management strategies.  Each funding area and grant  program summarized below is described in detail in Appendix 6.1.     
70    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 6.1
Project Type  #  Amount (millions) Waste Reduction & Recycling          Recycling Equipment          Organics Recycling          Education          Reduction  Solid Waste Management Planning Household Hazardous Waste  Municipal Waste Combustors  Other Solid Waste Disposal  Landfill Programs          Landfill Closure          Landfill Gas   Total 
 

Source* 

769  381  191  160  37  36  461  19  3  266  254  12  1554 

$208.7  $138.0  $31.5  $30.8  $8.4  $7.5  $30.2  $122.3  $11.0  $319.8  $307.5  $12.3M $699.5 

  EQBA; SWMA; CW/CA; EPF  EQBA; SWMA; CW/CA; EPF  SWMA; KSWS; EPF  SWMA; PORA; EPF  SWMA  EPF  EQBA  EQBA    EQBA; CW/CA; EPF  EQBA; CW/CA;   

Source: *Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA); Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA);  Kansas Stripper Well Settlement (KSWS); Petroleum Overcharge Restitution Act (PORA); Clean Water Clean Air  Bond Act (CW/CA); Environmental Protection Fund (EPF).                      71    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.1.1 

Waste Reduction and Recycling 

Since 1987,  DEC’s $209 million in funding for waste reduction and recycling programs has supported  769 projects.  While this may sound like a substantial amount, given the overall cost of waste  management, these grants do not begin to meet local pleas for assistance. The average annual  appropriation to EPF recycling programs during the last three years has been $10.16 million or $0.53  per capita.  By contrast, California allocates more than $36 million annually to recycling and related  activities or $2.42 per capita, and Minnesota allocates more than $5 million or $2.78 per capita.      6.1.2  Solid Waste Management Planning 

Recognizing the need for local planning to integrate waste reduction, reuse and recycling with waste  disposal, the 1988 Solid Waste Management Act authorized DEC to administer a $7.5 million  planning grant program.  The grants were intended to foster and facilitate local planning for  integrated solid waste management systems to implement the state’s solid waste management  hierarchy.  (For more on planning, see section 3.)  This $7.5 million represents only 1 percent of DEC  funding to municipalities for solid waste management projects and activities since 1987, as  summarized in Table 6.1.    6.1.3       Household Hazardous Waste  The 1987 Plan identified the need for and the benefits of separate collection and handling of HHW  and recommended actions to help foster development of these programs.  In 1982, Broome County  sponsored the first HHW collection event in the state, and by 1988, there were 31 collection events  sponsored by 13 municipalities.  While HHW programs continued to grow in popularity, it became  apparent that the major impediment to widespread HHW collection was the high cost of individual  events or permanent collection facilities.  To address this need, in 1993, the Environmental  Protection Act authorized and began funding an HHW State Assistance Program, and, since then, the  state’s commitment to local HHW collection efforts has been consistently strong, providing $30.2  million in reimbursement to municipalities during the program’s 15‐year history.  (For more  information on HHW, see Section 5.)    6.1.4  Solid Waste Disposal   

DEC’s funding for new solid waste disposal capacity has been limited to the High Technology  Resource Recovery Program (HTRRP), which was created in 1972 to assist local governments in the  planning, design and construction of MWC projects.  This funding was consistent with the 1987 Plan,  in which MWC was envisioned as a significant part of the long‐term strategy to address what was  viewed as a looming disposal capacity crisis and to move the state toward self‐sufficiency with  respect to solid waste management. Although a statewide network of MWCs was not completely  realized, the state provided more than $122 million toward the establishment of MWCs. (For more  information on MWC, see Section 9.3.) 
  72    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.1.5 

Municipal Landfill Closure  

The 1987 Plan articulated a strong concern about groundwater contamination and operational  deficiencies related to older, unlined landfills.  In June 1986, there were 358 active landfills in New  York State, only 47 of which had valid permits while the rest required upgrading or closure.  Ninety‐ four of the non‐permitted landfills were under consent orders resulting from enforcement action, 80  of which were required to close by a specific date.  The Plan set a goal of upgrading or closing  unpermitted facilities or those not meeting modern landfill requirements.  Recognizing the  significant cost this would impose on municipalities across the state, the legislature authorized DEC’s  Municipal Landfill Closure Program which, since its inception, has awarded a total of $307.5 million  to 254 projects, including $75 million specifically allocated for the closure of the Fresh Kills Landfill in  New York City.  Thanks to the state’s efforts, the 1987 Plan goal of upgrading or closing substandard  landfills was substantially met.    6.1.6  Landfill Gas Management 

The Municipal Landfill Gas Management State Assistance Program was established to improve air  quality and reduce odors at solid waste landfills and to encourage energy recovery from landfill gas.   Municipal owners or operators of non‐hazardous‐waste landfills who have incurred costs associated  with the design and construction of an active landfill gas collection and treatment system are able to  receive reimbursement of up to 50 percent of eligible costs, up to a maximum of $2 million dollars.   Since the program was launched in 1996, $12.3 million in funding has been provided for 12 projects.   As of early 2009, four applications for a total of $8 million remained on the waiting list with limited  funding allocated in the past few fiscal years.      6.1.7  Limited Funding 

The funding needs for waste reduction, recycling, HHW, landfill closure and landfill gas programs  have consistently outpaced the appropriations available.  Funding has not been sufficient to keep  pace with annual need, creating an ever‐growing backlog of projects on the waiting list.  Additional  funding is necessary to address both projects on the existing waiting lists and new project  applications received on an annual basis.    6.1.8  Lack of Flexibility 

While each of DEC’s financial assistance programs has helped address an important and clearly  identified need, the lack of flexibility in the programs’ enabling legislation and their implementing  regulations, particularly the first‐in, first‐out provisions, has resulted in an inability to target the  state’s resources to address new priorities or emerging issues.  Because funding has been limited to  only certain types of projects and equipment, DEC has not been able to provide more holistic  support to help underwrite integrated programs.     

73   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Greater flexibility in funding sources and regulatory and legislative authorization would accomplish  two critical aims:  • Addressing immediate priorities: With greater flexibility in distributing funds obligated to  infrastructure and education (e.g., the EPF), DEC could more effectively advance  critical  priorities and achieve more targeted goals. DEC should have the ability to apply the  principles used in grant programs of other agencies, such as NYSERDA, whose programs  identify priorities, issue program opportunity notices, and evaluate responses based on the  greatest likelihood of effectively addressing that priority.  For example, potential priority  areas for a DEC program could include commercial recycling improvement, food scrap  recycling infrastructure, or waste prevention education, and awards would be granted for  the most promising and well‐grounded proposals.  Providing holistic support: A DEC fund to provide core support for planning units to  implement their LSWMPs would provide an incentive for planning units to engage in  substantive planning and would allow DEC to provide comprehensive support for a plan that  implements the solid waste management hierarchy and moves the planning unit toward the  state’s policy goals.    

 

6.2      ESD FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS 
More than 20 years ago, the New York State Legislature recognized that the state could not achieve  its solid waste management goals without the support of a vibrant recycling industry and the  conversion of its manufacturing base to the use of recycled feedstock and environmentally  sustainable practices.  The legislature directed ESD to create a comprehensive program of financial  and technical assistance for business to build a market‐based recycling industry and develop new  technologies to enhance sustainable manufacturing.    ESD assistance to the recycling and manufacturing sectors is a vital component of sustainable  materials management and an essential complement to local and state materials and waste  management strategies.  ESD’s Environmental Services Unit (ESU) fosters market‐driven capacity for  recycling and helps manufacturers achieve enhanced competitiveness through pollution prevention,  recycling and sustainable management.  As markets and technologies evolve, ESD’s ESU continues to  facilitate economic growth through enhanced environmental management.  The current ESU program represents the latest evolution of a 20‐year history in recycling market  investments, summarized in Appendix 6.2.  Despite its broad market development mandate, early  funding was scant.  From 1987 through 1993, ESD implemented two key programs to facilitate  recycling market development:  Feasibility Study grants of up to $100,000 (later raised to $200,000) were offered on a  competitive basis to New York State firms to evaluate recycling technologies, processes,  systems or products manufactured from recycled materials.   

74   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recycling Technology financing (direct loans or interest subsidies) was offered competitively  for the construction of recycling facilities or the acquisition of related machinery and  equipment.  Through 1993, ESU (known at the time as the Office of Recycling Market Development) awarded  nearly $2 million in feasibility study grants, committed $1.4 million in loans and interest subsidies,  and directed an additional $36 million in loans, interest subsidies and loan guarantees from the  Urban Development Corporation and the New York State Job Development Authority for recycling  market development projects.   
 

6.2.1  

   Environmental Investment Program 

Funding to support the ESU mandate improved significantly with the passage of the New York State  Environmental Protection Act in 1993, creating the EPF as a dedicated fund to support recycling and  a broad range of other environmental initiatives. Beginning in 1994, ESD received annual allocations  from the EPF.  With a reliable source of funds to support the legislative mandate, ESD created the  Recycling Investment Program. In 1998, with legislative expansion, the program became the  Environmental Investment Program (EIP).    EIP assists three types of projects:  • Capital projects assist in the acquisition of machinery and equipment and improvements  to building, property, and infrastructure directly associated with the environmental  outcomes achieved by New York State businesses.  Non‐profit organizations or  municipalities apply on behalf of New York State businesses.  Research, development and demonstration projects answer questions between  product/process prototypes and their commercialization or implementation and are  available to New York State businesses or non‐profit organizations.  Technical assistance projects for non‐profit organizations or municipalities help groups  of New York State businesses to achieve measurable recycling, pollution prevention or  sustainability outcomes. 

EIP operates as an outcome‐based funding program, and applications are reviewed competitively for  multiple criteria including: how well they compare to EIP investment benchmarks for recycling,  pollution prevention and sustainability outcomes; associated economic benefits; return on  investment; ability of the applicant to successfully complete the project, and the amount of private  investment leveraged by the EIP award.  Applicants must achieve environmentally significant and  measurable results to receive funds.  EIP establishes investment priorities annually, based on areas of greatest need and inefficiency in  the marketplace and identifies specific strategies within each priority that receive highest  consideration during competitive review.  In state fiscal year 2008/09, EIP investment priorities  included paper, plastic, glass, tires, C&D debris/building materials reuse, food‐processing waste and  industrial pollution prevention.     
75    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Investment strategies for each priority area assess specific needs for enhanced waste diversion,  processing capacity, technology innovation and development of value‐added end‐use markets.  ESD  consults with DEC in the development of investment priorities to advance statewide strategic  objectives for solid waste management.  In FY 2008/09, ESD added a new investment priority for  sustainable product and technology development, recognizing the need and opportunity for New  York State firms to compete in the global market for sustainable products.  The EIP program has demonstrated during two decades that investing in environmentally  sustainable business enterprise generates economic development results, as detailed in Appendix  6.2.1.  On average, EIP capital projects return $6 of economic benefit to the state economy for every  $1 of public funds invested.  As the global conversion to sustainable business practice accelerates,  ESD is positioned to help New York State firms capitalize on this growing market opportunity.     ESD has also learned, through two decades of measuring EIP investment results, what projects are  less likely to succeed.  ESD continues to refine the EIP investment strategy and analysis methodology  to ensure the best possible value for the use of public funds–value that is determined by measurable  improvements to environmental quality and sustainable economic return.    6.2.2      Environmental Investment Program Results 

From 1994 through 2008, EIP committed $59.74 million to 399 projects that leveraged $221.05  million in private sector support.  Appendix 6.2.1 provides aggregated economic and environmental  benefits achieved by all ESD environmental investments from 1987 through 2008, grouped by  investment priority areas.  In total, these projects have:  • • • •
 

Established new capacity to recycle 3.329 million tons/year of secondary materials  Developed the capacity to recycle 421 million gallons/year of water for beneficial uses   Helped to create or retain nearly 4,800 jobs   Created a recurring economic benefit estimated at $279.63 million per year 

6.2.3    

Operating Constraints  

In recent years, ESU’s annual EPF appropriations have increased while staffing levels have dropped  by nearly half.   Most current staff have been with the program since its inception and represent  more than 80 years of combined experience in recycling market development and pollution  prevention.  Their expertise is essential to the development of quality projects that return both  economic and environmental results, as well as to the on‐going facilitation of recycling market  networks in New York State.  ESU has outsourced some project and technology development  through partners like the Regional Technology Development Centers and the New York State  Pollution Prevention Institute. 38   But there is a limit to how much external partnerships can 
                                                                  38  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund.  For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/   76    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

compensate for the reduction in in‐house expertise.   Staffing constraints limit ESU’s capacity to  address the full spectrum of recycling issues and the growing role of sustainable production,  resulting in lost opportunities for economic growth.    The market forces that shape sustainable recycling and manufacturing have evolved since passage  of the ESD‐enabling statute in 1987 and its amendment in 1998.  For example, the cost of energy  and transportation exert greater market pressure now, making some earlier business choices non‐ competitive while supporting new opportunities—transporting heavy waste materials long distances  for recycling becomes less competitive, while the possibility of capturing energy value from them is  increasingly attractive.    The EIP‐enabling statute sought to direct investment to specific policy priorities—waste prevention,  reuse and recycling—and, therefore, precludes investment in projects that don’t fit those criteria,  particularly energy recovery.  This prevents ESD from funding technologies, such as anaerobic  digestion, that provide the dual benefit of capturing energy from bio‐gas and creating a digestate  that can be composted and used as a valuable soil amendment.  In essence, the statutory preclusion  is an impediment to improving food scrap recycling in New York State.   This result of the statutory restriction is anomalous, in that, during the past two decades, ESD has  invested in a broad range of organics recycling projects.  Projects that recover organic materials  from dairy and food processing facilities have been particularly successful when nutrients are  recovered for beneficial uses as nutriceuticals or animal feed.  ESD has also invested in various  projects to build merchant capacity to divert commercially generated food scraps into compost,  including research projects to test technologies and waste‐mix formulations and capital projects to  build collection and recycling capacity.    Because food scraps are wet, heavy and putrecible, they cannot be stored for extended periods of  time, and long‐distance transportation is expensive.  The specialized equipment needed to collect,  transport and compost the material creates a capital burden that may not be recovered from the  value of composted soils and low tip fees required to compete with relatively low landfill fees in  many parts of the state.  Given the benefits of organics recovery as a solid waste management  strategy, including the energy benefits of recovery of  bio‐gas through digestion, state assistance  funding categories must be adjusted to support local investment in food scrap recycling.    
                    77    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.3    FINANCING THE MOVE BEYOND WASTE 
To advance the goals of this Plan, the state and its communities will need resources well beyond  what is currently available.  While New York State can implement certain elements of the Plan  within existing constraints, additional staff and funding at both the state and local level are critical  to increasing reuse and recycling and reducing dependence on disposal.    While the Plan does not dictate the precise methods that communities and planning units in the  state will use to move Beyond Waste, DEC estimates that a significant financial investment will be  necessary to achieve its goals.  These funds would be used to make investments in materials  management program planning and implementation at the local and state level, as well as public  and private sector capital investments to develop the infrastructure necessary to reuse, recycle and  compost more materials in New York State.  Substantial as they may seem, these costs will be more  than offset by the economic and environmental benefits to New York State’s communities and to  the climate.  With municipal governments shouldering much of the burden of solid waste management, meeting  new goals and making maximum use of new options for reducing the amount of waste disposed will  necessitate significant state participation in the form of grants, training, planning assistance, and  demonstration projects. To the extent that funding will flow from the state to individual planning  units, the state will seek greater flexibility in targeting funds to achieve the greatest overall gains for  the reasons noted in section 6.1.8.  The funding sources described below include existing revenue streams used by the state, as well as  potential new sources.  To develop the list of potential sources, DEC evaluated funding mechanisms  used in other states and looked particularly closely at states with strong recycling programs and high  diversion rates, including California, Minnesota, Oregon and Massachusetts.   
 

6.3.1  

Existing and Potential State Funding Sources 

6.3.1 (a) Environmental Protection Fund 

In 1993, New York State inaugurated the EPF to support environmental programs in special need of  regular and sustained funding.  EPF funding is proposed annually by the Governor, and appropriated  by the Legislature as a part of the state budget, using as the primary funding source a dedicated  portion of the proceeds of the Real Estate Transfer Tax.  EPF appropriations have increased from  $31.5 million in 1994/95 to $250 million in 2007/08.    Solid waste programs have been funded by the EPF since its inception.  In the first program year (FY  94/95), solid waste programs were assigned the largest portion of the fund—$13 million or 42  percent of the $31 million total.  However, as the amount of EPF funds grew, the percentage  allocated for solid waste programs got smaller.  For example, when the EPF reached its peak of $250  million in FY 07/08, only $21.5 million or 8.6 percent was allocated to solid waste programs despite  a 63 percent increase to the funds allocated to the EPF.  Solid waste program funding has included three primary line items within the EPF: landfill closure  (including landfill gas management); municipal recycling (including HHW collection), and secondary  materials market development.  Annual allocations for the landfill closure grants have ranged from 
78    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

$0 (FY 02 to 05) to $18 million (FY 96/97).  Municipal recycling appropriations have ranged from $2  million (FY 94/95) to $10.8 million (FY 09/10).  Allocations for the secondary materials markets line,  managed by ESD, have ranged from $2 million (FY 94/95) to $8.75 million (FY 07/08).  EPF grants  generally require a match of 50 percent or more from the grantee—a municipality in the case of a  DEC grant and a private company or not‐for‐profit in the case of an ESD grant.   
   6.3.1 (b) Product and Packaging Stewardship 

Product and packaging stewardship programs require the producers or brand owners of a product  or package to extend their responsibility to the end‐of‐life management of the products or materials  they put into the marketplace.  In these programs, producers take either physical or financial  responsibility for recycling and safe disposition of their products or materials.  As a result, these  programs either relieve a government obligation, generate revenues for state and local  governments or both. (For more information, see Section 5.)  In all cases, stewardship programs reduce the demand for local resources by shifting responsibility  from local governments, taxpayers and ratepayers to producers and consumers.  In addition,  stewardship programs often include a requirement that producers pay annual registration fees to  the state to offset the program management and oversight costs.    In some cases, stewardship programs generate revenue for government entities, particularly those  that provide collection services for producers.  For example, the Washington State E‐Cycles product  stewardship program has yielded new revenue for local governments with e‐waste collection sites.   One county in Washington was able to achieve a net gain of more than $500,000 per year by  avoiding $368,000 in operating costs and generating $180,000 in revenue by providing e‐waste  collection infrastructure.    In Ontario, Canada, the packaging and printed product stewardship program requires brand owners  to pay 50 percent of the costs of residential recycling programs.  Reimbursements to local  municipalities are based on the amount of material recycled and the net cost to manage each  material, as derived from a formula agreed upon by the brand owners and municipalities.  The  program generates approximately $48 million per year for municipal recycling programs, and, during  the past four years, it has generated approximately $60 million in investments in efficiency and  other system improvements.39 
  6.3.1 (c) New York State Bond Act 

One tool for financing large‐scale public investments is bonding.   The authority to issue bonds must  be approved by the State Legislature, then by the public through a general referendum, and then,  once again, by the Legislature.  In New York State, this tool has been used to fund environmental  infrastructure investments three times, with enactment of the 1972 EQBA, the 1986 EQBA, and the 
                                                                  39 Packaging Stewardship in Action; presentation by Gordon Day, Corporations Supporting Recycling;  November 2008.  Additional information available  at www.csr.org, www.stewardshipontario.ca, www.ontarioelectronicstewardship.ca   79    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

1996 CW/CA Bond Act. Each of these included significant allocations for materials and waste  management.    The 1972 EQBA authorized a total of $1.15 billion in environmental spending, including $175 million  for solid waste projects.  The 1986 EQBA provided $1.2 billion for various projects, including $100  million for zero‐interest loans to local governments to properly close municipal landfills.  The 1996  CW/CA Bond Act authorized $1.75 billion in total, including $175 million in the solid waste category.  Some stakeholders have suggested a new bond act that would help to finance the move Beyond  Waste.     
  6.3.1 (d) Solid Waste Disposal Fees 

More than 30 states assess some type of fee or tax on the disposal of solid waste, serving as both a  disincentive to disposal and a source of revenue to meet various funding needs.  Generally, those  fees are either passed on to the consumer or absorbed by the entity charged with paying it.  Fees  vary by state from $.25 per ton, to $8.25 per ton.  With the exception of Massachusetts, all of New  York State’s neighbor states assess a solid waste disposal fee.  (See Table 6.3/)  Most states assess  the fee on waste only (not on recyclables) and use the revenues raised to fund solid waste‐related  programs such as landfill closure or recycling programs and grants.    The state fees and taxes of other states summarized below demonstrate that disposal fees can be  structured in a variety of ways, depending on the policy goals and financial needs of the state and  local governments targeted.  For example, in New York State, a fee could be structured either to  exempt facilities that already support an integrated solid waste management system, including  waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting programs, or to enable some portion of the fee  to remain with the local government to fund such systems.  In any instance, the fee should be  directed to a special fund dedicated to support planning, infrastructure, education and outreach  expenses to implement waste prevention, reuse, recycling, and composting more aggressively  throughout the state.    Using current disposal figures, New York State could generate more than $100 million each year to  fund recycling activities if a moderate $5 per ton tip fee was imposed.  This would have a significant  impact on recycling activities in the state, representing more than five times the funds currently  available from the EPF.      
             

80   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 6.2 – SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FEES IN NEIGHBORING STATES  State  Per‐Ton  Fee  $6.00  Comments 

Vermont 

On all waste, including export, to fund Solid Waste  Implementation Fund (grants, state programs, education,  etc.)  Assessed on waste at MWC facilities; funds Solid Waste Account  at CT DEP  Funds Recycling Fund (60% to municipalities; 30% to counties; 5%  to higher education institutions; 5% to state)  Includes: $4 waste‐disposal fee; $2 recycling fee; $1 host  municipality benefit fee; $.25 stewardship fee  $1 for hazardous waste fund; $1 for solid waste fund; $1.50 for  environmental protection fund; also authorizes local entities  to levy additional fees for specific solid waste‐related uses 

Connecticut 

$1.50 

New Jersey 

$3.00 

Pennsylvania 

$7.25 

Ohio 

$3.50 

 Some states have structured their disposal fees to advance policy goals, either by providing greater  support for areas with lower recycling rates, or by rewarding strong performers.  For example, the  fees assessed by the State of Iowa are greater for “planning areas” with lower recycling rates and  lower for areas with higher rates, with some of the fee retained by the planning area  for planning  and implementation.  Areas with less than a 25 percent diversion rate are assessed a fee of  $4.75/ton, $1.45/ton of which is retained by the planning area; in areas with greater than 50  percent diversion, the fee is $3.25/ton, $1.30 of which is retained by the planning area.    New Jersey’s Recycling Tax funds four distinct revenue streams, with all funding used to support  solid waste and recycling related programs:  • Sixty percent of the proceeds of the Recycling Tax are dedicated to the Recycling Tonnage  Grants Program.  This program provides payments to municipalities based on the overall  weight of materials recycled, thereby providing an incentive for communities to achieve  greater levels of recycling and put strong data collection and reporting mechanisms in place.    Thirty percent of the tax proceeds are distributed to counties in the state in three ways: the  majority of county funds are distributed for implementation of solid waste management  plans based on the counties’ waste generation levels; a portion is set aside for recycling  enhancement grants for counties to establish new programs (e.g., enforcement, education,  etc.) , and a portion is set aside for public information and education.    Five percent of the tax revenues are used to provide grants to universities and other  institutions of higher education to conduct research on recycling.  Five percent is used to fund a portion of the New Jersey Department of Environmental  Protection’s solid waste program. 
81    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• •

West Virginia has the highest per‐ton tip fee surcharge at $8.75.  The funds are raised for the  following specific purposes:  • • $1.75/ton Solid Waste Assessment Fee to fund solid waste management programs  $1.00/ton Solid Waste Assessment Interim Fee for a solid waste management fund, half of  which is distributed to county or regional solid waste authorities, and half is used for grants  and administration  $2.00/ton Recycling Assessment Fee, half of which is dedicated to grants for municipalities  to plan and implement recycling programs, while the remainder is distributed to other  agency funds  $3.50/ton Closure Cost Assessment Fee for the landfill closure assistance program   $.50/ton County Solid Waste Assessment Fee for administration, cleanup, litter control, or  other county solid waste programs 

• •

Minnesota originally financed its solid waste management program through a disposal fee assessed  at the solid waste facility but later transitioned to a Solid Waste Management Tax paid by waste  generators (i.e., residents, businesses, and institutions).  Non‐residential (i.e., commercial and  institutional) MSW generators pay a 17 percent tax on their waste disposal bills (including fees for  collection and disposal of waste), while residential generators pay 9.75 percent.  Generators of  other waste streams, including C&D debris, industrial and infectious waste, pay $.06 per cubic yard  collected.  Fees for materials collected for recycling, composting, and use as alternative daily cover  at landfills are exempt from the tax, as are disaster debris and industrial wastes disposed of in a  landfill owned by the generator.  Half of the revenue from the tax is dedicated to landfill clean up  and state agency activities, and the remainder goes to the general fund.   
  6.3.1 (e) Permit and Compliance Fees 

Many states raise revenues by assessing fees on solid waste management facility permits.   According to a survey conducted by NEWMOA, New York is the only state in the region that does  not collect fees from solid waste facility permit applicants.  DEC does collect fees for many other  types of permits, including those issued by the air and water divisions, and assesses hazardous  waste regulatory fees.  In some states (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island), fees are paid to the  general fund, while others (Maine, New Jersey and Vermont) use permit fees to fund their solid  waste programs.  The fees charged in other northeastern states differ dramatically, ranging from  approximately $1,000 (for small transfer station permit modifications in MA) to $100,000 or more  (for landfills in NJ and RI).  Most states use a formula or a set of criteria for determining the fee  schedule for different types of facility permits, usually related to the facility acceptance rate or  whether the facility is in public or private ownership.    In addition, with the exception of New Hampshire, all of the other northeast states charge permit  renewal or annual compliance fees which, like permit fees, vary widely from state to state.  It is  important to note that, although New York State does not have a compliance fee per se, some solid 
82    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

waste disposal facilities are required to fund a DEC‐employed monitor to provide independent  oversight of their operations.  The fees paid by facility operators to cover the cost of monitors are  intended to ensure compliance.   
6.3.1 (f) Unclaimed Bottle Deposits 

In 2009, thanks to the leadership of Governor Paterson, the New York State budget included an  expansion of the state’s bottle deposit/return program (Bottle Bill) to: capture water bottles and  redirect to the state’s general fund 80 percent of all unclaimed deposits on beverage containers.   The revenues from unclaimed deposits, estimated at $115 million per year, are to be used to offset  substantial anticipated revenue shortfalls in the state’s General Fund.    Several states use, or have used, unclaimed deposits to fund recycling programs or agency activities.   The logic is simple—if the deposit on a container is not redeemed, that container will end up as solid  waste to be managed by a government program.  For example, in California, unclaimed deposits  have funded grant programs and administrative activities, as well as municipal recycling programs.  California communities received the unclaimed deposits for those containers that are managed in  their solid waste programs, as determined by reports and periodic audits, instead of being returned  for deposit. 40   For many years, Massachusetts funded its state agency solid waste program and a  municipal recycling grant program through the use of unclaimed deposits.   
 

6.3.2 

 Existing and Potential Local Funding Sources 

6.3.2 (a) Property Tax 

Most municipalities in New York State fund their solid waste and recycling programs using general  revenues derived from property taxes.  This system provides no incentive to the resident/taxpayer  to reduce or recycle waste because the actual cost of waste disposal is hidden.  Moreover, this  approach, while simple and straightforward, leads to difficult budget decisions where investments in  waste reduction and recycling compete with other critical public services, such as police, fire  protection, libraries and schools.  Those who waste less essentially subsidize their neighbors who  waste more. 
  6.3.2 (b) Pay as You Throw/Save Money and Reduce Trash (PAYT/SMART) 

More than 400 communities in the state employ some form of volume‐based pricing.  These  programs charge residents for waste collection and recycling services based on the volume of waste  generated.  When properly structured, the full system costs (including recycling, composting and  waste prevention programs) are included in waste disposal fees, while recycling and composting  collections are provided for free.  This gives residents an incentive to reduce their waste and recycle  more. These properly structured volume‐based pricing programs are known as PAYT/SMART. USEPA  has documented the benefits of PAYT/SMART programs  (See http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/tools/payt/ or Appendix 8.2).   
                                                                  40  http://www.conservation.ca.gov/dor/lgacp/curbside/Pages/csp.aspx   83    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

DEC estimates that if PAYT/SMART was implemented statewide, the amount of MSW disposed  would drop by three million tons or nearly 40 percent.  
  6.3.2 (c) Integrated Systems Fees 

Some municipalities in New York State own solid waste management facilities (transfer stations,  landfills or MWCs) and finance their integrated solid waste management programs with revenues  from the tip fees charged at those facilities.  Like PAYT/SMART, these programs generally place fees  on disposal, though not at the household level, but provide recycling programs for free.  In some  cases, integrated systems are further supported by flow control ordinances that allow municipalities  to direct the waste generated within its borders to particular waste management facilities.  This  structure enables a municipality to set fees based on total system costs without regard to  competition from private waste facilities whose prices can be lower because they either do not  provide or separately charge for other services, such as recycling and composting.  (For more on  flow control, see Appendix 3.2.) 
  6.3.2 (d) Private Subscription Service 

In many communities in New York State, the municipality has little involvement in recycling and  waste collection, processing and disposal.  In these areas, residents subscribe to collection services  provided by the private sector.  Communities can regulate services provided by private carting  companies by local law to ensure, for example, that recycling services are provided or otherwise set  performance parameters.  However, many New York State communities do not exercise that  oversight.  While private subscription services are feebased, they tend not to achieve the waste reduction gains  of PAYT/SMART programs because the fees are assessed based on actual service cost, not on system  costs.  For example, many private carting companies charge for recycling or yard trimmings  collection services.  They also tend to assign a waste management fee amount for collection, with  only minor incremental increases, if any at all, for greater volume—a 64‐gallon container will cost  only a small amount more than a 30‐gallon container. In contrast, PAYT/SMART programs purposely  discourage higher volume disposal by charging more than twice as much for a 64‐gallon container as  a 30‐gallon container.  Most private subscription services are simply not structured to incentivize  waste reduction and recycling.   
  6.3.2 (e) Sales Tax 

One New York State county uses a portion of its sales tax to finance its innovative solid waste  management program.  In Delaware County, one cent out of every eight cents collected in sales tax  is dedicated to the county’s solid waste management complex, which includes a material recovery  facility, a mixed waste (MSW, food processing waste, and biosolids) composting facility, a C&D  debris recovery facility and a landfill.  Sales tax revenues have made possible the substantial  investment in mixed‐waste composting that produces a marketable product and reduces the 

84   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

residual waste stream, thus facilitating an increase in recycling in the county and a significant  extension to the site life of the county landfill.   
  6.3.2 (f)  Generator Fees and Other Direct Municipal Charges 

Some municipalities in New York State charge residents a separate, dedicated fee for solid waste‐ related services.  For example, Otsego and Tompkins counties directly bill residents and businesses a  “generator fee” to finance recycling, composting, and solid waste programs.  Other municipalities  charge residents for municipally operated or contracted waste collection services either directly, as  a bill, or as a line item on local taxes.  These programs can have the same drawbacks as private  subscription services unless they are structured as PAYT/SMART systems or otherwise provide  incentives for waste reduction, recycling and composting.  The main benefits of municipally  operated or contracted collection, as compared to private subscription service, are reduced truck  traffic and cost savings that result from collection efficiencies and economies of scale.  
 

6.3.3   

Existing and Potential Financial Incentives 

6.3.3 (a) Carbon Credits 

Carbon offset credits are an emerging revenue stream, designed to monetize the environmental  value of reducing GHG emissions through enhanced environmental management techniques. There  are several voluntary carbon offset trading programs, including the Voluntary Carbon Standard  (VCS), the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) and the California Climate Registry (CCR).  In addition, the  Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), operates a regulated market. Each RGGI state, including  New York State, has issued regulations setting basic operating parameters, such as what actions  yield tradable credits.  The others are venues for private transactions between generators and  purchasers of offsets without government oversight or endorsement, and the vigorous verification  associated with a regulated program.    To trade carbon credits, the offset measure must be verifiable using an approved protocol.  Such  protocols exist for the destruction of methane gas and, as a result, methane destruction credits are  routinely traded on all of the markets listed above.  The CCX recently approved protocols for  verifying credits for composting, and the CCR is expected to follow suit.  To date, verification  protocols have not been developed for recycling, but once protocols are in place, they can be used  to capture carbon offset revenue for the recycler through the trading of credits.  Ideally, that  revenue could be used to finance infrastructure and other investments in recycling and organics  recovery.      Price variability and volatility limit the application of carbon offset credits as a reliable financing  mechanism for the investments necessary to move Beyond Waste.  Reliability is also diminished by  the fact that, in time, national legislation regulating carbon emissions could either preempt or  support credits for waste‐related activities.  Reliability aside, carbon credits can still provide a  valuable incentive to improve solid waste management performance by monetizing the  environmental benefits of actions like recycling and composting. 
  85    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.3.3 (b) Feed‐In Tariffs 

Some states and many European countries use Feed‐In tariffs to incentivize renewable energy  production, such as the capture of bio‐gas for energy production in anaerobic digestion systems.  In  these systems, the government sets a rate that utilities must pay for renewable electricity sources.   The rate is well beyond market rate to create a financial incentive for renewable energy production.   
  6.3.3 (c) Tax Incentives 

According to the EPA, 25 states use tax incentives to foster recycling.  Most of these states provide  tax credits for investments in recycling equipment; some also exempt recycling equipment or  recycled content products from state sales tax or provide a property tax reduction for recycling  companies. 41     Allowing for accelerated depreciation of the value of recycling equipment is another way of offering  a tax incentive for recycling companies.  Using a modified accelerated cost recovery system (MACRS)  to depreciate capital expenses on a faster timeline allows companies to deduct the value of  depreciation sooner, thus providing a direct financial incentive for recycling‐related investments.   

6.4   FINDINGS 
• To achieve the state’s goals and move Beyond Waste—reducing waste, increasing recycling  and composting, and reducing disposal—will require:   o o More significant investment of state resources   Greater flexibility in how those resources are disbursed to respond to emerging  issues and critical needs   A mechanism to provide general support to planning units to implement integrated  LSWMPs 

o •

Building market‐driven recycling capacity, industrial pollution prevention and the  development of new green products and process technologies requires:  o Keen understanding of evolving market and regulatory conditions that shape new  business obstacles and opportunities for sustainable production and economic  growth   Assistance to New York State firms to help them compete in a sustainable global  market place and to ensure that economic growth is coupled with enhanced  environmental quality at home 

o

• •

There are many options for funding the implementation of this Plan, enhancing local  programs and moving Beyond Waste.  Properly structured financing programs can provide incentives to reduce waste and increase  recycling. 

                                                                  41  http://www.epa.gov/waste/conserve/rrr/rmd/bizasst/rec‐tax.htm  86    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

6.5   RECOMMENDATIONS 
 

6.5.1   • •   6.5.2  •

Programmatic Recommendations  Continue to allocate state resources to ESD and DEC investment programs and ensure  adequate staff capacity to process and disburse funds  Support monetization of the GHG benefits of materials management strategies through  carbon offset credit trading or other methods of carbon valuation   

Regulatory Recommendations  Target EPF Solid Waste Program funding: To complement the new program described  below, EPF funds could be targeted through a request for proposals or similar process to  address critical priorities identified annually, such as education, outreach, reuse,  composting, etc.  Possible priorities, identified in other sections of this Plan, include:  o Increased enforcement of source separation requirements throughout all  generating sectors, with special focus on improving recovery of materials from the  commercial and institutional sectors   Infrastructure development in focused areas such as enhanced organic materials  recovery, glass recovery, plastics recovery, and the updating and upgrading of the  current materials recovery facility processing network  Increased development and stabilization of local secondary materials markets   Volume‐based pricing (PAYT/SMART) program evaluation and implementation  across the state 

o

o o
 

6.5.3  • •

Legislative Recommendations  Develop a package of preferred funding mechanisms and develop legislation to advance the  package    Create a new grant program, with a new funding source, to provide consistent, annual  funding to planning units to implement waste prevention, reuse, recycling and organics  recovery programs.  This program would: address the long‐standing need for enhanced  resources for planning unit program implementation; be easily implementable; deliver  funding in a timely manner; provide an equitable distribution of funds to municipalities, and  foster consistent implementation of sound LSWMPs.    Establish Product and Packaging Stewardship Programs: Such programs either generate  revenue directly or relieve government from the obligation to finance collection and end‐of‐ life management of the products and packaging targeted, thus releasing resources for other  priorities.  (For more information, see Section 5.) 

87   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• •

Authorize ESD to support organic materials recycling technologies that provide the dual  benefits of capturing energy and creating a valuable product  Require municipalities to finance recycling and waste management programs through  PAYT/SMART or other mechanisms that provide incentives to reduce waste and increase  recycling 

     
 

 

88   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.  MATERIALS COMPOSITION AND CHARACTERIZATION 
 

This section evaluates the composition of the materials in New York State’s MSW stream and  provides a description of the characteristics of the key streams it includes.  It also describes the  other waste streams managed in the state, including industrial waste, construction and demolition  debris and biosolids. This section is intended to be background information to aid communities in  evaluating appropriate materials management strategies and implementing the state’s solid waste  management hierarchy.  The data summarized in this section is provided in Appendix 1.  Because  this section is analytical in nature, it does not include a discussion of findings or recommendations.    In 2008, facilities in New York State managed a total of more than 36 million tons of materials and  waste, as depicted in Table 7.1.  TABLE 7.1 MATERIALS AND WASTE MANAGEMENT IN NYS, 2008 
    MSW  Million  Tons  Recycle/  Compost  Landfill  Combustion  Export for   Disposal  Total 
 

Industrial    Million Tons  20  1.4    %  39  Million Tons 

C&D    %  55 

Biosolids  Million Tons  0.9    %  47  Million Tons  13.1 

Total    %  36 

 

3.7 

7.2 

6.0  2.5    6.1  18.3 

33  14    33  100 

2.1  <0.1 

60  1 

4.1  <0.1 

32  0 

0.3  0.4 

17  24   

12.5  3.0 

34  8  22 

<0.1  3.5 

0  100 

1.7  13.0 

13  100 

0.2  1.8 

12  100 

8.0  36.6  100 

                  89    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.1        MATERIALS COMPOSITION  
7.1.1   Methodology 

FIGURE 7.1  ESTIMATED MSW GENERATED IN NYS 

DEC has developed estimates of the  composition of the materials present in the  MSW stream using data inputs that include  field‐based waste composition studies  performed within New York State, in other  major US cities, and in other states that have  similar demographic characteristics to some  of New York’s regions.  In developing these  estimates, DEC aimed to characterize the  MSW that is discarded or recycled by the residential and commercial/institutional (CI) generators.    The MSW composition estimate does not include the separately managed construction and  demolition debris (C&D) stream; C&D is addressed in section 7.2.5. It does not include several  organics streams (biosolids, septage, agricultural materials, etc.), industrial waste, or medical and  biohazardous materials either.  It contains data on tires and scrap metal that are generated as part  of the MSW stream but not the full range of those materials managed outside of the MSW  management structures.  More detail on each of these streams is provided in Section 7.2.    DEC’s analysis looks at the variations in the materials stream based on urban, rural and suburban  generators, as well as residential and commercial/institutional generators.  Because no one study  provides directly transferable data by these divisions, data from multiple sources were compiled and  aggregated to create the DEC composition estimate.  After a careful review of dozens of  composition analyses, the data from the following sources were used:  • • •
 

Municipalities within New York State: New York City and Onondaga County Resource  Recovery Authority (OCRRA)  Municipalities in other states:  Seattle, WA and San Francisco, CA  Other States: Vermont, Wisconsin, Missouri, Georgia, Oregon, Ohio, Delaware,  Pennsylvania, and California 

90   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.2:  ESTIMATED MSW COMPOSITION IN NEW YORK STATE AS COMPARED TO EPA ESTIMATES 

    7.1.2  MSW Generation Estimates 

The estimated composition of materials generated by the residential and commercial/institutional  sector is presented in Figure 7.1. A comparison of the results of DEC’s analysis with the US EPA’s  Characterization of MSW in the United States, which is commonly used as a baseline by states and  local governments, is presented in Figure 7.2.  The notable differences—rates of generation of yard  trimmings, food scraps, some containers and paper products—are likely related to differences in  methodology or the demographic characteristics of New York State, such as the substantial urban  population.    As noted, DEC’s estimates are based on field studies.  The EPA study estimates for most materials  are based on a materials flow approach which relies on production data (adjusted for imports and  exports) and certain assumptions about patterns and length of use for various products.  However,  for food scraps and yard trimmings, EPA uses data reported from states as well as materials  composition studies.  The substantial differences between EPA and DEC estimates of food scrap  generation are likely due to New York City’s high rate of generation of this material as compared to  other urban, suburban and rural areas.  The yard trimmings differences are likely attributable to the  low rate of generation of this material in NYC as well as the fact that rural communities mostly  handle this material onsite. 
          91    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

7.1.3     Materials Discard Estimates 

Figure 7.3 depicts DEC’s  estimate of the composition  of the materials discarded in  New York State.  These  estimates are particularly  useful in developing  programmatic, legislative, and  regulatory priorities to  minimize disposal and move  Beyond Waste.  Disposal data  can inform program managers  regarding how well their  programs are capturing  targeted materials and can help identify targets to maximize diversion. 

FIGURE 7.3 ESTIMATED MSW DISPOSED OF  IN NEW YORK STATE 

For example, approximately 20 percent of the material disposed of in New York State is paper that is  commonly recycled in many of the state’s municipal programs. Clearly, those programs are not  achieving their optimal capture rates.  More than 30 percent of the materials currently discarded  are organics (food scraps and yard trimmings) and compostable paper.  So, strengthening the  organics recycling infrastructure must be a priority to move Beyond Waste.  For a more detailed  composition of MSW disposed of in New York State, see Figure 7.6. 
 

7.1.4 

Materials Composition in Urban, Suburban and Rural Areas 

The population density of a community can have an impact on the composition of its waste stream.   As illustrated in Figure 7.4, DEC estimates that the materials generation differences in New York  State’s urban, suburban and rural areas can be significant, particularly with regard to food scraps,  yard trimmings, wood and certain grades of paper.  Urban areas account for 54 percent of the  state’s population, while suburban areas account for 30 percent and rural 16 percent.  For the purposes of this analysis, DEC defined rural areas as communities in the state with a  population density of less than 325 people per square mile; suburban areas as communities with a  population density between 325 and 5,000 people per square mile, and urban areas as communities  with population density greater than 5,000 people per square mile.  A higher population density for  suburban and urban areas was used compared to most other states, primarily due to the greater  population density of the suburban areas of Long Island and New York City.  These distinctions are  important to note when using this data for local planning purposes or comparison with other states  and national data.   
 

92   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.4  ESTIMATED MSW GENERATED IN RURAL, SUBURBAN, AND URBAN AREAS OF NYS 

      7.1.5     Materials Composition in the Residential vs. the Commercial/Institutional Sectors  DEC estimates that 54 percent of the MSW generated statewide is residential, and 46 percent is  commercial/institutional.  In designing waste prevention and recycling programs for specific sectors,  it is important to understand the details of the materials generation patterns in those sectors.  As  Figures 7.5 and 7.6 indicate, there are some important differences between sectors that are useful  to know in determining which materials to target for aggressive recycling programs.  For example,  the generation of food scraps and corrugated cardboard in the commercial/institutional sector is  substantially higher than in the residential sector, as is the generation of other recyclable paper and  glass.   

93   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.5  ESTIMATED MSW GENERATED IN THE RESIDENTIAL AND CI SECTORS IN NYS  

 

   
FIGURE 7.6  ESTIMATED MSW DISPOSED OF IN THE RESIDENTIAL AND CI SECTORS IN NYS   

          94    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.2      MSW MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION 
This section will further characterize the components of the MSW stream generated by residential,  commercial and institutional sources to provide more specific information to aid in local and state  planning and in programmatic efforts.  The analysis includes materials streams that are addressed in  the composition analysis above and those that are not included in the discussion in section 7.1 but  are considered MSW.  All should be managed in accordance with the state’s solid waste  management hierarchy favoring waste prevention, reuse and recycling instead of disposal. All  percentages and figures provided are based on weight. 
 

7.2.1  

Paper 

Paper  comprises approximately 33 percent of the MSW generated in New York State and 28  percent of MSW sent for disposal.  The paper stream is technically completely recyclable or  compostable and, as generated, includes:  • • • • Newspaper (4 percent)   Corrugated cardboard (10 percent)  Other recyclable paper, such as printing paper, office paper, magazines, books, telephone  directories, junk mail and boxboard or paperboard (e.g., cereal boxes) (12 percent)   Other compostable paper, such as paper towels, food‐contaminated paper and cardboard,  tissues, and napkins (7 percent) 

According to the NERC’s 2009 Recycling Economic Information Study (REI), 25 mills recycle paper in  New York State. 
  7.2.2   Food Scraps                                  FIGURE 7.7   USEPA’S FOOD RECOVERY HIERARCHY 

Food scraps include uneaten food and food  preparation materials from residences,  commercial establishments (such as restaurants  and supermarkets), and institutions (such as  colleges, hospitals and prisons). About 96 billion  pounds of food are wasted each year in the US,  costing one billion dollars to manage.42  In New  York State, DEC estimates that food scraps  represent nearly 18 percent of the MSW  generated every year.  There are many ways to divert excess food and/or  food grade material from disposal. Aggregating  unused food to provide meals for the hungry is 
                                                                  42  USEPA website, “Basic Information about Food Scraps”  95    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

the highest priority use for excess food management, and there is a strong, established network of  food banks and other charitable organizations in New York State that actively seek food for the  needy. Food scraps as animal feed is another way to cost effectively manage food scraps while also  reducing feed costs for farmers. Historically, rendering has been a well‐established and available  industry for processing select organic wastes, primarily animal tissue and fats from the food  processing industry, to make multiple products used in industry.   Composting converts food scraps into soil products and is the most common management option at  this time. Anaerobic digestion has the potential to extract energy from food scraps and also  generate materials that can be further composted into fertilizers and soil amendments.      
 

7.2.3           Yard Trimmings  Yard trimmings (yard waste or yard debris) include leaves, grass clippings, and garden debris, and  comprise, on average, approximately five percent of the MSW stream. Quantities of yard trimmings  vary significantly depending on the type of community (urban, suburban or rural) and the character  of the properties in the area (mature trees, etc.).  DEC estimates that just under three percent of  MSW generated in urban areas are yard trimmings compared to more than ten percent in suburban  areas and approximately two percent in the state’s rural areas.    Yard trimmings, especially leaves, are relatively easy to compost because they are often collected  separately from other residential wastes, providing a clean stream of material that can be  composted using relatively simple methods, windrow composting (i.e., using long rows of material)  being the predominant method.  
 

7.2.4  

Plastic 

Plastics make up more than 14 percent of the MSW generated and nearly 17 percent of the MSW  disposed of in New York State.  This stream includes plastic bottles, rigid containers and film plastics.   While all plastics are technically recyclable, most community programs collect PET (#1) and HDPE  (#2) bottles; together, these comprise less than two percent of the overall MSW stream.  The largest  plastic component in the waste stream, nearly six percent, is film plastic, made up of soft, pliable  bags and wraps, such as grocery bags, shrink wrap and garbage bags.  To address film plastics,  legislation was passed in 2008 requiring most retailers who use plastic bags to provide film plastic  collection to the public.   (For more on the plastic bag recycling law,  see http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/50034.html).  According to the NERC REI study, there are 20  plastics reclaimers in New York State.    7.2.5   Wood 

More than three percent of the MSW generated by residences, businesses and institutions is made  up of wood.  While this stream generally does not include materials handled by a contractor as C&D  debris, it can include materials generated through small‐scale or do‐it‐yourself projects and 

96   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

discarded items such as furniture and pallets.  Most communities in New York State do not have  programs in place to recycle residentially generated wood waste.   
 

7.2.6   

Textiles 

Textiles in the MSW stream generally include used clothing, carpets, towels, sheets and draperies.   These materials make up approximately five percent of the materials stream.  Many textiles are  readily technically recyclable, such as through the rag trade.  Although textiles are sometimes  recycled through charitable organizations that receive as donations clothing and other textile  products that cannot be reused, there are few community textile recycling collection programs in  New York State.  
 

7.2.7  

 Metals 

Metals make up nearly seven percent of the waste stream in New York State and include consumer  packaging such as steel and aluminum cans, aluminum foil, appliances, and other municipally  generated scrap metal (e.g., bicycles, toys, pots and pans, etc.).  All metals are technically recyclable,  though many communities collect only metal containers in their source separation programs.  Some  communities provide drop‐off locations for larger scrap metals and appliances or provide special  collection days/procedures. 
 

7.2.8 

 Glass   

Glass makes up a four percent of the materials generated in New York State.  It includes glass  packaging and other items, such as window glass, ceramics, etc. Most communities in New York  State collect glass containers, though few provide collection of other types of glass.   
 

7.2.9  

Other 

This category includes elements of the waste stream that collectively comprise nearly 11 percent of  the state’s generation.  It includes residentially generated C&D materials, diapers, electronics, HHW,  and tires, among other items.  Electronics and HHW are fully discussed in Product Stewardship,  Section 5.   
                97    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.3   NON‐MSW MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION 
 

7.3.1  

Organic Materials  

While composting and organics recycling is generally comparable to recycling of other materials in  terms of priority on the state solid waste management hierarchy, DEC supports the EPA hierarchy  specifically for organics (see graphic), which mirrors the broader solid waste management hierarchy  and combines principals of waste reduction and reuse as well as recycling. Additional information on  organic materials management is provided in Appendix 7.1. 
  7.3.1 (a) Biosolids 

Biosolids, also referred to as sewage sludge, are the solid or semi‐solid organic materials generated  as a result of the treatment of wastewater. Biosolids’ characteristics vary depending on the sources  of wastewater to the treatment plant and the treatment methods used at the plant. Biosolids may  contain contaminants (heavy metals, pathogens, etc.) that would be detrimental to the environment  if not properly controlled. DEC has regulations in place (see Part 360‐4 and 360‐5  at http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/2491.html) that require routine testing of biosolids to be recycled or  beneficially used and set standards for pollutants of concern.   In New York State, 584 publiclyowned treatment works (POTWs) generate biosolids. The combined  design capacity of the POTWs is about 3.7 billion gallons of wastewater per day, with an actual flow  to these facilities of about 2.55 billion gallons per day (representing 70 percent of available  treatment capacity). More than half of the POTWs have design capacities of less than one million  gallons per day. In total, POTWs in New York State generate 353,000 dry tons, which is equivalent to  1.8 million wet tons per year (about 1,000 dry tons or 5,000 wet tons per day) of biosolids requiring  further management.  Approved beneficial uses of heat dried or composted biosolids have become the most common  management strategy in New York State. On a dry weight basis, 48 percent of the biosolids  generated are beneficially used while 26 percent are landfilled and 25 percent incinerated.  Beneficial use processes include heat drying (37 percent of beneficial use or 18 percent of total  biosolids), composting (24 percent of beneficial use or 11 percent of total), land application as an  agricultural fertilizer (20 percent of beneficial use or 10 percent of total), and chemical stabilization  with a neutralizing agent to produce a liming material, (19 percent of beneficial use or 9 percent of  total).  Some very small treatment plants have the ability to store biosolids for many years before  they must remove and recycle or dispose the material. This practice accounts for the remaining one  percent.  Nearly half of the biosolids generated in New York State are managed outofstate, either in  landfills or through beneficial use.         More data on the generation and use of biosolids are provided in Appendix 7.1.  
      98    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.3.1 (b) Septage 

In many areas of New York State, residents and businesses rely on septic systems for sewage  treatment. Septage contained in system tanks must be pumped periodically and properly managed  at a wastewater treatment plant, or it can be land applied to supply nutrients on agricultural  property.  However, for land application, septage must be mixed with lime and meet other criteria  defined in the state’s solid waste management regulations (see Part 360‐4). More than 90 percent  of the septage generated in New York State goes to municipal POTWs. In 2006, about 16.4 million  gallons of septage were land applied, while nearly 190 million gallons were transported to POTWs  and, therefore, ultimately managed as biosolids.      
  7.3.1 (c) Paper Mill Residuals 

The production of paper products, either from virgin wood or recycled paper, results in the  production of residuals, sometimes termed paper mill sludge. These residuals are primarily organic  in nature, consisting of short fibers, lignin, and other constituents of wood that are undesirable in  paper production because they could degrade the ultimate product. Depending on the  manufacturing process employed, there is also the potential for chemicals used in the process, like  bleaching agents or coloring inks, to end up in the residuals stream. Paper mill sludge can be a  challenge to compost because paper fibers decompose slowly; however, it can be composted  effectively with the appropriate type and quantity of amendment. Currently, there is one paper mill  residual composting facility in New York State, located in Washington County, composting about  70,000 tons annually.                              
  7.3.1 (d) Carcasses, Manure, and Other Agricultural Waste 

Animal carcass sources include mortalities at farms, roadkill, and butcher residuals.  More than  25,000 animals, primarily deer, are killed each year on the roads of New York State.  An estimated  14,000 cow carcasses are generated by dairy farms in New York State each year. 43   Poultry and  swine farms in New York State also generate carcasses through normal animal mortality.  In  addition, about 400 butchers in the state must properly manage the byproducts of their operations,  estimated at 58,000 tons per year.   Besides carcasses, farming and raising animals result in other organic wastes that must be managed,  including manure and crop residues. Crop residues are typically turned into the soil on the field  where they are generated. With an average generation rate of 100 pounds of manure per cow, per  day, dairy cows in New York State produce 12 million tons of manure each year. In the past, land  application on farm fields was the standard method for handling animal manure. However, as the  typical farm has increased the number of animals it manages, and with more regulatory restrictions  on land application, farms have turned from land application to other methods for manure  management, including anaerobic digestion, composting, and reuse of the dried manure as animal  bedding.  
                                                                  43  In 2001, there were 670,000 milk cows and 80,000 beef cows in New York State. The typical mortality loss is  2 percent for dairy herds and 0.5 percent for beef cows, resulting in 14,000 cow carcasses each year.  99    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

7.3.2  

Scrap Metal 

Scrap metal includes a wide variety of materials generated by  many different entities.  It includes end‐of‐life vehicles, prompt  scrap from metal manufacturers, appliances and metal from  construction and demolition (e.g., copper pipe, aluminum  siding, radiators, obsolete machinery, structural beams, bridges  structures), among other things.  According to the Institute for  Scrap Recycling Industries, scrap recycling (which includes other  recyclable materials, in addition to metals), is a $65 billion  industry that employs more than 50,000 people and processes  more than 150 million tons of material each year.    The economics of scrap metal recycling differs from that of  most recyclable materials.  Scrap metal values, although  volatile, are always positive and almost always higher than the  cost of processing.  This means that scrap metal recyclers  almost always pay for material that is received at their facility.   This payment has allowed the scrap metal business to be  vibrant for many years, without governmental mandates or  incentives.  The value of the scrap metal to the generatorsor  their intermediaries has provided enough incentive for  recycling rates to remain high.  As a result of differing  economics, the scrap metal recycling infrastructure  was  developed long before the recycling infrastructure for most  other commodities, and these two recycling infrastructures  remain largely separate to this day.    

CARCASS  COMPOSTING 
 

While DEC believes that scrap metal  comprises a substantial  portion of the total waste stream by weight and enjoys a  significant recycling rate, most of the facilities that process  these materials are exempt from state reporting requirements.   The State of New Jersey requires scrap metal recyclers to  report recycling tonnages to the state through an annual  reporting program.  Based on these data over recent years,  scrap metal recycling represents five to ten percent of the total  tonnage recycled in New Jersey. While some New York State  planning units report significant quantities of scrap metal recycling, DEC suspects this represents  non‐MSW materials reported by scrap metal dealers to the planning unit.  On a broad scale, there is  little data available at this time to enable DEC to evaluate the extent of this waste stream in New  York State or its contribution to the state’s recycling success.   

In the past, these carcasses  were either taken to  landfills or dragged into the  woods along the side of the  road. Today, landfill  operators prefer not to  handle large animals, and  the practice of dragging  carcasses into wooded  areas is no longer an option  in many communities.  Instead, a number of New  York State Department of  Transportation (DOT) sites  have established compost  piles specifically designed to  handle road‐killed animals.  The carcass composting  procedures they employ,  developed by Cornell  University, are also being  used at many farms for  normal mortalities that  occur in a herd and for  disease incidents.  

100   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recently DEC has begun collecting data on end‐of‐life vehicles.  Pursuant to legislation passed in  2006, vehicle dismantling facilities (VDFs) are now required to submit annual reports to DEC.  In the  first reporting year, 548 of the 993 VDFs identified by DEC, or 55 percent, submitted reports  documenting the recycling of nearly 400,000 vehicles in 2007.  A full description of DEC’s VDF  program is provided in Appendix 7.2.  The data submitted in the required VDF annual reports for  2007 have been summarized in the DEC report available  at http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/58165.html  
 

7.3.3  

Tires 

New York State has a substantial scrap tire management program that was created with the 2003  Waste Tire Management and Recycling Act.  As part of that program, ESD commissions an annual  market analysis, the latest of which found that in 2006, New York State generated more than  200,000 tons of waste tires or the equivalent of 20.3 million passenger tires.  In that year, more than  80 percent of the used tires flowed to in‐state end‐use markets, with the remainder going to other  states and Canada.  In general, use of New York State tires in tire‐derived fuel and ground rubber  applications steadily grew, while use in aggregate applications and, to a lesser degree, other  recycling steadily declined.  Ground rubber, used in a variety of applications from road paving to  athletic fields, grew from the fourth largest use in 2003 to the second largest use in 2006.  A full  description of the program, including more full market data, is provided in Appendix 7.3.   
 

7.3.4  

Construction & Demolition (C&D) Debris 

Similar to the analysis described in section 7.1.1 for the MSW stream, DEC has developed estimates  of the materials present in the C&D debris waste stream using data inputs that include field‐based  waste composition studies and research‐based evaluations performed both within New York State  and within states and cities that have demographic characteristics similar to some of New York  State’s regions.  In broad terms, C&D debris is defined as uncontaminated solid waste resulting from the  construction, remodeling, repair and demolition of utilities, structures and roads and includes land‐ clearing debris.  In developing these estimates, DEC’s analysis aimed to characterize the C&D debris  that is discarded by both the building and infrastructure‐generating sectors.  Additionally, DEC’s  analysis looks at variations in the materials discarded from the building sector from new  construction, renovation and demolition activities from both the residential and non‐residential  sectors, as well as differences between rural/suburban and urban generation.  Because no single study provides directly transferable data by these divisions, data from multiple  sources were compiled and aggregated to create the DEC composition estimates.  After careful  review of a number of compositional analyses and research evaluations, data from the following  sources were used:     
101    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

  • • • •
  FIGURE 7.8  ESTIMATED C & D DEBRIS GENERATED IN NYS   

Municipalities within NYS: Town of Babylon and New York City  Municipalities in other states: Seattle, WA and Des Moines, IA  Other states: Vermont, Wisconsin, Oregon, Delaware, Minnesota, Florida, and California  US EPA 

   

The estimated composition of C&D debris generated statewide before recycling or other diversion is  presented in Figure 7.8.  The concrete/asphalt/rock/brick (CARB) and  the soil/gravel material  categories are by far the greatest material segments at approximately 35 percent and 27 percent  respectively, with wood a distant third at 15 percent.  Differences among residential buildings, non‐residential buildings and the infrastructure/other  generating sectors are presented in Figure 7.9.  While the differences are most significant between  the building and infrastructure segments, interesting differences can be seen between the  residential and non‐residential building sectors.  The greatest differences appear to be in the CARB,  wood and metal material categories.         
102    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.9  STATEWIDE C&D DEBRIS GENERATION BY MATERIAL (%) 

    C&D debris tends to be generated in larger quantities in areas of the state with a greater population,  as evidenced by the fact that nearly 90 percent of the C&D debris processing capacity is located in  New York City and Long Island.  While there is limited data and information available on the origin,  destination and flow of C&D debris in New York State, DEC understands that these materials tend to  flow through transfer stations and or C&D debris processing facilities on their way to ultimate  disposition (For a discussion of these, see Section 9.1).  DEC estimates that a significant amount of both the soil/gravel and CARB materials are often used  on or near the construction site, especially in the infrastructure generating sector. There are a  number of exemptions within the regulations for this use, and, therefore, it is likely that a significant  portion of C&D debris is not included in the reporting of this material.  Based on the available data  within the compositional analyses and DEC’s evaluation in this analysis in conjunction with data  reported, DEC estimates this to be between 3.5 and 9 million tons per year, which equates to  between 20 and 40 percent of the amount of C&D debris generated.             
103    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.10 ESTIMATED C&D DEBRIS DISPOSED IN NYS   

   DEC also estimates that much of the C&D material is ultimately recycled or beneficially used as  aggregate or fill, while only a portion of either is disposed in dedicated C&D debris landfills or in  MSW landfills or combustors.  Table 7.10 presents the amounts and percentages of the various  management practices for the reported C&D debris in New York State.  The estimated composition of C&D debris disposed on a statewide basis after recycling or other  diversion, is presented in Figure 7.10.  The CARB and the wood material categories are the greatest  material segments disposed at approximately 36 percent and 20 percent respectively.  Differences among residential buildings, non‐residential buildings and the infrastructure/other  generating sectors are presented in Figure 7.10.  As was the case with C&D debris generation, the  differences are most significant between the building and infrastructure segments, with the  differences between residential and non‐residential buildings less pronounced.  Because much of the infrastructure generating sector material is likely handled onsite as part of  many projects, additional analysis was directed toward identifying differences within the building  generating sector.  Most C&D debris waste composition analyses performed have primarily focused  on this generating sector.  Figure 7.11 presents the differences of materials disposed from three  general building activities: new construction, renovation, and demolition.  There are some  significant differences in the materials discarded among these activities.  The most significant  differences are in the roofing wood, drywall, CARB and corrugated/paper material categories. 
        104    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.11  STATEWIDE C&D DEBRIS BY BUILDING ACTIVITY (%) 

   

A comparison of the discards from the rural/suburban areas and urban areas of the state is  presented in Figure 7.12 for each of the three general building activities.  The greatest differences  are in the demolition and renovation work areas.  Urban areas account for 54 percent of the state’s  population.  This has a significant effect on both the quantity and composition of the C&D debris  waste stream.  It is important to note this when using this estimated C&D debris waste composition  data for planning purposes and to use the data that is most applicable to each individual  circumstance.                   

105   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 7.12 STATEWIDE C&D DEBRIS DISCARDS BY BUILDING ACTIVITY VS. POPULATION DENSITY 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.4 (a) C&D Debris Volumes    

Overall, about 10.2 million tons of C&D debris was managed by permitted and registered C&D debris  processors in 2008, with about 60 percent of the C&D debris processing in NYC and another 26  percent on Long Island.  Approximately 250 registered C&D debris processing facilities managed  more than 6 million tons of registration material in 2008. (For a distribution of C&D processing  facilities, see figure 9.2.)  Based on the limited data available, DEC estimates that 55 percent of C&D  materials processed are reused as fill, aggregate or alternative daily cover at landfills, and 50  percent was directly landfilled.  (See figure 7.8.) 
  7.3.4 (b) Processed Concrete, Asphalt, Rock, Bricks & Soil (CARBS)  

A particular challenge in and around New York City, Long Island, the counties immediately north of  New York City, and other major urban areas in the state is managing the large amount of concrete,  asphalt, rock, brick and soil (CARBS) that is generated from the construction and demolition  industry.  These materials generally are processed at registered C&D debris processing facilities  where, typically, the materials are reduced in size so that they may be used as a substitute for 
106    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

crushed rock or gravel in a variety of construction related applications.  The residues and soil‐like  products resulting from the size reduction process is often marketed as general fill, the movement  and use of which is difficult to track or monitor, posing regulatory challenges.   
  7.3.4 (c) Historic Fill 

Historic fill refers to C&D debris, non putrescible waste, ash or “inert” industrial waste used to fill  selected urban locations in the early and middle 20th century for creation of land for development.   Using data compiled by the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, DEC estimates that  approximately 20 percent of the land in New York City is historic fill. 44    The push for urban development in the last two decades has coincided with a better understanding  of the breadth of historic and industrial contamination that marks our urban centers. Non‐soil,  deleterious components of historic fill, such as coal ash and demolition debris, render it  inappropriate for general distribution as construction fill.  Comparison of the chemical analysis of  historic fill with recentlypromulgated 6 NYCRR Part 375 soil cleanup objectives (see further  discussion in section 8.5.4) highlights the need for careful consideration of the off‐site reuse of  historic fill, particularly on residential developments, parks, preserves, and other locations with a  high potential of human or biota exposure to contamination.   Despite DEC enforcement efforts and regulations, historic fill has been processed at registered C&D  debris facilities that are only authorized to handle recognizable, uncontaminated soil, and  distributed without restriction.  DEC has responded to historic fill reuse in the short term by allowing  developers of historic fill sites to reuse the historic fill on the same site or sites with similar  contaminants, under pavement or with an appropriate clean soil cover to protect the public and the  environment.   The 2010 proposed amendments to Part 360 will address management of historic fill  sites and the movement of historic fill.   
  7.3.4 (d) Unrecognizable C&D Debris Materials 

DEC has investigated numerous sites, primarily in the downstate area, where C&D debris has been  placed as fill in a manner which violates the exempt disposal site criteria in Part 360.  Most of these  violations have involved sites where otherwise acceptable C&D debris includes waste materials not  allowed at exempt sites or includes material which was pulverized at the job site or illegally at a  registered C&D processing facility and is no longer recognizable.  Such unrecognizable material is  likely to be unsuitable for use in residential settings as it could contain processed historic fill or other  problematic materials.  Many nearby states have developed regulated fill policies to address these  issues.  DEC will follow suit as it develops the 2010 amendments to Part 360.   
                                                                  44  Personal Communication, New York City Soil and Water Conservation District Staff. 2005. New York City  Reconnaissance Soil Survey. United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation  Service, New York City Soil and Water Conservation District, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment  Station.    107    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

  7.3.4 (e) Asbestos Containing Materials 

Asbestos containing material (ACM) is a particularly challenging type of waste to manage.   Although  not prohibited by DEC regulations, many solid waste management facilities choose not to handle  ACM due to perception, liability, and permitting issues.  These issues are complicated by the fact  that several state and federal agencies regulate different aspects of the material, and oversight  sometimes overlaps.  Better guidance on the removal, handling, and disposal of ACM is needed from  all involved agencies, particularly for homeowners.  
  7.3.4 (f) Creosote‐Treated Wood 

Creosote includes a variety of products: wood creosote, coal tar creosote, coal tar, coal tar pitch and  coal tar pitch volatiles. These products are mixtures of many chemicals created by burning beech  and other woods or coal, or from the resin of creosote bushes. Effective January 1, 2008, ECL Article  27, Title 25, (27‐2501 through 27‐2513) banned the manufacture, sale, and use of creosote or  products containing creosote by anyone other than utilities, railroads, or marinas.   Creosote‐treated  wood products can be brought to most waste disposal facilities that accept C&D debris.  However,  because of the ban on its sale and use, certain treated materials such as used railroad ties have  reportedly started to stockpile at locations where these materials may have previously been sold or  given away to landscapers or homeowners.  Also, the statutory definitions of the terms  “manufacture” and “sale” have created some ambiguity, making enforcement problematic.  
  7.3.4 (g) Disaster Debris  

Both natural and human‐caused disasters have the potential to produce volumes and types of debris  that require special procedures and policies.  Recent events have stressed the challenge of handling  debris from large‐scale disasters and the need for clear guidance.   For example, debris is often co‐ mingled with various types of waste, including hazardous materials.   DEC has issued guidance that  can be used in times of emergency when quick waste management decisions must be made to  protect public health and the environment.   DEC will also track the activities of the state’s Sea Level  Rise Task Force and include guidance anticipating associated coastline emergencies, such as  guidelines for protecting hazardous and non‐hazardous debris storage from floodwaters. 
 

7.3.5 

 Regulated Medical Waste and Biohazardous Waste  

The awareness and concern about regulated medical waste (RMW) has evolved into a broader  category of biohazardous waste issues that encompasses: RMW; biohazard incident waste, and  contaminated or infected animal and food supply waste.   
        108    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

7.3.5 (a) Regulated Medical Waste(RMW)  

This subcategory includes discarded cultures and stocks, sharps, human pathological waste, human  blood or blood products, animal waste, and waste generated in the production and testing of  biologicals. There are approximately 36,000 generators of 250,000 tons of RMW each year in New  York State. One‐third of this volume is attributed to healthcare facilities such as nursing homes,  hospitals, and clinical laboratories, while the other two‐thirds is generated by physician offices,  blood establishments (those that collect, manufacture, store, or process blood and blood products),  colleges and universities, veterinarian and dental offices, funeral homes, research laboratories, and  pharmaceutical and biotechnology facilities.   New York State has provided regulatory oversight of the RMW stream since the early 1980s and has  adopted a comprehensive regulatory framework covering all aspects of handling, storage, treatment  and disposal of RMW.  In accordance with state laws and regulations, both the New York State  Department of Health (DOH) and DEC jointly administer New York State’s RMW Program.    DOH has jurisdiction of hospitals, freestanding diagnostic and treatment centers, residential health  care facilities and clinical laboratories, and their onsite waste management procedures.  DOH is also  responsible for developing treatment standards and approving alternative waste treatment  technologies.  RMW treatment categories include thermal, chemical, irradiation and  thermal/electrical. DEC staff collaborates with the DOH to evaluate an alternative treatment  system’s capacity to process RMW and on the classification of present and emerging RMW  treatment technologies.    DEC has oversight authority for: all storage, treatment and destruction processes located on site of  facilities not under DOH jurisdiction; off‐site transport of RMW; all generators; tracking of waste;  response to illegal disposal incidents, and all off‐site storage, transfer, treatment and disposal  facilities.   In New York State, most RMW is disposed of away from the site of generation, with 94 hospitals and  eight research facilities treating their own waste onsite. In accordance with both federal and state  requirements and to ensure containment, untreated RMW (except medical waste sharps)  must be  placed in plastic bags and then packaged in single‐use (e.g., corrugated boxes) or reusable rigid (e.g.,  plastic) or semi‐rigid, leak‐proof containers before transport. Once packaged, RMW is either  transferred to a designated secure storage or collection area within the facility for third‐party pickup  or to a generator’s on‐site treatment facility.  Treated waste may be disposed at a landfill or  combustor authorized to accept the waste.  In 2008, 11 commercial RMW transfer facilities,  5 treatment facilities and approximately 112  transporters were permitted by DEC to handle RMW.  Fourteen radiopharmacies were also  permitted to store low‐level radio pharmaceuticals that are also considered RMW.  Once the waste  decays to background levels at the storage facility,  it may be safely managed as an RMW. 
        109    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT  

7.3.5 (b)  Biohazard Incident Waste 

This subcategory includes the waste generated from a cleanup response to an accidental spill or  other unintended release, from a naturally occurring source, or from any intentional release of  infectious agents (e.g., an act of bioterrorism).  The waste may  comprise large volumes of building  decontamination residue and may require special packaging and additional decontamination to  ensure that infectious agents are contained or have been destroyed.  Once disinfected at the site of  the incident, due to heightened public concerns, the debris may still need to be handled as if it were  still contaminated.    New York State has experienced two biohazard emergencies in recent history: the 2001 anthrax  incidents that impacted several buildings in New York City and the 2006 contamination in Brooklyn,  NY from naturally occurring anthrax associated with imported animal hides.  In both cases, large  volumes of contaminated building materials required special waste management strategies. Such  wastes have similar contamination concerns as those associated with RMW (i.e., infectious agents),  and, consequently, most of the waste was treated at RMW treatment facilities prior to disposal.  
7.3.5 (c) Contaminated or Infected Animal and Food Supply Waste 

This subcategory includes animal waste from naturally occurring diseases that may have a significant  impact on human society (e.g., transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,  foot and mouth  disease, exotic Newcastle disease, etc.) and include those that are indigenous to other countries but  not found in domestic animals or poultry, wildlife, or the environment within the US. Contaminated  food supply waste is the waste from the human and animal food supply known to be contaminated  with infectious agents or their toxins.  It can include large volumes of food waste that require special  handling and management strategies such as the animal feed tainted with melamine that was  recalled in 2007 and canned goods contaminated with clostridium botulinum.   No formal handling and management standards or federal and state rules and regulations exist for  addressing the handling and disposal or environmental impacts associated with these wastes.  In  New York State, these have been managed on a case‐by‐case basis, depending on the unique  characteristics of the materials and circumstances.       7.3.6  Industrial Waste   
FIGURE  7.13    INDUSTRIAL  WASTE    MANAGEMENT  IN  NYS

Recycled/  Industrial waste includes discarded materials  Composted  generated by manufacturing or industrial  30% processes and include materials such as paper  mill residuals, food processing waste, coal ash,  liquid wastes (acids, leachate, etc.), and foundry  Combustion  Landfill 59% 1% sands but do not include materials resulting  Fill/  from mining, oil or gas drilling. DEC estimates  Aggregate  10% that approximately 3.5 million tons of industrial  waste was generated in New York State in 2008 and managed as shown in Figure 7.13.  The  industrial waste landfills in New York State are described in section 9.4.5.    

 
110    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.   MATERIALS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 
 

This section describes the various materials management strategies employed by communities in  New York State and around the country.  DEC understands that the range of strategies and facilities  used to implement integrated materials management programs will differ from one community to  the next.  Therefore, this Plan does not aim to dictate the particular application of any combination  of approaches.  Rather, DEC will evaluate local solid waste management plans (LSWMPs) and solid  waste management facility permit applications against regulatory standards and for conformance  with the state policy that places a clear preference for waste prevention, reuse and recycling  above  disposal.  

8.1   WASTE PREVENTION 

 

Waste prevention, also known as source reduction or waste reduction, refers to changes in the  design, manufacture, purchase or use of materials or products to reduce their volume or toxicity  before they become waste.  The original 1987 State Plan (1987 Plan) and later, the NYS Solid Waste  Management Act (Act) placed waste prevention at the top of the state’s solid waste management  hierarchy.    As its priority standing in the hierarchy indicates, the state values the reduction of volume and  toxicity of materials that ultimately become waste as the strategy with the greatest overall  environmental benefit.  By not producing waste to begin with, we don’t have to manage it—  whether by reuse, recycling, combustion or landfilling—and we save money and natural resources  besides.    Waste prevention is not in the state’s purview alone—individuals, businesses, institutions and  governments all share responsibility for preventing waste.  To make greater use of this strategy,  manufacturers  must make better and more informed choices in the materials they use, the  amounts they produce, and the packaging they design, and consumers  must make better choices in  products they purchase.  Avoiding the creation and use of products and packaging that are  unnecessary and are destined to become waste can also avoid the consumption of energy, raw  materials and fuel required to produce and distribute the material, in addition to savings related to  its collection and end‐of‐life management.    Progress in waste prevention requires behavioral change, and behavioral change requires education.   DEC’s outreach and education program to promote waste prevention, reuse and recycling was born  in 1989 when the Bureau of Waste Reduction and Recycling was created subsequent to the 1988  Solid Waste Management Act (Act).  The Bureau developed one of the nation’s best collections of  web‐based and published waste prevention resources.  Unfortunately, DEC’s ability to execute this  important program has eroded as the staff dedicated to education and outreach has been reduced  dramatically.  A renewed emphasis on outreach and education is critical to progress.    The 1987 Plan made several recommendations to achieve waste prevention; some have been  implemented while others have not.  Notably, New York State developed a strong program to  reduce waste in agency operations and improve the state procurement process by purchasing less 
111    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

wasteful products.  Through this program, the state developed an impressive, environmentally  preferable products purchasing program that resulted in the specification of more than 100 distinct  energy‐efficient, recycled and less toxic products for use by New York State agencies.      More recently, in April 2008, Governor Paterson signed Executive Order 4 (EO4) which establishes  an Inter‐Agency Committee on Sustainability and Green Procurement (Committee) co‐chaired by the  commissioners of DEC and OGS to implement its many provisions, including the establishment of  waste prevention and paper use‐reduction goals for agencies and authorities.  In addition, EO 4  requires that the Committee establish lists of and specifications for green products each year.  The  criteria for “green products” includes recycled content, prevented waste, reduced toxicity,  recyclability, compostability and extended producer responsibility.  EO4 also requires that state  agencies designate a sustainability coordinator and develop and implement a sustainability and  environmental stewardship program.  The order specifically requires that state agencies implement  waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting programs.  (For more information,  see http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/ExecutiveOrder4.html or Appendix 8.1.)  Among the still worthy, yet unimplemented waste prevention recommendations of the 1987 Plan  are:    • • Setting packaging reduction requirements   Mandating product and packaging take backs 

These recommendations fall under what we now refer to as product stewardship or extended  producer responsibility.  Stewardship will be a key waste prevention strategy for New York State.   (See discussion below and Section 5.) 
 

8.1.1  

Reducing Volume 

Volume‐based pricing programs for waste, known as Pay as You Throw or Save Money and Reduce  Trash (PAYT/SMART), have taken hold in thousands of communities throughout the country,  including many in New York State.  These programs create a financial incentive for consumers to  waste less and reduce and recycle more.  In fact, according to USEPA, communities with  PAYT/SMART programs reduce the amount of waste destined for disposal by 40 percent, with one‐ third of that reduction attributable to waste prevention.  (For more on the benefits of PAYT/SMART  programs, see http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/tools/payt/ and Appendix 8.2.)  
             

112   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

While New York State has not developed an estimate of waste prevented, USEPA estimates for 1996  indicate that 23 million tons or about 11 percent of the waste generated was prevented, which is an  increase from 630,000 tons in 1992. 45   Nonetheless, waste prevention efforts, undertaken by  government, the private sector, and citizens, have yielded some improvements.  For example:  • • • • • • Light weighting of packaging (making the same package using less material) for almost all  packaging types  Typical aluminum beverage containers and 10‐ounce steel cans are now one‐quarter of their  1987 weight.  Product or packaging design changes that deliver the same product or service using less or  alternative material (e.g., concentrated cleaning supplies)  Target Stores eliminated 1.5 million pounds of waste by changing the specifications for  vendor packaging to have products delivered “floor ready” instead of individually packaged.  Packaging elimination through design changes and supply chain management  Sears now offers small tools and items in bins or directly on hooks, eliminating the need for  plastic blister packs. 

While there are many examples that illustrate the reduction of materials used to deliver products  and/or services to the American consumer, these changes have been driven primarily by  economics—fewer or lighter materials cost less to produce and are also cheaper to transport and  deliver to market.  The waste prevention gains experienced in New York State and around the  country have not been the direct result of government policy or environmental stewardship  constructs though, undoubtedly, public and government pressure helped highlight the waste  reduction aspects of these actions.  As transportation and material costs continue to escalate, the  economic drivers for reduced materials use will remain strong.    Despite the progress noted above, other economic and social trends have yielded an increase in the  waste stream in gross terms.  According to USEPA, the amount of MSW generated on a per capita  basis has remained relatively constant between 4.5 and 4.65 pounds per person per day since 1990.   Therefore, as the population has increased, the total amount of waste generation has increased  accordingly.  As a result, even though waste prevention and recycling have increased, the volume of  waste going to disposal has not decreased since 1990.  EPA estimates per capita generation of MSW  at 4.6 pounds per day.  By comparison, DEC estimates that waste generation in New York State in  2008 was 5.15 pounds per person per day.    The drive for “convenience” products has resulted in ever greater numbers of single‐use, disposable  products and packaging. A notable case in point is the advent of bottled water.  In the past decade,  the number of water bottles sold nationally has increased 10‐fold, from 3 billion in 1997 to 31 billion  in 2006.  Convenience foods, such as packaged lunches and cleaning products like disposable  cleaning wipes are examples of newer market entrants that yield a great deal of additional waste.   
                                                                  45  National Source Reduction Characterization Report for Municipal Solid Waste in the United States; EPA 530‐ R‐99‐034; US EPA, November 1999  113    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Furthermore, the combination of “planned obsolescence” and the rapid commercial introduction of  new technologies have created waste streams that were not anticipated two decades ago.  Products  like computers, cell phones, other electronics and appliances are constantly upgraded and designed  with shorter and shorter useful lives.  This is compounded by the fact that related components such  as batteries and chargers are not standardized and, like the electronics they augment, rapidly  become obsolete.  The result is more waste generated and generated more quickly, with volumes  expanding as the products increase in popularity and affordability.   

TRAYLESS DINING REDUCES CAFETERIA WASTE 
Many colleges within and outside of New York State are looking for ways to reduce waste  and cut spending.  For example, the University of Buffalo reduced its impact on the  environment and saved money by implementing trayless dining at its four residential  dining halls.  Lacking trays, students must take only the food they can carry.   Implementing this change:  • • • •

Reduced food scraps by 40 percent  Saved 700 gallons of water per day  Eliminated a full‐time dishwashing position  Reduced food costs by 4 percent   

  8.1.2   Reducing Toxicity 

The hierarchy emphasizes reduction in the toxicity as well as volume of waste.  New York State has  made strides to reduce the toxicity of products and packaging through two key initiatives: 
8.1.2 (a) Toxics in Packaging Clearinghouse (TPCH) 

In 1990, New York State enacted the Hazardous Packaging Act (ECL Article 37 Title II Section 37‐ 0201), which requires the reduction of lead, cadmium, mercury and hexavalent chromium used in  packaging.  The legislation was based on a model developed under the direction of the Coalition of  Northeastern Governors (CONEG) in the late 1980s with the help of a broad array of stakeholder  perspectives, including government, advocates and industry.  The model legislation has since been  adopted by 19 states and several countries.  New York State is a charter member and 2009 chair of  the TPCH, a consortium of 10 states that aim to reduce the toxicity of packaging by cooperatively  implementing the model legislation. The TPCH provides a forum for industry to advise the states  about technology changes and trends to help in decision ‐making and to help ensure a consistent 
114    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

approach across the country.  The TPCH website contains a significant amount of additional  information: http://www.toxicsinpackaging.org/index.html 
  8.1.2 (b) Mercury‐Added Consumer Products  

In 2005, New York State enacted legislation (Chapter 145, Laws of 2004, and Chapter 676, Laws of  2005) placing requirements and restrictions on the sale and distribution of most mercury ‐containing  products, based on model legislation developed by the Northeast Waste Management Officials  Association (NEWMOA). While not all the provisions of the model were included in New York State’s  version, New York’s law contains product stewardship concepts that require manufacturers and  distributors to take on some end‐of‐life management responsibilities of mercury‐containing  products they sell and trade.  The legislation authorizes New York State’s participation in an  interstate clearinghouse which, similar to the TPCH, helps states implement their mercury product  laws in a consistent manner.  More information about this program can be found on the Interstate  Mercury Education and Reduction Clearinghouse (IMERC)  website: http://www.newmoa.org/prevention/mercury/imerc.cfm    8.1.3   Waste Prevention Education and Outreach 

DEC has had an outreach and education program to promote waste prevention, reuse and recycling  since 1989 when the Bureau of Waste Reduction and Recycling was created subsequent to passage  of the 1988 Solid Waste Management Act (Act).  DEC now boasts one of the nation’s best collections  of consumer resources on these issues, mainly in the form of web‐pages and printed publications.   (See http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8502.html.)  Many New York State communities have taken  advantage of this information to educate their citizens, as have other states and municipalities  across the country.    Typical waste prevention strategies promoted in DEC outreach programs and materials include:   buying items in bulk to reduce packaging; leaving grass clippings on the lawn; printing on both sides  of paper; reducing junk mail by refusing catalogues and other unwanted circulars; using e‐mail and  the Internet instead of print copies of documents, etc.      Unfortunately, DEC’s ability to execute this important program has eroded as the staff dedicated to  education and outreach has been reduced dramatically.  In the early 1990s, DEC had one waste  prevention/recycling specialist assigned in every DEC region of the state.  By 2009, DEC had only  three regional staff who still dedicated some of their time to providing this information to the tens  of thousands of businesses, institutions, and municipalities across the state.  Altogether, there is  probably less than one FTE dedicated to waste prevention.   Despite this, DEC has been able to continue funding municipalities to develop, promote, and expand  waste prevention, reuse and recycling programs through several funding sources, most currently the  Environmental Protection Fund (EPF).  (For more information, see Section 6.)   
    115    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.1.4  

The Stewardship Solution   

Product stewardship, also known as extended producer responsibility, extends the role and  responsibility of the manufacturer of a product or package to include the entire life cycle, including  ultimate disposition of that product or package at the end of its useful life.  In stewardship  programs, manufacturers (or producers) must take either physical or financial responsibility for the  recycling or proper disposal of products and/or packages.    Product stewardship can be a powerful driver for the reduction of waste volume and toxicity.  By  placing responsibility for end‐of‐life management on the producer, these programs ensure that  manufacturers consider the end‐of‐life impacts of their product or package during the earliest  stages of design.  As such, stewardship programs create incentives for manufacturers to redesign  products and packaging to be less toxic, less bulky and lighter, as well as more recyclable.  For more  information and examples of stewardship at work, see section 5.    Given the importance of stewardship as a policy tool, DEC intends to pursue expansion of this  approach in New York State by:  • • Working with the New York State Product Stewardship Council to build support and  momentum for product and packaging stewardship  Seeking legislative authority to implement stewardship/producer responsibility programs  and exploring regional or national approaches to product stewardship through the national  Product Stewardship Institute and other regional and multi‐state organizations  Working with other stakeholders in New York State to develop consensus and support to  move a product stewardship/producer responsibility agenda   Working with the New York State Pollution Prevention Institute46  to develop stewardship  initiatives 

• •
 

8.1.5        Preventing Medical Waste  Waste reduction is practiced by many of New York State’s generators of RMW. For example, many  healthcare institutions have switched from using disposable, single‐use rigid sharps containers to  reusable sharps containers, are reprocessing unused supplies, are evaluating options such as  reusable dishware instead of single‐use polystyrene or paper, and collecting batteries and  electronics for recycling.           
                                                                  46  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund.  For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/.  116    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.1.6    • •

Findings  Waste prevention gains have been driven primarily by economics, not public policy.  Waste prevention successes have been offset by negative trends, such as planned  obsolescence and the growth of convenience products, to yield no substantial reduction in  the amount of waste going to disposal in the last two decades.  Product and packaging stewardship offers an opportunity to create an incentive to reduce  waste in product and package design.  PAYT/SMART programs create an incentive for consumers to waste less.  Public education is critical to preventing waste. 

• • •
 

   8.1.7   

Recommendations  

As we move Beyond Waste, the state and its solid waste management planning units must  implement the wide range of actions listed below.  Fully realizing these recommendations will  require additional resources—both financial and human—at the state and local level.       
8.1.7 (a) Programmatic Recommendations 

• •

Demonstrate waste prevention in state operations by implementing EO 4’s waste  prevention and paper use reduction goals  Maximize current education programs to organize workshops, meetings and otherwise  communicate with key constituencies to:    o o Encourage, promote and demand longer‐life products  Encourage leave‐it‐on‐the‐lawn/grasscycling and other organic waste prevention  strategies  Promote junk mail and phone book reduction/opt‐out lists   

o • • •

Expand the DEC Waste Prevention Education Program to reach a broader audience  Allocate funding for community‐based education through the EPF and other sources  Work with the Pollution Prevention Institute (P2I) to evaluate products and packages on the  market, identify priorities for reduction and redesign, target outreach to New York State  companies manufacturing priority products or packages, and solicit research and  development projects for packaging and product design models  Require planning units to evaluate and implement waste prevention programs, such as  outreach, education, and subsidized backyard composting bins Develop written guidance on  organic waste prevention for specific sectors (e.g., grocery stores) based on similar  documents available from Cornell University’s Waste Management Institute and successful 
117  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

strategies being employed by other states and organizations (e.g., Massachusetts  Supermarket Composting Handbook and several documents by NERC); distribute the  guidance to all known facilities in that industry in the state and other interested parties  (e.g., local recycling coordinators, etc.) 
  8.1.7 (b) Legislative Recommendations 

• • •

Establish product and packaging stewardship programs (See section 10.1.2.)  Require communities in New York State to implement PAYT/SMART programs unless they  can demonstrate other methods to achieve the state’s waste reduction and recycling goals  Expand mercury‐containing product sale restrictions to be consistent with the model  legislation developed by NEWMOA and implemented in other states, with very limited  exemptions   

 8.2   REUSE 
Reuse is the recovery of materials and products for the same or a similar use for which they were  originally produced.  It involves the collection and distribution of useful products, such as household  and office furniture, food, building materials, books, sporting equipment and appliances, from those  who no longer want or need them to those who can put them to use.  Reuse includes  remanufacturing and refurbishing products for their original intended use.    Practicing reuse helps to build a materials conservation ethic and illustrates, in a hands‐on way, the  benefits of moving Beyond Waste.  Like waste prevention, effective implementation of reuse  strategies often requires behavioral change and is aided, therefore, by education and outreach  efforts to motivate new actions and activities.  The solid waste management hierarchy does not distinguish between reuse and recycling in the  second position on the hierarchy, and prior state plans have considered these two strategies  together.  However, reuse typically offers greater environmental, economic, and social benefits than  recycling, and the actions required to maximize reuse are distinct from those that increase recycling.   Therefore, this Plan addresses them independently.    Reuse offers New York State triple bottom‐line benefits. Because reuse maintains the integrity of  the original product, it retains the embedded energy and value of the materials used, with obvious  and significant environmental benefits.  Reusing, remanufacturing and refurbishing products can  also have significant economic benefit.  For example, the labor intensity of computer repair makes it  a potential job creator.  According to the Institute for Local Self‐Reliance, refurbishing 10,000 tons of  used electronics for reuse creates 296 jobs as compared to only one job to landfill it. 47   Because  reuse operations generally capture and retain the value of higher‐end products, such as refurbished 
                                                                  47   Institute for Local Self‐Reliance, Washington DC,  1997; http://www.ilsr.org/recycling/recyclingmeansbusiness.html  118    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

computers and building supplies, the jobs created generally require more skilled labor than simple  sorting and processing.    Perhaps most important, reuse also offers tremendous social value. For example, reuse offers high‐ quality office furniture to startups and nonprofits operating on tight budgets; provides computers  and supplies to school children and arts organizations; provides furnishings for the homes of people  transitioning out of shelters; creates a source of more affordable building materials for homeowners  and contractors, and feeds the hungry.  Across New York State and the nation, there is a significant and growing infrastructure for reuse,  particularly through nonprofit organizations.  Thrift shops, such as Salvation Army and Goodwill, and  consignment stores redistribute clothing and furniture to the frugal and those in need; the proceeds  of sales also often support people in need.  Food banks in the state and other nonprofits (e.g., City  Harvest, Long Island Harvest, etc.) redistribute surplus food to the hungry.  Retail centers that  specialize in building materials (e.g., Build It Green, Buffalo Reuses, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStores)  sell used or surplus building materials to the public at reduced prices. While other reuse centers  (e.g., Materials for the Arts, Hudson Valley Materials Exchange, Material Resource Center) provide  supplies for school children and arts organizations. And, of course, community tag sales and  individual yard sales create a vibrant market for reuse.  With regard to commercial and industrial  reusables, several materials exchanges  operate in the state today, serving much of the population.   (See Appendix 8.3 for a directory of reuse organizations in New York State.)    Nonetheless, reuse opportunities are not fully used or consistently available to all regions of the  state, and quantities of readily reusable material still go to waste in New York State.  Work remains  to promote the full use of the state’s existing reuse infrastructure through education and outreach,  and to fill infrastructure gaps.  On the community level, reuse can be a low‐cost, low‐effort  waste management strategy that provides great  environmental gains.  Because local transfer stations often  already serve as drop‐off sites for recyclables and waste,  many communities have added structures at these facilities  to allow residents to drop off products and materials they  no longer need and take, at no cost, items they can use.    On a commercial scale, New York State is fortunate to be  home to the Rochester Institute of Technology’s National  Reuse shed at a rural transfer station  Center for Remanufacturing and Resource Recovery  (Center).  The Center fosters reuse of components and equipment through applied research and  development of tools and technologies for efficient remanufacturing and environmentally benign  product design.  With funding from ESD, the center has done valuable work to advance reuse (e.g.,  rebuilding of small engines, remanufacturing of toner cartridges, etc.).   New York State also hosts a statewide chapter of the Reuse Alliance—a professional association that  connects, supports, and promotes reuse sector organizations. Reuse Alliance hosts a variety of  programs and services to sector members, including a web‐based certificate program, online  resources, and annual conferences and meetings. 
119    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

It is important to note that quality control and data collection are critical elements of any reuse  program.  Many organizations engaged in reuse are confronted with donated materials that are  damaged, dirty or otherwise undesirable.  Reuse education programs must emphasize the  importance of reuse but also specify what items are suitable for reuse and in what condition (i.e.,  “readily reusable”). Likewise there is currently no sector‐backed standard for collecting and  distributing data (e.g., tons diverted from the waste stream, value of materials donated, etc.).  Standards for quality control and data management would make the sector even more effective and  could aid in public outreach efforts. 
 

8.2.1        Building Deconstruction and Materials Reuse  A new but rapidly growing trend to maximize reuse in the construction and demolition industry,  called deconstruction, is taking hold in New York State and nationally. This technique involves taking  apart a building or structure in a manner that allows higher value components to be separated as  they are removed and then directed for reuse.    Deconstruction has the potential to: create training and job opportunities; foster the creation and  expansion of reuse retailers to distribute the salvaged material from deconstruction projects, and  benefit the environment by diverting valuable resources into productive use.  Deconstruction can be  cost competitive by generating materials sales revenues and by reducing waste disposal costs.  Deconstruction initiatives often market their materials through or to building materials reuse  outlets.  In the last decade, a number of building materials reuse stores have been launched across  the state.  ESD’s Environmental Services Unit has provided funding for building material reuse,  recycling and deconstruction via its Environmental Investment Program.  (See Section 6 and  Appendix 6.2 for more on ESD efforts.) 
 

8.2.2      Reuse of Consumable Food 
8.2.2 (a) Food Banks 

DEC estimates that in 2008, more than 1 million tons of usable food were disposed of by New  Yorkers.  Recovering unused food to feed hungry people is an important component of any food  management process. In 1998, about 36 million Americans, including 14 million children, lived in  households that suffered either from hunger (about 10 million) or food insecurity. An estimated 21  million Americans depend on food donations.  New York State has a comprehensive food bank  system in place that covers every county in the state, but these programs frequently run out of  supplies. Meanwhile, about 27 percent of the food supply in the US is disposed of each year,  representing more than 300 pounds of food for every person in the country. For each 5 percent of  those discards recovered, 4 million people could be fed each day. 48 

                                                                  48  Waste Not, Want Not: Feeding the Hungry and Reducing Solid Waste Through Food Recovery, USEPA.      120    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Although not all discarded food is suitable for human consumption—NYS’s Department of Health  regulates the conditions under which food can be redistributed—there are significant sources of  excess food that can be redirected to feed people, and there are many well‐established  organizations to assist with its redistribution. Generators of excess food that currently participate in  these efforts include colleges, restaurants, and grocery stores. These sectors work with food banks  and local food providers, such as soup kitchens, to deliver leftovers in a timely manner. To  encourage food donations, the federal “Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act” protects  businesses, organizations, and individuals that donate food in good faith from legal liabilities that  might arise from their donations. However, to continue to increase supplies to those who need  them, it is critical that more and improved connections are made between generators and food  providers. Such connections are now being facilitated by outreach from food banks, DEC’s regional  food scrap forums and supplemental actions, and a statewide food residuals listserve to help match  generators and users of excess food. 
  8.2.2 (b)  Animal Feed 

Farms and zoos can also use food scraps as feed for their animals. While reuse of food scraps for  animal feed is somewhat limited by the specific dietary needs and restrictions of certain animal  populations, animal feed represents a high‐value end‐use for food scraps that should be facilitated.  The acceptable types of food scraps will depend on a number of factors:   • • • • • •
 

Nutrient density – energy, protein, minerals, roughage, etc.  Target animals – the type and age of the animals  Quality and variability of the food scraps – variability in nutrient content and contamination  with non‐food material  Moisture content – moisture levels must be compatible with the feed system (dry or slurry)  at the farm or zoo   Handling – the food residual production schedule, delivery schedule, use schedule, and  ability to store food must be coordinated to meet the needs of all parties  Regulations – the New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets (Ag & Markets) has  restrictions on acceptable food for some animals 

8.2.3         Reuse of Medical Devices  Advances in medical science and, in particular, minimally invasive surgical and diagnostic procedures  have stimulated the development of new and improved medical devices.  The design of devices for  reusability is particularly important in an effort to provide cost‐effective healthcare. Collection and  reprocessing of reusable medical devices is growing in New York State, with commercial RMW  processing facilities often offering this service to healthcare facilities. However, there are US Food  and Drug Administration requirements for reprocessing reusable medical devices that require  cleaning, disinfection or sterilization prior to reuse. 
121    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

8.2.4         Findings  • • •
 

Reuse provides multiple environmental, economic and social benefits.  Significant infrastructure exists, particularly through charities, but reuse options are not  consistently available or convenient across the state.  Potential exists to expand reuse, particularly in the key sectors of building deconstruction  and food redistribution. 

8.2.5        Recommendations  As we move Beyond Waste, the state and its solid waste management planning units must  implement the range of actions listed below.  Fully realizing these recommendations will require  additional resources—both financial and human—at the state and local level.     
8.2.5 (a) Programmatic Recommendations 

Support and promote reuse centers and material exchanges: DEC will continue its support of  existing materials exchanges and will seek additional resources to fund or otherwise support  commercial and residential online exchanges (e.g., NY WasteMatch, NY Biomass Trader, NY  FoodTrader, NY C&D Material Trader, Pencil Box, ReSwap, FreeCycle), reuse centers,  technical assistance, networking forums, quality control, data management, and other  means to foster the reuse sector  Maintain and expand outreach and education efforts on reuse: strengthen the reuse  component of the DEC website; develop a broad education campaign on the importance of  reuse  Support and promote food and clothing donation programs:  food banks and charitable  organizations play an important role in providing necessary support for the state’s indigent  population; DEC will support these programs and encourage other relevant state agencies to  do so.   Encourage designing for disassembly and reuse: Through the New York State Pollution  Prevention Institute 49  and other outreach efforts, the state will educate manufacturers on  the feasibility and benefits of designing for reuse and remanufacturing.   Encourage and incentivize building deconstruction and building material reuse: The state  will encourage deconstruction and building materials reuse by removing disincentives in  state policy and funding programs and, with additional resources, foster the growth of  deconstruction through funding, incentives, and support. 

                                                                  49  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers, funded through the Environmental Protection Fund.  For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/.  122    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Incorporate reuse into government procurement and asset management programs: State  agencies will be authorized and required to ensure that gently used furniture, equipment  and supplies are directed to reuse, and that government buildings are deconstructed  instead of demolished.   To the extent that barriers to the purchasing of used products exist,  they will be reexamined and, if not serving a valid public pupose, be removed.  Require planning units to plan for reuse: Planning units must address and, where possible,  create infrastructure and implement outreach and education programs to foster reuse.    Encourage the use of the Food Bank Network: DEC will work with municipalities and  planning units to organize meetings in each food bank region of the state, inviting  representatives of relevant state and local agencies, local recycling coordinators, and  institutional and commercial sources of excess food. The meetings should focus on  identifying potential new suppliers to food banks, raising funds to expand food bank  activities, creating education programs for commercial and institutional generators about  food donation options, and addressing regulatory, economic and other barriers to increased  food redistribution.    Work with appropriate state agencies (e.g., OGS, the Dormitory Authority) to incorporate  “design for deconstruction” concepts into the many other aspects of sustainable building  design and construction and to create incentives for deconstruction in state projects.  

• •

 
8.2.5 (b) Legislative Recommendations 

Amend the Creosote Ban to allow the sale of used railroad ties for non‐residential  landscaping purposes. 

123   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3 RECYCLING 
“MORE PEOPLE RECYCLE THAN VOTE... RECYCLING IS MORE POPULAR THAN DEMOCRACY.”                   Jerry Powell, Editor, Resource Recycling Magazine 

Recycling involves the recovery, processing, sale and use of materials that otherwise would be  destined for disposal.  While waste prevention provides more significant environmental benefits,  recycling shares the second tier of New York State’s solid waste management hierarchy with reuse  because it conserves natural resources and energy, reduces air and water pollution, and can save  money.  Reuse offers greater overall environmental benefit because it generally retains the  embedded energy and material value with minimal processing.  Recycling, on the other hand,  generally consumes more energy and fuel in the processing and transportation of materials than  reuse.  For materials that have already been produced and are not readily reusable, recycling is the best  strategy from an environmental perspective, because it conserves natural resources by keeping  valuable materials in circulation and, in turn, reduces the volume of waste destined for disposal.  By  offsetting the use of virgin materials, recycling avoids the environmental impacts of mining,  extracting, transporting and using those materials in production and provides significant GHG  reductions.    Industries that replace virgin feedstocks with recycled materials pay less for the raw materials and  energy consumed to make their products, helping them to remain competitive in today’s global  market.                       

124   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recycling Saves Energy, Reduces Pollution and Combats Climate Change 
Using recycled aluminum in place of virgin bauxite:   • • • reduces the energy used in production by greater than 90 percent  decreases air pollution by 95 percent   decreases water pollution by 97 percent 

Substituting recycled paper for pulp from trees:  • • • reduces energy use by 23 to 74 percent (depending on the paper grade)  reduces air pollution by 74 percent   reduces water pollution by 35 percent (source: Wasting and Recycling in the US,  2000” Grassroots Recycling Network, 2000; p. 25.) 

Recycling one ton of:  • • • • aluminum reduces GHG emissions by 13.7 tons  office paper reduces GHG by 4.3 tons  newspaper reduces GHG by 2.5 tons   steel cans reduces GHG by 1.7 tons (source: “Solid Waste Management and GHG,  3rd Edition” USEPA, 2006. 

Recycling offers other economic benefits as well.  It creates jobs in collection and processing in  addition to the manufacturing jobs associated with creating the new products.  According to the  Recycling Economic Information Study Update: Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New York and  Pennsylvania released in February 2009 by NERC, more than 2,300 New York State businesses are  directly engaged in recycling, with another 250 in businesses related to or dependent on recycling  (e.g., glass container manufacturing using recycled content). The recycling businesses support more  than 13,000 jobs, while businesses related to or dependent on recycling support another 14,000  jobs in the state.    Today, there are more than 250 recyclables handling and recovery facilities (RHRFs) in New York  State, including material recovery facilities (MRFs) and convenience and transfer stations that  aggregate recyclables for further processing at MRFs.  Half of these facilities are privately owned and  half are in public ownership, though some of the publicly owned facilities are privately operated.       
125    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

ALUMINUM RECYCLING COMBATS CLIMATE CHANGE AND  CONSERVES RESOURCES LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY  
International aluminum manufacturer Alcoa’s use of scrap aluminum in place of  virgin reduces GHG emissions and reduces the need to mine bauxite. Alcoa’s annual  operations globally have:   ‐Recycled 772,000 metric tons of aluminum   ‐Replaced 4,000,000 metric tons of bauxite that would have been mined   ‐Reduced 7,000,000 metric tons of CO2E produced     In the Massena, NY facility alone, the company’s annual operations have:   ‐Recycled 127,000 metric tons of aluminum   ‐Replaced 658,000 metric tons of bauxite that would have been mined   ‐Reduced 1,152,000 metric tons of CO2E produced  
  8.3.1  Reporting, Data and Recycling Rate Calculations 

Data collection and subsequent reporting on recycling rates and program performance has been a  constant challenge in New York State and nationally.  In New York State, the 1987 Plan and each  subsequent update has identified data and reporting as an area of concern, as has the Legislative  Commission on Solid Waste Management in its series of Where Will the Garbage Go reports.   Nationally, the EPA, BioCycle Magazine and others have identified data and reporting as critical to  gauging progress toward recycling goals but fraught with data collection, reporting, measurement  and analytic difficulty.  As a result, reported disposal and recycling numbers tend to be imprecise at  best, with their unreliability compounded when used to compare data across jurisdictions and  across time.    Since 1988, DEC has relied almost entirely on planning units 50  to aggregate, analyze and report  recycling and composting data for all generating sectors within their geographic areas, while  additional data was gathered from facilities (composting facilities, landfills, MWCs, etc.) that  manage materials and waste.  However, collecting reliable data has been challenging for the  planning units as well, especially with respect to commercial and institutionally generated materials.  
                                                                  50  Planning units contain two or more local jurisdictions that jointly plan and implement solid waste  management programs.   For a full discussion of planning units, see Section 3.2.2.   126    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

For the most part, the strongest and most consistent data collected has been municipally collected  residential materials; the weakest is from regions or planning units dominated by private collection.   DEC regularly collects data from municipal recycling programs through an annual survey of the  state’s 64 planning units (For a profile of each planning unit, see Appendix 3.3).   During the last  decade, DEC has typically only received annual recycling reports from approximately 80 percent of  the state’s planning units, representing about 90 percent of the state’s population.  The data was  not independently verified and is not uniform; some planning units report only residential materials  recycled, while others report only materials that the municipalities handle, and still others include  all commercial and industrial materials recycled or processed within the planning unit.    Even so, the data provided by planning units was considered the best available and was used for  both state and local planning and reporting purposes.  To avoid double counting materials already  reported by planning units, DEC did not include recycling and composting facility report data in the  state’s recovery rate calculations.    From 1987 to 2002, DEC calculated and reported the total recovery rate based on materials  reported by planning units supplemented with data from other sources, including the Bottle Bill,  beneficial use determination (BUD) data (not including fuel and landfill related uses); the Port  Authority of New York/New Jersey (PANY/NJ) and the American Forest and Paper Association (AFPA)  for non‐municipally generated materials, and facility reports for waste disposal and export data.  In  2003, DEC discontinued use of the PANY/NJ and AFPA data and the facility reports for disposal to  avoid double counting because it was expected that by 2003, most of that material was included in  planning unit reports.    Based on the best information available at the time, DEC estimated that in 1997, 42 percent of the  solid waste generated in the state was diverted through a combination of reuse and recycling.  Using  the data received from the sources described above, DEC reported that the total state recycling rate  rose from three percent in 1987 to 50 percent by 2002.      In September 1997, the United EPA published Measuring Recycling: A Guide for State and Local  Governments (EPA 30‐R‐97‐011), intended to provide a consistent methodology to compare  recycling achievements of states and localities.  The EPA methodology examines only the recovery of  MSW‐generated by households, commercial or institutional sources, not C&D debris, industrial  waste or biosolids.  New York State, on the other hand, had since 1987 reported total recovery,  which includes all recyclables and yard trimmings plus other recyclable materials, such as Bottle Bill  material, C&D debris, non‐hazardous industrial materials, and some beneficially used materials.  In 2000, DEC also began calculating the state’s recycling rate using USEPA’s methodology and  planning unit reported data.  With the considerable variability of the reporting methodologies of the  planning units, this separate MSW recycling rate calculation was considered less reliable. Using this  method, New York State’s MSW recycling rate remained relatively stable between 26 and 30  percent between 2000 and 2005.   For development of this plan, DEC undertook additional analysis of the data reported by planning  units as compared to facility data.  This intensive analysis revealed that a significant amount of  material that is handled in private sector recycling, transfer and disposal facilities has not routinely  been included in most planning unit reports.  Also, closer scrutiny of the reports revealed errors in 
127    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

units of measure, terminology, and other areas that substantially alter the amount of materials  recycled and waste disposed. Therefore, DEC’s reliance on planning unit reports has likely resulted  in data gaps.  The greatest differences appear to be related to planning units underreporting waste  disposal, both at in‐state facilities and exported and, to a lesser extent, the underreporting of  recyclables.  This difference is more apparent in recent years because DEC has been improving data  collection and reporting by those facilities.    Given this effort, DEC now believes that the actual facility‐reported data is the best available and is  more representative of the reality of materials management in New York State.  It is important to  note that some recyclables are sent directly out of state, and many recycling facilities (e.g., scrap  metal yards, recycled paper manufacturers, etc.) are not required to report to DEC, so the recycling  figures may be understated.  However, much of this material is likely to be reported by either  transfer stations or recycling facilities.  Beginning with data for 2006, DEC is using facility report data as the basis for estimating both the  total recovery rate and the MSW recycling rate, using the EPA methodology, supplemented with  data from other sources, including BUD reports and, where available, export data collected by the  states that import New York State’s waste.  Using these data sources, the state’s MSW recycling rate  was 20 percent in 2008, and the total recycling rate was 36 percent.   The 20 percent MSW recycling  rate is well below both the EPA’s estimated national recycling rate of 33.4 percent and the Biocycle  Magazine “State of Garbage In America Survey” estimate of 28.6 percent, despite the significant  efforts of the state, local planning units, industry and individual New Yorkers.    While the calculations for 2008 as compared to 2005 and earlier create an apparent drop in the level  of recycling in New York State, these differences can be attributed most directly to the different  methodology used to calculate the rate, not an actual reduction in recycling activity.  In addition, as  described more completely in section 7.1.2, New York State’s waste stream is somewhat different  from the EPA’s national estimate, which effectively lowers the anticipated recovery rate for  the  state using EPA protocols.  Applying the EPA’s recovery rate percentages to the materials  composition estimates in New York would yield an expected recycling rate of 26 percent.    As such, the analysis undertaken to prepare this Plan also underscores the need for a new metric  based on more reliable, available and accurate data and supports the use of a percapita disposal  metric to be the key measure of progress in implementing this Plan.  Disposal weights are perhaps  the most accurate metric DEC can acquire because disposal facilities are under direct state  regulatory control.  Normalizing data to a per capita basis reduces the data anomalies inherent in a  state with substantial demographic and geographic disparities.    The analysis also supports greater focus at the state, regional and national levels to improve the  consistency of reporting mechanisms and platforms.  Better and more uniformly managed data will  improve performance nationwide and allow for more fair and true comparisons across jurisdictional  lines.  Nonetheless, this analysis confirms that New York State must refocus and redouble efforts to  improve recycling and reduce waste.   
   

128   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3.2       Local Responsibility  The Act required municipalities to adopt laws or ordinances that require waste generators in all  sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, institutional and industrial) to separate their recyclable  materials from waste at the point of generation (i.e., source separation) by no later than September  1, 1992.  Thus, state law placed the responsibility for designing, implementing and enforcing  recycling programs on local governments and the planning units they created.  The Act specifically  directs “[a] state‐local partnership, in which the basic responsibility for the planning and operation  of solid waste management facilities remains with local governments and the state provides  necessary guidance and assistance…”      Under the Act, the state was directed to regulate solid waste management facilities, develop state  solid waste management plans, develop programs to promote waste reduction and recycling market  development, provide technical assistance to local governments, approve LSWMPs, and fund  various recycling‐related activities at the local level. (For more on state and local roles in materials  management, see Section 3; for more on state investments in recycling, see Section 6.)  As described in Section 3, subsequent to the Act, 64 planning units were formed to manage solid  waste within their borders.  A significant number of planning units are organized on the county  level, while several encompass local governments from multiple counties, others are subsumed  within solid waste authorities created by the State Legislature, and still others are town and city  based, such as those in Long Island and New York City.  Although most municipalities did adopt the requisite local source separation laws or ordinances  before the statutory deadline of September 1992, in some cases, local laws still lack fundamental  and important provisions, such as requiring source separation in all generating sectors and providing  for enforcement. In many cases where the laws adopted include enforcement provisions,  municipalities have not effectively used them, particularly for commercial and institutional  generators.  The programs and infrastructure developed, and, by extension, the progress in recycling has varied  dramatically by planning unit and municipality, as evidenced by the data presented in Figure 8.1.   While some of this variation may be related to reporting anomalies, there are clearly significant  differences in recycling performance.  Recovery rates for MSW paper and containers range from a  low of 17 pounds per person to a high of 764 pounds per person per year.  While there is no single  explanation for why some communities have performed better than others, data and anecdotal  information suggest that success in recycling is related to the municipalities’ commitment of both  staff and financial resources to education, enforcement and infrastructure, and the level of  dedication and drive behind the program as well as financial incentives in place, such as  PAYT/SMART, to drive participation.   

129   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

MEASURING SUCCESS 
Recycling diversion rates are a fair barometer of  progress on a statewide basis or in areas where  closed systems (e.g., flow control) are in place.   However, there are many variables that arise in  calculating a recycling rate.  Issues like how to  account for yard trimmings or food scraps that  are composted at home, how light weighting  (e.g., reduction in the weight of containers) and  overall materials‐use reduction (e.g., fewer  newspapers being read) affect recycling rates,  etc., have been debated at length.  It is often  difficult to derive an accurate diversion  percentage in part because some planning units  under or over report the  full volumes of waste  sent for disposal or recycling, when, for  example, some local waste is transported for  management outside of the planning unit or the  reverse.  In addition, some planning units report  significant amounts of scrap metal, presumably  processed by private companies and reported to  the planning units, while most do not.   

The challenge is to inspire the  highest‐performing communities  to continue to strive for even  lower levels of waste disposal,  while working with lower‐ performing communities to  bring them to the level of the  more successful efforts.    Instead of diversion rates, then,  DEC is using per capita recycling  weight, broken out by major  material category, and per capita  disposal rates to better measure  local programs.  Even these  metrics may not support  comparisons from one  community to the next if, for  example, one community enjoys  a sizable seasonal population.   However, the per capita metrics  will help to gauge each  community’s progress Beyond  Waste by determining whether  their recycling tonnages are  increasing and disposal tonnages  are decreasing with time.  (See  figure 8.1 for illustration and  sidebar for more information.) 

 

To better understand the status  of waste reduction and recycling,  we must go beyond the  calculation of a recycling rate and look for new metrics that more accurately evaluate efforts. As it  implements this Plan, DEC will transition to a metric primarily based on per capita tonnages recycled  and wasted.   In 2008, New Yorkers recycled and composted about 382 pounds of MSW per person  per year and disposed of 1,497 pounds of MSW per capita annually.  Nationally, the average  American recycles and composts 562 pounds of MSW per person per year and disposes 1,336  pounds of MSW.  Using this measure to gauge the state’s progress in implementing the 1988 Act, the per capita MSW  disposal rate has dropped by nearly 25 percent, from 5.4 pounds per person per day in 1988 to 4.1  pounds per person per day in 2008. Using this metric, DEC will measure achievements under this  Plan; as disposal numbers go down, we will know we are progressing toward our goal of moving  Beyond Waste. 
130    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 8.1 2008 PER CAPITA MSW RECYCLING AS DETERMINED FROM PLANNING UNIT & FACILITY REPORTS   

 
Co.—County    SWMA‐‐Solid Waste Management Authority  SWMB‐‐Solid Waste Management Board  SWMC‐‐Solid Waste Management  Committee  SWDD‐‐Solid Waste Disposal District  SWMP‐‐Solid Waste Management  Partnership  WMD‐‐Waste Management District 

  131    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3.3          New York State’s Bottle Bill  The Returnable Container Law (also known as the Bottle Bill) remains the most effective recycling  program in the state, capturing, on average, 73 percent of the targeted cans and bottles sold  annually.  In the 25 years since it was enacted, the Bottle Bill program has reclaimed more than six  million tons of material.  By promoting recycling and discouraging the wasting of that material, the  program helped conserve 285 billion BTUs of energy and avoid the release of 4.8 million metric tons  of GHGs.  Notably, states with a $.10 deposit achieve even higher recycling rates, averaging more  than 90 percent.  Unfortunately, the drafters of the original Bottle Bill, in addressing the popular soda and beer  market, could not have contemplated the significant expansion of the beverage industry to include  bottled water, sport drinks, fruit juices, tea and other non‐carbonated beverages, none of which are  covered by the law.  In 2009, thanks to the leadership of Governor Paterson, the New York State  budget included an expansion of the state’s Bottle Bill to capture water bottles and redirect 80  percent of unclaimed deposits into the state’s general fund.   
 

8.3.4          Engaging All Sectors    While many municipalities and planning units have established strong residential collection  programs, DEC suspects that recycling in the commercial and institutional sectors has been much  less aggressive and much less successful in many areas of the state.  Many municipalities and  planning units continue to view commercial and institutional waste as a private sector responsibility  outside their control or influence.    It is important to note that much recycling does happen in the commercial and industrial sectors  that is not regularly reported to or by the planning units and is not tracked, therefore, by the  planning unit. Nonetheless, there are countless office buildings, including government offices,  apartment buildings, schools, and other businesses and institutions that do not have effective  recycling programs or, often enough, any recycling at all.    The commercial and institutional waste stream often contains significant quantities of valuable  material.  However, many companies do not have the time or expertise to identify the value in their  materials or to design programs and systems to source separate those materials.  Many recycling  companies and consulting services specialize in auditing a company’s waste stream and designing  recycling programs with an eye toward maximizing disposal cost savings and secondary materials  revenues.  These types of technical assistance efforts are critical to ensuring program  implementation and capturing the economic and environmental value of recycling for the  commercial and institutional sectors.    Notably, as of 2007, many public and private schools in New York State still did not have recycling  programs in place.  After years of confusion, in 2007, DEC partnered with the State Education  Department to inform all schools in New York State that they are required to recycle and launched a  School Recycling Challenge.  Nonetheless, New York State is fortunate to be home to some  outstanding school recycling programs.  For example, New York City supports its collection program  with curricula that enable teachers to integrate recycling into lesson plans, and many school districts 
132    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

have developed robust recycling programs either on their own (e.g., Goff Middle School in East  Greenbush) or through programs like the Go Green Initiative (e.g., Syracuse Central Schools). 51    To increase recycling rates, municipalities, planning units and companies must step up their efforts  to ensure that recycling programs are in place in the commercial and institutional sector.  For its  part, DEC will seek legislative authority to increase the state’s enforcement capacity in this area to  assist municipalities in their efforts. (See section 9.1.) 
 

8.3.5          Improving Recycling Rates and Participation  Part of the reason that recycling rates have not increased appreciably in the last decade is that in  most municipalities, the “low hanging fruit” has been harvested—most, if not all, New Yorkers have  access to recycling programs at home, and most people who are inclined to recycle are able to do so  at least to some degree.  To achieve increases, communities need to expand participation and seek  other methods to improve materials capture rates, identify additional materials to recycle and  expand markets for recovered materials.  To improve the recycling rate of materials that are already targeted by municipalities for source  separation, there is a need to engage those who do not already participate and to encourage those  who do recycle to capture all that is recyclable wherever they live, work or play.  Recycling programs   must be designed or modified to provide opportunities to recycle wherever waste is generated,  whether in residences, in public spaces, in offices, in schools, etc.  Improving participation on a  broad scale will require a combination of the following tools:    • Education: With or without incentive programs, communities that have dedicated resources  for outreach and education experience greater recycling success.  The public must be  continually made aware of the many reasons why recycling is important: to reduce both the  environmental and financial costs of waste disposal, combat global warming, reduce  pollution from the extraction and manufacture of virgin materials and to comply with the  law.  They also must be reminded regularly about what materials are collected and how, and  they must believe that their materials are actually recycled, not mixed with garbage and  disposed of.  It is not possible to overstate the importance of employing dedicated recycling  coordinators for this type of effort.  As evidence, regions in which DEC has a strong recycling  outreach presence or, more important, in which planning units have recycling outreach  staff, experience better recycling performance than those without dedicated staff.  Incentives: The most common incentive program is volume‐based pricing, also referred to as  “quantity‐based user fees,” like PAYT or SMART.  In PAYT/SMART systems, generators are  charged for disposal based on the amount of waste picked up or dropped off, with recycling  and composting programs provided for free.  PAYT/SMART programs in communities as  diverse as Seoul Korea and Worchester, MA have consistently reduced waste going to 

                                                                  51  For more information on school recycling,  see http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8803.html, http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/tools/localgov/sect ors/school.htm, and http://www.gogreeninitiative.org/      133    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

disposal by 40 percent, with one‐third of that reduction attributable to increases in  recycling, one‐third to composting and one‐third to waste prevention and reuse.   PAYT/SMART programs can be implemented in a variety of ways, depending on the needs  and goals of the community.  For example, some PAYT/SMART programs rely on the sale to  the consumer of bags, stickers or tags to measure, segregate and label waste to be  disposed, while other programs use specifically designed collection containers as a core  element of their measurement strategy.  (For more on PAYT/SMART, see Appendix 8.2.)  The  EPA and DEC have encouraged these programs since the mid 1990s and, according to  USEPA, volume‐based pricing systems are currently in place in more than 7,000  communities in North America, including more than 400 in New York State.   A second type of incentive program rewards households with “points,” redeemable as coupons and  credits at retailers who volunteer to support the program, based on the amount of material set out  for recycling.  This strategy requires a capital investment in carts with imbedded computer chips to  track volumes and calculate “points.”  That investment has proven very successful.  For example, in  one pilot program, Philadelphia, PA increased recycling participation from 7 percent to 90 percent of  households.  In Wilmington, DE, a similar program helped the city increase its recycling rate from 3  percent to 32 percent in the first year.    Special incentive events can also be run from time to time to spur additional interest in recycling.    For example, the Town of Yorktown, NY celebrated the tenth anniversary of its recycling program by  sending out educational materials.  Included in the items sent to residents was an entry form for the  “best blue bin” contest.  Entries were drawn at random, boxes inspected unannounced, and  participants with impeccably sorted recyclables were awarded prizes, such as gift cards to local  businesses.  This event succeeded in increasing recycling rates for the town by several percentage  points.  The educational materials were partially funded through DEC’s MWR&R grant program.  Planning units can also provide incentives for their member municipalities to increase recycling  participation.  Westchester County tabulates the materials sent for recycling by municipalities and  calculates the amount of money saved by recycling rather than disposal.  “Recycling Report Cards”  are then issued to each municipality to publicize the economic benefits realized by taxpayers  through recycling and to help communities gauge their own progress.  The report cards for the 2008  reporting data reflect increased recycling volumes during the prior year in each municipality that  sent material to the county MRF.     • Access to recycling collections: Many public events and public spaces do not provide  recycling for participants or visitors.  Increasing the presence of recycling collection bins at  concerts, street festivals, parks, NYC subways, transit stations, and other public spaces will  enable greater levels of recycling and reinforce the recycling message.  Many communities  around the country have vibrant public space recycling programs.  New York City’s recent  public space recycling pilot project demonstrated that recycling in parks, transit stations,  and other public spaces can be efficient and effective.  (For more information,  see http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/html/recycling/public_space_recycling.shtml)  Enforcement: When all else fails, citizens, businesses and local governments can be  motivated to source separate their recyclables by the possibility of a fine or other 
134    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

enforcement action.  Enforcement is a logical extension of the education program—the  backstop in the case where other means of education do not achieve the necessary change.   In most cases, DEC lacks the authority to enforce local recycling requirements, and there is a  wide disparity in the approaches to enforcement taken by New York State’s municipalities  and planning units.  Several municipalities in New York State have active recycling  enforcement programs that both improve participation and raise revenue, but many  planning units do not have dedicated staff, resources, or clear authority to enforce recycling  requirements.  It also appears that some elected officials oppose enforcement and,  therefore, block programmatic efforts fearing potential voter backlash.  Even in  communities that have strong programs, enforcement in the commercial and institutional  sector is the exception rather than the rule.  This must be resolved to achieve increases in  recycling. 

INCREASING PARTICIPATION RATES 
Many communities in New York State have improved participation in recycling  programs through well‐promoted campaigns.  For example, as a part of its  commitment to combat climate change, in 2008 Westchester County stepped up its  recycling enforcement efforts.  In January of that year, the county informed residents  and businesses that it would begin to enforce recycling requirements.  For the first  month, waste and recyclables that were improperly sorted were left on the curb and  tagged with a yellow sticker.  Starting in February, both municipal and private haulers  licensed to operate within the county did not collect materials that were improperly  sorted, and violators were fined.  The program was extremely successful, with the  volume of materials collected for recycling increasing by 25 percent before the full  enforcement program was underway in February.   

         
        135    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3.6       

Collection Strategies 

As they seek to improve performance of their source‐separation programs, communities have  multiple collection options, including curbside and drop‐off programs, and single, dual or three‐ stream collection.  To control costs and minimize GHG emissions related to collections, it is  important that communities develop collection strategies and routes that maximize efficiency and  ensure that recycling trucks are operating at full capacity.  Much of the state’s population is served by curbside recycling collection, although the more rural  communities tend to rely on drop‐off sites and transfer stations.  Since the passage of the 1988 Act,  DEC has consistently advised that the same level of service for waste collection must be offered for  the collection of recyclables (i.e., In locations where curbside waste collection is offered, curbside  recycling collection must also be offered, and where waste drop‐off programs are used, access to  recycling is also required).     As communities evaluate their collection and processing options to maximize the volume and value  of materials recovered, with guidance and assistance from the state, they should consider which  system would work best in their local circumstances and would make the best use of existing  infrastructure. Whatever choice is made, it is imperative that municipalities, planning units and  private companies make the investment necessary to ensure that recycling collection and processing  systems generate high‐quality materials that meet market specifications and minimize residue.   
   

8.3.6 (a) Dual‐Stream Collection 

Currently, a majority of the communities in New York State operate traditional dual stream  collection programs which segregate recyclables into two streams—one for paper (newspapers,  cardboard, junk mail, paperboard, etc.) and one for containers (metal, glass, and plastic).  The  separation of these two recycling streams is maintained through collection and transportation to an  MRF or paper processor for further separation into marketable commodities.  While there is a  substantial network of dual‐stream MRFs in the state, many were developed in the late 1980s and  early 1990s and have not updated the technology and equipment to facilitate optimal levels of  recovery.  Many will require capital upgrades to improve performance and allow for added  materials.    The major advantages of dual‐stream collection programs are:  • • • They are well established; most New Yorkers are comfortable with this type of separation  and understand the reasons for keeping paper and containers separate.   There is an existing processing infrastructure; many communities already have access to an  MRF or other processing facility for dual‐stream materials.    They produce quality materials using simple processing technologies: keeping containers  separate from paper generally simplifies processing and avoids contamination, such as  shards of glass imbedded in newsprint, that can create problems for endusers and limit  recycling market options.  

  136    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3.6 (b) Single‐Stream Collection 

A number of communities in the state have moved to single‐stream collection, an emerging trend in  recycling collection that combines all recyclables (paper and containers) in one collection stream,  while collecting waste separately. This system has emerged as a way to control costs and improve  participation by allowing residents to place all recyclables in one container. The experience with  single‐stream collection in New York State to date has been positive, with four “state‐of‐the‐art”  single‐stream processing facilities serving several community recycling programs, and others in the  planning stage.  New York State’s single‐stream communities report high participation, increased  diversion and low residue rates.      The major advantages of single‐stream recycling include:  • Greater participation: Because sorting is easier for residents and large recycling containers  are usually provided, single‐stream programs have greater participation rates.  Some single‐ stream system operators report that recovery rates increase by 20 to 40 percent  above  prior dual or multiple‐stream performance when these programs are launched.  Reduced collection costs: Because the systems usually involve semi‐automated collection,  larger volumes of materials and only one recycling truck (with one compartment), collection  costs—one of the most expensive steps in the recycling process—are reduced.  Compatibility with other program changes: Many communities around the country have  implemented single‐stream collection of recyclables along with other program changes,  such as the addition of source‐separated food scraps collection, additional recyclables  collection, or PAYT/SMART pricing, yielding strong overall results. 

While newer single‐stream facilities have proven to function well, any conversion of existing dual‐ stream facilities to single stream must be carefully planned and designed and sufficiently capitalized  to maximize the benefits.  While some single‐stream processes in other jurisdictions have generated  poor quality materials and high‐residue rates, experience in New York State and elsewhere indicates  that when appropriate technology is employed, contamination problems can be avoided.52      
8.3.6 (c) Multi‐Material Collection 

Some communities, many of which are smaller and rely primarily on drop‐off programs, have more  than two recycling streams; instead of requiring that only paper and containers be separated, some  programs require residents to separate several types of material (plastic, metal, glass, newspapers,  cardboard, etc.) from one another at the drop‐off location or the curb.  These programs often yield  very high‐quality materials that are more readily marketable for higher‐value uses which,  presumably, allow for higher prices.  On the other hand, in the case of multi‐material curbside  collection, there may be greater labor costs and greater consumer participation challenges.      
                                                                  52  Single Stream Recycling Best Practices Implementation Guide, pp. 17, 19 & 73  137    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.3.6 (d) Recycling and Food Scrap Collections 

Dozens of communities nationwide have launched what is commonly referred to as “three‐stream”  collection programs—single‐stream recyclables, an organics stream with food scraps and other  compostables, and a waste stream.  By combining organics collection, including food scraps for  composting, with single‐stream recycling and PAYT/SMART, these communities are achieving very  high recovery rates.  In New York State, at least two planning units (Tompkins and Onondaga  counties) are developing such programs for the commercial sector.    Through three‐stream collection, municipalities have achieved organics collection without increasing  overall program collection costs by implementing source‐separated organics collection along with  other program changes instead of as an “add on” to existing systems.    This can be accomplished by:  • Adjusting collection schedules: Once recyclables, food scraps and other putrescible organics  are removed from the waste stream, the remaining waste can be collected less frequently.   For example, in Toronto, organics are collected weekly, while recyclables and remaining  waste are collected on alternate weeks.  Converting to semi‐automated collection: Using toters and semi‐automated collection can  reduce the number of workers per truck, thereby reducing labor costs as well as worker  injuries, resulting in significant savings.53 

 

8.3.7      Post‐Collection Separation  As has been noted, anecdotal information suggests that many commercial and institutional  generators and their haulers have generally not met their source‐separation obligations under state  and local law, and there has been little effort on the part of local planning units to bring these  sectors into compliance.  However, in some areas of the state, particularly in New York City, some  commercial carters have developed extensive post‐collection separation systems to supplement  minimal source‐separated recycling.  In these systems, “pantry waste,” including most food scraps  and other putrescibles, is separated and collected in black bags for disposal, while all other materials  are collected in clear bags and separated for recycling.  Commercial carters report that between 70  and 95 percent of the material collected in clear bags is recyclable. 54    State law does not support post‐collection separation as an alternative to source separation, but it  can be used as a supplemental management method.  DEC’s Part 360 regulations require post‐ collection separation facilities to obtain a permit subject to the requirements for both recyclables  handling and recovery facilities and transfer stations.  Unless the percentage of putrescibles is  extremely low, post‐collection separation facilities can have all of the same environmental impacts  and concerns as waste transfer stations.   
                                                                  53   Making Recycling Work: A Roundtable on the Future of Recycling Proceedings Report, Center for  Environmental and Economic Partnership, page 4. 
54

 Communications with Sprint Recycling and Metropolitan Recycling.    138  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

While these systems require minimal workforce education or effort, they can also undermine the  educational messages to source separate at home and elsewhere.   Nonetheless, given the high  levels of recovery achieved in some commercial post‐collection separation facilities, and the  efficiencies gained and emissions reduced through consolidating collections, stakeholders have  argued that supplemental post‐collection separation should be explicitly supported in New York  State.  In the absence of a change in the law, DEC will continue to require communities to  implement source‐separation programs in all generating sectors.   
 

8.3.8      Glass   Many communities around the state and the nation are struggling with how to manage glass  collected curbside with other recyclables.  Because haulers often use compaction for more efficient  collection and eject their loads directly onto concrete surfaces, much of the glass breaks during the  process.  The broken glass often becomes contaminated with other waste and ends up color mixed  in a pile that includes small bits of paper, plastic and other materials.  Broken glass can also become  embedded in other material, thereby contaminating other recyclables.  ESD has invested significant resources in identifying value‐added opportunities for the management  of mixed‐color glass collected curbside.  As the material is typically too contaminated to be used in  traditional markets for recovered glass, such as container or insulation manufacture, research  supported by ESD has shown that with minimal processing, glass can be an effective substitute for  aggregates used in a variety of engineering applications, such as sub‐base for road construction,  embankment construction, drainage and as a component of asphalt.  As a result, specifications are  in place for the use of recycled glass in these applications.  Indeed, many of these categories qualify  as “green specifications” through the implementation of Governor Paterson’s EO4.  Although these  end uses do not typically earn revenues for an MRF, if the glass can be used locally for any of these  purposes, the community can avoid the cost of purchased aggregate and can significantly reduce or  eliminate transportation costs.  ESD has also invested in the development and implementation of technologies that allow for the  cost‐effective cleaning and color‐sorting of MRF‐generated glass.  As a result, some businesses in  central and western New York State are successfully converting mixed‐color, contaminated glass  into feedstock for container and insulation manufacture, as well as for sale as alternative sandblast  medium, landscape and drainage media.  With additional refinement, the glass could even replace a  portion of the cement needed for making concrete products.  Two manufacturers, one in New York  City and another in the Finger Lakes region, have successfully developed building products made  with significant amounts of recycled glass.   While strong markets do exist for clean, color‐sorted glass, primarily material generated through the  Bottle Bill, preparing municipally collected glass to access those markets can still be difficult and  costly.  To clean, sort and dry the material requires a significant initial investment in equipment that  cannot usually be recouped in the absence of substantial economies of scale.  Accordingly, the state  needs to continue to assist with the development of markets or enhanced collection, transportation  and processing systems that maximize the productive recycling of glass and reduce contamination of 

139   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

other recyclables, especially paper.  With a continued trend toward single‐stream collection of  recyclables, this becomes increasingly important. 
 

8.3.9      Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris Recycling  While nearly half of C&D debris in New York State is recovered today, much of  it is used for low‐ value applications, such as chipped clean wood mulch.  In many areas of the state, opportunities  exist to increase the amount of C&D material recycled and to improve the value of C&D materials  recovered through enhanced source separation and processing of materials.    Many materials from the C&D debris stream, such as metals and cardboard, are commonly recycled,  with established markets supported by supply‐and‐demand economics.  A growing consensus exists  among government and industry researchers that the C&D stream holds other materials that are  inherently valuable and highly recyclable.  It makes both environmental and economic sense to  remove many of these materials prior to disposal.    Materials such as asphalt shingles, carpet and ceiling tiles, are potentially recyclable and generally  easier to separate at the point of demolition.   Recycling these materials can provide a significant  benefit in terms of reduced GHG.  Recycling materials such as unadulterated gypsum wallboard can  also avoid other problematic emissions, such as the odorous hydrogen sulfide released when  crushed gypsum is landfilled in an anaerobic environment.    However, inexpensive disposal tip fees for C&D materials have limited growth in recycling, and  incentive programs have, in some cases, missed the mark.  For example, the LEED Green Building  Program allows “points” for recycling C&D materials, even if they are used as alternative daily cover,  providing “green” credit for C&D materials that are ultimately used in a landfill, albeit through a  more beneficial use than disposal.  Instead, incentives should be driving higher uses of recycled C&D  materials and avoiding the energy and raw material costs of producing new building products.  While it takes time for markets to develop, this time could be well spent by regulatory agencies  developing and enhancing clear regulatory structure and support that will foster new markets.  State  government can support or encourage markets through careful management of its own  construction projects to ensure the recycling of C&D debris and the optimal use of recycled  construction materials.    
 

8.3.10      Recycling Markets  Recyclables are commodities and, like other commodities, values fluctuate based on overall market  conditions.  In response to a need to ensure value‐added uses for recovered materials and try to  capture the economic returns associated with a strong recycling industry, the 1988 Act created an  office in the State Department of Economic Development (now ESD) that would work to expand and  strengthen New York State’s recycling marketplace and serve as a repository for recycling market  information.  That office, currently known as the Environmental Services Unit, continues to improve  recycling opportunities for collectors, processors and endusers of recovered materials.  Personnel  and resources at ESD assist businesses that want to build new recycling capacity.  In addition, ESD  maintains an on‐line recycling markets database that enables generators to search for regional 
140    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

markets for the materials they handle or, in the case of manufacturers in need of raw materials, to  locate adequate supplies.  Access to the database is free, and recyclers are encouraged to be listed  on the database, located at www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle.  For more on ESD’s programs, see  Appendix 6.2.  New York State has been a leader in supporting markets for recyclables by channeling the state’s  purchasing power toward the products that contain recycled content.  Beginning with passage of the  1988 Act and bolstered first by Governor Cuomo’s Executive Order 142 and, more recently,  Governor Paterson’s EO4, the OGS developed a comprehensive green purchasing program.  In fiscal  year 2007‐08, OGS issued more than 30 contracts for products that reduce waste, are  remanufactured or contain recycled content.  In more general terms,  during the past decade, the recycling industry has experienced some of the  strongest market conditions in history as demand for secondary materials in China, India and other  developing nations exploded. The economic events of 2008 illustrate the volatility of the markets,  though they represent only a snapshot in time.  In the early part of that year, recyclers enjoyed  record high market values for their materials.  However, due to the general economic decline felt in  the fall of 2008 and the related downturn in purchasing of consumer goods and related packaging  and products made from recycled materials, many secondary materials end users, particularly in  Asia, slowed down or stopped their intake of secondary materials. As a result, the economic  downturn late in the year brought dramatic drops in secondary materials prices.  Corrugated  cardboard in the Northeast dropped from $120 per ton to $30 per ton in one week in October 2008.   Residential mixed paper dropped from $50 per ton to $5 per ton.55   Similar reductions in secondary  material value were experienced in the plastic and metal markets.  These drops were dramatic and  largely unanticipated.    This example represents a temporary downturn in what has otherwise been demonstrated as a  positive trend in recycled materials market value in the last decade.  Nonetheless, to weather these  temporary storms, the state  must continue to encourage local programs to maintain access to more  than one market and to remain flexible in terms of sorting, processing and storage capacity. It is  challenging for local or regional secondary materials end users to compete with foreign markets  during upswings in market value like  those experienced in early 2008, but, ultimately, stabilizing  collection programs and recycling markets will require both the development of local and regional  endusers for recycled materials and the commitment of recycling program managers and MRF  operators to long‐term supply contracts.    Communities that weathered the 2008 recycling markets collapse most successfully were the ones  that had long‐term contracts with market outlets.  Communities that choose to sell material on the  spot instead of making long‐term commitments have likely seen short‐term gains, but those gains  may have come at the expense of long‐term stability.   Long‐term contracting for recyclables processing provides stability to the municipality, its  contractors and materials markets generally.  The value of recyclables’ can vary greatly year to year  and sometimes even month to month, but responsible government budgeting requires the ability to 
                                                                  55  “Recycling Market Woes,” BioCycle, November 2008.    141    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

reasonably project expenditures and revenue. To maintain a consistency of service, processors need  to protect themselves from market volatility as well.  Long‐term (10‐20 year) contracts protect both  parties from this volatility.  In return, though, both parties must sacrifice—municipalities sacrifice  some portion of the market value of their commodities during upswings, while processors accept  some added risk by guaranteeing a modest floor price regardless of market conditions.    Long‐term supply contracts usually have provisions for a floor price with a mechanism for revenue  sharing when market values go up.  In most cases, revenue sharing arrangements are valued based  on a mutually acceptable market index.  For example, New York City’s contracts with paper  processors include a floor price of $10 or more per ton, with provisions to increase revenues to the  city when markets improve.  The city has experienced revenues of up to $70 per ton under these  contracts.    Because markets for most grades of paper and metals are well developed notwithstanding periodic  downturns in market value, the state’s market development efforts should focus on secondary  materials that are challenged by troubled or less mature markets.  Examples include:  • Glass: As noted above, while markets for clean, color‐sorted glass are stable, most  communities generate a mixed‐color broken glass that is usually contaminated with small  bits of paper, plastic and other unwanted materials.  There are facilities in New York State  that can clean and process glass to meet market specifications.  A network of glass‐ processing facilities would help to provide communities with outlets for this troublesome  material.  Creative local uses of mixed glass in construction and civil engineering projects  can also help address this problem.  Plastics: Markets for plastic bottles, particularly PET (#1) and HDPE (#2), are relatively stable.   However, markets for other plastic containers, such as tubs, jars, and film are less robust  and require development assistance.    Organics: As discussed in Section 8.4, capturing more organic materials such as food scraps,  food‐processing waste, non‐recyclable paper and yard trimmings, will be critical to  increasing recovery and reducing waste disposal in New York State.  It will be necessary to  develop infrastructure for organics recovery and endmarkets for compost and other organic  products to support increased recovery.     Construction and Demolition Materials: Much of the concrete, brick, asphalt and metal  generated on construction sites is routinely recovered; however, other potentially valuable  materials like gypsum wallboard, asphalt shingles, and wood are often sent for disposal.   Local end‐use markets for these materials would encourage greater sorting and recovery.   

 

8.3.11      Responsible Recycling of Electronics  Electronic waste placed or disposed of in landfills can potentially release lead, mercury and/or other  hazardous substances into the environment.  Given the hazardous nature of many  components in  electronic equipment, it is imperative that these materials be handled safely and appropriately.  It is  also true that all of the materials from used electronic equipment (metals, plastics, and glass) are  potentially recyclable, reducing the need to produce these materials from raw materials and 
142    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

diverting waste from disposal.  For these reasons, in 2007, DEC initiated a rulemaking to streamline  the management of used electronic equipment, whether regulated as hazardous waste or solid  waste, so that collection and recycling will become more efficient and safer, and manufacturer take‐ back programs will not be discouraged by regulatory impediments. The proposed rulemaking  includes:  • • • • Adopting provisions of the federal Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) Rule, which will remove barriers  to recycling CRT glass   Adopting management standards for collectors, dismantlers, and recyclers of used  electronic equipment that will better protect human health and the environment   Adopting provisions of the New York State Wireless Telephone Recycling Act  Amending the requirements of New York State's current generator "c7" notification, which  would improve the ability to ensure that used electronics are properly recycled. 

The export of electronic waste also constitutes a significant environmental, public health and public  policy issue in that the waste goes to developing nations with minimal oversight or standards for its  handing.  As documented by the Basel Action Network 56  and reported in the major media, much  electronic waste is exported under the guise of reuse or recycling, only to be managed in abysmal  conditions that threaten workers and the communities that host these activities.  New York State  does not have the constitutional authority to regulate the export of electronic waste, and, to date,  the federal government has not taken action to restrict these exports.  
 

8.3.12      Product and Packaging Stewardship  Product stewardship, also known as extended producer responsibility, extends the role and  responsibility of the manufacturer of a product or package to include  its entire life cycle, including  ultimate disposition of that product or package at the end of its useful life.  In these programs,  manufacturers (or producers) must take either physical or financial responsibility for the recycling or  proper disposal of products or packages.  As described more fully in section 5, these programs are  an important driver to both prevent waste and increase recycling.  Stewardship programs reduce the financial burden on local communities.  Local governments are  required to manage and pay for whatever winds up on the curb, with little or no ability to influence  the design of the products or packaging to reduce management costs or improve recovery options.   The costs are borne locally for production decisions made remotely, usually without consideration of  waste‐management implications.  Instead of requiring local governments to fund collection and recovery programs for discarded  products, stewardship programs incorporate the cost of disposal or recovery into the cost of the  product, so those costs are borne jointly by the manufacturer/producer and the consumer, not by  local government and taxpayers.  This reduces the financial burden on communities and internalizes 

                                                                  56 Exporting Harm, Basel Action Network.    143    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

disposal costs into the cost of the product, so materials that are easier to recycle or dispose of at the  end of life should be cheaper.    To stem the rising tide of packaging and printed material waste and help finance local recycling  programs, the European Union and many Canadian provinces have turned to stewardship programs.   While the programs differ in many ways, most packaging stewardship systems have the following  components:  • Fees: Producers/manufacturers pay into a fund based on the amount of packaging they use  or the volume of printed materials they distribute and the cost to recycle those materials or  otherwise manage them at the end of their useful life.    Funding: Most packaging stewardship programs use proceeds to cover the costs of  collection and recycling or disposal of the packages/materials by paying either municipalities  or private companies to provide these services.  Many also allocate funds for market  development, infrastructure improvements, education or other methods to improve  materials recovery and efficiency in the system.  Third‐party Organization or Authority: Packaging stewardship programs tend to be run by  independent or quasi‐governmental organizations or authorities that assign fees, collect and  redistribute funds, and identify and fund system improvements and market development  projects.   

Packaging stewardship achieves several critical ends.  First, it provides an incentive for waste  prevention.  When manufacturers must pay for the amount of packaging they use, they have a  financial incentive to use less.  Programs with more substantial fees have experienced greater levels  of materials‐use reduction.  Second, it generates much needed revenue for community recycling  programs.  Third, it improves recycling by allocating resources for critical education programs,  infrastructure improvements and market development; in Ontario, Canada, the packaging  stewardship program has yielded a 10 percent increase in the recycling rate in just its first three  years.  And fourth, it incorporates the cost of recycling or disposal into the cost of the product.   
 

8.3.13      Findings  • While New York State and its communities have made progress in establishing successful  recycling programs, as evidenced by the rise in recycling rates between 1987 and 1999,  progress in the last decade has stalled.  There is a wide variation in municipal recycling reporting and program performance  statewide, with reported amounts of MSW paper and containers collected for recycling  ranging from 17 to 764 pounds per capita per year.  Data collection and analysis of program and industry performance needs to be refined; new  statewide performance metrics are needed to better gauge progress toward this Plan’s  goals. 

144   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

The implementation of source‐separated recycling programs has been inconsistent from one  community to the next and in different settings such as schools, businesses, and public  spaces; engaging all sectors is critical to success.  Like any commodity, recycling markets  vary; however, on average, market values have been  consistently strong for the past decade.  Local or regional markets and long‐term supply‐and‐demand agreements provide stability to  community programs.  Market development initiatives must expand to address organics, plastics, glass and C&D  debris.  C&D debris recycling has been inhibited by competition with inexpensive disposal, in part  due to a lack of markets for valueable materials.    Planning units either lack resources or have not consistently dedicated them to outreach,  education and enforcement of recycling programs, particularly in the commercial and  institutional sector.   Some municipal recycling processing infrastructure is aging and in need of upgrading to  capture more materials or access higher‐value markets.   

• • • • •


  

8.3.14      Recommendations  As New York State seeks to improve recycling and move Beyond Waste, the state and its solid waste  management planning units must implement the wide range of actions listed below.  Fully realizing  these recommendations will require additional resources—both financial and human—at the state  and local level.   
8.3.14 (a) Programmatic Recommendations 

Launch an aggressive public education campaign to promote waste prevention, reuse,  composting and recycling.  DEC will seek funding to develop an aggressive marketing and  public education campaign aimed at motivating New Yorkers to make changes to reduce  waste, recycle and properly manage hazardous components of the waste stream.  A key  element of this campaign will be material, such as templates for informational  presentations, brochures and posters specifically designed for local governments to use in  their own outreach efforts.    Require planning units and local governments to implement incentive, education, and  enforcement programs.  As planning units develop new LSWMPs or modifications and  otherwise plan for and implement programs, DEC will require them to evaluate options for  incentive, education and enforcement programs and put them into action where possible.   (For more on LSWMP requirements, see Section 3.)  Build recycling markets by increasing the state’s purchases of recycled‐content products  through implementation of Governor Paterson’s EO4.  

145   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Improve data collection. DEC will develop an on‐line reporting system to collect moretimely  recycling and disposal data and will work with industry to develop uniform methods for  more accurate data gathering and reporting, using the new performance metrics based on  pounds per capita collected for recycling and disposal.   Encourage regional or national collaboration to develop consistent data collection and  reporting protocols and systems.  DEC will encourage NERC, NEWMOA, the EPA and others  as appropriate to promote the development of a consistent regional or national reporting  platform to better compare data among states.  Evaluate, and implement where appropriate strategies to promote the establishment of  recycling facilities in the context of environmental quality review and regulatory processes  for other solid waste management facilities.  Encourage public space, event, institutional and commercial recycling. Through the  implementation of EO 4, DEC will work with state agencies and authorities to ensure that  recycling is implemented at all state facilities and spaces.  DEC will also require planning  units to address these critical issues as they update LSWMPs. (EO 4 is provided in Appendix  8.1).  Encourage long‐term recycling agreements.  As planning units develop new LSWMPs or  modifications, DEC will encourage long‐term recycling market contracts to ensure the  stability and viability of recycling programs.    Ensure that appropriate staffing and resources are made available to ESD for recycling  market development assistance and to encourage the use of recycled feedstocks by New  York State‐based manufacturers.    Expand market development initiatives for glass, plastic film, plastics #3‐7, organics, C&D  materials, etc., to further advance recycling and as a means to create green jobs and  encourage local use of secondary materials.  The state needs to increase its investment in  this effort to ensure that sufficient attention is placed on developing local markets for key  materials and, in doing so, creating economic opportunity.    Provide assistance to local governments to help determine the need for MRF upgrades.   Many municipal MRFs in the state were developed more than a decade ago.  To maximize  efficiency and collect additional materials, these facilities must be upgraded.  DEC will seek  funding to aid planning units and municipalities in analyzing their infrastructure to  determine the capital improvements necessary to bring the state’s recycling infrastructure  up to modern standards and capabilities and to help finance those improvements.    Develop regional processing facilities for specific materials, most particularly glass, plastics,  organics, and C&D debris.  Encourage local use of processed, mixed glass, chipped tires and other appropriate recycled  materials in engineering applications.    Continue to make EPF funds available for the development and expansion of recycling  capacity throughout the state.  EPF funds  for the ESD have been effective for spurring 
146  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• • •

 

private investment in recycling infrastructure and helping manufacturers convert to recycled  feedstock.  • Facilitate the development of forums to bring government and private entities together    to  identify strategies  for overcoming barriers to increased material recovery, including market  development, and address C&D debris management issues.  Track and evaluate trends in the C&D management industry and technologies available to  foster greater materials recovery.  Establish a New York State center for C&D debris recycling through the ESD to:  research  issues and solutions relative to C&D debris; act as a central information access point;  promote deconstruction and building materials reuse; provide C&D job site training  programs, and identify potential investments for ESD’s ESU.  Work with the state OGS to require recycling of materials generated on state‐funded  construction sites. 

• •


 

8.3.14 (b) Regulatory Recommendations 

• • •
 

Enact Part 374‐5 regulations to improve the safe and appropriate collection, handling and  recycling of electronic waste   Restrict the disposal of source‐separated recyclables in solid waste management facilities  Prohibit the commingling of source‐separated recyclables and waste in collection vehicles   

8.3.14 (c) Legislative Recommendations 

Increase state appropriations for municipal recycling.  Municipal recycling grants provide  critical funding for recycling education and infrastructure.  To achieve the goals of this Plan  and move Beyond Waste, the state will need to increase the resources allocated to public  education and recycling infrastructure and link resource distribution to local solid waste  management planning. (For more on investment programs and funding needs, see section  6.)  Create a packaging stewardship program. (See Section 5.)   Create product stewardship programs. (See Section 5.)  Create a statewide electronics product stewardship program that requires manufacturers to  establish convenient collection systems that achieve designated waste‐reduction  performance objectives.     Update the Solid Waste Management Act (see Section 9.1.1) to acknowledge the new state  plan and allow for its implementation by, among other things:  o Setting per capita waste disposal reduction goals  

• • •

147   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

o

Increasing DEC’s enforcement authority, particularly with regard to commercial and  institutional recycling requirements  Allocating additional resources for planning, education, enforcement, and other  critical activities  Updating procurement and recycling requirements for state agencies and  authorities  Requiring the implementation of PAYT/SMART programs  Explicitly mandating the basic materials that must be recycled throughout the state  (which provide for expansion of the list and hardship waivers) and where recycling  opportunities must be available (e.g., residences, businesses, schools, MTA transit  stations, public spaces, etc.) 

o

o

o o

 

8.4   COMPOSTING AND ORGANIC MATERIALS RECYCLING 
“THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ORGANIC WASTE–ONLY WASTED ORGANICS.”  City of Christchurch, New Zealand Solid Waste Plan (2006) 

Organic residuals are of plant or animal origin and are a common and ubiquitous byproduct of  modern life. From animal manure and crop residue, to the uneaten food generated daily in  cafeterias, restaurants and homes, to massive quantities of food‐processing waste, organic residuals  constitute a large component of today’s waste stream. As described more fully in Section 7, organic  materials, including yard trimmings, food scraps, and non‐recyclable papers, typically make up 30  percent of New York State’s MSW. The biodegradable portion of the waste stream is in fact much  higher–a full 60 percent—but the additional 30 percent  comprises nonputresible materials that can  be recycled into cardboard and other paper products, a higher and better end use from both an  economic and environmental perspective.     As New York State moves to further reduce the amount of waste going to disposal, organics  diversion offers an enormous opportunity toward that end. As more fully discussed in the sections  on waste prevention and reuse, preventing organic waste through the redistribution of usable food,  changing processes and practices to reduce residual organics, and other means provide greater  social and environmental benefits than organics recycling.  DEC has long considered composting,  anaerobic digestion and other organic material recycling technologies to be equivalent to recycling  of other materials and, therefore, in the second tier of the state’s solid waste management  hierarchy.  Composting involves the aerobic biological decomposition of organic materials to produce a stable,  humus‐like material.  While it is the most prevalent method of recovering organic materials for  value‐added end use, it is not the only method of organics recycling.  Technologies such as  anaerobic digestion, long used in sewage treatment plants, are now being applied to convert food  residuals, manure and other materials into a biogas that can be recovered for energy and a  digestate that can be composted and used as a soil amendment.   
148    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Organic materials in the state’s waste stream contain rich nutrients that, when captured through  composting or other recovery methods, can play an important role in rebuilding the state’s soil  structures.  According to the US Composting Council, compost’s useful properties lead to healthier  soil and plants, better nutrient cycling and greater fertility  and also aid in erosion control and storm  water management. 57  However, the very characteristic that makes organics valuable as potential  soil amendments—degradability—creates challenges in effective collection, handling and recycling.    Organics recycling also plays an important role in combating climate change. Once in a landfill,  organic residuals degrade and generate methane—a potent GHG. Because these materials start to  create methane within days of disposal, some of the methane escapes before it can be captured by  a landfill gas destruction system. Research compiled by the University of Washington’s Dr. Sally  Brown confirms that every ton of food waste generates an average of 6 tons of carbon equivalent,  and that generation happens in the first 28 to 100 days—well before large landfills are required by  federal regulations to begin capturing gas. By contrast, a well‐operated composting system will  generate little if any methane. 58     When used to enrich soil, the application of compost increases soil’s carbon storage capacity by  increasing the formation of stable carbon compounds that remain bound in the soil for long periods.   This storage also provides a GHG benefit; according to the European Commission’s Working Group  on Organic Matter,:  “Applying composted EOM [exogeneous organic matter] to soils should be recommended  because it is one of the effective ways to divert carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and convert  it to organic carbon in soils, contributing to combating greenhouse gas effect.”  The positive impact of composting on GHG emissions from waste management systems can be  significant; just how significant depends on the waste disposal method being avoided when  materials are diverted for composting.  Using the NERC EBC and waste composition and quantity  data from New York’s Capital District, DEC estimates that a community can reduce its GHG emissions  related to waste management by 10 percent if it diverts half its food scraps from an MWC to a  composting facility.  If a community achieves the same 50 percent diversion of food scraps from a  landfill, the reduction is 129 percent.  It is important to note that  neither the NERC or WARM  models account for the additional GHG benefits of using compost (e.g, offsetting the use of other  soil amendments and reducing the need for fertilizers) which would further increase the projected  benefits. The EPA is expected to update the WARM model to account for these factors in 2010.   These findings are consistent with research being undertaken around the country and the world.  In  the first full lifecycle study on the environmental impacts of composting, the Australian Department  of Environment and Conservation found that commercial composting of organic materials and the  application of compost to agricultural soils resulted in net GHG reductions, even if the recycled  materials have to be transported more than 370 miles for agricultural applications. This analysis was  on the composting process itself, so it did not include the GHG emissions avoided by not disposing 
                                                                  57  US Composting Council, Keeping Organics Out of Landfills. 
58

 US Composting Council, Keeping Organics Out of Landfills. 

  149    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

the organic materials in a landfill or through MWC.  The study also determined that commercial  composting and agricultural application resulted in other benefits, including “reduction in use of  fertilizers, herbicides, water, and electricity resulting from compost applications and, therefore,  reducing release of GHGs, nutrients and toxic chemicals to environment (air, water, and soil) during  production and use of these avoided inputs.”  Since there are many different types of organic materials and methods for recycling them, the best  approach for any particular organic waste stream will depend on a number of factors, including the  volume and makeup of the material, the space available for aggregation and management,  flexibility, cost, GHG emissions, transportation distances, etc.   In New York State and nationally, the recycling of organics has grown phenomenally since the 1987  Plan. The USEPA estimates that yard trimmings composting has grown from diverting 12 percent of  it in 1990 to 64 percent in 2007. Few composting operations existed in New York State in the late  1980s, while more than 300 facilities exist today. The facilities vary in size, with smaller ones  handling a few hundred cubic yards per year and larger facilities handling more than 100,000 cubic  yards per year.  In total, DEC estimates that more than 600,000 tons of yard trimmings are  composted annually in New York State, which represents 67 percent of the total estimated  generation.  One significant factor that helped promote the development of yard trimmings composting sites  was the inclusion of special conditions in solid waste disposal facility permits prohibiting the  acceptance of yard trimmings. Four of the five largest landfills in the state and all MWCs have  special permit conditions that include this prohibition.   However, large quantities of organics, especially food scraps and soiled paper, still end up in landfills  instead of being used to improve the physical, chemical and biological properties of New York  State’s soils.  
 

8.4.1      Organic Recycling Technologies and Methods                     This section briefly describes organic waste diversion methods and biological recycling technologies  currently used in New York State, without attempting to provide an exhaustive list of all  technologies and methods available or on the horizon.  As this is a dynamic area of waste  management, new technologies for organics recycling will likely surface in the coming years, each  posing environmental concerns that must be properly addressed prior to planning for their use.  Their resultant products must also be fully understood. For example, depending on the waste that is  being processed, pathogens, heavy metals, or pesticide/herbicide residues may be present and  would need to be managed. The state’s solid waste management regulations, 6 NYCRR Part 360,  contain specific design and operational criteria governing these facilities.    
8.4.1 (a) Composting 

As previously described, composting involves the aerobic biological decomposition of organic  materials to produce a stable, humus‐like material. Composting happens naturally in the  environment when organic material falls to the soil surface. There are many compost technology  options for managing most organic materials in the waste stream, each striving to optimize the 
150    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

biological conditions in the mass of material to achieve the most uniform, mature compost in the  least amount of time.   The composting process is somewhat forgiving in practice, so it is not always necessary to meet ideal  conditions for making good compost, but, the closer the system can get to the ideal, the better and  more consistent the product will be. The resultant compost product makes a valuable soil  amendment due to its high organic matter content. Because compost contains high levels of organic  carbon, which can fuel key ecosystem functions like nutrient cycling, water retention, and erosion  control, it can also help rebuild soils.  One distinct advantage that composting has  compared to other organic treatment systems is its  ability to work at a wide range of scales with both low technology and sophisticated systems. A  homeowner’s backyard compost bin or pile can be an effective method for recycling household food  scraps and yard trimmings. On a larger scale, municipal and private facilities operating in New York  State recycle from as little as a few hundred cubic yards of organics to  more than 200,000 cubic  yards each year and handle a variety of materials, including yard trimmings, food scraps, manure,  biosolids, and mixed solid waste.  When evaluating alternative processing methods, key criteria  include available land and labor—passive composting systems with limited management  requirements will use more land area and take more time. More active composting systems with  greater management requirements can process the materials more quickly using less land.  While it  is important to be aware of odor concerns, a well‐run composting system will not create  problematic odors.  As discussed above, expanding composting to capture the substantial volume of food scraps and  non‐recyclable paper that are still being thrown away would significantly increase the overall  recycling rate in New York State.  The cost for a composting facility for food scraps varies depending  on the technology employed, the size of the facility, and the revenue received for the product. As  demonstrated in the table below, typically the processing cost will be $40‫ 06$־‬per ton of food scraps  received.  Food scrap composting programs may also incur additional costs, including collection.    However, collection costs can be avoided or minimized through the development of on‐site systems,  such as backyard composting for residences and small‐scale composting operations at the location  of large generators, such as colleges, institutions and food processing facilities.                     
151    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 8.1   Operating Costs for Food Scraps Composting Facilities    NYS DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS                      $ 34/TON TERRA FIRMA ORGANICS, WYOMING                        50/TON BARNES NURSERY, OHIO                                             26/TON CEDAR GROVE, WASHINGTON                                    55/TON MACKINAC ISLAND, MICHIGAN                                  37/TON CITY OF ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN                  52/TON                                         

Large‐scale composting systems for mixed solid waste streams have been available in the US for 25  years. While some facilities built in the last two decades have closed due to odor or product quality  issues, 13 still exist today.59  One of the newest and most successful systems is located in Delaware  County, NY.  The Delaware County MSW Co‐composting Facility is a sophisticated system designed  to accept mixed solid waste, biosolids, and dairy waste. The Delaware County facility was designed  to manage 33,400 tons of MSW annually (after source separation of recyclables), 2,300 tons of  whey, and 9,900 tons of biosolids. The facility, which is fully enclosed (with three months of product  curing/storage capacity), consists of a large rotating drum that accomplishes the initial biological  degradation, a primary separation system to remove non‐organics, a multi‐bay composting system,  a secondary removal system, and a long‐term aerated curing and storage area.  The result is a  product that meets the state’s strict quality standards for sale as Class A compost and generates  revenue to offset operating costs. 
  8.4.1 (b) Anaerobic Digestion (Biogas) 

Anaerobic digestion is a biochemical degradation process that converts complex organic materials  into biogas in the absence of oxygen. Biogas is composed of methane, carbon dioxide, and small  amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Once the biogas has been extracted, the remaining slurry  must be  separated into liquids and solids, usually using a screw press or similar device.   After testing, the liquid portion generally can be used as fertilizer, and the solids can be directly  applied to the soil or be further processed through composting.   Some of the potential advantages of using anaerobic digestion include:  • • • • •  
                                                                  59  BioCycle, November 2008.  152    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Reduction in odor  Reduction in pathogen content  Reduction in solid mass  Biogas production for heat or electrical power  Space efficiency 

NYS DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES LEADS IN FOOD  COMPOSTING 
The NYS Department of Corrections (DOC) diverts more compostable material from the  waste stream than any other entity in the state.  The DOC’s 29 composting facilities divert  more than 50 tons per day of food scraps and wood chips from 52 correctional facilities.   Since the inception of DOC’s resource management program, the agency has diverted  more than 270,000 tons of food scraps and recyclables and saved the state more than $37  million.  DOC also leads the way on food waste reduction and the redistribution of usable food.  By  operating a cook/chill facility that prepares bulk quantities of food at a food production  plant, DOC significantly reduced the amount of food waste it produces.  Meals are sealed  in bulk in multi‐portion bags, chilled and then distributed to facilities around the state.  In  addition, DOC donates consumable food to families in need through the ComLinks 
  For decades, anaerobic digestion has been used as an accepted way to stabilize biosolids from  wastewater treatment. Use of the technology for other organic material streams has grown in  popularity in New York State, and today there are 15 digestion facilities in the state that process  manure. Some of these facilities also incorporate food scraps. Experience has shown that food  scraps, fats, oils and grease can increase biogas production in these systems, as well as help  generate income through tipping fees.  Although experience with digesters in New York State and elsewhere in the US—aside from  wastewater treatment—has been largely limited to manure and some food processing waste, more  technically sophisticated anaerobic digestion has the potential to process source‐separated food  scraps and other organic waste. In Europe, nearly 90 anaerobic digestion facilities process MSW,  managing a total of 2.75 million tons per year.  While most of those facilities accept source‐ separated organic waste, some European plants accept mixed waste and process it to remove  contaminants prior to digestion. 60  In Canada, the City of Toronto operates an anaerobic digester for  residential food scraps so successfully that it is expanding its system to include a second digester.  Anaerobic digesters are getting additional consideration in the US for treatment of food scraps due  to the potential for energy generation.           A study prepared by the Tellus Institute for the State of Massachusetts estimates the energy  generation potential of anaerobic digestion at 250 kWh per ton of materials, as compared to 105  kWh per ton in landfills and 585 kWh per ton in MWC.  Capital costs for these facilities vary  depending on the waste stream handled and the pre‐processing required.     
                                                                  60  Assessment of Materials Management Options for MA Solid Waste Master Plan Review, Tellus Institute.    153    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.4.1 (c) Direct Land Application   

Sometimes organic wastes can be applied directly to agricultural land with little or no prior  treatment, as long as the materials meet regulatory requirements for controlling potential  contaminants.  DEC regulations are intended to address and control problems related to land  application, such as odors and runoff, particularly the spread of pathogens that can damage waste  supplies or crops.    New York State is a prolific dairy producer, and dairy farmers have historically managed animal  manure as organic waste. Traditionally, manure was directly applied to the soil as a nutrient source.  Similarly, harvesting crops results in leaves, stalks, or other plant waste remaining on the field,  which often gets turned into the soil to be used as a source of nutrients and organic matter for the  subsequent growing season.   Although these organic residuals can also be composted or processed using other means, direct land  application is still a common and acceptable practice and in many cases, serves as a direct source of  nutrients for farms. However, this is changing as farms grow and  cannot effectively apply the large  amount of materials they generate. Limitations on the amount of organics that can be applied per  acre continue to support the increased use of anaerobic digesters and composting on dairy farms.  There are also non‐farm organic waste streams that can be directly applied to agricultural lands,  including biosolids, food processing waste, leaves, grass clippings, and more. These can serve as  good sources of nutrients for farms that don’t generate enough organic waste on their own and  offer cost savings better than most commercially available fertilizers. For any land application  program,  a number of factors  must be considered, such as the length of the growing season,  weather, storage, transportation, and the nutrient needs of the crops grown.  
  8.4.1 (d) Vermicomposting 

Vermicomposting is a method of degrading organic waste using worms. The worms, which are  earthworms commonly known as red worms, red wigglers or manure worms, consume any edible  waste and excrete castings or worm manure that are considered to be excellent nutrient‐rich, soil  amendments. Worms will eat a wide variety of organic materials, such as paper, manure, fruit and  vegetable waste, grains, yard trimmings, and biosolids. For the worms to effectively process organic  material, it must be moist but not water logged and in small enough component units for the worms  to swallow. The wastes cannot contain materials toxic to the worms, which can survive a wide range  of temperatures but are most efficient between 55° and 77°F.   Once the worms have consumed the organics, their castings are separated so that they can be  applied as a soil amendment and the worms reused to consume the next batch of organic waste.  Vermicomposting can work  on a small scale (a 12‐20 gallon bin is often suitable for a residence) or   on a large scale (worm beds can be hundreds of feet in length and handle hundreds of tons of  organic waste). An example of a large‐scale vermicomposting system in New York State is Organix  Green Industries in Ontario County, which accepts up to 10,000 cubic yards of leaves, grass, and  food processing waste each year. The incoming organics are shredded and placed in trenches with  the worms for six months. The trenches are two‐feet deep, four‐feet wide and 100‐feet long.  Organix is currently using only four acres but has sufficient area on site to build 50 worm beds.   
154    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.4.1 (e) In‐Sink Food Scrap Disposers 

Many communities manage some food scraps in combination with biosolids by allowing or  encouraging the use of kitchen sink food disposers or “garbage disposals” in both commercial and  residential settings—essentially, sending it to the local treatment facility along with other  wastewater.  Encouraging or requiring these “garbage disposals” in certain circumstances can  further recycling goals.  Critical considerations include:  • Sufficient wastewater treatment capacity:  Service areas of facilities that regularly overflow  to combined sewer outfalls would not be ideal locations for the addition of food scraps to  the wastewater stream. Areas served by septic systems are also inappropriate for food  waste disposers because they can lead to system failure that impacts surface and  groundwater quality.  Recycling of wastewater treatment plant biosolids:  Using food scrap disposers in service  areas of the wastewater treatment plants that process biosolids through composting could  be costeffective and environmentally beneficial.  On the other hand, incentivizing or  requiring disposers  serviced by a wastewater treatment plant that incinerates (without  energy recovery) or landfills its biosolids can actually be environmentally counterproductive 

  8.4.1 (f) Rendering 

Rendering is a process that converts waste animal tissue into stable, value‐added materials.  Rendering simultaneously dries the waste and separates the fat from the bone and protein, yielding  a fat product (possibly including yellow grease, white grease, tallow) and a protein meal (meat and  bone meal, poultry byproduct meal, etc.). The protein is then dried and ground prior to storage. The  fat product is further refined prior to distribution.  Because one‐third to one‐half of each animal produced for meat, milk, eggs, and fiber is not  consumed by humans, a majority of animal waste comes from slaughterhouses.  However,  restaurant grease, butcher shop trimmings, expired meat from grocery stores, and carcasses of  euthanized and dead animals from shelters, zoos, farms, and veterinary offices can all be suitable  feedstock for rendering.  Rendering has become more expensive and less available for these  materials, so there has been a substantial increase in their composting. Restrictions on the animal  parts that can be used for production of feed for ruminant animals, due to fears of mad cow disease,  have also resulted in the decrease of rendering capacity in New York State and elsewhere.   

 8.4.1 (g) Heat Drying 

Heat drying is a treatment process that removes almost all of the water from biosolids. Although the  chemical composition of treated biosolids remains essentially the same following heat drying, the  percent of solids left is 90 percent or greater. Depending on the system employed, the end product  will either be a powder‐like material or grain‐sized pellets. These heat‐dried products are typically  used directly as a fertilizer or blended with other nutrients to produce highergrade fertilizers. There  are two heat‐drying facilities in the state. The largest is a private facility in New York City with the  capacity to make 300 dry tons per day.  
155    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.4.1 (h) Chemical Stabilization 

Chemical stabilization facilities mix commercial lime and/or lime equivalents with biosolids to  achieve pathogen destruction. Alkaline materials like lime or cement kiln dust are mixed with  dewatered biosolids, where the combined materials react to generate heat while also raising the pH  of the mass. The resultant product is used primarily as a lime substitute in agriculture. Chemical  stabilization facilities consist of a mixing device, a bunker where the material is allowed to react, and  a curing area to allow the material to stabilize. Chemical stabilization is used by three facilities that  treat biosolids in New York State. The largest chemical stabilization facility is located in Syracuse and  processes 10,800 dry tons per year. 
 

8.4.2      Developing sufficient organics recycling capacity  While substantial yard trimmings composting infrastructure exists in New York State, to recover  additional organics such as food scraps and non‐recyclable paper, additional infrastructure will be  needed.  In 2008, DEC held a number of forums across the state to bring together food scrap  generators and potential users, including food banks and composting facilities. A consistent theme  that emerged from the forums is the need of organic waste generators to find beneficial uses for  their unused food. It is clear that the lack of capacity for handling food scraps at composting  facilities or anaerobic digesters inhibits expansion of food scrap recycling. Using information learned  from the forums, DEC is developing a plan to facilitate greater diversion and recycling of food scraps  through education, networking and assistance with new infrastructure development.  
 

8.4.3      Organics Collection  Since the technology is effective and can be cost competitive with alternative management options,  the true roadblocks to increased composting of food scraps are aggregation and transportation.  There is currently no standard method for collection of these organics. The specifics of each  program must depend on the type and quantity of organics being collected, how frequently it would  need to be picked up, the type of generator, spatial considerations at the points of generation and  management, the distance to the recycling facility, and the cost of collection vehicles. 61    Municipalities have achieved organics collection without increasing overall program collection costs  by implementing source‐separated organics collection along with other program changes, instead of  as an “add on” to existing systems.  Most often, this is accomplished by:  • Adjusting collection schedules: Once recyclables, food scraps and other putrescible organics  are removed from the waste stream, the remaining waste can be collected less frequently.  

                                                                  61  A comprehensive summary of the various techniques and types of equipment currently being used to collect  and transport food scraps, “Source Separated Organics Collection” by Craig Coker, was published in the  January, 2009 edition of BioCycle magazine (see www.biocycle.net). Additional information is available at  the “Compostable Organics Out of Landfills by 2012”  website, http://www.cool2012.com/community/collection/.    156    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

For example, in Toronto, organics are collected weekly, while recyclables and the remaining  waste are collected on alternate weeks.  • Converting to semi‐automated collection: Using toters and semi‐automated collection can  reduce the number of workers per truck, thereby reducing labor costs as well as worker  injuries and resulting in significant savings. 62 

 

8.4.4      Competition for Biomass  Composting operations sometimes use wood chips or some other biomass as a bulking agent to  facilitate the composting process.  With the growing imperative to develop renewable energy  sources, there is increased interest in using wood chips and other sources of biomass to generate  electricity or be converted into fuel.  Already, these efforts are increasing demand for wood chips,  causing composting operations to compete for what was once a free and plentiful material.  Further  demand for wood chips as a fuel could exacerbate this problem and create a significant market  dislocation for composting operations. 
 

8.4.5      Findings  • • • •
 

Organics comprise 30 percent of the MSW in New York State.  Recycling organics has multiple benefits, including reducing the generation of GHGs, creating  valuable soil amendments, creating jobs and reducing reliance on waste disposal.   Organic materials are diverse, and there  is a wide variety of technologies to recover them.  Costs to compost or otherwise recycle organic materials vary widely, depending on the  technology applied, the feedstock recycled, the cost of land, and other factors. 

8.4.6      Recommendations  This Plan seeks to progressively reduce the amount of materials disposed of in landfills or through  MWCs.  Achieving that goal necessitates an increase in the recycling of organic materials for value‐ added end uses like soil amendments.  To maximize the environmental and social benefits of the  recycling system, organic materials should be directed, where possible, to their highest and best  use.  (See additional recommendations in Sections 8.1 and 8.2.)  As New York State seeks to improve recycling and move Beyond Waste, the state and its solid waste  management planning units must implement the wide range of actions listed below.  Fully realizing  these recommendations will require additional resources—both financial and human—at the state  and local level.     
                                                                    62  Making Recycling Work: A Roundtable on the Future of Recycling Proceedings Report, Center for  Environmental and Economic Partnership, page 4  157    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.4.6 (a) Programmatic Recommendations 

Promote and demonstrate organics recycling systems and activities within state agencies:  o Work with DOT, OGS, DEC Operations staff, and the Office of Parks and Recreation  (OPR) to increase state use of locally available compost, mulch and soil amendments  as directed in EO 4.   Continue to work with OGS in support of its efforts to implement organic recycling  programs at state agencies, with a goal of diverting all state‐generated organic  materials to recycling.  Work with staff at DOC to assess any obstacles to accepting food scraps from other  state facilities at nearby correctional facilities with existing composting operations.    Work with all state agencies, including the State University of New York (SUNY)  system of colleges and universities, to recycle food scraps through implementation  of EO 4; focus on on‐site systems where possible.  Publicize organic recycling efforts ongoing in the state via the website, ESD’s  Recycling Markets Database, agency publications and other communications.  Identify interested school systems and assist them in demonstrating the advantages  of on‐site composting systems. Work with New York State‐based Go Green Initiative  participants to implement new systems. 

o

o

o

o

o

Use information and contacts from food scrap forums across the state to identify new  opportunities for food waste generators (food processors, restaurants, and retailers) to  work with processors and endusers.  Help existing facilities that compost yard trimmings, institutional organics, biosolids or on‐ farm organic residuals to determine the feasibility of accepting food scraps or food  processing waste at their facilities. Encourage and facilitate demonstration projects at  appropriate sites.  Determine how the ESD, NYSERDA, Ag & Markets, and the EFC can work together to  promote and expand composting and organics recycling.  o Quantify the statewide available food scrap feedstock, and assess the current and  potential capacity for managing materials at their highest value (ESD, DEC and Ag &   Markets).  Identify and develop a database of wood waste generators and, in particular, utility  supplies of waste wood, and coordinate with compost facility need (ESD, NYSERDA).  Allocate existing or develop new funding sources for composting and organics  recycling infrastructure needs. 

o

o •

Continue to provide technical and regulatory assistance for entities (private and public)  interested in developing small and large‐scale organic recycling systems and operators  interested in demonstrating the viability of incorporating food scraps into existing yard  trimmings or biosolids composting facilities. 
158  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

• •

Require planning units to more closely evaluate the remaining organic portion of their waste  streams in LSWMPs and, where feasible, develop ways to recycle these materials.  Complete a technology assessment of composting and organics recycling technologies,  including technology and financing options, to aid planning units in evaluating food waste  recovery systems.    Evaluate the progress toward organics recycling in biennial state solid waste management  plans and recommend additional policy approaches, including phased‐in disposal  prohibitions where readily available alternatives would allow for the diversion of significant  amounts of food residuals from either specific sectors (institutional/commercial/industrial,  for example) or from all sources, including residential.  Evaluate and implement, where appropriate, strategies to promote the establishment of  organics recycling facilities in the environmental quality review and regulatory process for  other solid waste management facilities.  Generate additional revenue for composting and other organics recycling activities by  working with other regional greenhouse gas initiative (RGGI) states to include as an eligible  carbon offset category. (See section 6.3.3.)  Provide funding to a non‐governmental organization to:  o Develop and distribute written guidance on the regulatory requirements governing  consumable food used for animal feed, including an outline of what food residuals  are amenable to animal feed and how they can best be used   Work with Cooperative Extension agents to identify farms and local food sources  and facilitate relationships for the productive use of food scraps   Hold forums across the state to disseminate information and facilitate relationships  between the sources and farmers 

o

o •

Work with the NERC to take full advantage of its On‐Farm Compost Marketing Project,  including connecting farms with NERC’s technical assistance services and disseminating the  Compost Marketing Toolkit. 

  8.4.6 (b) Regulatory Recommendations 

• •

Restrict the disposal of recognizable quantities of yard trimmings from solid waste disposal  facilities through special permit conditions or revision to the Part 360 regulations    Review existing state regulations to remove or address contradictory regulatory  requirements that limit the creation or expansion of composting and other organics  recycling facilities 

      159    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.4.6 (c) Legislative Recommendations 

Amend state law to list categories of food scraps and residuals as a mandatory recyclable,  and phase in restrictions on the disposal of organics where sufficient infrastructure is readily  available to recycle these materials  Expand the ESD’s investment authority to allow for support of anaerobic digesters and other  technologies that can cost effectively convert organic residuals to biogas and other energy  products in addition to generating a valuable end product.  

 

8.5      BENEFICIAL USE DETERMINATIONS (BUDS) 
A BUD is a jurisdictional designation made by DEC in regard to a material that has been used and is  no longer usable for its original purpose but can be directed to an alternative use considered to be  beneficial compared to disposal.  Some BUDs, referred to as pre‐determined BUDs, are set forth in  Part 360, the state’s solid waste regulations, and others are designated by DEC on a case‐by‐case  basis. Once a material satisfies the conditions for a pre‐determined BUD or DEC grants a case‐ specific BUD, the material ceases to be considered a solid waste (for the purposes of Part 360).   Since the inception of the BUD program in 1993, DEC has reviewed more than 950 BUD petitions  and granted 533 BUDs.    While not specifically identified in the solid waste management hierarchy, DEC generally considers  BUDs to be preferable, by definition, to waste disposal from an overall environmental perspective  because the materials generally offset the use of virgin material.  While deemed as “reuse” of  materials in the Part 360 regulations (i.e., The essential nature of the proposed use of the  material constitutes a reuse rather than disposal), not all BUD uses are counted as recycling,  particularly when they do not represent the highest and best use of a material.  Some BUDs are  granted for fuel‐related uses or for low‐value end uses, such as landfill daily cover, and the GHG and  overall environmental benefits of these BUDs are not as significant as reuse or recycling a material  into a new product that can be recycled or reused for its original purpose.    A BUD is not subject to State Environmental Quality Review or State Administrative Procedure Act  requirements.  However, DEC applies certain regulatory criteria in making these designations.  The  criteria include:  • • • Is the material intended to function or serve as an effective substitute for an analogous raw  material or fuel? Is the proposal consistent with the solid waste management policy?  Does the use of the material adversely affect human health and safety, the environment, or  natural resources?   Does a market for the proposed product or use exist? 

According to DEC’s annual survey, more than two‐million tons of material was beneficially used in  2008.  This figure includes materials used under case‐specific BUDs and the pre‐determined coal  combustion ash BUDs; other pre‐determined BUDs are not tracked or reported.  Landfills in the 

160   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

state reported the beneficial use of an additional 2.1 million tons of materials as alternative daily  cover (ADC), a predetermined BUD.   Only 3 percent of the two‐million tons of BUD materials reported originated from MSW sources; the  vast majority were from industrial sources (58 percent) or construction, demolition, remediation, or  dredging projects (38 percent).   Approximately 53 percent of the BUD materials reported were used  in some form of soil or soil‐like application, and 26 percent of BUD materials were used as  alternative fuel.  Only 36 percent of BUD materials represent recycling‐related uses, while  8 percent  of BUD materials are used in a landfill setting.  Figures 8.2 and 8.3 below show a breakdown for  case‐specific BUDs by major categories of waste and by beneficial use.  Only the BUDs that represent recycling‐related uses are included in the total statewide recycling  rate.  However, BUDs for use as ADC or alternate grading material in landfills and for alternate fuels  are not.   This distinction has caused confusion  because BUDs have often been equated with  recycling. 
 

8.5.1        Pre‐Determined BUDs  As of 2009, 16 pre‐determined BUDs have been designated in the solid waste regulations.  Examples  of pre‐determined BUDs include: compost, newspapers when used as animal bedding, tire chips  when used as aggregate for road base or asphalt pavements, non‐hazardous contaminated soils  excavated as a part of construction and used onsite as backfill, and wastes that are approved by DEC  for use as alternative daily cover at landfills.    Pre‐determined BUDs provide a significant market for C&D debris materials.  Current BUD  regulations allow for specific uses of: unadulterated wood, wood chips and bark; uncontaminated  glass; recognizable and uncontaminated soil; nonhazardous contaminated soil, and recognizable,  uncontaminated concrete and concrete products, asphalt pavement, brick, glass, and rock. 63   Processed mixed C&D debris (containing wood, plastic, insulation, wallboard, etc.) may also be used  as ADC at landfills if it meets certain performance criteria.     Some pre‐determined BUDs are self‐implementing in that the user needs no prior approval (e.g.,use  of newsprint as animal bedding), while others may require DEC authorization (e.g, use as ADC at a  landfill).  The predetermined coal ash BUDs are the only pre‐determined BUDs with an annual  reporting requirement.  DEC periodically reviews the list of predetermined BUDs to re‐evaluate their suitability as  unregulated activities.  For example, in a recent review, DEC concluded that the use of coal fly ash as  a feedstock for high‐temperature kilns for the manufacture of cement could significantly impact air  emissions, depending on the source and composition of the fly ash.  Therefore, in 2009, DEC  initiated a rulemaking procedure to eliminate the pre‐determined BUD for this activity and instead  require a case‐specific BUD to ensure appropriate oversight and evaluation of individual sources of  fly ash in each petition as described below.     
                                                                  63  In the context of DEC’s C&D debris regulations, “recognizable” means readily identifiable by visual  observation and “uncontaminated” means not mixed or commingled with other solid wastes and not  having come into contact with spilled petroleum products, hazardous waste, or industrial waste.    161    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.5.2        Case‐specific BUDs  In situations where a particular proposed use is not specifically identified as a pre‐determined BUD,  generators and potential users can petition DEC for a case‐specific BUD.  Unless otherwise directed  by DEC, a case‐specific BUD petition must include a physical and chemical characterization of the  solid waste and the proposed product, a demonstration that there is a known or probable use or  market, and a solid waste control plan.  Following a review of the petition, DEC determines whether  the proposed use constitutes a beneficial use based on a showing that all regulatory criteria have  been met.  For example, a petition that seeks a BUD for substitution of a waste material for a raw  material in a manufacturing process will be evaluated to determine whether the proposed use is a  legitimate substitution or whether the predominant nature of the use is comparable to disposal.  If a  BUD involves the use of materials in place of soil, DEC may reference test results, where  appropriate, for consistency with the recently‐promulgated 6 NYCRR Part 375 soil cleanup  objectives.    Generally, case‐specific BUDs are for waste material used as:  • • • A substitute for a component material in the manufacture of a product  A substitute for a commercial product   An alternative fuel 

Some examples of case‐specific BUDs that have been granted include the use of:  • • • • Dried papermill sludge as animal bedding and poultry litter   Foundry sand as an aggregate in the production of concrete and as construction fill material  Tire chips in civil engineering applications such as construction fill  Non‐recyclable waxed cardboard as an alternative fuel 

Most case‐specific BUDs require the user to perform periodic tests to reaffirm the physical and  chemical characterization of the material and the product. DEC always reserves the right to revoke a  case‐specific BUD based on non‐compliance with conditions on which the BUD was based or if new  information points to the potential for an adverse effect.  Facility inspections or followup with  generators or endusers may also reveal the need to revoke a BUD.   
                  162    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.5.3      BUD Data and Trends 
  FIGURE 8.2  

   

Note: “Other” includes miscellaneous byproducts from manufacturing or refining processes, such as  spent catalysts or dusts; asphalt shingles; ceramics; food scraps; yard trimmings, and non‐recyclable  paper and plastic.  Individually, each of these miscellaneous materials constitute less than five  percent of the case‐specific BUDs total.  Some solid wastes granted case‐specific BUDs prior to the  1993 version of Part 360 (e.g., certain uses of coal ash) have been subsequently addressed in  regulation as pre‐determined BUDs.  
                    163    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 8.3 

 
Note: “Other” includes various specific applications such as the construction of barnyard pads, track surfaces and tire walls and use as  abrasives. 

 

8.5.4      Toxics Along for the Ride  “Toxics along for the ride” (TARs), as termed by the EPA, is one of four factors used by the EPA to  determine when recycling of hazardous secondary materials is legitimate.  TARS refers to  concentrations of hazardous constituents, such as mercury, lead, or other materials that are present  in solid wastes proposed as effective substitutes for conventional raw materials or products but that  are not essential to, normally part of or positively contributing to the material’s beneficial use.  However, it is important to note that the mere detection of such constituents does not disqualify a  material from beneficial use.   The EPA provided guidance on this issue in the December 2008 regulation defining solid waste (40  CFR Parts 260, 261 and 270) for the hazardous waste program.  This guidance is intended to avoid  “sham recycling” where users of secondary materials incorporate hazardous constituents into a  product to avoid proper hazardous waste disposal.  DEC has adopted the “TARS factor” concept for  use in its solid waste BUD program.  When evaluating a BUD, toxic constituents must be identified  and compared to those found in analogous products or feedstocks.  If the BUD material contains  toxic constituents that are not present in analogous feedstocks or if the product contains toxics in  greater concentrations than analogous products, DEC will determine on a case‐by‐case basis  whether the difference in concentration is significant based on the facts of the activity.  This is  consistent with the EPA’s approach, which considers the relevant principles and facts under which a  specific proposal is analyzed. 
164    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

In most cases, if the level of hazardous constituents in the BUD product or feedstock is significantly  greater than the analogous product or feedstock, it should not be considered a legitimate  application. However, in certain circumstances, the BUD can be considered legitimate even if there  are “toxics along for the ride.”  The factors that should be evaluated in this case include whether the  BUD materials are likely to be released into the environment or damage human health and the  environment, and whether the BUD material provides value or contributes to the effectiveness of  the material.  DEC follows EPA guidance to carefully evaluate BUDs to place limits on the concentration or mass  loading of hazardous constituents to deter sham recycling and to avoid adverse effects to human  health and safety and the environment.  The December 2006 revision to 6 NYCRR Part 375, “Environmental Remediation Programs,” contains  soil cleanup objectives (SCOs) which vary depending on the proposed use of the property being  remediated.  These SCOs do not directly apply to the BUD program but can be used as benchmarks  where appropriate to measure the impact from chemical constituents in waste soils and dredged  material and have proven to be a helpful tool in evaluating BUD petitions.  DEC is required by statute  to update the Part 375 soil cleanup objectives every five years. 
 

8.5.5      Upland Management of Navigational Dredged Material   Dredging of harbors and waterways is necessary to provide the proper channel depth for navigation,  which allows transportation and commercial shipping on New York State waterways.  Disposal of  dredged material in upland areas (i.e., areas that are not in water and are not considered part of the  riparian zone) is subject to the disposal requirements of Part 360, unless used beneficially (e.g., in  place of commercial fill, aggregate, or topsoil). The cost of properly managing dredge spoils is a  major impediment to dredging projects. Contaminants of concern in dredged material include a  variety of organic chemicals and heavy metals, petroleum compounds and lead and mercury.   Pesticide residues may persist from agricultural runoff into waterways, and industrial discharges  have contributed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and furans in certain locations.    BUDs for dredged material are granted on a case‐specific basis, though efforts continue to develop  policies and regulations to streamline reviews.   Sandy, gravelly sediments, for example, seldom  contain significant contamination.  The 2010 proposed revisions to Part 360 will include pre‐ determined BUDs for use of dredged material  comprising sand and gravel and specific procedures  for petitioning for case‐specific dredged material BUDs.    The most significant volumes of navigational dredged materials are generated in the New York/New  Jersey Harbor, where an estimated four‐million cubic yards of material must be dredged annually to  properly maintain channels.  Currently, much of this material is not beneficially used locally and is  exported, instead, by rail for use or disposal elsewhere. Lakes Ontario and Erie also require  significant channel maintenance.  Inland, major rivers and the New York State Barge Canal are  maintained through periodic dredging, and innumerable lakes, ponds, and private marinas are  dredged for commercial shipping, recreational boating or aesthetic purposes.  In‐water disposal of  dredged material, including once‐common ocean disposal, has become severely restricted.  Much 
165    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

dredged material is placed in shoreline (riparian) disposal sites in accordance with state or federal  dredging permits.    More widespread beneficial use of dredged materials, where environmentally safe, would alleviate  the strain on disposal capacity in these riparian sites and landfills and, in many instances, foster  more timely maintenance of waterways.  Careful planning of future shoreline development and  siting of new facilities such as marinas or structures such as seawalls and piers could anticipate the  natural movement and deposition of sediments and reduce the frequency and volume of  maintenance dredging.  DEC has participated in various interstate and international groups such as the New York Dredge  Team (with the US Army Corps of Engineers, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection,  USEPA) and the Great Lakes Dredge Team, affiliated with the Great Lakes Commission.  Within DEC,  the Division of Solid and Hazardous Materials (DSHM) works with the divisions of Water (DOW),  Environmental Permits (DEP), Environmental Remediation (DER), and Fish, Wildlife & Marine  Resources (DFWMR) in reviewing significant projects and the ongoing development of guidelines  and procedures.  Involvement with these entities, both inside and outside DEC, gives the  department access to progressing science with regard to sediment and dredged material, including  treatment technologies for contamination that could allow for more widespread beneficial use. 
 

8.5.6      Fill  Use of excavated soil from one construction site as fill at another project site is a common beneficial  use and is addressed by several pre‐determined BUDs or, where appropriate, by case‐specific BUDs  for excavated soils from historic fill areas.  For more on historic fill, see Section 7.3.4.   
    

8.5.7      Crushed Container Glass  Municipal and private MRFs collect many tons annually of returnable and recyclable glass  containers.  Traditionally, the crushed‐glass cullet has been sold for container re‐manufacture, but  glass containers are in decline and the markets that remain have strict specifications that many  MRFs cannot meet due to contamination.  (For more on glass issues, see Section 8.3.8.)  As a result,  more recyclers are turning to BUDs to market their mixed‐color glass.  ESD has invested in many glass BUD projects and is supporting higher‐value beneficial uses for glass,  including as stormwater runoff drainage material and as a sand blast medium.   One of the pre‐determined BUDs allows use of uncontaminated glass as a substitute for  conventional aggregate in asphalt or subgrade applications.  Contaminants include metal rings,  paper labels, plastic caps, ceramics, non‐container glass or other solid wastes, soil, or excessive food  residues.   
     

166   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.5.8      Biofuels  Interest in, and production of, biodiesel from waste cooking oils and grease has greatly increased  statewide.   While handling and transfer of waste cooking oils and greases or other biomass may  require permitting under Part 360, some producers of these biofuels operate under the  “manufacturing exemption” definition of solid waste.  NYSERDA has worked with DEC in advising  biofuel producers of approvals needed to ensure safe and environmentallyprotective operations.  As the practice grows in popularity and as other materials are proposed, solid waste regulation may  be needed for many biofuel producers to ensure the protection of environmental quality, though  other environmental regulations for chemical bulk storage or air quality may also apply.   The 2010  proposed revisions to Part 360 would clarify the status of certain biofuel processes. For example, the  proposed regulations will clarify that gasification, plasma arc and pyrolysis facilities for the purpose  of producing fuels from MSW are regulated as MWCs and not considered exempt or BUD activities.    
 

8.5.9        Agricultural Uses  DEC has experienced an increase in the last several years in BUD petitions to use alternatives to  traditional materials in agriculture, especially in upstate New York.   Paper mill sludge, when  thermally dried or mixed with lime to absorb water, has proven a successful bedding material for  cattle in place of traditional sawdust.  Spent paper mill sludge bedding can be landapplied, usually  onsite at the farm, contributing to soil nutrients.  Wood products from furniture makers have also  been put to use as animal bedding on farms.     Soils in many areas of New York State may require regular application of lime to raise pH for  improved crop growth, and DEC has granted BUDs for alternatives such as coal ash or cement kiln  dust (CKD) on a case‐specific basis.   An evaluation of background soil concentrations and careful  limits on trace heavy metals in ash or CKD are necessary to prevent the accumulation of heavy  metals in soils.  
 

8.5.10 Access to Markets  The logistics of developing and accessing markets and generating marketable quantities of BUD  material continue to hamper beneficial use.  Many approved uses never materialize due to a failure  to match the generator with end users.  In addition to testing requirements that are intended to  protect public health and the environment, BUD petitioners are required to demonstrate a market.   However, unforeseen circumstances can prevent actual use of waste materials.   Industry groups  continue to help in this area by sponsoring clearinghouses for available materials.  Interstate groups  such as the NEWMOA sponsor databases concerning BUDs or equivalent approvals by member  states to facilitate beneficial use of various byproducts and wastes. 
        167    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8.5.11      Relationship of BUDs to Recycling Rate  When DEC calculates New York State’s total recycling rate, it generally includes certain C&D and  industrial BUD materials based on a review of the applications and reports that are submitted.   Generally, uses that involve substitution for another material, such as mixed color glass or chipped  tires that are used in place of virgin aggregate or wood chips used in landscaping, are counted  toward the state’s total recycling rate.  However, BUD materials that are used in fuel‐related  applications or as ADC, alternative grading material, or temporary roadways at landfills are not  included in the total recycling rate calculation.  Virtually no BUD materials are counted toward the  MSW recycling rate.  This structure for gathering and aggregating data tends to create confusion and a lack of clarity  as  to what the state does or does not count toward recycling.   
 

8.5.12        Findings  A tremendous amount of solid waste–more than 4 million tons in 2008—is put to use through  implementation of DEC’s BUD program.  However, DEC needs to update the regulations and develop  policy to divert even more material to productive use and provide transparency on how DEC views  the beneficial use of waste materials as a fuel, as fill, and in landfill‐related uses (e.g., ADC and  grading materials) in the context of proper solid waste management. 
 

8.5.13        Recommendations 
8.5.13 (a) Programmatic Recommendations 

Develop standardized cover sheets for case‐specific BUD applications addressing the basic  information necessary and criteria for beneficial use of priority solid waste streams,  including: papermill sludge in animal bedding; foundry sand and crushed glass in fill; water  treatment alum sludge to amend soil; and coal ash and cement kiln dust as liming agents.  Develop a DSHM policy regarding appropriate use of 6 NYCRR Part 375 soil cleanup  objectives in the review of waste soils and soil‐like materials for beneficial use in topsoil and  fill.    Develop memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other divisions or agencies as needed  to streamline BUD procedures or establish standards for beneficially used materials.    Expand beneficial use applications for mixed color recovered glass by conducting pilot  projects to demonstrate acceptability of glass as a filter medium under DEC’s DOW  Stormwater Design Manual’s Criteria for Acceptable Practices, and also acceptance by DOH  for use in residential septic systems.   Funding for pilot projects will be sought from  development authorities, USEPA, or other sources.  Encourage the use of BUD materials, particularly mixed‐color recovered glass and tire‐ derived rubber, through the implementation of the green procurement requirements of  EO4.  (See appendix 8.1 and http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/ExecutiveOrder4.html.) 
168  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• •

 

  8.5.13 (b) Regulatory Recommendations 

Include the following changes in the 2010 proposed Part 360 revisions:  o o Remove certain pre‐determined BUDs    Establish additional pre‐determined BUDs, especially for use of cooking oil for  biodiesel, use of foundry by‐products in concrete, and use of clean dredged  materials as aggregate  Authorize DEC to issue additional pre‐determined BUDs or rescind an existing  predetermined BUD without requiring an amendment to Part 360.  This is intended  to transition case specific BUDs to predetermined BUDs without needing to change  Part 360.  Eliminate those that are no longer appropriate.  Create recordkeeping and recording categories for BUDs that provide clarity with  regard to  those that are considered recycling and those that are not (e.g., fuel‐ related and landfill‐related uses).    Include new regulations on historic fill and additional operational conditions in its  use that protect neighboring areas, particularly in communities of disproportionate  impact. 

o

o

o

                                    169    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

9.  DISPOSAL 
      ”WASTE NOT, WANT NOT.”           Anonymous 

While significant strides have been made by the state and its communities, businesses and residents  to increase recycling and reduce waste, the data indicate that there is still much room for  improvement.  Twenty years after the state adopted a solid waste management hierarchy that  places waste prevention, reuse and recycling ahead of disposal, nearly 65 percent of waste managed  in the state and approximately 80 percent of MSW ends up in disposal facilities. (See Table 9.1; for a  description of each stream, see Section 7; for a discussion of the data that support these figures, see  Section 8.3.1.)      TABLE 9.1  WASTE DISPOSAL IN NYS 

   
Landfill‐Waste  Landfill‐ ADC  Combustion  Export for  Disposal  Total 

MSW 
Million  Tons  6.7  0.2  2.8    6.0  15.7    %  43  0.1  18    39    100 

Industrial
Million Tons  1.6  0.5  0.1  <0.1  2.2    %  73  23  4.0  0  100  Million Tons  2.9  1.6  <.01  1.6  6.1 

C&D
  %  48  26  0  26  100 

 Biosolids 
Million  Tons  0.3  <0.1  0.4  0.2  0.9    %  33  1.0  44    22  100  Million  Tons  11.5  2.3  3.3  7.9  25 

Total
  %  46  9  13  32  100 

  While this Plan details a set of strategies to achieve substantial reductions in waste disposal and  increase reuse and recycling, when these strategies are implemented, there will still be residual  wastes requiring disposal.  This section describes the various disposal methods and facilities used by  New York State’s communities and the network of transfer stations that consolidate waste for  disposal.  The analysis provided here is based on environmental characteristics alone and does not  address economic, contractual or planning issues that communities in New York must consider when  evaluating an appropriate disposal method for residual waste.   DEC estimates presented in this section are based on data provided in solid waste management  facility annual reports for amounts of waste handled by the following three primary management  methods—municipal waste combustion (MWC), landfilling and export.    

170   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

These estimates include imported waste that is managed by facilities in New York State; the amount  exported for disposal in Table 9.1 includes the amounts reported by transfer stations that export  waste, as well as an adjustment of approximately 1.3 million tons based on importing states’ data.    Each of these waste management methods will be explored individually and in more detail later in  this section.  Although DEC includes MWC as a “disposal” method because it is a strategy to be employed after  waste prevention, reuse and recycling have been maximized, MWC is in fact one part of a treatment  and disposal process.  After energy is recovered from waste through combustion, metals are  recovered and the residual ash is landfilled, either directly or as ADC.  The Part 360 regulations  provide opportunities for facility operators to propose other, more productive uses of the ash.    Landfilling, as used in this section, refers to in‐state land disposal of solid waste regardless of  whether it was generated in or out of state, while export includes all out‐of‐state disposal (landfill or  MWC) of waste generated within New York State. 
 

9.1   TRANSFER AND PROCESSING PRIOR TO DISPOSAL 
Disposal facilities in the state receive waste from local collection  and are also fed by a network of  transfer stations and C&D debris processing facilities that collect, consolidate, store, process and/or  transfer waste in preparation for transport to disposal.  Solid waste transfer stations are subject to  either the permitting or registration requirements of Part 360. C&D debris processing facilities are  subject to either the permitting, registration or exemption provisions of Part 360, depending on the  size of the facility and other factors.    In 2008, there were approximately 165 permitted transfer stations in New York State that  collectively managed about 11.6 million tons of waste.  About half of these facilities are located in  the downstate area (DEC regions 1, 2 and 3) as shown in Figure 9.1.  Permitted transfer stations can  only receive residential, commercial and institutional waste unless otherwise approved by DEC.  Many transfer stations are located in densely populated areas and particularly in a few communities  of disproportionate impact, also known as environmental justice communities.  The nature of their  operations often burdens the host community with noise, odors and truck traffic.  Transfer station  location is primarily determined by local land use and environmental policy, with the Part 360  regulations prohibiting the siting of these facilities in certain environmentally sensitive areas.    For example, the clustering of transfer stations in New York City’s communities of disproportionate  impact resulted from two key factors—a policy decision by the city about its tipping fees and the  city’s existing zoning requirements.  In the late 1980s, New York City raised the tipping fee for  commercial waste at its marine transfer stations and at the Fresh Kills Landfill in an effort to extend  the life of the landfill and encourage commercial waste carters to find other disposal outlets.  The  private sector responded to this change by developing land‐based transfer stations to export  commercial waste.  To comply with local zoning requirements, those transfer stations needed to be  in manufacturing zones which, in the city, either include or surround communities of  disproportionate impact.   
171    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Because land use is a local decision, DEC’s Part 360 regulations do not affect or supersede local  zoning requirements.  DEC’s siting restrictions primarily focus on environmental concerns and  operational requirements rather than proximity to residences, although they are intended to  protect public health.  Significant environmental impacts, including siting issues, are addressed in  the State Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) process, with DEC’s Environmental Justice policy and  enforcement efforts also playing a role in avoiding environmental and public health impacts of  facility clusters.  In addition to the facilities required to obtain permits, in 2008 there were also approximately 370  registered transfer stations that collectively managed more than 310,000 tons of waste.  Registered  transfer stations must be owned or operated by or on behalf of a municipality and receive less than  12,500 tons of solid waste annually.  They are fairly evenly distributed throughout the state with the  exception of the New York City area where there are very few. 
FIGURE 9.1 – SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATIONS IN NYS

 

 
 

   
172    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Another 71 facilities had permits to process C&D debris in New York State in 2008.  As depicted in Figure  9.2, nearly 75 percent of them were in DEC regions 1 and 2. Facilities clustered in a few New York City  communities managed 68 percent of the C&D processed in the state with another 25 percent processed  on Long Island.  These permitted processors managed more than 4.1 million tons of C&D in 2008.  There  were also about 250 registered C&D debris processing facilities which managed approximately 6.1  million tons of material. Registered C&D processors can receive only recognizable, uncontaminated  concrete and masonry waste, asphalt pavement, brick, soil, and rock or uncontaminated and  unadulterated wood.  Facilities that receive and process only land‐clearing debris are exempt from DEC  regulation. 
FIGURE 9.2 – C&D DEBRIS PROCESSING FACILITIES IN NYS   

           

173   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

9.2  

DISPOSAL CAPACITY OVERVIEW 

DEC estimates that in 2008, approximately 11.5 million tons of solid waste were landfilled (an  additional 2.3 million tons were used as ADC), 3.3 million tons were combusted, and 8 million tons  were exported for disposal, for a total of about 22.7 million tons disposed. 64   The capacity of each of  the state’s disposal facilities is presented in Table 9.2.    If the state continues to dispose of waste at the same rates it did in 2008, and all MWC facilities  continue to accept waste at the same rate, the remaining disposal capacity in the state can be  equated—for illustrative and planning purposes—to an overall average of about 21 to 25 years of  remaining, approved landfill site life.  However, three significant variables can impact disposal  capacity projections.  They are:  1. Facilities dedicated to specific planning units or regions: About ten of the MSW landfills and  one MWC facility are operated by public agencies or authorities that essentially serve only  the constituents within their planning units.  They provide some degree of integrated solid  waste management and some have flow control laws to support their self‐sufficient  systems.  These facilities generally have ample capacity for the waste within their  jurisdictions (ranging from 1 to 106 years); however, they would not be expected to provide  disposal capacity for the rest of the state.  Excluding those facilities from the state’s overall  available capacity and the amount of waste they have typically taken in from the total  amount of waste generated would cut the remaining 20 to 25 years of remained approved  site life to about 14‐18 years for the rest of the state’s communities.  (See Table 9.10.)    2. Export restrictions: If policies are put in place or significant economic or market shifts occur  that restrict waste export, the remaining landfill site life at New York State’s facilities could  be reduced by as much as one‐third—to approximately 9‐12 years statewide.  This could  increase to 15‐18 years if facilities dedicated to specific service areas lifted their restrictions.    3. Increased diversion: If the state is successful in moving Beyond Waste and achieving the  goals of this plan, the useful life of existing landfills could be extended significantly unless  waste imports also increased dramatically.    
 

                                                                  64  To eliminate double counting, DEC made the following adjustments to the disposal data reported in the  MWC, Landfill and Export sections: MSW ash is included in the amount landfilled and removed from the  amount combusted; combusted biosolids are included; imported waste is included, and ADC is not  included as waste disposed.      174    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Table 9.2:  Landfills and MWCs in New York State    Existing &  Entitled  Capacity  Under  Permit  (tons) 

Name 
Landfill ‐ municipal solid waste  Albany Rapp Road Landfill  Allegany County Landfill  Allied Waste Niagara Falls Landfill  Auburn Landfill No. 2  Bristol Hill Sanitary Landfill  Broome County Landfill  Chaffee Landfill  Chautauqua Landfill  Chemung County Sanitary Landfill  Chenango County Landfill  Clinton County Landfill  Colonie (T) Sanitary Landfill  Cortland County Landfill Westside  Extension  Delaware County SWM Facility  DANC Landfill  Franklin County Regional Landfill  Fulton County Landfill  High Acres Western Expansion  Landfill  Hyland Landfill 

Activity  Number 

County 

2008  Waste  Quantity  (tons per  year) 

Existing  Annual  Permit Limits  (tons per  year) 

Proposed  Capacity  Not Under  Permit  (tons) 

01S02  02S15  32S11  06S14  38S14  04S07  15S14  07S12  08S02  09S16  10S20  01S26 

Albany  Allegany  Niagara  Cayuga  Oswego  Broome  Erie  Chautauqua  Chemung  Chenango  Clinton  Albany 

239,785  50,490  508,759  72,014  39,165  187,000  385,570  262,877  118,356  26,184  170,237  164,083 

275,100  56,680  800,000  96,000  100,000  232,000  600,000  408,000  120,000  41,550  175,000  170,500 

478,351  249,600  9,242,609  761,301  3,352,607  10,554,066  6,084,000  2,243,724  1,243,383  1,104,009  7,644,201  4,004,593 

4,214,552                       

12S10  13S18  23S13  17S21  18S20 

Cortland  Delaware  Jefferson  Franklin  Fulton 

22,676  19,337  272,591  51,509  86,873 

44,500  52,800  346,320  125,000  134,000 

709,513  508,111  3,505,060  574,861  9,450,845 

         

28S32  02S17 

Monroe  Allegany 

765,157  279,739 

1,074,500  312,000 

44,400,000  7,708,367 

   

175   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Madison County WS Extension  Landfill  Mill Seat Sanitary Landfill  Modern Landfill  OHSWA Landfill  Ontario County Sanitary Landfill 

27S15  28S31  32S30  33S15  35S11 

Madison  Monroe  Niagara  Oneida  Ontario 

49,738  554,322  786,889  253,261  673,483  1,750,0 79  105,477  62,795  7,958,445 

61,000  598,650  815,000  312,000  1,200,000 

7,769,992  6,893,846  22,140,000  21,388,497  7,349,795 

         

Seneca Meadows Landfill  Steuben Sanitary Landfill  Sullivan County Landfill  Subtotals:  Waste Combustion ‐ MSW MWC  Babylon Resource Recovery Facility  Covanta Niagara; L.P.  Dutchess County Resource  Recovery Facility  Hempstead Resource Recovery  Facility  Huntington Resource Recovery  Facility  MacArthur Waste‐To‐Energy  Facility  Onondaga County RRF  Oswego County Energy Recovery  Facility  Wheelabrator Hudson Falls  Wheelabrator Westchester  Subtotals:  Totals:   

50S08  51S21  53S03 

Seneca  Steuben  Sullivan 

1,866,000  151,000  226,000  10,393,600 

37,611,560  2,422,279  140,130  219,535,298 

    4,988,032  9,202,584 

52E13  32E01 

Suffolk  Niagara 

219,899  801,016 

273,750  821,250 

   

   

14E01 

Dutchess 

142,844 

166,440 

 

 

30E06 

Nassau 

969,328 

975,000 

 

 

52E15 

Suffolk 

336,280 

350,400 

 

 

52E10  34E01 

Suffolk  Onondaga 

172,361  348,613 

177,025  361,350 

   

   

38E01  58E01  60E01 

Oswego  Washington  Westchester 

62,424  170,328  692,923  3,916,016  11,874,462 

61,000  152,500  674,730  4,013,445  14,407,045   

     

       

219,535,298 

9,202,584 

176   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

9.3   MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTORS (MWCS) 
The third order of preference in the solid waste management hierarchy is Ato recover, in an  environmentally acceptable manner, energy from solid waste that cannot be economically and  technically reused or recycled.@  Thus, the law states a preference for MWCs that generate energy,  also known as waste‐to‐energy (WTE) or energy‐from‐waste (EFW) facilities,  rather than landfills for  the management of residual solid waste that still requires disposal after waste reduction, reuse, and  source separation of recyclable materials.  In 2008, combustors managed approximately 14 percent  of New York State’s MSW and about 8 percent of all materials and waste (including MSW, C&D,  industrial waste, and biosolids).  Waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting are significantly better waste management  strategies than any type of disposal, including MWC, as they offer greater energy conservation, GHG  reduction and other environmental benefits. Recent research and analysis supports the hierarchy  that exists in statute, as discussed more fully in other sections of this Plan, in which waste  prevention and reuse/recycling maintain the top two positions.  It also supports maintaining a  preference for MWC  rather than landfill disposal, particularly when viewed from a GHG perspective.  (See Section 4.)  The 1987 State Plan anticipated a network of 37 MWC facilities across the state that, at the time,  were in the planning, construction, or operational stage.  For a number of reasons described later in  this section, this projected development did not fully materialize, and only 10 MWCs are currently  operating in the state.  However, the 1987 Plan goal of phasing out incineration of MSW without  energy recovery was accomplished.  The four major MSW incinerators—one in Huntington and  three in New York City—as well as the estimated 4,300 smaller incinerators serving apartment  houses, schools, supermarkets, etc. have long been shut down.  Modern MWCs reduce the amount of waste requiring disposal and also produce energy (about 585  kWh per ton) using specially designed furnaces equipped with required air pollution control  equipment.  The process reduces incoming, uncompacted solid waste volume and weight by 90  percent and 75 percent, respectively, with the ash residue disposed in lined landfills. In 2008, MWCs  supplied approximately 1.8 million megawatt hours of electricity to the state’s electrical grid— less  than 1.4 percent of the state’s electricity needs or enough electricity to provide power to more than  175,000 households for one year.  In addition, two MWCs in the state also generated and sold nearly  three billion pounds of steam to local industry.   In Europe, MWCs are reaching greater levels of  energy value by increased efficiency and incorporating existing district heating systems which  distribute excess steam or hot water to multiple buildings for space and hot water heating.  Such  efficiency upgrades and district heating systems could be available in the US.    MWCs can also be designed to capture and recover metals that are not diverted by source  separation.  In 2008, post‐combustion magnetic separation (processing ash using screens and  magnetic separators to remove any remaining metal) recovered more than 95,000 tons of ferrous  metals for recycling, or approximately 2.4 percent of the incoming waste stream.  Two MWCs in the  state also separate and collect non‐ferrous metals using Eddy current technology.  
  177    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Although the 1972 EQBA provided funding for several of the MWCs in New York State, the growth of  MWC was hampered in the late 1980s and into the 1990s in the state and nationally by a  combination of legal, economic, environmental, and environmental justice issues.  The most  recently constructed MWC facility in New York State, in Onondaga County, received its permit to  construct in 1992.  Strong environmental group and community opposition to MWCs created  significant political and practical barriers to further development.  In the less populated areas of the  state, MWCs are more capital intensive to develop and operate than landfills and, therefore, have  difficulty competing with existing landfills that have ample capacity and low tip fees.  Uncertainty on  the viability of flow control may have also curtailed development, making it difficult to guarantee  the necessary throughput to cover debt service and operating costs.  That uncertainty was partially  resolved in a 2007 Supreme Court ruling on flow control. (See Appendix 3.2.)  More MWCs were developed in the higher population density areas of the state such as Long Island  and Westchester County than any other part of the state, in large part because of economic and  statutory differences.  (For the location of MWCs in the state, see Figure 9.4.) The Long Island  Landfill Law restricted development of MSW landfills, leaving Long Island towns and cities to choose  between MWC (usually with local ash landfills) and longhaul to mostly out‐of‐state landfills for  disposal of the waste remaining after waste reduction, reuse, recycling and composting.  While four  MWCs are in operation on Long Island, many of the towns and cities still rely on long‐haul disposal,  with nearly 1.6 million tons of waste per year exported off Long Island (not including Brooklyn and  Queens) to MWCs and landfills.   Table 9.3 lists the operating MWC facilities in New York State and shows their statistics for 2008.   The 10 MWC facilities operating in the state received about 3.9 million tons of solid waste in 2008,  about 434,000 tons of which (or 11 percent of the total combusted) was imported.   MSW  represented about 97 percent of the waste combusted at these facilities, with the remaining 3  percent made up primarily of industrial waste with a small amount of C&D debris. About 95,470  tons (about 2.4 percent) represented scrap metal that was recovered for recycling.  These facilities are regulated by Part 360 solid waste regulations, by DEC’s Division of Air Resources  and federal government regulations.  In addition to the general requirements for all solid waste  management facilities,  “solid waste incinerators or refuse‐derived processing facilities or solid  waste pyrolysis units” are subject to facility‐specific requirements, including: detailed plans and  specifications for construction, operation, maintenance and eventual closure of the facility;  personnel and staffing; emergency preparedness and prevention; staff training, and ash residue  testing and disposal.   In addition to the ten MWC facilities which recover energy from waste, a number of combustors in  the state burn a total of 443,000 tons of biosolids from wastewater treatment facilities without  recovering energy.   
       

178   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 9.3 2008 MWC SUMMARY REPORT  MSW  By‐  passed  (tons)
                 14,298  

Facility Name  (DEC Permit)
Babylon  RRF***  Hempstead  RRF  Huntington  RRF 

MSW  Received  (tons)
       219,899          969,328          336,280  

MSW  Processed  (tons)*
              219,722                 964,727                 331,505  

Ash  Residue  Produced  (tons)

Electricity  (megawatt  hours)

Ferrous  Metals  Recovered  (tons)
                    3,693                    19,676                       4,559  

  Steam Sold  (thousand  pounds) Part 360  Permit  Expiration 
    08/06/2014      06/30/2015      04/04/2011   

                                       55,190   101,976                 566,701  

                                         291   230,375  

                                                        33   87,306   189,082     12,177 **  

MacArthur RRF  (Islip) 

       172,361  

              162,437  

                                         60,213   53,215  

                    6,598  

 

11/04/2009 

  Dutchess  County  RRA****  Wheelabrator  Westchester  Wheelabrator  Hudson Falls  Onondaga  County RRF         142,844          692,923          170,328          348,613                 143,618                 690,184                 170,995                 348,263                                                             162   44,010   44,201                           179,298                 378,340                       5,704                    18,049                       4,098                    11,775       09/13/2011      04/11/2012      05/30/2010      11/16/2011    Oswego  County  ERF*****  Covanta  Niagara  Total            62,424          801,016   3,916,016                   61,889                 797,609   3,890,949                                                               535   24,251   3,637                                            8,173   197,537   35,713   1,019,357                 217,345   1,856,572                      21,318   95,470            153,437  07/28/2014         2,829,362   2,982,799   03/31/2015   

 

                                                          27   52,450   82,584                                                           18   88,726   219,491  

Source:  Data reported to DEC. * MSW processed can exceed MSW received because waste may have been received in  the prior year.  ** MSW received exceeded the annual permit capacity; excess waste is exported.  ***RRF: Resource Recovery Facility  ****RRA: Resource Recovery Agency  *****ERF: Energy Recovery Facility   

179   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

  

Strong public concern for environmental protection, expanded state and federal regulatory  programs, and improved MWC technologies have led to enhanced operational efficiencies and  significantly reduced emissions from MWCs  during the past 20 years.  While high costs and lack of  community support may limit the development of new MWCs and other thermal technologies,  MWC is recognized by the EPA and DEC as an acceptable method of management of the waste that  remains after waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting programs have been implemented.   These facilities also produce energy, which represents a small contribution to meet the demand for  electricity and efforts to reduce New York State’s dependence on fossil fuels.  
 

9.3.1      Energy Generation   While more energy is conserved by reducing waste and reusing and recycling materials than is  generated by combusting them, an MWC will generate energy from the waste that remains after  maximizing reduction, reuse and recycling.  An MWC can offer both electricity and steam for  consumer use, while also supplying electricity for its own operational needs.  In fact, 1.4 percent of  the state’s electricity that MWCs provide is in addition to the electricity used for their own  operations.  The efficiency of energy generation varies depending on the type of combustion  technology used at an MWC.  Appendix 9.1 presents the combustion technologies used by the  state’s 10 MWCs.  Based on the data presented in Table 9.3, MWCs using the mass burn water wall  technology generate more electricity and less ash per ton of waste than the other MWC  technologies in use in the state (mass burn rotary or modular combustion).  In either case, long term  electric and/or steam revenues are critical to the financial viability of a MWC project.  In the context of the methods of electricity generation that produce emissions, as distinct from  methods that produce few or no emissions, such as solar, wind, geothermal, and hydropower  systems, MSW is not as efficient an energy source as are fossil fuels, such as oil, gas and coal65 .  This  is because fossil fuels are more homogeneous and contain higher BTU values and because the sole  purpose of fossil fuel power plants is to extract energy.  MWCs serve the dual purpose of generating  electricity and reducing waste volume.  The energy value of MSW is approximately 4,500–6,000 BTU  per pound as compared to coal, which has an energy value of 8,000–13,000 BTU per pound or  natural gas with a value of approximately 24,000 BTU per pound.  A more appropriate comparison is between MWC and other energy generating technologies for  residual waste, such as landfill gas to energy.  Landfill gas is generated  during a longer time frame  after a significant amount of waste is in place, while MWC generates energy immediately using  incoming waste.  A landfill gas to energy facility will not extract as much energy value from the 
                                                                  65  New York considers only the source‐separated, combustible, untreated and uncontaminated wood portion  of municipal solid waste or construction and demolition debris as an eligible renewable energy source for  the purposes of the renewable portfolio standard. DEC regulations (NOx Budget Program, 6 NYCRR Part  204‐1.2(b)(67)) and state law (Chapter 497 of 2009) exclude the combustion or pyrolysis of municipal solid  waste from the definition of renewable energy sources.]    180    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

residual waste stream because certain materials with high BTU values for MWC (e.g., plastics) will  not break down into methane in a landfill, and, therefore, their embedded energy will be lost.  And,  landfill gas collection systems do not completely capture all methane gas produced, contributing to  the inefficiencies in that system.  (For a full discussion of landfill gas collection and management, see  Section 9.4.76.4 (g); for a more complete analysis of the GHG implications of MWC vs. landfilling,  see Section 4.)  Taking these factors into account, a landfill gas‐to‐energy project can provide about  105 kWh per ton of MSW as compared to 585 kWh per ton from MWC and 2,250 kWh per ton of  energy saved through recycling. 66  A recent study comparing MWC and landfill gas to energy on a  life‐cycle basis found that MWC can generate an order of magnitude more electricity than landfill  gas to energy, given the same amount of waste handled. 67       9.3.2       Compatibility with Recycling  A common issue that is raised during consideration of a new MWC is whether combustion and  recycling are incompatible, as it can be argued that both compete for the same high BTU value  materials.  The implication is that a robust recycling program will reduce the quality or quantity of  waste necessary for the effective operation of an MWC or, conversely, that the operational needs of  a MWC will diminish recycling efforts.  In fact, however, communities with MWCs tend to have  slightly higher recycling rates than average.  Nationally, in 2004 the average actual recycling rate of  MWC communities across the country was 34 percent, as compared to the national average of 31  percent. 68     The capacity of an MWC, its steam boiler capacity and permit limits are based on the amount of  MSW projected to be combusted and the heating value (BTUs per pound) of the MSW.  While  certain combustible recyclable items, such as plastic, paper, cardboard, can improve the BTU value  of the waste stream, separating out non‐combustible materials such as metal and glass also  improves the BTU value of the remaining waste. However, because throughput at MWCs is limited  to 110 percent of the capacity at which emissions are tested, combusting disproportionate amounts  of recyclable materials with a significantly higher BTU value is counter‐productive and will actually  result in a reduction of the total tonnage of MSW that can be charged into a combustion unit.  Success in recycling in New York State has a stronger correlation to the level of investment in  recycling outreach, education and infrastructure in the facility’s service area, the facility’s financing,  facility permit conditions, and flow control or other legal support structures.  In particular, public  outreach and education to gain public support for and participation in recycling programs is critical  to good performance.  Another significant factor is the financial incentive or disincentive created by  disposal contracts.  Contracts that commit communities to deliver a certain amount of waste to a  facility, known as “put or pay” contracts, have created a disincentive for communities to reduce the 
                                                                  66  Materials Management Options for MA Solid Waste Master Plan Review, Tellus Institute, 2008; p.3 
67

 “Is it Better to Burn or Bury Waste for Clean Electricity Generation?”  P. Ozge Kaplan, Joseph Decarolis, and  Susan Thrnelow; Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 43, No. 6, 2009.  Surveys conducted by J. V. L. Kiser.  181  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

76  

 

amount of waste going to disposal.  These types of contracts are often used for MWCs and have also  been used for transfer stations and other facilities in the state.    Given that recycling is a preferred management strategy under the statutory hierarchy,  compatibility is an important consideration.  An important factor in achieving compatibility with  recycling is the proper sizing of an MWC, considering the amount of materials that can be diverted  through comprehensive reduction, reuse, recycling and organics recovery programs as described in  the LSWMP or CRA for the facility’s service area.  DEC influences the proper sizing of MWCs through  the Part 360 permit application requirements, which require a year‐by‐year analysis of the projected  waste stream and the permit conditions that include acceptance rate limits.     When appropriately sized and permitted, MWCs can co‐exist with very strong recycling programs, as  evidenced in Onondaga County.  In the permits for the Onondaga RRF, the sizing of the facility was  limited to what was calculated to be residue after the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency  reached aggressive recycling diversion goals.  That provision, in combination with a management  structure that includes flow control and a publicly owned facility that invests tip fee revenues into  an integrated waste prevention, recycling and composting program, has yielded one of the strongest  MSW recycling rates in the state at 51 percent.  (For more on OCRRA, see profile in appendix 5.1.)   
 

9.3.3 

     Air Emissions 

The poor performance and significant air pollution of incinerators in the past have resulted in strict  emission standards and numerous emission controls being used in all active MWCs in New York  State and nationwide.   To ensure compliance with standards, DEC requires MWCs to perform their  own continuous emissions monitoring for NOx, SO2, CO,  opacity and O2, and to perform annual  stack tests to gauge levels of other pollutants. 69     In its book, Waste Incineration & Public Health, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) found that  the application of improved combustor design, operating practices, air pollution control equipment  and changes in waste feed composition have resulted in a dramatic decrease in the emissions that  used to characterize uncontrolled incineration facilities. However, operating data analyzed from off‐ normal operations (startup, shutdown, equipment malfunction, etc.) in the early 1990s indicated  that production of dioxins and furans during these upset conditions could rapidly increase.  Based on  its findings, the NAS identified 13 specific best practices for reducing emissions.  Although the  instances of these off‐normal operations are infrequent, the stringent limits and operating  requirements in facility permits embody the best practices outlined by NAS.  DEC MWC permits  require waste screening and operator training.  DEC air permits require continuous monitoring for  the pollutants identified above as well as for temperature.  Federal Title V permits also require  compliance assurance monitoring, such as monitoring voltages of the electrostatic precipitators and 
                                                                  69  Most MWCs in NYS are required to monitor: NOx; SO2; CO; Total Hydrocarbons; PM; HCl; Hg;  Dioxins/Furans; PCBs; PAHs; Formaldehyde; Hexavalent Chromium; Total Fluorides; Various metals  (Arsenic, Be, Cd, total Chromium, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, Vanadium, and Zinc), and Ammonia.    182    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

the injection rate of carbon, to help assure removal for pollutants which do not have continuous  monitors.    A variety of pollution control technologies are now used to significantly reduce the gases and  particulate matter (PM‐2.5) emitted into the air, including:  • • • • • Combustion Controls B to minimize the formation of organic compounds  Urea or Ammonia Injection B to control NOx emissions  Carbon Injection B to reduce mercury emissions  Scrubbers B to neutralize acid gases through use of a liquid spray  Fabric Filters B to remove very tiny ash particles, down to submicron size, including heavy  metals such as lead, cadmium, chromium, etc., attached to particulates 

Pollution control technologies used in the state’s 10 MWCs are identified in Appendix 9.1.  In  addition to use of these technologies, prohibiting certain waste from entering the MWC waste  stream (e.g., batteries and fluorescent light bulbs) has also resulted in lower stack emissions for  certain compounds.    As demonstrated in Table 9.4 (EPA Memorandum, August 10, 2007; Subject: Emissions from Large  and Small MWC Units at MACT Compliance), these emissions have been dramatically reduced as a  result of the EPA‐required maximum achievable control technology (MACT) retrofits.  This data  includes the 1990 and 2005 emissions for 66 large and 22 small MWC plants nationwide.  The EPA data represented in Table 9.5 demonstrates that, nationally, MWCs operate below EPA  standard emission limits for key pollutants.   

TABLE 9.4       EMISSIONS FROM LARGE AND SMALL MWC UNITS 

Pollutant  CDD/CDF, teq basis  Mercury  Cadmium  Lead  Particulate matter  HCl  S02  NOx 

1990 Emissions  (tpy)  440  57  9.6  170  18,600  57,400  38,300  64,900 

2005 emissions  (tpy)  15  2.3  0.4  5.5  780  3,200  4,600  49,500 

Percent Reduction  99+%  96%  96%  97%  96%  94%  88%  24% 

*Dioxin/furan emissions are in units of grams per year toxic equivalent quantity (teq), using 1989 NATO  toxicity factors; all other pollutant emissions are in units of tons per year  Source: USEPA Memorandum, “Emissions from Large and Small MWC Units at MACT Compliance,” August 10, 2007 

        183    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 9.5     COMPARISON OF 2001 EMISSIONS  FROM 95 US MWC PLANTS W/USEPA STANDARD  Pollutant  Average  Emission  EPA  Standard  % of EPA  Standard  Unit 

CDD/CDF*  Mercury  Cadmium  Lead  Particulate  Matter  HCl  SO2  NOx 

0.05  0.01  0.001  0.02  4 

0.26  0.08  0.02  0.20  24 

19.2%  12.5%  5%  10%  16.7% 

ng/dscm  mg/dscm  mg/dscm  mg/dscm  mg/dscm 

10  6  170 

25  30  180 

40%  20%  94.4% 

ppmv  ppmv  ppmv 

Source:  “Comparative Impacts of Local Waste to Energy vs. Long Distance Disposal of Municipal Waste” presented at AWMA Annual  Meeting, New Orleans, LA, June 2006  ng/dscm = nanogram per dry standard cubic meter; ppmv = parts per million volume  *Represents dioxin and furan compounds (i.e., mono‐ to tri‐chlorinated dibenzodioxins [CDDs] and dibenzofurans [CDFs])   

In addition to achieving the EPA standards, as part of the SEQR process, DEC requires MWCs to  prepare a Health Risk Assessment (HRA) in accordance with an established protocol, to be approved  by DEC and DOH, that includes a description of the project, the air contaminants that will be  modeled, the basis and documentation for emission factors, the air dispersion model that will be  used, human exposure pathways to be evaluated and the public health guidelines that will be  referenced. The HRA is used to determine whether the project will have any adverse effects on  public health that need to be mitigated. Once constructed, the MWC is required to conduct  emissions tests which are used by DEC to determine whether the actual emission rates exceed the  values used in the HRA.  Once full‐scale operations are underway, MWCs begin to perform the  requisite daily continuous emissions monitoring and annual air emissions tests to ensure that they  are operating within environmentally protective parameters.    
           

9.3.4      Ash Management 
184    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

While MWC significantly reduces the volume of waste to be disposed of in landfills, in the US the ash  is typically landfilled, either directly or as ADC. In 2008, MWCs in New York State generated  approximately one million tons of ash residue.  More than three quarters of this ash was disposed in  one of the state’s three lined ash monofills 70 , monofill areas at the Town of Brookhaven Cleanfill, or  in MSW landfills.  Approximately 200,000 tons per year are being used beneficially as ADC at several  landfills in the state.  (See Table 9.7.)  MWCs generate two primary types of ash residue.  Coarse bottom ash is generated in the primary  combustion zone, while a finer fly ash is captured in pollution control equipment.  While the base  constituents of fly ash are somewhat similar to those of bottom ash, fly ash contains higher  concentrations of volatile metals than those found in bottom ash and in some cases, may require  management as a hazardous waste if managed separately. It is common industry practice in the US  to manage bottom ash and fly ash together as combined ash, with fly ash comprising approximately  10‐15 percent of the combined ash stream. However, this serves to limit the development of  potential higher‐value uses of the bottom ash.     In May, 1994, the US Supreme Court ruled that MWC ash is subject to hazardous waste  determination requirements, and in the February 1995 Federal Register, USEPA issued its  interpretation that these requirements take effect when the ash exits the combustion facility. In  June of 1995, USEPA issued Sampling and Analysis of Municipal Refuse Incineration Ash Guidance  (EPA 530‐R‐95‐036), which provided guidance to MWCs on how to sample and analyze ash to  determine whether or not the ash is a hazardous waste.  In New York State, combined ash is subject to an initial testing regimen that begins at a MWCs  startup with weekly testing for volatile matter and quarterly testing for leaching potential.   Combined ash from all of the MWCs in New York State has been tested for more than a decade in  accordance with USEPA protocol.  These tests have demonstrated that combined ash is a non‐ hazardous solid waste and can be managed pursuant to Part 360, and they have formed the basis  for granting facility‐specific variances to reduce the testing frequency. The average TCLP data for  cadmium and lead for MWCs in New York State since 1994 has ranged from 0.08 ppm to 0.61 ppm  for cadmium and 0.36 ppm to 1.51 ppm for lead.  The TCLP hazardous waste regulatory limit is 1.0  ppm for cadmium and 5.0 ppm for lead.    9.3.5     Siting Issues and Restrictions  Siting MWCs has been a lengthy and controversial process.  The high costs and lack of community  support for MWCs and other thermal technologies has limited their development.  MWCs are  required to evaluate a host of environmental impacts, including those related to siting, through the  State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA).   The review includes impacts on traffic, aesthetic  resources, community character, noise and odors, and public health.  DEC has issued guidance to aid  project proponents in addressing climate impacts under SEQRA analysis  (see http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/56552.html).   The extent to which significant 
                                                                  70  The three monofills are: Babylon North and Babylon Southern in West Babylon and Sprout Brook in  Peekskill.  185    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

environmental impacts can be mitigated is weighed in the decision to permit MWCs and to place  conditions on a permit.   

9.4   LANDFILLING 
The fourth and final solid waste management method in New York State’s hierarchy is land burial, in  the category of “other methods approved by the department.”  Although landfilling should be the  management method of last resort, given the state policy goals expressed in the solid waste  management hierarchy, landfills—either in state or out of state—handle the largest proportion of  New York State waste sent for disposal.  Approximately 53 percent of the total waste disposed of  from New York State generators is landfilled within the state, while about 13 percent is processed in  MWCs (with the residual ash land disposed), and 34 percent is exported, primarily to out‐of‐state  landfills.  When only MSW is considered, more of the waste disposed is exported than landfilled  within the state (42 and 41 percent, respectively).    The goals and recommendations expressed throughout this Plan are intended to correct this trend  and reduce reliance on landfilling as a waste materials management strategy. Continuing reliance on  waste disposal, and landfills in particular, comes at a significant environmental and economic cost.   The state’s preference for waste prevention, reuse, recycling and composting reflects the fact that  these strategies offer greater energy conservation, GHG reduction and other environmental  benefits.  Once these strategies are maximized, however, some residual waste will still remain and  need to be disposed.    Significant progress has been made in landfill design and operation to mitigate the negative impacts  of landfilling; much less waste is landfilled in New York State now than in 1988 compared to other  waste management methods, with most of that reduction achieved between 1988 and 1992. Still,  there is much room for improvement in diverting waste from disposal and reducing reliance on the  least preferable waste management approach.  The dramatic reduction in the number of MSW landfills since 1988 is shown in Figure 9.3.  The old,  small, local, unlined municipal landfills, which used to be known as “town dumps,” are no longer in  operation, in large part due to the regulatory structure DEC put in place in 1988 and the federal  requirements for MSW landfills promulgated in 1991 (40 CFR Part 258).  As with most other types of solid waste management facilities, landfills may be permitted,  registered or exempt, depending primarily on the types of waste they receive.  The exempt and  registered sites handle a very limited range and amount of materials and are described briefly in  Appendix 9.2.  The Part 360 regulations of 1988, and revisions thereafter, established some of the  most stringent, protective, and costly permitting requirements in the nation with regard to siting,  design, construction, operation, closure and post‐closure care.  A brief summary of those  requirements is also included in Appendix 9.2.  The regulations, combined with changes in the  industry and state financial assistance for municipal landfill closure, effectively led to the elimination  of “town dumps” and the development of larger, regional, highly engineered and controlled  facilities.     
186    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

In 2010, the state is developing revisions to the Part 360 regulations, which will improve  environmental protections even further, reflect advances in technology and practice  during the last  two decades and set the course for facility design, construction and operation for the next 10 to 20  years.  Revisions include enhanced operational requirements, including provisions for improved  odor control, resource efficiency, liner systems and post‐closure care and maintenance.   
FIGURE 9.3 

   

Of the 63 active landfills in the state, 62 are subject to the Part 360 permitting requirements, and  one active coal ash landfill is not directly subject to Part 360 permitting (see 9.4.5).  In addition to  the requirements applicable to all landfills, the regulations include specific requirements for Long  Island landfills and for landfills that receive only one type of waste, such as C&D debris or industrial  waste, which include wastes such as paper mill sludge, coal ash or MWC ash. 
 

9.4.1      Total Landfill Capacity  The amount of waste landfilled in New York State steadily decreased between 1988 and 1992.  This  was the result of two key factors.  First, many communities particularly in the downstate area  increased exports.  And second, recycling began to take a foothold and expand across the state.  The  in‐state landfill disposal decrease continued until about 2002, but increased sharply for the next  couple of years as exports decreased and imports increased.  Landfilling in New York State has  essentially levelled off since 2004.     
187    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

In addition to the 63 active landfills in New York State, there is also one permitted and constructed  MSW landfill that has remained inactive and two MSW landfills that were permitted but never  constructed.  The active landfills received about 11.4 million tons of solid waste in 2008.  The  number of each type of landfill and the amounts of waste they received in 2008 are shown in Table  9.6; their locations are depicted in Figure 9.4. Figure 9.5 shows the distinct regional differences in  the quantities of waste landfilled, with approximately 80 percent  of all landfilling in 2008 occurring  in DEC regions 1, 8 and 9.     
TABLE 9.6    Type of Landfill  Number of Active Landfills  Amount of Waste   Received in 2006 71  (millions of tons)  Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)  Long Island  C&D Debris  Industrial  MWC Ash Monofills  Total 27  3  14  16  3  63 8.0  1.7  0.4  1.1  0.3  11.5

                     
                                                                  71  The amounts presented here do not include materials used as alternative daily cover but do include imports.  188    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.4 

                           
189    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.5   

    9.4.2      MSW Landfills  The 27 active MSW landfills are located in DEC regions 3 through 9, as shown in Figure 9.6.  These  landfills receive MSW and can accept C&D debris and industrial waste.  About 78 percent of the  MSW that was land disposed went to landfills in DEC regions 8 and 9, where all 6 private MSW  landfills are located.  There are no active MSW landfills in DEC Region 2 (New York City) since the  2001 closure of Fresh Kills—the world’s largest landfill, based on measurement of waste‐in‐place.   There are also no active MSW landfills in DEC Region 1 (Long Island) due to the enactment of the  Long Island Landfill Law in 1983, which essentially eliminated direct landfilling of MSW in Nassau  and Suffolk counties.         
190    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

There are 64 planning units in New York State, only about half of which have disposal facilities  (landfills and/or MWCs) within their boundaries.  New York City is the most notable planning unit  without any disposal facilities, though several towns on Long Island also lack such capacity.  Most of  New York City’s waste and approximately 1.3 million tons of waste from Long Island is exported out  of state.  The remaining planning units without disposal facilities, however, rely primarily on other  in‐state disposal capacity.     FIGURE 9.6 

  Table 9.2 shows the amount disposed in 2008 and the remaining capacity for the active MSW  landfills.  These 2008 disposal amounts are shown by individual landfill and DEC region on the maps  in figures 9.7 and 9.8.             
191    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

 

FIGURE 9.7 

 
                            192    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.8 

  The remaining disposal capacity is also depicted by individual landfill and DEC region on the maps in  figures 9.9 and 9.10.  About 68 percent of the remaining MSW landfill capacity in New York State is  currently located in DEC regions 8 and 9.                       
193    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.9 

 
                            194    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT    

FIGURE 9.10 

  Six of the 27 active MSW landfills operating in the state are privately owned and operated.  The  remaining 21 are publicly owned.  Of these, four are owned by county agencies and operated on  their behalf by private waste management firms, while the remaining 17 are owned and operated  by municipalities (counties, cities, towns, or public authorities).  Despite their smaller number, privately operated landfills play a dominant role in MSW landfilling in  New York State.  The six privately owned and operated landfills received about 4.5 million tons of  waste, or 56 percent of the waste disposed of at MSW landfills in 2008.  The four publicly owned,  privately operated landfills received about 1.5 million tons of waste in 2008.  Altogether, the  privately operated MSW landfills (six privately owned and four publicly owned) received about six  million tons or about 75 percent of the total waste disposed of at MSW landfills in the state.  The 27 active MSW landfills and ten MWCs provide disposal service for most of the 64 planning units  in the state as well as a number of out‐of‐state communities, with New York City among the largely  downstate exporting communities.  The MSW landfills essentially operate according to one of four  generalized service area models.  An example of each model is depicted on maps in figures 9.11  through 9.14.  It should be noted that landfill operators can, and sometimes do, change from one of  these models to another, depending on market conditions, operational restrictions, or other factors.   
195    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

1. Publicly owned and operated  landfills planned and designed to  primarily serve their own  planning unit.  These are located  in planning units that have made  conscious decisions and  significant investments to be  essentially self‐sufficient and  take responsibility for  management of waste  generated within their own  borders for the longterm.  This is  typical of the landfills in DEC  Region 7, although there is  currently one example of this  model in each of DEC regions 3  through 6 as well. An example is  provided in Figure 9.11.      2. Publicly owned and operated  landfills that primarily serve  their own planning unit and also  provide service to one or more  neighboring planning units.  One  or more of these operates in  DEC regions 4 through 9.  An  example is provided in Figure  9.12.                        
196    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.11 

FIGURE 9.12 

3. Publicly owned landfills, often  privately operated which act as  merchant facilities serving a  limited and usually nearby group  of planning units.  These can be  found in DEC regions 5 and 8. An  example is provided in Figure  9.13.    4. Privately owned and operated  merchant facilities in DEC  regions 8 and 9 that serve a  much larger and more diverse  area. An example is provided in  Figure 9.14.   
                                                       

FIGURE 9.13 

FIGURE 9.14 

                     

9.4.3 
197   

 Long Island Landfills 
Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Landfills located in Nassau and Suffolk counties on Long Island are subject to special requirements  and restrictions under the ECL and corresponding Part 360 regulations.  They can receive either  “clean fill” only (as defined in the ECL and Part 360) or residual waste resulting from recycling and  composting facilities, or MWCs.  In the case of MWCs, residuals include ash and materials that  cannot be combusted either because the facility is experiencing downtime or because the materials  are non‐processble and designated as such by regulation or permit condition. There are three  permitted facilities considered by DEC to be Long Island landfills that primarily receive C&D debris  and similar “inert” materials.  Two receive only “clean fill,” and one, the Town of Brookhaven  Landfill, can also receive the residual wastes described above.  These landfills received about 1.7  million tons of waste in 2008, about 1.3 million tons of which was C&D debris or “clean fill.”  There  are also two MWC ash monofills in the Town of Babylon which are discussed in Sections 9.3.4 and  9.4.6.    9.4.4        C&D Debris Landfills  There are 14 active C&D debris landfills in New York State, most of which are relatively small and  located in upstate New York.  Collectively, these C&D landfills received almost 374,000 tons of C&D  debris in 2008, which represents only about 13 percent of the total C&D debris landfilled in the  state.  This does not include C&D materials that are beneficially used in landfills as ADC.  Much more  significant quantities of C&D debris are disposed of in Long Island landfills (1.3 million tons, about 45  percent of C&D debris landfilled) and MSW landfills (almost 1.2 million tons, about 42 percent).  The C&D debris landfills are shown in Figure 9.15.  Figure 9.16 shows the quantities disposed at C&D  debris landfills in each region, including the Long Island landfills.                             
198    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.15 

 
                            199    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.16 

  9.4.5     Industrial Landfills  The 16 active industrial landfills are shown in Figure 9.17.  They include coal ash monofills and paper  mill residuals monofills.  They are all located near water bodies due to the needs of these industries.   The paper mill sludge monofills are mostly located in the Hudson River Valley in the eastern portion  of the state, while the coal ash monofills serving coal‐fired power plants are primarily in the western  part of the state.  One coal ash landfill is not permitted by DEC pursuant to Part 360 but is subject to  the requirements of a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need issued pursuant to  Article VIII of the Public Service Law.           

200   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.17 

  9.4.6      Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) Ash Monofills  There are only three permitted MWC ash monofills.  Two are in DEC Region 1 and one is in DEC  Region 3, as shown in Figure 9.18.  All three are publicly owned and operated.  One of the landfills in  Region 1 did not receive ash in 2008 but is expanding and will resume ash disposal upon completion  of construction.  The monofill in Region 3 is expected to reach capacity around the end of 2009.   MWC ash is also disposed at MSW landfills and at the Brookhaven Landfill on Long Island.  MWC ash is also used as alternative daily cover (ADC) at a number of MSW landfills in the state.  As  shown in Table 9.7, about 318,000 tons of ash was disposed of at the ash monofills, about 546,000  tons of MWC ash generated within New York State was disposed of at in‐state landfills, about  45,000 tons was imported to an MSW landfill, and about 211,000 tons was used as ADC.           
201    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 
TABLE 9.7   
Ash Disposed of in Ash Monofill Landfills  Sprout Brook LF  Babylon North "U" Bypass  Babylon Southern Ashfill  Subtotal Ash Disposed of in MSW Landfills  Allied Waste Niagara Falls Landfill  Modern Landfill  Bristol Hill SLF  Mill Seat SLF  Seneca Meadows LF  Subtotal Ash Imported and Disposed of in MSW Landfills   Seneca Meadows LF  Ash Disposed of in LI Landfills  Brookhaven Waste Management Facility  Ash used as ADC at MSW Landfills  Allied Waste Niagara Falls Landfill  Ontario County Sanitary Landfill  Mill Seat SLF  Madison County West Side Extension LF  Bristol Hill SLF  Seneca Meadows LF  Franklin County Regional Landfill  Delaware County SWMF  Sullivan County Landfill  High Acres Western Expansion Landfill  Hyland Landfill  Chemung County Sanitary Landfill  Subtotal Tons  179,296  138,490  0  317,786        2,061             91      14,611           166    171,411   188,340

   

                                 

   45,339      358,412       84,585     74,570     12,831       9,856       9,741       6,854       5,433       4,506       2,075          622            42              5                        211,119                   

                 
202    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 
FIGURE 9.18 

9.4.7      Landfill Gas  As concern about climate change grows, so does the urgency in combating its effects by reducing  GHG emissions.  Landfill gas contributes approximately 4 percent of the state’s GHG inventory,  primarily because about half the gas generated at a landfill is methane, a potent GHG whose  warming potential is 23 to 72 times more powerful than CO2, depending on the time horizon  analyzed.   This impact cements landfilling at the bottom of the state’s solid waste management  hierarchy in the 21st century, and reducing these emissions is a critical strategy for New York State in  combating climate change. (For more detail see Section 4.)  Landfill gas is generated by the anaerobic (oxygen‐starved) degradation of organic waste.  It is  typically composed, on a volume basis, of about 50 percent methane (CH4), 49 percent carbon  dioxide (CO2) and 1 percent other gases.  The amount of gas produced depends on many factors,  particularly waste composition and site conditions. (See Section 4 for more details.)  Landfill gas  generation follows a very familiar pattern in which the volume of gas increases due to  biodegradation of the waste under anaerobic conditions until it reaches peak production and then  slowly decreases with time as the amount of organic waste is consumed. (See Figure 9.19.)    During the first phase of decomposition, aerobic bacteria consume oxygen while breaking down  organic waste.  Phase I decomposition can last for days or months, depending on how much oxygen 
203    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

is present when the waste is disposed of in the landfill.  Phase II decomposition begins the anaerobic  processes that start after the oxygen in the landfill has been used up.  The landfill becomes highly  acidic in Phase II.  During Phase III, the landfill becomes a more neutral environment in which  methane‐producing bacteria begin to establish themselves.  Phase IV decomposition begins when  both the composition and production rates of landfill gas remain relatively constant.  Under  favorable conditions, the methanogenesis stage for a waste mass can be reached in two years.   Phase IV landfill gas usually contains approximately 45 percent to 60 percent methane by volume,  40 percent to 60 percent carbon dioxide, and two percent to nine percent other gases, such as  sulfides. Gas is produced at a stable rate in Phase IV, typically for about 20 years.  However, the  actual timeframes for landfill gas production can vary.  Gas can continue to be emitted for 50 or  more years after waste is placed in the landfill.72   
FIGURE 9.19. TYPICAL LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION IN TIME (TCHOBANOGLOUS, ET AL., 1993)     

   

Several options are available for the management of landfill gas, depending on the landfill’s size, age  and waste composition.  Owners and operators of larger MSW landfills constructed or operated  since November 8, 1987 must comply with the requirements of 6NYCRR Part 208, Landfill Gas  Collection and Control Systems for Certain MSW Landfills. 73   Owners and operators of these landfills  must design, construct and operate a collection and control system if the calculated non‐methane  organic compounds (NMOC) emission rate exceeds 50 megagrams per year and must monitor  methane concentrations at the landfill surface to ensure they do not exceed 500 parts per million.   Of the 27 operating MSW landfills in New York State, 14 are subject to this requirement.  They are  highlighted in Table 9.9.  For smaller landfills where gas collection is not mandatory, carbon offset  trading and renewable energy credits have created incentives for the collection and destruction of  landfill gas and its conversion to energy. 

                                                                  72  Crawford and Smith 1985. 
73

 Landfills with a design capacity of at least 2.5 million cubic meters and with non‐methane organic compound  (NMOC) emissions of at least 50 megagrams per year are subject to Part 208.  204  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

Gas is collected using either a passive or active gas collection system.  An active gas collection  system typically includes horizontal collection laterals and/or vertical collection wells.  Gas is  extracted from the landfill by vacuums created by large blowers directing the gas to a large enclosed  flare or gas‐to‐energy facility.  A passive system typically consists of a number of shallow wells which  penetrate a few feet into the waste mass or connect to a gas venting layer in the cover system and  vent directly to the atmosphere or sometimes to small flares mounted to the vents.  Most of today’s  larger, active MSW landfills use an active collection system.    DEC regulations (6NYCRR Part 208) require that the gas from larger landfills be collected and  destroyed.  Facilities can meet Part 208 requirements by combusting the gas, either using flares or  engines that generate electricity. Gas combustion, with or without energy recovery, converts the  methane from all of these systems into CO2, resulting in lower GHG impacts.  GHG reductions are  also realized in systems that use the landfill gas for energy production because the combusted gas  displaces fossil fuels for energy production.  In some cases, such as the Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten  Island, the gas is cleaned and marketed to commercial gas supply systems.  In New York State,  approximately half of the landfill gas captured from both active and inactive landfills is used for  energy generation. (See tables 9.8 and 9.9.)   Table 9.9 shows the amount of landfill gas that was collected and flared or used to generate energy  from the active MSW landfills and one Long Island landfill.  At these 28 landfills, the amount of gas  flared (about 10.5 billion cubic feet) was only about 6 percent more than was used for energy  production (almost 10 billion cubic feet) in 2008.  This is an improvement compared to 2006 when  the amount flared was 42 percent more than was used for energy production.  Thus, there may be  significant opportunities for additional energy recovery at these sites.  Energy generation from  landfill gas is limited by the substantial costs to facilities, as well as logistical and regulatory hurdles  related to connecting landfill energy recovery facilities to the electricity grid.    In the case of small, old, inactive MSW landfills (25 acres or less), it has generally been assumed that  recovery of methane for energy production is not feasible due to economies of scale.  Little has  been done to develop small scale landfill gas recovery systems or to seriously evaluate their  potential.  Although individual landfills of this type may produce relatively small quantities of  methane compared to larger and newer facilities, because of their sheer number—which is  estimated to be more than 1,500 statewide—their cumulative contributions to GHG emissions may  be significant.  Due to the problems inherent in recovery of landfill gas on a small scale and the need  for basic research in this area, it is likely that grant monies or other incentives will be needed to  encourage research and development.

205   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Table 9.8 shows information, compiled from the 2008 annual reports, about the gas collected from  landfills for energy recovery in New York State. Twenty MSW landfills and one Long Island Landfill  currently have gas‐to‐energy production systems.  Of the 21, 7 are closed, and 14 are still  operational.  Figure 9.20 shows the locations of the landfill gas‐to‐energy facilities and MSW  landfills.  Altogether, they collected a total of about 14 billion cubic feet of gas and produced almost  564,000 megawatt‐hours of electricity.  The gas collected from two of the landfills is not used to  produce electricity onsite.  The gas from Fresh Kills Landfill is conditioned and marketed to a  supplier of natural gas, while the City of Auburn uses its landfill gas for sludge drying at its nearby  wastewater treatment plant. 
FIGURE 9.20 

206   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 9.8  2008 LANDFILL GAS‐TO‐ENERGY FACILITY ANNUAL REPORT DATA   
Region  Facility Name  Activity  Number  Landfill  Amount Gas  Recovered for  Energy  (cubic feet)  185,000,000     110,440,000   2,875,596,000    657,394,532   22,103,348   359,850,000   797,463,000   144,242,589   6,720,000   194,073,483      328,220,000    67,300,000   1,552,100,000  864,400,000                           306,738,169   1,014,669,687   2,792,137,640   800,129,000   249,684,545   2,218,131,000   15,546,392,993   Amount  Electricity  Generated   (megawatt‐ hours)  284   3,617       3,726    933   12,521   38,241   6,994   417   9,410      13,478   2,193   70,605   41,087   11,648   47,917   145,342   41,627   12,106   101,805   563,951   Amount  Low BTU  Gas  Produced   (cubic feet)         Amount  Condensate  Generated  (gallons)  175,000   12,105  

1  1  2  3  4  4  4  5  5  6  7  7  7  8  8  8  8  8  9  9  9   

Brookhaven Landfill Gas  Recovery Facility  Oceanside Landfill Gas  Recovery Facility  NYCDOS/GSF FRESHKILLS  GAS PLANT  Ameresco  Hudson Valley  Community College LFG  Minnesota Methane  Albany LGRF  Town of Colonie Sanitary  Landfill  Clinton County Landfill  Saratoga Springs Landfill  Gas Project  DANC  Auburn Landfill Gas  Broome County LGRF  Onondaga Energy Group  High Acres Gas  Mill Seat LGRF  Monroe‐Livingston Gas  Ontario LGRF  Seneca Energy; Inc.  Chaffee Landfill  Hyland Landfill  Model City Energy   

52F06  30F13  43F21  36F02  42F01  01F01  01F  10S20  46F01     06F01  04F  34F01  28F02  28F03  26F01  35F  50F02  15F01  02F01  32F01   

Brookhaven (52S02)  Oceanside (30S06)  Fresh Kills (43S02)  Al Turi (36S04)  Troy (42S17)  Albany (01S02)  Colonie (01S26)  Clinton County  (10S20)  Wieble Avenue  (46S17)  DANC (23S13)  Auburn (06S14)  Broome (04S07)  Onondaga/Tripoli  (34S12)  High Acres (28S32)  Mill Seat (28S31)  Monroe‐Livingston  (26S09)  Ontario (35S11)  SMI (50S08)  Chaffee (15S14)  Hyland (02S17)  Modern (32S30)  Total:

1,490,748,000  142,021                        109,255,383                                1,600,003,383   15,410   2,449                     38,321   15,600   1,451,952   603,944                            85,050      462,211   23,713         3,027,776 

                207    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT 

TABLE 9.9  
Activity  Number  Amount Gas  Flared   (cubic feet)  1,360,579,877     % Gas  Flared  Amount Gas  Recovered for  Energy  (cubic feet)                 359,850,000      % Recovered  for Energy of  Total Gas  Collected  21%    

Region 

Landfill Name 

Comments 

4  9 

Albany Rapp Rd.  Allegany County  Allied Niagara  Falls  Auburn Landfill  No. 2  Ava  Bath  Bristol Hill  Brookhaven  Broome County  Chaffee  Chautauqua  Chemung County  Chenango  County  Clinton County  Colonie  Cortland County  Westside Ext  DANC  Delaware County  SWMF  Franklin County  Regional  Fulton County   High Acres  Western  Exp  Hyland   Madison County  West Side Ext.   Mill Seat  Modern  Ontario County  Seneca  Meadows  Sullivan County    

   02S15 

79%    

32S11 

  

  

  

  

7  6  8  7  1  7  9  9  8  7  5  4  7  6  4  5  5  8  9  7  8  9  8  8  3   

06S14  33S15  51S21  38S14  52S02  04S07  15S14  07S12  08S02  09S16  10S20  01S26  12S10  23S13  13S18  17S21  18S20  28S32  02S17  27S15  28S31  32S30  35S11  50S08  53S03  Total:

   24,440,000    303,711,000      446,000,000   216,260,000   290,371,000   565,261,146   376,400,000      756,400,000   3,379,860      622,000,000   197,000,000   143,000,000   227,959,000   1,900,038,000  618,425,000   259,288,000   1,012,500,000  ‐     132,870,000   534,000,000   552,000,000   10,541,882,883 

  100%  100%     71%  40%  27%  100%  100%     84%  0%     76%  100%  100%  100%  55%  71%  100%  54%  0%  12%  16%  100%   

                                   ‐                                       ‐          185,000,000                  328,220,000                  800,129,000            144,242,589   797,463,000        194,073,483                            1,552,100,000   249,684,545      864,400,000      2,218,131,000     1,014,669,687            2,792,137,640              15,546,392,993 

  0%  0%     29%  60%  73%  0%  0%     16%  100%     24%  0%  0%  0%  45%  29%  0%  46%  100%  88%  84%  0%   

3 Open Flares  No flare  No flare ‐  Nonputrescible  Waste  1 Open Flare ‐  variable amounts  flared  4 Open Flares  1 Open Flare  No flare  1 Open Flare, 1  Enclosed Flare  1 Open Flare  1 Open Flare, 1  Enclosed Flare     6 Open Flares  5 Open flares  1 Flare  2 Open Flares  No flare  2 Open Flares  1 Open Flare  1 Open Flare  1 Open Flare  2 Enclosed Flares  1 Open Flare  1 Open Flare  1 Enclosed Flare  1 Enclosed Flare  1 Open Flare, 2  Enclosed Flares  2 Enclosed Flares  2 Open Flares   

Note:  1. The amount of gas collected does not equal the amount generated because landfills experience uncontrolled emissions.  For a more complete  discussion, see Section 3.    2. Higlighted landfills are subject to the requirements of 6NYCRR Part 208, Landfill Gas Collection and Control Systems for MSW Landfills.  

208   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT 

9.4.8    Siting Issues and Restrictions  Siting landfills is a complicated and controversial process that has, at times, taken more than a  decade.  This is, in part, due to the siting restrictions identified in Appendix 9.2.  Among the most  common issues are the restrictions related to regulated wetlands.  These are often applicable to  proposed landfill projects because of the widespread nature of wetlands in New York State and  because the low‐permeability soils which promote wetland formation are also preferred for landfills  because they limit the potential for groundwater contamination.  Additional factors are considered  under SEQRA and include impacts on traffic and aesthetic resources, such as scenic views; noise and  odors, and public health concerns.  DEC has issued guidance to aid project proponents in addressing  climate impacts under SEQRA analysis (see http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/56552.html).   The  extent to which significant environmental impacts can be mitigated is weighed in the decision to  permit waste disposal capacity and to place conditions on a permit.   
 

9.4.9    Landfill Expansions  In 2009, landfills are fewer in number and larger in size due to the challenges of siting new landfills  in greenfield sites, the time and cost involved in developing a new landfill, the objectives of many  municipalities to use exising facilities outside their boundaries rather than construct and operate  their own facilities, and the goals of private enterprises to provide and expand service to a wide  array of customers.  Today, landfill expansions, which typically take one to five years to develop, are  much more common than new landfill sites because of litigation, local zoning prohibitions, real  property acquisition costs and lengthy regulatory and public review processes that make new  greenfield site development ever more daunting.  Also in their favor, landfill expansions use existing  infrastructure, are much less expensive to design and construct, and generally impact fewer natural  resources than new landfills. Even municipalities that actively manage their waste and operate their  own landfills have generally sought to expand existing landfills to provide long‐term disposal  solutions rather than site new facilities.   
 

9.4.10    Future MSW Disposal Capacity  74  Looking at the state as a whole, at the end of 2008, there were about 220 million tons of permitted  MSW landfill capacity for future disposal.  Approximately 75 percent of that capacity is available to  the marketplace, generally at merchant facilities, and 25 percent of capacity is designated for  particular jurisdictions. At 2008 waste disposal rates, the remaining capacity permitted in the state  can be equated, for illustrative and planning purposes, to an overall average of about 21 to 25 years  of remaining, approved landfill site life.  However, once acceptance restrictions are taken into  account, 9 to 12 years of capacity are readily available to the rest of the state.   
                                                                  74  It should be noted that capacity projections are a snapshot in time.  As landfill expansion applications are  approved, the remaining capacity picture changes.  DEC has provided estimates based on the assumption  that current operations and conditions will continue into the future.    209    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

To provide a more in‐depth analysis, Figure 9.9 and Table 9.11 provide the site life remaining at each  of the MSW landfills in the state at the end of 2008.   A more realistic analysis of disposal capacity  must consider site‐specific capacity at the landfills that serve or could serve that planning unit.   Approximately one third of the MSW landfills, representing less than 10 percent of the total  approved MSW landfill capacity, have less than 10 years of site life remaining before they reach  their current permitted capacity.  Several of these facilities have proposed expansions.  Another 12  representing  almost half of the remaining permitted capacity in the state have 10 to 30 years  remaining.  Another quarter, representing  about 45 percent of the remaining permitted capacity,  have more than 30 years left to fill.  Therefore, two‐thirds of the MSW landfill operators or the  planning units in which they are located, representing almost 95 percent of the permitted landfill  capacity in the state, have ample time to attempt to reduce waste and increase recovery or plan for  future expansion. 
  TABLE 9.10    MSW LANDFILL PERMITTED CAPACITY SITE LIFE SCENARIOS (YEARS) 

 
  Current Conditions  Continue  21‐25  No Waste  Import/Export  15‐18 

Permitted Landfill Capacity (All  MSWLFs)  Permitted Capacity w/o Self‐ Sufficient or Limited Service Area  MSWLFs 

14‐18 

9‐12 

                       
210    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

TABLE 9.11  Site Life >2008  Existing & Entitled  MSW Landfill  (Years)  Capacity (Tons)  0 ‐ 10 Years Albany  1  478,000 Sullivan  1  140,000 Chautauqua  2  2,240,000 Allegany  4  250,000 Franklin  7  575,000 Ontario  7  7,350,000 Auburn  8  761,000 Chemung  8  1,240,000 11 ‐ 30 Years Mill Seat  11  6,890,000 DANC  12  3,500,000 Allied Niagara  13  9,240,000 Colonie  15  4,000,000 Steuben  15  2,420,000 Chaffee  17  6,080,000 Hyland  17  7,710,000 SMI  17  37,600,000 Clinton  20  7,640,000 Delaware  20  508,000 Modern  24  22,100,000 Cortland  28  710,000 31 ‐ 50 Years High Acres  41  44,400,000 Chenango  42  1,100,000 Broome  50  10,600,000 51 ‐ 100 Years Bristol Hill  60  3,350,000 Fulton  63  9,450,000 OHSWA  67  21,400,000 100 + Years Madison  106  7,770,000       Denotes Self‐Sufficient or Limited Service Area MSW Landfills Percent of Total  Landfill Capacity 

49 

26 

16 

4

 
   

211   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

9.5  

IMPORT/EXPORT FOR DISPOSAL 

While some planning units have enacted flow control measures as part of integrated waste  management systems within their communities, more often than not, waste is moved from the  planning unit or community where it was generated to another where it is disposed.  While many  New York State communities dispose of their waste within the state, as shown in Figure 9.21, a  significant amount of waste is also transported for disposal across state borders, both out of and  into the state. Figure 9.22 illustrates the progressive increase in waste exports in time.  The state’s increasing reliance on waste export from many of its densely populated areas represents  a significant public policy issue.  While DEC acknowledges that the flow of waste is dictated by  economic and market forces as well as regulatory and policy directives, it is important to recognize  that relying on other jurisdictions to manage one‐fifth of the total waste stream and one‐third of  MSW is problematic and potentially unreliable.  Principles of sustainability and responsibility dictate  that materials be managed in the most efficient and environmentally sensitive manner, with  consideration of the risks and impacts of out‐of‐state transportation.  Although complete self‐ sufficiency is unlikely, it is a worthy goal to which the state and its communities should aspire to  reduce its vulnerability to the decisions of other states and jurisdictions and to achieve sustainable  materials management.  Achieving the goals of this Plan—preventing waste, increasing reuse, recycling and composting and  reducing waste disposal—will help reduce reliance on export.  For example, increasing the statewide  MSW recycling rate to 45 percent and reducing waste generation to 2.9 pounds per person per day  would result in six million tons of waste reduced statewide—roughly equivalent to the amount of  MSW exported annually. Fully realizing the potential of this Plan would reduce waste generation to  below one pound per person per day, even further reducing pressure for export.  If the state is  successful in moving Beyond Waste and achieving the goals of this Plan, existing in‐state disposal  capacity could be extended, and out of state export could be curtailed significantly. 
 

                   
212    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.21   
                         

Figure 9.22 demonstrates the trends in the total amount of solid waste transported out of the state  during the past 20 years and into the state during the past 10 years. (Supporting data is included in  Appendix 9.3.)  New York State continues to be a significant net exporter to disposal facilities in  other states, as the figure shows, with both exports and imports generally rising with time.  It should  be noted that the older data is not as comprehensive as that from recent years, and import data was  not collected prior to 1998.  The newer data is more reliable due to enhanced reporting  requirements and improved data management methods employed by solid waste management  facilities and by DEC, although further improvements are still needed as discussed in section 8.3.1.                     
213    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.22 

 

  9.5.1 Exports  This section focuses on waste transported for disposal and not on recyclables. 75   The data presented   here includes: MSW, C&D debris, and industrial waste but excludes biosolids.  MSW represented  about 74 percent of the solid waste exports in 2008 and about 60 percent of the imports.  The  export data presented in this section is based on the information provided in the solid waste  management facility annual reports submitted to the DEC.  During the past decade, more than a quarter of all solid waste generated and destined for disposal  in New York State annually has been exported.  Exports appear to have increased significantly in the  past 20 years, and they are still rising.  Perhaps the most significant reason for the increase since  2000 is that the immense Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island ceased receiving waste at that time.   New York City began gradually decreasing the amount of waste disposed at Fresh Kills and  increasing out‐of‐state exports several years prior to that the landfill’s closure.  Much of the waste exported from New York State is generated in New York City (DEC Region 2).   Since 2005, almost 75 percent of the state’s exported waste originated there.  Most of the rest was  exported from the neighboring downstate areas of Long Island (DEC Region 1) and the lower Hudson  Valley (DEC Region 3).  Altogether, waste exports from these three DEC regions account for about 99  percent of the state’s export total.       
                                                                  75  It is important to note that, in addition to conventional recyclables, approximately 86,823 tons of yard  trimmings were exported from Long Island for composting in other states in 2008.  214    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

As illustrated in figures 9.23 and 9.24, the primary states to which New York State waste has been  exported for disposal in recent years were, from greatest quantities to least:  1. Pennsylvania – exports from New York State have consistently ranged between 2 and 3  million tons per year since 2004.  2. Virginia – exports increased from about 1.2 million tons in 2004 to more than 1.5 million  tons in 2008.  3. Ohio – exports increased significantly from about 200,000 tons in 2004 to more than 1.7  million tons in 2008.  4. South Carolina – exports increased significantly from virtually none in 2004 to more than  500,000 tons in 2008.  5. New Jersey – exports amounted to just under 200,000 tons.    These five states receive about 99 percent of New York State’s exported waste.    FIGURE 9.23 

215   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

FIGURE 9.24 
                         

Solid waste exports for disposal far outweigh imports and will continue to do so for the foreseeable  future, primarily due to long‐term export contracts that are in place for New York City’s residential  solid waste.  Despite excluding New York City’s exports, imports and exports for the rest of the state  seem to be comparable.  Exports from the rest of the state, which have been primarily from DEC  regions 1 and 3, have generally been about the same as imports during the past several years. Table  8.11 shows this, as well as a breakdown by waste type, for 2008.  It should be noted that the data in  Table 9.12 is based on information reported by solid waste facilities in New York State.  As  mentioned earlier, the primary states to which waste from New York is exported report about an  additional 1.3 million tons from New York.  Imports have been accepted, for the most part, at  facilities in DEC regions 3, 5, 8 and 9. 
  TABLE 9.12   Waste Type    MSW  C&D  Industrial  Biosolids  Total       216    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT 2008 Exports from NYS (in Millions of Tons)  Total  4.7  1.6  <0.1  0.2  6.5 NYC 3.7 1.0 <0.1 0 4.7 Other NYS 1.1 0.6 <0.1 0.2 1.9 2008 Imports    1.2  0.5  0.2  0.07  2.0

9.5.2      Imports  Although New York State is a net exporter of solid waste, waste import quantities have also  increased substantially during the past decade.  Since 2005, imports have accounted for more than  ten percent of all solid waste disposed at landfills and MWCs within New York State. As illustrated in  Figure 9.25 for 2008, the major states/provinces from which waste is imported are:  1. Ontario – Imports from this province have increased since 2005 from about 300,000 tons to  almost 900,000 tons in 2008.  2. Connecticut  3. Massachusetts  4. New Jersey  5. Pennsylvania    FIGURE 9.25 

     

As illustrated in Figure 9.26, about 75 percent of the waste imported into New York State since 2005  has come from Ontario, Connecticut and Massachusetts.  The top five import states, which include  these three plus New Jersey and Pennsylvania, are the source of about 95 percent of the waste  imported into New York State.  While imports from most states have remained relatively constant or  vary somewhat from year to year, imports from Ontario in particular have increased steadily since 
217    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

2005 and have accounted for approximately 33 percent of all imports into New York State since that  time.  As with exports, most imported waste is received by privately operated landfills and MWCs. 
  FIGURE 9.26 PERCENTAGES OF SOLID WASTE IMPORTED FOR DISPOSAL FROM OTHER STATES 

   

9.5.3       Interstate Transport Limitations  Communities and businesses that generate or receive waste make waste management decisions  based on a variety of economic, legal, and political factors.  Only about half of the 64 planning units  in the state have disposal facilities (landfills and/or MWCs) within their boundaries.  The rest  essentially rely on disposal capacity in other in‐state planning units or out‐of‐state facilities.  The  free movement of waste is critical, therefore,  to these planning units and the facilities that serve  them.  Restrictions on waste exports would potentially impact about 22 percent of New York State’s  waste that is currently destined for disposal. 
 

9.5.4       Data Collection and Reporting   As mentioned earlier, the information presented in this section is based on the data provided to DEC  in the solid waste management facility annual reports.  Unfortunately, there have been inherent  discrepancies and inconsistencies in data reporting and transcription.  Data collection and reporting  improvements have been made both by DEC and the facilities, resulting in more complete and  accurate data.  Better monitoring of facilities has also resulted in the submission of more reports,  and measurements are more accurate as most facilities now use calibrated weighing scales rather  than estimating loads based on truck counts or volumes. 
218    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Nevertheless, data on exported waste available to DEC is incomplete in that annual reports are  submitted to DEC only by regulated solid waste management facilities in New York State.  DEC  currently does not capture information about waste that is transported directly out of state without  going through such a facility, resulting in an underreporting of exported waste.  The degree of  underreporting is uncertain.  The difference between New York State’s annual export estimates and  those reported by other states, most notably Pennsylvania, has been up to three million tons.   Efforts have been underway to obtain better information, but more comprehensive reporting  mechanisms and other improvements are still needed.   To prepare the 2008 export estimate, DEC included: (1) reported exports from transfer stations and  other facilities in New York State and (2) data from state agencies in the five states that receive most  of New York State’s waste exports, as reported by transfer and disposal facilities in those states.   Adding data collected from other states resulted in an estimated increase of 1.5 million tons of solid  waste exports. 
 

9.6  

EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES 

Many municipalities, companies, universities and research institutions are working to develop the  next generation of MSW conversion technologies as a waste management alternative to landfilling  or conventional mass burn MWC.  These technologies use advanced thermal, biological, or chemical  processes to convert the organic portion of the waste stream into a syngas which can be used to  produce electricity, synthetic fuels, and/or chemical products.    Thermal conversion technologies include pyrolysis, gasification, and plasma arc gasification.  As of  fall 2009, there were four proposals for gasification plants in the state in the permit application  process.  Biological and chemical conversion technologies include anaerobic digestion, fermentation  to ethanol, acid hydrolysis, and catalytic cracking.  While some consider anaerobic digestion an  “emerging energy from waste technology,” DEC considers it a biological organics recovery system,  and, therefore, it is discussed in Section 8.4.  Emerging technologies are attracting the attention of researchers, consultants and municipalities  seeking alternatives to current residuals management techniques.  Communities in California,  Florida and New York City have commissioned studies on alternative thermal, thermochemical and  biochemical conversion technologies.  They are finding that thermochemical and biochemical  conversion technologies possess unique characteristics which have varying potentials to reduce the  amount of material that is ultimately landfilled.    However, there are still many questions regarding the implementation of these technologies on a  commercial scale, including:   • • Can the technology be scaled up successfully and for long‐term operations?  Will costs and revenues be as proposed by the project sponsor for the life of the project? 

219   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• • • • •

Will the system be available, and the project sponsor solvent, at the time contracted for  delivery and operation?  Will the project sponsor be available throughout the life of the project for servicing and  operation assistance?  Will the system perform as expected during the life of the project?   Will the system have good reliability and greater than 85 percent availability when waste is  delivered?   Will the environmental impacts be as described by the project sponsor? 

In March 2006, the New York City Economic Development Corporation released its study, Focused  Verification and Validation of Advanced Solid Waste Management Conversion Technologies.  The  study found that anaerobic digestion and thermal processing technologies are in commercial  operation overseas for MSW, and these technologies could be successfully applied in New York City.   According to the report, the environmental findings showed that, in general, anaerobic digestion  and thermal processing technologies have the potential to offer better environmental performance  than MWCs, including lower air emissions, increased beneficial use of waste, and reduced reliance  on landfilling.  The economic findings also showed that costs for these technologies (on a  commercial scale) were comparable to costs for current export practices.   Other studies, however, have found that some thermal treatment facilities have demonstrated  higher air emissions than mass‐burn MWCs.  Test burns at a pyrolysis facility in Riverside County, CA  yielded emissions of key pollutants (ozone precursors NOx and reactive organic gas and dioxins) at  higher levels than conventional mass‐burn MWCs.76    Also to be considered is the potential energy consumption needs of certain emerging technologies  that can offset their value as a source of electricity.  For example, plasma arc facilities use electricity  to create the ultra‐high‐temperature environment needed to generate the arc.  Reportedly, 40  percent of the energy produced at a plasma facility would be required to operate it, and only 60  percent would be available for resale.  It is also important to note that many emerging technologies have been plagued by operational  problems and have had difficulty growing from bench to commercial scale.  There are two examples  of MSW gasification facilities, one in Germany and one in Australia, which have closed due to  operational issues, including technical problems, equipment breakdowns, and air emissions  exceedences. 77     In summary, while thermal treatment technologies are emerging, they have not yet been  successfully demonstrated in the US in an economically viable, environmentally protective  commercial scale operation.   
                                                                      76  South Coast Air Quality Management District. 
77

 Source: Incineration in Disguise.  220  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 

10.  AGENDA FOR ACTION 
 

The Plan seeks to fundamentally change the way discarded materials are managed in New York  State.  The action agenda presented here is a compilation of the recommendations detailed  throughout the Plan and represents the path that will move the state toward sustainable materials  management by progressively reducing the amount of materials that go to waste.  Taking this path  will have a tremendous positive impact on our economy and our environment—conserving energy  and natural resources, creating economic opportunity and jobs, and reducing greenhouse gas  emissions.  This Plan is ambitious.  To meet its promise, the state and its solid waste management planning  units must implement the wide range of actions detailed throughout the Plan and summarized  below; New York State’s citizens must embrace its concepts as well.  Fully realizing these  recommendations will require additional resources—both financial and human—at the state and  local level.  Options for generating new resources are presented in Section 10.1.3 below.     

10.1     LEGISLATIVE RECOMMENDATIONS 
While some of the goals of the Solid Waste Management Act of 1988 (Act) have been met, as  evidenced by the growth in recycling programs since its passage, it is undeniable that higher levels  of achievement are possible.  With the continued growth in the volume of solid waste generated, an  evolved understanding of the environmental impacts of waste disposal, and the emergence of new  materials management options, there is a clear need for new priorities.  Moving forward requires an  updated statutory framework that sets the stage for growth and supports the paradigm shift needed  to move Beyond Waste.    This section includes the critical elements of a new legal structure to prevent waste and increase  recycling, including an updated solid waste management act, product and packaging stewardship  programs, and options for generating new resources.  Together, these legislative recommendations  are intended to achieve the following objectives:  • • • • • • • Prevent waste generation   Use materials in the waste stream for their highest and best use  Maximize reuse and recycling   Engage state agencies, authorities, businesses, institutions, and residents in sustainable  materials management programs   Maximize the energy value of materials management  Engage manufacturers in end‐of‐life management of the products and packages they put  into the marketplace   
221    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

 10.1.1   Updated Solid Waste Management Act  Making truly significant progress to prevent waste and increase recycling will require a new  statutory structure.  Updates to the act proposed here represent an integrated package of  recommendations that address many issues raised throughout this Plan.  Together they create a  framework that will support the state’s efforts to move Beyond Waste.  A critical element of a new framework is an updated solid waste management act to guide the  actions of the state’s many involved agencies and its varied municipalities.  An updated act should  address the following key issues:  1. Set new goals and define new metrics: New and aggressive reduction, composting and  recycling goals will guide New York State and its citizens, businesses, local governments, and  planning units in striving for reductions in waste and increases in recycling.  Statutory goals  should mirror the statewide goals proposed in this Plan, beginning with a shift to a more  effective way of measuring success. Instead of attempting to measure the percentage of  waste diverted from the waste stream, the new metric will gauge the amount of waste  destined for disposal on a percapita basis, with a goal of reducing that amount by 15  percent every two years.  Using this metric, the state will be able to assess the impact of  waste prevention, reuse and product and packaging stewardship and more effectively assess  progress in moving Beyond Waste.  To measure recycling progress, the state will track  percapita diversion of recyclables and organic materials.   DEC will evaluate the  effectiveness of the new metric and the state’s progress against the disposal reduction goal  in biennial Plan updates, which will assist the State Legislature and solid waste managers in  making short and long‐term policy decisions that promote both effective and  environmentally responsible materials management.  2. Update and clarify recycling and green purchasing requirements for state agencies and  authorities:  The 1988 Act required all state agencies and authorities to implement recycling  programs; however, many agencies have not met their obligations.  Executive Order 4 (EO4)  is a valuable step forward in integrating waste prevention, recycling and sustainability into  state operations. (See Appendix 8.1 or http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/ExecutiveOrder4.html.)   Codifying state agency waste prevention, recycling, purchasing, and sustainability  requirements of EO4 would ensure that the state continues to lead by example.    3. Clarify the Solid Waste Management Hierarchy: Research indicates that the hierarchy is still  a valid and useful tool for prioritizing waste management strategies.  An updated act should  maintain the core elements of the existing hierarchy, which places a preference for waste  prevention, reuse, and recycling above municipal waste combustion (MWC) and landfilling,  while clarifying that reuse is preferable to recycling, that composting and organics recycling  are equivalent to recycling, and that product stewardship is the preferred approach to  implementing the heirarchy.  The updated act should make clear that the hierarchy is a  statement of policy that communities should use as a guidepost, while using more advanced  tools to evaluate the economic, environmental and GHG impacts of various alternatives to  determine the best path Beyond Waste. 
222    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

4. Generate and allocate new resources to move Beyond Waste: Meeting the goals and  objectives of this Plan will require significant investment in planning, reuse, recycling and  composting infrastructure, market development, education, outreach and enforcement.   This investment will necessitate an infusion of new revenue, such as one or more of the  potential revenue sources discussed in Section 9.1.3 below.    5. Reinforce recycling requirements for all generators: There must be no ambiguity in the  message that all New Yorkers are required to recycle, whether they are at home, at work, at  school, in public spaces, or in MTA transit stations.  An updated act must clarify that  recycling programs must be made available to and employed by all generators in all settings  in the state; that is, that source‐separation requirements extend beyond the residential  sector to commercial, institutional and industrial generators and to public spaces, events  and other gatherings.   Establishing and enforcing programs in these areas will ensure that  source‐separation/recycling messages are regularly and uniformly conveyed and clearly  understood.  6. Replace the “economic markets” clause in the current law (Section 120‐aa of Article 6 of  General Municipal Law) with a mandatory list of recyclables: The 1988 Act required that  communities establish recycling programs for materials “where economic markets exist.”   This clause has proven to be cumbersome in practice, creating confusion and potentially  undermining the value of recycled materials because a reliable supply of material is critical  to justifying private capital investment in secondary materials markets.  In fact, most  programs have continuously collected the same materials for much of the past two decades  despite periodic dips in market values.  Experience also shows that when the same items are  widely understood as recyclable for long periods,public participation is more successful.  After more than 20 years of experience in recycling, DEC and ESD can identify the materials  that are common to most programs in the state and that have had consistently viable  markets; they include newspaper, cardboard, metals, PET and HDPE plastic bottles, and yard  trimmings.  These would comprise an initial list of mandatory recyclable materials in the  updated act.  DEC should be authorized to add or remove materials by regulation as the  market and collection/processing systems evolve. The updated act should then provide for  an expedited mechanism for communities to petition DEC for an exemption from mandatory  recycling requirements and a mechanism for DEC to provide statewide waivers in times of  severe economic hardship or based on other critical concerns.     7. Increase DEC’s authority and resources to enforce recycling requirements: As described in  other sections of the Plan, planning units and municipalities have had the responsibility of  enforcing source‐separation requirements but have had difficulty allocating resources for  this important task.  An updated act should supplement local enforcement of source‐ separation requirements with explicit authority for DEC to enforce against generators who  do not source separate mandatory recyclables designated in the act.  Increasing DECs  authority and resources in this area would help municipalities get the attention and engage  the cooperation of reluctant recyclers.   
223    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

8. Ensure that every permitted facility maximizes recycling and reuse and otherwise affords  opportunities to manage waste at the highest possible point in the hierarchy within the  facility’s service area: An applicant whose facility is not explicitly part of an integrated  system should contribute in other ways to encourage recycling, reuse, organics recycling,  household hazardous waste (HHW) collection and other means of reducing the amount of  waste disposed in the community in which it is located and by the communities within its  service area.    9. Establish disposal restrictions on bulk quantities of mandatory recyclable materials and other  materials, including hazardous products, where recovery options are readily available or  achievable: Facilities should report the appearance of such materials and any information on  their origin to DEC and the appropriate planning unit. For example, an initial material eligible  for restriction would be yard trimmings because ample composting infrastructure already  exists, and many solid waste management facilities are already subject to permit conditions  that restrict its disposal.  To be most effective, such restrictions should be placed  on waste  generators and collectors, not only on the disposal facility.  Other states, including  Wisconsin and Massachusetts, report that disposal bans are an effective educational and  enforcement tool and help ensure that materials are properly managed or recovered where  alternatives to disposal exist.  They also provide a feedback mechanism so that the state and  the municipality will be notified if materials targeted for recycling are not being effectively  source separated.  The act should direct DEC to develop protocols for disposal facilities to  aid in compliance with restrictions, such as performing random inspections of incoming  materials and distributing notices to facility users.    10. Require communities to implement Save Money and Reduce Trash/Pay as You Throw  (SMART/PAYT) programs unless they can demonstrate that their programs otherwise  achieve the state’s waste reduction and recycling goals: In SMART/PAYT programs, residents  are charged for waste disposal based on the volume of waste picked up rather than the level  of service and are provided with recycling and composting services for free, thus creating a  financial incentive for reducing waste and increasing recycling.  11. Require local solid waste management planning: The 1988 Act enabled local governments to  create planning units to manage materials regionally.  To foster more consistent program  implementation, local solid waste management plans (LSWMPs) should be made  mandatory.    12. Authorize local governments to franchise private materials management services:   Franchising offers an opportunity for local governments to control materials collection,  recycling and disposal systems without actually operating them to ensure that local systems  are consistent with the state’s sustainable materials management strategy.  However, local  governments must be authorized by state law to franchise these services.       
224    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

13. Expand the Waste Transporter program to place specific requirements on transporters of  municipal solid waste (MSW), recyclables, construction and demolition (C&D) debris and  historic fill to: enforce source separation requirements; account for wastes that are  currently largely unaccounted for, and ensure that communities who export waste comply  with source separation requirements and disposal restrictions.  An expansion of the  program should:  a) Require transporters to provide recycling services to all customers; at a minimum,  transporters should be required to provide all services required by local or state  recycling laws in effect for the service area, including the collection of source‐separated  recyclables (SSR) from all generating sectors (residential, commercial, institutional,  industrial).  b) Prohibit the comingling of SSR with MSW, the delivery of SSR to solid waste disposal  facilities, and the comingling or delivery for disposal of any waste prohibited by law,  regulation or permit condition from being disposed of at a solid waste management  facility.  c) Allow for transportation of waste only to facilities authorized to accept the waste or  materials being handled.  d) Establish a means to account for the amounts and composition of waste that is  transported directly outofstate.  e) Establish means to ensure that exported waste complies with source‐separation  requirements, disposal restrictions and other regulations or standards that apply to  waste generated in New York State, so that export is not used as a way of avoiding the  costs and constraints that accompany management in New York State.  14. Provide technical fixes: Several solid waste laws require amendments to resolve technical  and definition issues.  Several definitions in existing statute date back to the 1960s and are  not reflective of current conditions. For example, the vehicle dismantler law contains some  requirements that are not consistent with current best practices and the law banning the  sale of creosote treated lumber does not allow for reuse or resale of post‐consumer  creosote treated lumber in commercial or industrial settings.       10.1.2   Product Stewardship 

Product stewardship is a centerpiece of the Beyond Waste Plan because it represents a paradigm  shift that can help New York State overcome many of the critical hurdles that have hindered  success.  It can influence the design of products and packaging to reduce materials use, reduce  toxicity and improve recyclability.  It can generate resources to optimize collection and recycling  systems and improve efficiency.  Ultimately, it can reduce the amount of waste disposed of and help  New York State move Beyond Waste.  (For more information, including the successful use of product  stewardship in other jurisdictions, see Section 5, Product Stewardship.) 
225    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

10.1.2 (a) Packaging Stewardship 

The product stewardship concept is particularly appropriate for consumer product packaging, which  constitutes 30 percent of waste generated nationwide.  Despite a 30 percent recycling rate, EPA  estimates that the amount of packaging being disposed of as waste has not dropped since 1990.  Clearly, conventional approaches to recycling are not reducing the amount of packaging heading to  disposal.  Following the product stewardship model, packaging stewardship programs reimburse  municipalities or private companies for the costs of collection and processing recyclable materials,  and, in most cases, also set aside funds to invest in education, market development, processing  infrastructure or other program enhancements that improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the  recycling system.  Packaging stewardship encourages manufacturers to embrace materials efficiency  and to design for recyclability, which helps local recycling programs capture more materials. And,  when manufacturers must pay for the amount of packaging they use, they have a financial incentive  to use less.   
  10.1.2 (b) Product‐Specific Stewardship 

Any product stewardship program will have to be created by statute, likely beginning with programs  for specific products. A list of potential products most suited to a stewardship approach was  developed by DEC through research and feedback from stakeholders throughout the development  of this Plan.  The unannotated list is presented below, with detailed justification for inclusion of each  of these products provided in Section 5.   • • • • • • • • • •
        226    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Electronics  Household Hazardous Waste   Pharmaceuticals  Mercury‐Containing Thermostats   Paint   Automobiles   Carpets  Office Furniture  Roofing Shingles  Batteries 

10.1.2 (c) Product Stewardship Framework 

In many Canadian provinces, multiple product stewardship programs are implemented through a  single law that establishes the structure of product stewardship in the province and creates a  process and criteria for identifying products for stewardship and adding them as they meet the  criteria.  Known as product stewardship framework, this approach maximizes efficiency by  structuring stewardship programs in a consistent manner.      California, Washington, Oregon and Minnesota introduced product stewardship framework  legislation in 2009 based on the principles of product stewardship, which have been endorsed by  product stewardship councils in New York State, California, the Pacific Northwest, the Midwest,  Texas and Vermont.  (See Appendix 5.1.) In support of this approach, the Association for State and  Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) issued a Product Stewardship Framework  Policy document in 2009 that provides greater detail on the various options in pursuing a framework  approach.  (See Appendix 5.2.) New York State should also pursue legislation to ensure efficient and  timely implementation of product stewardship programs.   
 

       10.1.3    

Revenue Generating Programs 

Achieving the goals of this Plan—reducing waste generation, increasing reuse and recycling and  reducing disposal—will require a significant commitment of funding, as well as staff and other  resources.  In addition to more resources, the state needs greater flexibility in allocating resources  to respond to emerging issues and critical needs.  Likewise, municipalities need access to a less  restricted base of financial support than currently provided through the Environmental Protection  Fund (EPF) to create and implement the next generation of integrated materials management plans  and programs.    The funding sources below are described in greater detail in Section 6.  Potential sources include:  • Increase state funds dedicated to reduction, reuse and recycling:  In 1993, New York State  inaugurated the EPF to support environmental programs in special need of regular and  sustained funding.  The EPF has been the most consistent, long‐term funding for the  municipal waste reduction and recycling, HHW and secondary materials marketing  programs.  In New York State, Bond Acts have been used to generate hundreds of millions  dollars for environmental infrastructure investments in the past (1972, 1986 and 1996).  Each of these included significant allocations for municipal recycling and solid waste  management.  Given current needs for waste water treatment, clean energy and materials  management infrastructure, stakeholders have suggested that an investment on the scale of  a Bond Act is warranted.  Solid Waste Disposal Fees: More than 30 states assess some type of fee on the disposal of  solid waste, serving as both a disincentive to disposal and a source of revenue to meet  various funding needs.  Fees vary by state from $.25 per ton to $8.25 per ton.  With the  exception of Massachusetts, all of New York State’s neighbor states assess a solid waste  disposal fee.  Fees can be structured in a number of ways to achieve specific objectives, such 
227    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

as to direct proceeds back to local municipalities to support integrated programs or exempt  facilities whose tip fees are already dedicated, in part, to waste prevention, reuse, recycling  and composting programs.    • Permit Fees: Many states raise revenues by assessing fees on solid waste management  facility permits. According to a survey conducted by the Northeast Waste Management  Officials Association (NEWMOA), New York State is the only state in the region that does not  collect fees from solid waste facility permit applicants.  Other DEC programs, including  Water and Air, assess permit fees. 

 

10.2   REGULATORY RECOMMENDATIONS 
This section outlines the regulatory changes that can be made within existing statutory authority  and that are necessary to support implementation of this Plan and achievement of its goals and  recommendations.  The passage of the legislative recommendations outlined above will likely  require development of implementing regulations not discussed here. 
 

10.2.1 

Revisions to the Part 360 Solid Waste Management Facility Regulations 

In addition to the technical and structural changes that have been in discussion for some time, DEC  will advance a revision to the Part 360 regulations that include the following key components.   • • • Update requirements for construction and operation of solid waste management facilities to  better protect human health and the environment.  Revise and update the Beneficial Use Determination (BUD) Program regulations.   Add new requirements for the management of historic fill, including additional operational  conditions for its use that protect neighboring areas, particularly in communities of  disproportionate impact.  Restrict the disposal of yard trimmings and source‐separated recyclables in solid waste  management facilities and other recyclable and organic materials as recycling infrastructure  is developed or product stewardship programs are established.    Take a regulatory approach to ensure consistent implementation of the requirements to  source separate recyclables, particularly in areas served by private collectors.   Separate tracks and waiting lists for EPF funding for recycling coordinators, educational  activities, reuse programs, and other high‐priority projects.    

• •

228   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

10.2.2 

Other Regulatory Recommendations 

Enact new Part 374‐5 regulation to oversee the collection, handling and recycling of electronic  waste.   Review existing state regulations to remove or address contradictory regulatory requirements that  limit the creation or expansion of composting and other organics recycling facilities. 

10.3     PROGRAMMATIC RECOMMENDATIONS 
This section outlines the programs and initiatives that the state will pursue within current statutory  and regulatory authority in implementation of this Plan.  These recommendations are compiled  from other sections of this Plan, including Materials Management Planning, Roles and  Responsibilities, Financial Assistance, and Materials Management Strategies.  Taken together, these  activities represent a comprehensive sustainable materials management program.  The state’s  ability to implement these initiatives and achieve the goals of this Plan will depend on its ability to  increase available staff and financial resources. 
 

10.3.1    

State Agencies and Authorities Lead by Example 

As the state works with municipalities, institutions and businesses to reduce waste and increase  reuse and recycling, it is imperative that it demonstrate sustainable materials management within  its own operations.  To that end, the state will:  • Work aggressively to implement the requirements of Governor Paterson’s EO4, including:  goals for waste prevention and paper‐use reduction; sustainable operations plans, including  maximizing reuse, recycling and composting in all contexts (within state facilities, on state  construction projects, etc.); green products purchasing program, including purchase of  reused and recycled content products and local compost, and incorporating “design for  deconstruction” concepts in sustainable building design and construction projects. (See  Appendix 8.1 and http://www.ogs.state.ny.us/ExecutiveOrder4.html.)  Promote and demonstrate organics recycling systems and activities by state agencies by:  continuing the DEC/OGS partnership to implement organic recycling programs at state  agencies with a goal of diverting all state‐generated organic materials to recycling;  expanding the Department of Correctional Services’ (DOCS) composting program to accept  food scraps from other state facilities where possible, and identifying interested school  systems and assisting them in demonstrating the advantages of on‐site composting systems.   Develop memoranda of understanding (MOUs) within DEC divisions or with other agencies  as needed to streamline BUD procedures or establish standards for beneficially used  materials (e.g., to provide the Division of Environmental Remediation (DER) with the  authority to make BUDs for materials used as backfill and cover on Superfund and  Brownfield sites).   

   
229    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

    10.3.2    

Educate the Public 

Public participation in waste prevention, reuse and recycling is key to achieving sustainable  materials management in New York State.  To improve participation, the state will:   • Launch an aggressive public education campaign to promote waste prevention, reuse,  composting, recycling and the proper management of hazardous components of the waste  stream.  DEC will seek funding to develop and implement the campaign, which will also  include the production of tools such as templates and informational materials for local  governments to use in their own outreach efforts.    Organize workshops and other meetings and expand web‐based and other outreach  materials to communicate with key constituencies to promote waste prevention, reuse,  recycling and composting.  Publicize innovative reuse, organic recycling and other model programs in the state via the  DEC website, ESD’s Recycling Markets Database, agency publications and other  communications.    Build regional DEC staff outreach and education capacity to assist planning units in  improving recycling.  Encourage design for reuse and disassembly: Educate manufacturers on the feasibility and  benefits of design for reuse and remanufacturing through the New York State Pollution  Prevention Institute 78  and other methods as appropriate.     Encourage public understanding of the role of local solid waste management planning units,  how the units function, and how the public can participate in local materials management  planning. 

• •

   

10.3.3    

Provide Outreach and Technical Assistance 

Municipalities, businesses, institutions and agencies in the state will need guidance and assistance  to develop sustainable materials management programs.  To meet that need, the state will:    • Develop written guidance on organic waste prevention for specific affected sectors (e.g.,  grocery stores) based on similar documents available from Cornell University’s Waste  Management Institute and successful strategies being employed by other states and  organizations (e.g., MA Supermarket Composting Handbook and several documents by 

                                                                  78  The Pollution Prevention Institute is a collaborative of several universities and technology development  centers funded through the Environmental Protection Fund.  For more information,  see http://www.nysp2i.rit.edu/.  230    Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

NERC) and distribute the guidance to all known facilities in that industry in the state and  other interested parties (local recycling coordinators, etc.).  • Encourage use of the Food Bank Network. Organize meetings in each food bank region of  the state, inviting representatives of relevant state and local agencies, local recycling  coordinators, and institutional and commercial generators of unused food to identify  potential new suppliers, raise funds to expand activities, educate commercial and  institutional generators about food donation options, and address regulatory, economic and  other barriers to increased food redistribution.    Facilitate forums on C&D debris management to bring government and private entities  together to identify strategies for overcoming barriers to increased material recovery,  including market development, policy tools and economic incentives.  Continue to provide technical and regulatory assistance for entities (private and public)  interested in developing small and large‐scale organic recycling systems and for operators  interested in demonstrating the viability of incorporating food scraps into existing yard  trimmings or biosolids composting facilities.  Issue a technical guidance document to assist local governments in planning for and  implementing organics recycling and other sustainable materials management programs.  Maximize the diversion of food scraps to feed animals by providing funding to a non‐ governmental organization to: develop guidance on the regulatory requirements governing  food residuals used for animal feed; work with Cooperative Extension agents to identify  farms and local food residuals sources and facilitate relationships, and hold forums across  the state to disseminate information and facilitate relationships between the sources and  farmers.  Work with the NERC to take full advantage of its On‐Farm Compost Marketing Project,  including connecting farms with NERC’s technical assistance services and disseminating the  Compost Marketing Toolkit. 

• •

 

10.3.4    

 Comprehensive Materials Management Planning 

Comprehensive planning is one of the key elements of successful materials management programs.   A comprehensive program will:  • Expand DEC’s local solid waste management planning technical assistance program and  provide guidance and tools to help municipalities, advocates, and other stakeholders  address challenging planning issues, including:  o o Recycling market development and stabilization  Flow control or other private sector oversight programs (e.g., waste transporter  licensing or permitting)  Recycling and waste composition data collection and use 
Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

o
231   

o o o o •

Technology transfer and data/information sharing  Infrastructure analysis and needs assessment  Incentives, education and enforcement  Program implementation uniformity  

Require planning units to evaluate and implement, to the maximum extent practicable, the  following programs, policies and initiatives as they develop new LSWMPs, modify existing  LSWMPs, and otherwise plan for and implement programs:  o o o o o o Education and enforcement   Incentives, including volume‐based pricing structures (e.g., PAYT/SMART Program)   Waste prevention and reuse programs and infrastructure   Public space, event, institutional and commercial recycling   Recovery of additional materials, including residential mixed paper and food scraps  Long‐term recycled material supply agreements and/or processing contracts with  multiple market outlets 

Evaluate current planning unit membership and structure to ensure that original structures  are functioning, and if not, support efforts to adjust structures or create new planning units  to best carry forward the next stage of planning and program implementation.  Develop an on‐line reporting system to collect more timely and accurate recycling and  disposal data from solid waste and recycling facilities and planning units; work with industry  to develop uniform methods for more accurate data gathering and reporting, using the new  statewide performance metrics based on per capita amounts collected for recycling and  disposal.      Evaluate the progress toward this Plan’s goals in biennial state plan updates, and  recommend additional policy approaches as necessary. 


 

      10.3.5    

 Combat Climate Change 

Mitigating the impacts of climate climate represents one of the most pressing environmental  challenges for the state, the nation, and the world.  The management of discarded materials  represents an opportunity to reduce GHG emissions and combat climate change.  In addition to the  other recommendations of this plan, which collectively reduce waste and increase reuse, recycling  and composting to combat climate change, the state will:  • Ensure that landfills in New York State pursue every possible mechanism for achieving GHG  reductions: DECs Part 208 and 360 regulations and the financial incentives provided by the  carbon market have resulted in the installation of landfill gas collection and destruction 

232   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

systems at most active MSW landfills. DEC will continue to assess the facilities and markets  in New York State to ensure that landfills maximize gas collection and destruction.   • Maximize conversion of landfill gas to energy: DEC will continue to work with electric  utilities and other entities involved in the electrical grid system’s governance and operation  to minimize the costs to connect, while still ensuring sound engineering.    

 

      10.3.6   

 Develop Reuse and Recycling Infrastructure and End‐Use Markets 

Expanding the universe of materials diverted from disposal will require additional processing, reuse  and recycling infrastructure and new or stronger markets for the materials processed.  To address  market and infrastructure issues, the state will:  • Develop critical recovery infrastructure through inter‐agency collaboration (with ESD,  NYSERDA, and EFC) and public‐private partnerships, including the following:  o o o o Organic material recycling facilities  New or upgraded material recovery facilities in select areas  Regional glass processing facilities   Plastics recovery facilities capable of processing both rigid plastics #1‐7 and film  plastics  C&D debris processing facilities to generate materials suitable for high‐value end  uses 

o •

Expand market development initiatives to target glass, plastic film, plastics #3‐7, compost  and C&D materials as a means to create green jobs and encourage local recycling‐based  manufacturing.    Evaluate and implement where appropriate strategies to promote the establishment of  recycling and composting facilities in the environmental quality review and regulatory  processes for other solid waste management facilities.  Encourage local use of processed, mixed glass, chipped tires and other appropriate recycled  materials in engineering applications.      Establish a New York State Center for C&D debris recycling through ESD to: research issues  and solutions relative to C&D debris recycling in New York State; act as a central information  access point; promote deconstruction and building materials reuse; provide C&D job site  training programs; identify potential investments for ESD’s Environmental Services Unit, and  recommend policy options to support greater C&D debris recycling.    Encourage and facilitate food scrap recycling demonstration projects at appropriate existing  composting facilities.   Expand beneficial use applications for mixed color recovered glass by conducting pilot  projects to demonstrate acceptability of glass as a filter medium under the DEC Division of 
233  Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

• •

• •

 

Water Stormwater Design Manual’s Criteria for Acceptable Practices and also acceptance by  the New York State Department of Health (DOH) for use in residential septic systems.      1 0.3.7     Provide Necessary Human and Monetary Resources 

Solid waste staff at both DEC and ESD, including those dedicated to waste prevention, reuse,  recycling and market development, have been significantly reduced during the past two decades. To  the extent that the recommendations described above cannot be implemented without additional  staff or financial resources, the state must commit to greater investment in preventing waste and  maximizing recyclingwith an understanding of the significant environmental and economic gains  they represent.  In the interim, the state must make the most of the resources it has available by:  • ESD continuing to target recycling market development assistance, spur private investment  in recycling infrastructure, and encourage the use of recycled feedstocks by New York State‐ based manufacturers.    DEC developing a working group with ESD, NYSERDA, Agriculture & Markets, and the  Environmental Facilities Corporation (EFC) to maximize available resources to promote and  expand composting and organics recycling. 

Generating additional revenue for composting and other organics recycling activities by working  with other Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) states to include composting as an eligible  carbon offset category. (See discussion of Carbon Offsets in Section 6.) 
 

 

234   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

11.    IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE AND PROJECTIONS 
 
Note: There are constraints on DEC’s ability to accomplish the recommended actions listed above.   Many of the recommendations require the collaboration of other state and local government  entities and the private sector.  The legislative recommendations require approval by the Governor  and passage by the State Legislature; regulatory recommendations must be approved by the  Governor’s Office of Regulatory Reform (GORR), and many of the programmatic recommendations  require the allocation of staff and financial resources that are not yet available.   

 
Recommendation  Lead & Partner  Entities    Action Plan    Timeframe  Outcomes     

Legislative  Updated Solid Waste  Management Act 

 

  Seek  introduction  in 2010; work  for passage  by 2011 

DEC with  Draft legislation  Governor’s Office  and work toward  and Legislature  introduction and  passage  

Packaging  Stewardship Program 

Product‐Specific  Stewardship  Programs 

Product Stewardship  Framework Program 

DEC with  Participate in  Governor’s Office  national dialogue;  and Legislature  draft legislation  and work toward  introduction and  passage   DEC with  Participate in  Governor’s Office  national dialogues  and Legislature  on key products;  draft legislation as  needed, and work  toward  introduction and  passage  DEC with  Participate in  Governor’s Office  national dialogue;  and Legislature  draft legislation  and work toward  introduction and  passage 

Reduce waste disposal to  1.9 lbs./person/day in 10  years; increase recycling  to 11.5 million tons/year;  reduce GHG by 11.3  million metric tons of  CO 2 E; conserve 135  trillion BTUs of energy  Seek  Reduce or recycle 3.8  introduction  million tons/year; Reduce  in 2011; work  GHG by 8.8 million metric  for passage  tons of CO 2 E; conserve  82 trillion BTUs of energy  by 2012  Seek  introduction  and passage  of one  bill/year,  beginning  2010  Reduce or recycle  747,000 tons/year;  reduce disposal of  products containing  mercury and other toxins 

Seek  Reduce disposal of  introduction  products containing  in 2011; work  mercury and other toxins  for passage  by 2013 

235   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recommendation 

Lead & Partner  Entities 

Action Plan   

Timeframe 

Outcomes    Generate significant  resources dedicated for  state and local  government investment  in sustainable materials  management 

Revenue Generating  Program 

Regulatory

DEC with  Develop package  Governor’s Office  of dedicated  and Legislature  revenue  generating  proposals that do  not rely on the  general fund; draft  legislation and  work toward  introduction and  passage     

Seek  introduction  in 2010; work  for passage  by 2011 

Revisions to Part 360  Solid Waste  Management Facility  Regulations 

DEC 

Prepare proposed  revisions; achieve  GORR approval;  release for public  comment; enact  final rule  Prepare revisions;  achieve GORR  approval; release  for public  comment; enact  final rule  Prepare  regulations to  implement new  legislation   

New Part 364‐5  Electronic Waste 

DEC 

Implementing  regulations on new  legislation  Programmatic

DEC 

Support goal to reduce  statewide waste disposal  by 15 percent every two  years Submit  Improved facility  proposed  operations; increase in  regulations to  beneficial use of  GORR by  materials; reduced GHG  early 2010;  emissions  enact final  rule by 2011  Submit  Protect the public and  proposed  environment from  regulations to  negative impacts of  GORR in  processing and recycling  2011; enact  of electronics  final rule in  2012  As legislation  Realize outcomes of  is enacted  subject legislation 

 

 

 

State Agencies Lead  by Example 

OGS with DEC  and other  agencies and  authorities 

Implement EO4;  Ongoing  develop and  implement agency  sustainability plans 

Collectively reduce  statewide waste disposal  by 15 percent every two  years Reduce agency waste  generation by 10 percent  per year 

236   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recommendation 

Lead & Partner  Entities 

Action Plan   

Timeframe 

Outcomes    Increase materials  recycled; reduce waste  disposed  

Consistently  implement   recycling programs  at state facilities  and events  Promote and  demonstrate  composting and  organics recycling 

Ongoing 

Comprehensive  Materials  Management  Planning            Comprehensive  Materials  Management  Planning (continued) 

DEC with Local  SWM Planning  Units            DEC with Local  SWM Planning  Units 

Seek staff and  resources to  implement state  Plan 

Public Education  

Update  reporting  forms in  2010; create  additional  reporting  requirements  in 2011;  prepare for  and  implement  on‐line  reporting in  2011‐2012  DEC with Local  Launch public  Develop  Governments and  education  campaign in  Businesses  campaign; develop  2010; launch  outreach materials  in 2011  for local  governments 
Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Work with  planning units to  craft next  generation of  LSWMPs  Gather and  compile better  data; improve  current reports;  broaden reporting  requirements and  develop on‐line  reporting  

Pilot projects  expand in  2011;  complete  implementati on by 2015  Reorganize  staff to reflect  plan priorities  in 2010; add  staff as  resources  become  available  Ongoing 

Increase capture of  organic materials to 90  percent of state  operations’ generation 

Outcomes of all  recommendations  achieved; biennial Plan  updates and  modifications prepared 

Sustainable materials  management systems in  place across the state 

Stronger data on which  to base local planning  efforts and to update and  modify the state Plan 

Stronger public support  and participation in  sustainable materials  management 

237   

Recommendation 

Lead & Partner  Entities 

Action Plan   

Timeframe 

Outcomes    Stronger understanding  of sustainable materials  management strategies 

Outreach and  Technical Assistance   

DEC, ESD and  regional partners 

Publicize  innovative  materials  management  programs  Develop guidance  on waste  prevention in  specific  commercial  sectors 

Ongoing 

Encourage the use  of food banks and  other reuse  options  Organize regional  C&D debris  management and  recycling forums  Assist public and  private entities in  developing  organics recycling  and composting  systems 

Supermarket  guidance in  2010; one  additional  sector per  year or more,  as staffing  permits  Ongoing 

Guidance documents on  waste prevention in 10  commercial sectors 

Increased diversion of  usable food to the  hungry  Increased diversion of  C&D materials for reuse  and recycling by 50  percent in ten years   Organics recycling and  composting  infrastructure expanded 

Develop tools and  resources to  support local  sustainable  materials  management  programs 

ESD to lead  two forums  per year in  2010 and  2011  Develop  technology  assessment  and web‐ based  information  in 2010‐2011;  provide  ongoing  assistance as  staffing  permits  Develop two  guidance  documents  per year 

Twenty guidance  documents addressing  key planning issues 

238   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

Recommendation 

Lead & Partner  Entities 

Action Plan   

Timeframe 

Outcomes    New infrastructure for  recycling glass, organic  materials, plastics, and  other target materials  

Infrastructure and  Market Development 

ESD, DEC with  Develop critical  NYSERDA and EFC  recycling  infrastructure for  materials,  including mixed‐ color glass, organic  materials, and  plastics  

Target  existing  funds, where  possible, in  2010 and  2011;  develop  investment  strategy for  new revenues  in 2012   Expand market  Maximize  development  existing ESD  initiatives to target  resources in  glass, plastic film,  2010; work to  plastics #3‐7,  increase  compost and C&D  resources in  debris  2011 and  thereafter  Facilitate food  Identify and  scrap recycling  facilitate one  demonstration  demonstratio projects  n project per  year  Expand beneficial‐ Demonstrate  use applications  viability of  for mixed‐color  glass in two  glass   new   applications  by 2013 

Markets for key materials  expanded; additional  materials diverted to  recycling 

Food scrap recycling and  composting  infrastructure expanded 

Expanded markets for  mixed‐color glass 

 

239   

Beyond Waste Plan ‐ DRAFT

APPENDIX 1 
 

METHODOLOGY AND DATA USED TO ESTIMATE WASTE DIVERSION SCENARIOS,  GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTIONS AND JOB CREATION POTENTIAL OF THE BEYOND  WASTE PLAN 
1. Materials Composition and Diversion Scenarios 
 

Tables A and B provide data to support the estimated waste diversion scenarios that underpin the  goals of the Beyond Waste Plan (See Table 2.1).  The estimated composition of the materials stream  presented in Table A was developed by DEC staff using data inputs from field‐based waste  composition analyses performed both within New York State and in other US cities and states that  have similar demographic characteristics to some of New York’s regions.  (For more detail, see  section 7.1.1.)    The diversion scenarios in Table A and disposal reduction scenarios in Table B assume that the most  immediate gains would be in improving the capture rate of materials currently designated in most  New York State recycling programs, such as cardboard, newspaper, other recyclable paper, plastic  containers, metals and yard trimmings.  Improvements in the capture of materials that will require  new infrastructure, such as food scraps, glass, textiles, and other plastics, are expected to occur later  in the planning period.    2. Greenhouse Gas Reduction and Energy Conservation Estimates  The GHG calculation results presented in this Plan (Table 4.2) were obtained using diversion  scenarios in Table A and the Environmental Benefits Calculator developed by the Northeast  Recycling Council, Inc. (NERC).  NERC’s calculator generates estimates of the environmental benefits  of a study area, in this case New York State.  Estimates are based on the tonnages of materials that  are source reduced, reused, recycled, landfilled, or combusted (including waste to energy).  The  calculator is based on per‐ton figures of the estimated energy use and emissions from several  lifecycle analysis studies.  The estimates are average figures based on “typical” facilities and  operating characteristics existing in the United States.  This calculator does not account for the value  of electricity generation from landfill gas recovery and or waste‐to‐energy facilities.  It incorporates  US‐EPA’s most recent WARM Calculator, as well as facts and figures for the U.S. Department of  Energy, Steel Recycling Institute, Glass Packaging Institute, and U.S. Climate Technology Cooperation  Gateway, to name a few.  More facts and figures can be found throughout the calculator.   For more detail on the calculator and to obtain a copy of  it, please visit the NERC website at:  http://www.nerc.org/documents/environmental_benefits_calculator.html.        

3.
 

Potential Green Jobs Estimates 

The potential green jobs calculation includes the current documented number of jobs related to  recycling and reuse industries and an estimate of potential green job creation based on a national  survey of the recycling industry.  The Northeast Recycling Council’s Recycling Economic Information  Study Update: Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania (February 2009)  documented 32,240 jobs related to the recycling and reuse industries in New York State.  The study,  prepared for the National Recycling Coalition by R.W. Beck, Inc. (July 2001), estimates that 6 jobs are  created for every 1,000 tons recycled.  Using this estimate, and assuming that implementation of  the Plan will yield more than 12 million additional tons recycled annually (see Table A),  implementing the plan would result in an additional 74,220 jobs or a total of more than 100,000 jobs  created or sustained through implementation of the plan. 
 

 

  TABLE B: ESTIMATED MSW DISPOSAL SCENARIOS  Scenario  1‐  2012  12,311,682  Scenario  2‐  2014  8,435,638  Scenario  3‐  2016  4,220,615  Scenario  4 ‐  2018  2,221,817 

Estimated  2008  Tons Disposed  Percent of 2008  Disposal  Disposal/Capita (tons)  Disposal/Capita (lbs.)  Disposal/Capita/Day  (lbs.)           14,591,648 

        

 100%  0.75  1,497 

67%  0.63  1,263 

46%  0.43  866 

23%  0.22  433 

12%  0.11  228 

  

4.10 

3.46 

2.37 

1.19 

0.62 

Appendix 3.1

NEW YORK STATE OFFICE OF GENERAL SERVICES
Material Recovery and Waste Reduction Program

ANNUAL REPORT

Fiscal Year 2007-08
Submitted in accordance with Subsection 3 of Section 165 of the State Finance Law

David A. Paterson Governor

John C. Egan Commissioner

Appendix 3.1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.

Overview of the OGS Solid Waste Management Program…………………… A. The 3R’s Program-Reduce It! Reuse It! Recycle It! ……………... B. Solid Waste Management through Commodity Purchasing……….

3 3 4-5

II.

Quantities of Recycled Paper Purchased by the Office of General Services and Other Agencies………………………………………………………… Amount of Waste Recycled from State Offices and State Programs and Full Avoided Costs…………………………………………………………….. A. State Offices………………………………………………………..

5-8

III.

9 9 10-11 11 12 12 13 13 13 14 14 15 16-19 20 21

IV.

Extent of Waste Stream Reduction and Kinds of Materials………………. A. Bureau of Surplus Personal Property……………….. B. Department of Education, Bureau of Records Management……
Cost of Operating the Program…………………………………………….. Specific Actions Undertaken………………………………………………. A. Initiatives Summary………………………………………………... B. Technical Assistance………………………………………………..

V. VI.

VII. VIII. IX.

Executive Order 142 Recycling Initiatives by New York State Agencies… Goals For Fiscal Year 2008-09 Exhibits……………………………………………………………………. A. Procurement Services Group Contracts with Recycled and/or Energy Efficient Products & Technology B. Graph of Total Tons of Recycled Materials – 1988-89 to 2007-08 C. Graph of Tons of Recycled Materials Versus Trash – 1988-89 to 2007-08

2

Appendix 3.1
I. OVERVIEW OF THE OGS SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM A. The 3R’s Program - Reduce It! Reuse It! Recycle It!
Fiscal Year 2007-08 marks the 19th full year of the Office of General Services’ (OGS) Solid Waste Management Program. The program is aimed at reducing the demand for valuable landfill space by efficiently collecting and marketing recyclable waste produced in OGS-managed facilities. Since its inception, 90,568 tons of paper and other materials, including batteries and scrap metal, have been recycled, generating $2,092,072 of revenue, avoiding or averting approximately $7.1 million in tipping fees, and saving 247,684 cubic yards of landfill space. In addition, since inception, an estimated 1.6 million trees were saved through this recycling initiative. During the Fiscal Year 2007-08 reporting period, 2,096 tons of paper and 2,559 tons of other materials including batteries and scrap metal were recycled, which generated $174,713 in revenue and avoided $279,300 in tipping fees. Through these efforts, an estimated 35,632 trees were saved. In addition 13,965 fewer cubic yards of landfill space were used. Through participation of state agencies, employees, and tenants, 55.3% percent of the OGS properties’ waste stream was recycled.

The 3R’s Program is OGS Real Property Management’s response to the requirements of Section 165 of the State Finance Law and is consistent with Executive Order 142, which calls for the implementation of a comprehensive and environmentally sound Solid Waste Management Program by all state agencies. In addition to recycling various paper products, other OGS recycling efforts include collection and recovery systems for plastic, glass and metal containers; concrete, asphalt; yard waste; fluorescent lamps; electronic equipment including computers; motor oil; scrap metals such as brass, copper, iron, and aluminum; and wet cell batteries. Additionally, OGS encourages all its tenants and employees through training, posters, and brochures to reduce the waste stream by the use of e-mail in place of written memoranda; computerized scheduling of meetings to eliminate written notification; two-sided photocopying; reusing three-ring binders, hanging folders, note binders, paper clips, rubber bands, and mailing envelopes; and various other practices. Utilizing the Inmate Labor Program established by the Executive Chamber and working in conjunction with the Department of Correctional Services, OGS continues to augment its 3R’s Program staff through the placement of Inmate Labor at the Empire State Plaza.

3

Appendix 3.1 B. Solid Waste Management through Commodity Purchasing
The OGS Procurement Services Group (PSG) is the central commodity contracting office for New York State. PSG has contracted for recycled paper since 1981, when OGS became authorized to apply a 10 percent price preference for the purchase of recycled paper products. Since that time, PSG has expanded its purchase of recycled commodities significantly, which is illustrated by the attached list, Procurement Services Group Contracts with Recycled and/or Energy Efficient Products & Technology (Exhibit A). The list includes recycled and remanufactured items that assist state agencies and localities in meeting their recycling collection mandates, such as gondola collection trucks. Also, a number of OGS contracts, such as those for toner cartridges, paint, and items shipped in 55-gallon drum containers include provisions for the return of spent items, which removes them from the state and municipal waste stream. A 1993 contract for recycled plastic traffic cones was PSG’s first multi-state award for a recycled commodity. State agencies and local governments in the states of New York, New Jersey, and Maine participated. The latest renewal of this contract in 2000 incorporated the requirements of New York and a total of seven other states, resulting in significant price savings for all participants. Other contracts established by PSG that address solid waste management concerns include re-refined lubricating oil, high performance hydraulic oil, and remanufactured automotive replacement parts. In 2007, 76 percent ($17,413,225) of the $22.9 million value in estimated consumption of paper through all OGS paper contracts was for recycled paper. Since the program’s inception in 1981, 63 percent ($362,235,498) of the total $574,433,024 value in estimated consumption from OGS paper contracts has been for paper with recycled content. Most of the contracts established by OGS PSG are available for use by political subdivisions and other groups authorized to use state contracts. Currently, over 6,200 authorized users are included on PSG mailing lists. To encourage municipalities to purchase recycled commodities available through state contracts, OGS provides information and assistance through the Purchase Council for State and Local Government Procurement Officials. The Council meets bi-annually and consists of representatives from local government associations, including the New York State Conference of Mayors (NYCOM) and the New York State Association of School Business Officials (NYSABO). Through the Purchase Council, OGS provides articles on recycled and other commodities available through OGS contracts for publication in various professional association newsletters. Through the efforts of PSG, the State of New York is a recognized national leader in the field of recycled product procurement. This is evidenced by requested participation in national and regional conferences sponsored by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; the New York State Association for Reduction, Reuse and Recycling; the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; and the Empire State Development Corporation.

4

Appendix 3.1 PSG developed and maintains an innovative procurement initiative, fulfilling an objective outlined in previous annual reports, designed to encourage the state’s purchase of more recycled commodities. The program allows state agencies to utilize OGS’ increased discretionary purchasing authority of $100,000 to enhance procurement of recycled and remanufactured commodities.
II. QUANTITIES OF RECYCLED PAPER PURCHASED BY THE OFFICE OF GENERAL SERVICES AND OTHER AGENCIES When New York began its recycled paper procurement program in 1981, OGS PSG was one of the few major government contracting offices willing and authorized to pay a premium (no greater than 10 percent) for recycled paper. Thus, we enjoyed several years of significant growth in recycled paper purchases as the suppliers of such products sought to participate in New York State contract opportunities. By the end of the 1980’s, procurement of this product grew in popularity to the extent that we found ourselves competing with a larger number of governmental and private sector contracting offices. Consequently, in 1989, since the supply had not grown with the demand, PSG implemented an aggressive, innovative program designed to facilitate the establishment of recycled paper contracts.

Section 165(3) of the State Finance Law allows for a 10% preference for recycled paper which complies with the recycled content and recycled certification requirements specified. An additional preference, not exceeding a total preference of 15%, is allowed if at least fifty percent of the post consumer material utilized in the manufacture of the paper is generated from the waste stream in New York State.
On April 26, 2008, Governor David A. Paterson signed Executive Order No 4 Establishing a State Green Procurement and Agency Sustainability Program Pursuant to Executive Order No. 4, effective July 1, 2008, all copy paper, janitorial paper and other paper supplies purchased by each State agency or authority shall be composed of 100% post-consumer recycled content to the maximum extent practicable, and all copy and janitorial paper shall be process chlorine-free to the extent practicable, unless such products do not meet required form, function or utility, or the cost of the product is not competitive.

Additionally, effective July 1, 2008, all State agency and authority publications shall be printed on 100% post-consumer recycled content paper. Where paper with 100% post-consumer recycled content is not available, or does not meet required form, function and utility, paper procurements shall use post-consumer recycled content to the extent practicable. Non-recycled content shall be derived from a sustainably-managed renewable resource to the extent practicable, unless the cost of the product is not competitive.

The recycled paper procurement program specifically targets the various grades of paper found in the typical office environment, with the goal of replacing virgin paper with recycled paper. Among the accomplishments of the program to date are:

5

Appendix 3.1
Letterhead quality paper (25 percent cotton fiber bond) – The contract was originally issued in November 1989, and continues with the present contract having an annual value of approximately $35,000. All state agencies can use this contract to obtain letterhead quality stationery for in-house printing. White copy paper – The annual value of the recycled paper contracts for white copy paper, including acid free and elemental chlorine free, in both less than truckload lots and truckload lots, had a combined estimated consumption value of approximately $5.25 million. Xerographic paper (colors) – The first statewide contract for recycled xerographic paper in colors was established in 1994. Subsequent contracts have been established and in 2006 had an estimated annual contract value of $350,000. Wove envelopes – This contract was originally issued in March 1990. The present contract includes both white and colored envelopes and is valued at approximately $1million annually.

New York State Printing and Public Documents Law mandates that all lithographic printing used in the production of New York State printing requirements contain a certain percentage of vegetable oil as follows: News Inks - 40%; Sheet Fed Inks - 20%; Forms Inks - 20%; Heat Set Inks 10%.
Acid Free and Chlorine Free Paper – During the reporting period (2007 being the most recent full calendar year of data available at this time), 16 contracts were utilized, resulting in an estimated consumption of $14,819,525 of recycled paper with acid free and elemental chlorine free properties. Kraft envelopes – The contract was originally issued in May 1991, where two of the four items of Kraft envelopes awarded were recycled products. All items on the present contract, with estimated annual value of $500,000, are recycled. Computer paper – Contracts utilized during the reporting period for computer paper, including acid free and elemental chlorine free products, totaled approximately $900,000 in estimated consumption.

It is worthwhile to note that the legislated 10 percent/15 percent-recycled preference applied to only two contracts for paper products issued by the Procurement Services Group. The premium for recycled paper procurement in calendar year 2007 was $516,960. The estimated cumulative contract value of all paper contracts awarded or the total estimated consumption of paper containing recycled content, during the past 27 years is as follows:

6

Appendix 3.1
Year 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Recycled Paper Purchases $ 2,800,400 2,168,374 4,011,147 4,450,682 5,045,173 3,702,827 2,164,064 4, 655,121 7,166,351 17,159,807 11,972,838 11,655,370 13,932,010 13,001,473 20,366,074 29,830,873 26,932,536 28,923,335 25,582,595 Virgin Paper Purchases $ 6,303,688 5,649,085 3,279,330 4,858,951 3,488,797 5,407,725 6,799,338 13,161,187 16,232,199 14,444,554 18,938,572 13,851,664 10,472,372 15,940,901 21,099,048 1,281,341 1,826,767 1,024,025 1,910,274 Total Paper Purchases $ 9,104,088 7,817,459 7,290,477 9,309,633 8,533,970 9,110,552 8,963,402 17,816,305 23,398,550 31,604,361 30,911,410 25,507,034 24,404,382 28,942,374 41,465,122 31,112,214 28,759,306 29,947,360 27,492,869 Percentage with Recycled Paper 31% 28% 55% 48% 59% 41% 24% 26% 31% 54% 39% 1 46%2 57% 45% 49% 96% 94% 97% 93%

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Totals

26,792,233 21,085,168 20,167,624 12,260,545 8,946,963 7,752,088 12,296,602 17,413,225 $362,235,498

1,648,832 1,506,705 6,111,552 5,870,638 9,276,892 10,649,830 5,642,146 5,521,113 $212,197,526

28,441,065 22,591,873 26,279,176 18,131,183 18,223,855 18,401,918 17,938,748 22,934,338 $574,433,024

94% 93%3 77%4 68% 49%5 42% 69% 76% 63%

NOTES
1

In July 1991, the recycled paper preference provisions of Section 177 of the State Finance Law were revised. In accordance with Chapter 644 of the Laws of 1991, a "recycled product" was one which met the requirements of provisions of the Environmental Conservation Law and regulations (i.e., products certified under Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Emblems Program). As of December 1991, only one paper manufacturer had been so certified. In July 1992, the recycled paper preference provisions of Section 177 of the State Finance Law were again revised. Effective September 1, 1992, Chapter 412 of the Laws of 1992 decoupled OGS Central Purchasing's recycled preference authority from DEC's Recycling Emblems Program.

2

7

Appendix 3.1 3 Prior to 2002, paper contracts were bid out semi-annually or annually and the chart figures on page 7 for the years preceding 2002 are based on the number of contracts established during that calendar year and the estimated dollar value of those contracts issued in the respective calendar year.
4

In calendar years 2002 and 2003, PSG began establishing multiyear contract terms for paper contracts with indices for price adjustments, in lieu of bidding paper contracts semi-annually or annually. This led to a substantial decrease in the overall number of contracts awarded during the calendar year. It also necessitated the need to make a change in the method of overall reporting from "recycled paper contracts established" in any given calendar year to "recycled paper purchases" in any given calendar year, with values of multiyear contracts prorated to estimate annual consumption. Beginning in calendar year 2004, figures in the chart above are based on actual consumption values derived from sales data collected from contractors, sometimes extrapolated if a full year's data was not available. Regarding the drop-off in the "Percentage with Recycled Paper" over the past several years, the award of our largest paper contract, Xerographic Copy Paper - Less Than Truckload Lots, was made on virgin paper when PSG began establishing multiyear contract terms for paper in 2002. When the contract was re-bid in 2006, a significant portion of the contract was again awarded on virgin paper at a much lesser cost. This is the primary reason for the significant drop-off in recycled paper consumption in recent years. OGS anticipates that recycled paper consumption will increase significantly in the coming years as a result of the enactment of Executive Order No 4 – Establishing A State Green Procurement And Agency Sustainability Program, which requires that effective July 1, 2008, all copy paper, janitorial paper, and other paper supplies purchased by each state agency or authority be composed of 100% post-consumer recycled content to the maximum extent practicable. OGS will also continue to actively pursue more environmentally preferable paper products for addition to state contract.

5

8

Appendix 3.1

III.

AMOUNT OF WASTE RECYCLED FROM STATE OFFICES AND STATE PROGRAMS AND FULL AVOIDED COSTS A. State Offices When OGS initiated its paper recovery efforts on July 8, 1987, the “3R’s” Recover It, Recycle It, Reuse It name was used to promote the program. In May 1988, the office paper collection portion of the materials recovery effort was called the “Paper Chase Program” although it is still considered part of the larger 3R’s Program paper recycling efforts. In 1989, recycling efforts were expanded to include all categories of scrap metals, wet cell batteries, motor oil, plastics, and polystyrene products from cafeterias located at the Empire State Plaza. It should be noted that the amount of revenue generated and tipping fees avoided vary widely by location depending on two factors: the waste landfill space in the area and the type of solid waste material generated. For end reporting system purposes, the Office of General Services has categorized its buildings into three groups: The Empire State Plaza and the Harriman State Office Building Campus; the New York Metro Area; and the Western Region. The following chart summarizes the tonnage recycled, revenues generated, tipping fees avoided, and landfill space saved for the period April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008:

Group

Number of Buildings

Tons of Material Recycled

Tipping Fees Avoided

Cubic Yards of Landfill Space Avoided

Revenue Generated

Empire State Plaza and Harriman State Office Building Campus Downstate Region State Office Buildings
Eleanor Roosevelt

25

4094

$245,640

12,282

$174,140

6

352

$21,120

1,056

$551

Perry Br. Duryea 55 Hanson Place Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Hawthorne Nassau County Courts

Upstate Region State Office Buildings Senator Hughes Utica Homer Folks Facility Dulles Henderson -Smith Mahoney Binghamton

7

209

$12,540

627

$22

Totals

38

4655

$279,300

13,965

$174,713

9

Appendix 3.1

IV. EXTENT OF WASTE STREAM REDUCTION AND KINDS OF MATERIALS During the FY 2007-08 reporting period, a 55.3% percent waste stream reduction was achieved for all OGS owned and operated facilities. Section 165, Subsection 3 of the State Finance Law requires the Office of General Services to devise and institute a program to source separate and recover all waste (other than paper) from state office facilities. OGS has been involved in this activity since the inception of its own program in 1987. OGS is always looking for new ways to reduce, recycle and reuse items. OGS waste recovery efforts include the following initiatives: Cardboard Cardboard is a large commodity that is recycled through the 3R’s program. Cardboard boxes are reused as much as possible, and when they are no longer reusable they are recycled. During this reporting period, more than 391 tons of cardboard were recycled. Plastic/Glass/Metal cans In March 1996, the 3R’s Program was restructured to include the comingled collection and marketing of plastic, glass, and metal cans or containers. During this reporting period, more than 4 tons of plastic, glass and metal cans were recycled. Waste Oil The waste oil recycling program is an important part of the OGS Recycling program. Waste oil is typically stored in 275-gallon capacity holding tanks until quantities warrant collection by vendors. During this reporting period, more than 748 gallons of used oil were recycled, which is equivalent to about three tons. Mixed Paper Mixed paper is the biggest part of the OGS recycling program. Different kinds of paper are recycled, such as confidential paper (which is shredded), white ledger, colored paper, and computer paper. For every ton of paper that is recycled, 17 trees are saved. Since inception of the recycling program approximately 1.6 million trees have been saved. During this reporting period, 2,096 tons of paper has been recycled. Waste Metals A variety of bulk waste metals are recovered from OGS managed facilities. Recycling efforts are based on the markets available within a locality. Recovered metals include iron, steel, copper, and aluminum. During this reporting period, over 450 tons of metal were recycled.

10

Appendix 3.1
Yard Waste In 1998, OGS began sending its yard waste (i.e. leaves and grass clippings) to a compost vendor. During this reporting period, 241 tons of yard waste was composted. Concrete, Stone and Asphalt In 1998, concrete, stone, and asphalt were added to the recycling program. During this reporting period, 1,235 tons of these materials were recycled. To date, over 20,474 tons of materials have been recycled. Fluorescent Lamps and Ballasts In 1998, fluorescent lamps and lighting ballasts were added to the program. During this reporting period 2 tons of fluorescent lamps and ballasts were recycled. To date, more than 51 tons of material has been recycled. Electronic Equipment During Fiscal Year 1999-2000, electronic equipment such as old computers, monitors, fax machines, and copiers were added to the recycling program. During this reporting period, more than 5 tons of electronic equipment was recycled. Other 228 tons of other materials such as antifreeze, books, newspaper, used tires, batteries, and wood were recycled during this reporting period.

A. OGS Bureau of Surplus Personal Property The transfer of state personal property continues to be the first priority of the Surplus Personal Property Program. The recycling efforts have been greatly enhanced by the circulation of available surplus through an Internet site available to all agencies, which lists assets available for transfer statewide, and ongoing improvements in the operation of the OGS Surplus Property Warehouse. In Fiscal Year 2007-08, 3,778 items were transferred between and among state agencies, resulting in an estimated savings/cost avoidance of $1.6 million. Also, 7,116 items were sold to the public, generating a revenue return of $6.5 million. These sales included vehicles and highway maintenance equipment sold via the public auction program, and all other commodities such as office, computer and institutional furniture and equipment, and scrap materials, which were sold on eBay.

11

Appendix 3.1
B. State Education Department, State Archives, State Records Center Prior to the implementation of the 3R's Program, OGS was operating one of the largest paper recycling programs in the country. In 1978, OGS negotiated a contract for the shredding and recycling of confidential surplus records. The former OGS Bureau of Records Management, now a branch of the State Education Department, assists State offices in establishing efficient records management programs. A key component of their assistance program is the disposal of confidential material and source separated waste paper, primarily in the form of unsorted files. Any agency can have large quantities of confidential material picked up and shredded. During this reporting period, approximately 1,245 tons of materials were sold for recycling through this program, generating $112,662 in revenue, thus avoiding $74,691 in landfill tipping fees.

V.

COST OF OPERATING THE PROGRAM For Fiscal Year 2007-08, $347,700 was expended for the operation of the statewide 3R's Program. These funds were utilized to support the program as indicated below:
Personal Service Fringe/Indirect Cost Miscellaneous Supplies Travel Equipment Misc. Contractual Total: $217,700 109,600 600 3,500 800 15,500 $347,700

12

Appendix 3.1 VI. SPECIFIC ACTIONS UNDERTAKEN
A. Initiatives Summary In OGS’ continued commitment to conserve natural resources and significantly reduce the volume of solid waste entering the waste stream, the agency has: Continued to work with Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to assist each agency in fulfilling its requirement under Executive Order 142 and to help coordinate Executive Branch compliance with the mandate. Continued to increase the number of contracts for products that contain recycled components and/or positively affect the environment. Maintained innovative procurement initiatives, which enable OGS to utilize its higher discretionary purchasing authority in promoting and approving agency requests for the purchase of recycled products. Offered a current statewide contract for hydraulic oil used in hydraulic systems and highway maintenance equipment is derived from 50 percent or greater re-refined stocks and contains as much as 99 percent post consumer content. A new contract under review has a 90 percent rerefined content. Required take-back and recycling options on contracts for computers, copiers and compact fluorescent lamps. Continues to provide road products made of recycled materials, primarily used by the Department of Transportation – glass beads, highway safety equipment and various road surfacing products. An office furniture contract was issued that includes items made from created wood harvested from sustainably managed forests and are certified by the Forest Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, among others.

B. Technical Assistance Executive Order 142 directs all state agencies to undertake efforts necessary to maximize all opportunities to reduce the amount of solid waste generated, recycle material recoverable from solid waste originated at the facilities, and maximize the procurement of recycled products. In support of Executive Order 142 and as resources permit, OGS and DEC provide technical assistance to state agencies in identifying and reviewing products that contain secondary materials, and in determining product prices, availability and adequacy for the purposes intended.

13

Appendix 3.1 VII. EXECUTIVE ORDER 142 RECYCLING INITIATIVES BY NEW YORK STATE AGENCIES
Recognizing the integral part that the state itself must play to successfully implement its waste management policy, Executive Order 142 was issued in January 1991. The Executive Order directs all state agencies to increase their efforts to reduce waste, to source separate recyclable materials from the workplace waste stream, and to maximize the procurement of recycled products. The Order also directed selected agencies to undertake specific initiatives aimed at increasing the recycling of certain solid wastes. To fulfill our technical assistance mission under the Executive Order, OGS and DEC work together to help coordinate Executive branch compliance with the mandate.

VIII. GOALS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008-09

To ensure continuing compliance with the provisions of the Solid Waste Management Act of 1988 and Subsection 3 of Section 165 of the State Finance Law, OGS will: Establish additional recycled-content commodity contracts with other states and jurisdictions through active involvement with the National Association of State Purchasing Officials Eastern Regional Purchasing Cooperative and other established regional purchasing cooperatives throughout the nation. Continue to promote the purchase of commodities containing recycled content and educate client agencies in the use of the available procedures to increase such procurement (e.g., OGS’ innovative procurement initiatives discussed in other sections of this report). Continue to work in cooperation with the Department of Environmental Conservation to provide technical assistance and help coordinate compliance with the Executive Order 4 which was issued in April of 2008. Increase the purchase and use of alternative fueled vehicles by state agencies and local governments. Continue to promote the purchase of recycled commodities such as carpets, picnic tables, and waste containers. Continue to promote the recycling of electronic scrap. Promote the statewide battery recycling program and expand the locations for collection. Establish a compost collection program in regions that have composting facilities. Continue to recycle all fluorescent lamps and ballasts.

14

Appendix 3.1

EXHIBITS

15

Appendix 3.1

EXHIBIT A
New York State Office of General Services Procurement Services Group Contracts with Recycled and/or Energy Efficient Products & Technology
(See Legend at the bottom of this report for explanation of the Codes.)
CODE E* E* AWARD 00038 00263 GROUP 75318 75501 DESCRIPTION MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - GREAT LAKES ELECTRONICS DIST INC (STATEWIDE) EPSON AMERICA INC FOR PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACC & REL SVCS (STWD) OKI DATA AMERICAS INC FOR PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACC & REL SVCS (STWD) OCE PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACCESS & RELATED SERVICES (STATEWIDE) XEROX CORP-PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACCESSORIES & RELATED SERVICES INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORP INFO PRINT PRINTERS (STWD) TALLY GENICOM LLC FOR PRINTERS PERIPHERAL ACC & REL SVCS)(STWD) ALTERNATIVE INFORMATION SYSTEM MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS (STATEWIDE) COPIERS (ANALOG & DIGITAL) DIGITAL DUPLIC, COLOR & WIDE FORMAT (STWD) RICOH CORPORATION FOR PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACC & REL SVCS (STWD) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - FUJITSU PC CORPORATION (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS USITEK INC (STATEWIDE) EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY-PERIPHERALS ACCESS & REL SERVICES (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - DATA911 SYSTEMS (STATEWIDE) ASSISTIVE TECH FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES SIGHTED ELEC (STWD) ASSISTIVE TECH FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES/CAPTEK DBA SCI PROD MICROCOMPUTERS PC - STONE COMPUTER INC ASSIST TECHNGY-PERSON W/DISABILITY PULSE DATAHUMANWARE ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/ DISABILITIES - C-TECH INC (STWD) KONICA MINOLTA PRINTERS PERIPHERALS ACCESSORIES & RELATED SERVICES END DATE 11/21/2009 12/09/2011

E*

00265

75504

12/09/2011

E*

00266

75516

12/09/2011

E*

00267

75511

12/09/2011

E*

00270

75512

12/09/2011

E*

00272

75500

12/09/2011

E*

01374

75313

11/21/2009

E*

01649

22424

05/31/2012

E*

01762

75529

12/09/2011

E*

18012

75336

11/21/2009

E* E*

18311 18454

75339 75510

11/21/2009 12/09/2011

E* E*

18884 19202

75340 75702

12/03/2008 08/08/2009

E* E* E*

19408 19458 19464

75702 75341 75702

08/08/2009 10/18/2009 08/08/2009

E*

19465

75702

08/08/2009

E*

19478

75523

06/27/2011

16

Appendix 3.1
CODE E* AWARD 19514 GROUP 75702 DESCRIPTION ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/ DISABILITIESWASHINGTON COMP(STWD) ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/ DISABILITIES - VIS-ABILITY (STWD) ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/ DISABILITIES - EVAS (STATEWIDE) ASST TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/DISAB ENHANCED VISION (STATEWIDE) MAILING MACHINES, SCALES, FOLDERS, INSERTERS, METER RENTAL (STWD) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - SONY ELECTRONICS INC DOMESTIC REFRIGERATORS & FREEZERS "ENERGY STAR" (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTERS PC - LENOVO ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS W/ DISBINDEPENDENT LIVING AIDS INC ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES(G ROBERT OYER) INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT (STATEWIDE) PRINTER - KYOCERA MITA CORP DIAGNOSTIC REAGENTS AND INSTRUMENTS (STATEWIDE) RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL CLOTHING WASHERS AND DRYERS (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - ACER MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - APPLE AMERICA MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - UPSTATE BRITE COMPUTERS (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS (CSS LABS) (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - DELL (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - GATEWAY MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - HEWLETT PACKARD (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - IBM MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS MPC-G LLC (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - TOSHIBA (STATEWIDE) MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEMS - SENECA DATA DISTRIBUTORS INC AIR CONDITIONERS (WINDOW MOUNTED) (STATEWIDE) NAECA & ENERGY STAR MISCELLANEOUS OFFICE SUPPLIES (STATEWIDE) INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT (STATEWIDE) LEXMARK FOR PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACCESSORIES & REL SVCS (STWIDE) HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY / PRINTERS, END DATE 08/08/2009

E*

19515

75702

08/08/2009

E*

19516

75702

08/08/2009

E*

19517

75702

08/08/2009

E*

19594

22812

04/30/2010

E* E*

19680 19931

75343 25204

11/21/2009 12/31/2008

E* E* E* E*

19967 20064 20065 20304

75344 75702 75702 39000

11/21/2009 08/08/2009 08/08/2009 09/30/2012

E* E* E*

20397 20564 20685

75514 34104 25203

03/14/2011 02/28/2012 12/31/2009

E* E* E* E* E* E* E*

4054 4055 4056 4057 4060 4061 4063

75321 75314 75322 75312 75302 75304 75305

11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009

E* E* E* E*
E*-EE-ES

4064 4065 4066 4426 20332

75306 75328 75308 75329 30000

11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 11/21/2009 08/31/2008

E*-EE-RA-RM E*-RA

21030 20304

23000 39000

03/31/2013 09/30/2012

E*-RM-SW

00264

75505

12/09/2011

E*-SW

00262

75502

12/09/2011

17

Appendix 3.1
CODE E*-SW AWARD 18935 GROUP 75531 DESCRIPTION PERIPHERALS, ACC & REL SVCS (STWD) DELL MARKETING LP FOR PRINTERS, PERIPHERALS, ACC & REL SVCS (STWD) SPEED DISPLAY TRAILERS (STATEWIDE) ALTERNATIVE FUELED VEHICLES (STWD) (2007 MY)(ITEMS 11-16 ONLY 2008 MY PEST MANAGEMENT THROUGH INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT (IPM) (STATEWD) FURNITURE ALL TYPES (STATEWIDE) (EXCEPT HOSP RM & PATIENT HANDLING GLASS SPHERES FOR REFLECTORIZED PAVEMENT MARKING (VARIOUS) (STWD) TRAFFIC SAFETY PRODUCTS(CONES POSTS DRUMS)(STWD W/MULTI-ST PARTICIPAT) INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT (STATEWIDE) GUIDE/BRIDGE RAILS END SECTIONS & ACCESSORIES (STATEWIDE) HYDRAULIC OIL HIGH PERFORMANCE RETURNABLE DRUMS (STATEWIDE) OFFSET ROLLS UNCOATED WHITE& COLORS (ALB/UTICA/PLATS/ROCH AREA AGYS) OIL LUBRICATING HIGH DETERGENT(STWD (FOR INTERN COMBUST ENG) ZONE 1-11 COMPUTER PAPER (ALL STATE AGY & POL SUBS) INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT (STATEWIDE) XEROGRAPHIC COPY PAPER-WHITE (LESS THAN TRKLD LTS) (NYS AG & POL SUB) AUTOMOTIVE REPLACEMENT PARTS (STATEWIDE) LEGISLATIVE PRINTING-THE EXECUTIVE (BUDGET DOC & MISC PUBLICATIONS) LEGISLATIVE PRINTING-THE EXECUTIVE (GOVERNOR & MISC PUBLICATIONS) WOVE ENVELOPES - WHITE REG & WINDOW & COLORS REGULAR (ALL ST AGENCIES) KRAFT ENVELOPES (ALL STATE AGENCIES) LEGISLATIVE PRINTING/LEGISLATURE (LEGISLATIVE BILL DRAFTING COMM) LETTERHEADS (ALL STATE AGENCIES) OFFSET REPRODUCED BOUND BOOKS (OFFICE OF GENERAL SERVICES) ENGRAVED LETTERHEADS ENVELOPES & BUSINESS CARDS(ALL STATE AGENCIES) XEROGRAPHIC COPY PAPER - WHITE (TRKLD END DATE 06/23/2009

EE EE

20470 20555

35814 40401

11/30/2008 11/30/2008

ES

01510

71010

03/31/2012

ES

20551

20915

10/28/2012

RA

20056

38602

12/31/2008

RA RA

20187 20304

38612 39000

11/14/2008 09/30/2012

RA

20674

32000

11/30/2010

RA

20836

05701

07/31/2008

RA RA

20873 20937

50206 05700

09/30/2009 09/30/2008

RA RA-RM

21044 20304

23830 39000

03/31/2013 09/30/2012

RA-RP

20508

50211

08/31/2008

RM RS

18349 20431

30306 50020

07/31/2008 11/14/2010

RS

20432

50020

11/14/2010

RS

20435

50030

10/31/2008

RS RS

20436 20464

50030 50061

10/31/2008 12/31/2008

RS RS

20623 20624

50020 50020

02/28/2009 02/28/2009

RS

20715

50041

05/14/2009

RS

20934

50213

09/30/2009

18

Appendix 3.1
CODE AWARD GROUP DESCRIPTION LOTS) (ALL AG & POL SUBS)_ FACIAL TISSUE (ALL STATE AGENCIES AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISONS) PAPER NAPKINS (ALL STATE AGENCIES AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS) QUICK COPY/DUPLICATING (ALL STATE AGY ALBANY AREA) OFFSET SHEETS COLORS (ALL ST AGYS & POL SUBS) OPAQUE ROLLS UNCOATED (ALBANY AREA NYS AGENCIES) THERMOGRAPHED BUSINESS CARDS LETTERHEADS & ENVELOPE(ALL ST AGY) END DATE

RS

20994

23300

11/30/2012

RS

20995

23300

11/30/2012

RS

21045

50022

01/14/2010

RS RS RS

21047 21048 21128

50207 50208 50048

12/31/2012 12/31/2012 10/08/2009

Code Legend:
E* - EPA Energy Star Award; Use when awarded product (s) is approved under the US Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star Program. EE - Energy Efficient Award; Commodity contracts which fall into this category include, but are not limited to, those which use Life Cycle or Energy Efficient Costing in the bid evaluation or those which are Energy Efficient by their very nature, such as ballasts or rechargeable batteries. ES - Environmentally Sensitive Award; indicates an award such as integrated pest management. GR - “Green" Contract Award; containing environmentally friendly products or services. RA - Recycled Award; Use when awarded product (s) is Recycled but the award does not fit into either of the above categories (i.e. recycled product (s) is Low Bid Meeting Specifications) or when a combination of circumstances exists. RM - Remanufactured Award: Use when awarded product contains Remanufactured Components. RP - Recycled Preference Applied; Use when Price Preference is applied in awarding the contract to a Recycled product. RS - Recycled Specified; Use when the specification for a particular bid solicitation limits competition to Recycled products. SW - Solid Waste Impact Award: Use when awarded product (s) is not recycled or remanufactured but has an impact on solid waste management or the environment. Examples are Returnable Drums or items that reduce the Landfill or Encourage Recycling.

19

Appendix 3.1

EXHIBIT B
TOTAL TONS OF RECYCLED MATERIAL FROM ALL OGS OWNED AND OPERATED BUILDINGS

15,000 13,500 12,000 10,500 9,000 7,500 6,000 4,500 3,000 1,500 0 Total Tons

88-89 89-90 90-92 91-92 92-93 93-94 94-95 95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04* 04-05 06-07 07-08 463 979 1,377 1,537 2,287 3,548 4,510 3,984 3,552 4,400 5,014 6,549 7,038 7,731 7,667 11,911 6,402 5,974 4,655

*Spike in 03-04 was due to the Alfred E. Smith rehabilitation

20

Appendix 3.1 .

EXHIBIT C
NEW YORK STATE OFFICE OF GENERAL SERVICES – 3R’S PROGRAM TONS OF RECYCLED MATERIALS VERSUS TRASH

12000

10000

8000

6000

4000

2000

0 88-89 89-90 90-91 91-92 92-93 93-94 94-95 95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02 02-03 Recycle Trash 463 979

0304*

04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 5794 3650 4655 3767

1,377 1,537 2,287 3,548 4,510 3,984 3,552 4,400 5,014 6,549 7,038 7,731 7,667 11,911 6,402 5043

9,744 8,823 8,046 7,268 7,846 5,685 4,506 4,683 4,646 3,986 3,450 3,312 3,518 3,216 3,178 2,292 4,405 3871

*Spike in 03-04 was due to the Alfred E. Smith rehabilitation

21

APPENDIX 3.2   FLOW CONTROL 
 

Thirty‐five states (including New York) as well as the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands directly  authorize flow control, while four additional states authorize flow control indirectly through mechanisms  such as local solid waste management plans or home rule authority.  In New York State, a municipality is  usually specifically authorized by the State Legislature to adopt flow‐control legislation.  Unlike several other  states, New York explicitly states that flow control may cover source‐separated recyclable materials.   Currently, there are 37 New York municipalities (i.e., districts, towns counties, authorities) authorized by the  State Legislature to enact flow‐control legislation covering approximately 80 percent of the state’s  population.  New York State has been a primary stage for the legal battles on flow control.  In 1994, in C&A Carbone v  Town of Clarkstown, the Supreme Court’s decision struck down the flow‐control ordinance adopted by the  Town of Clarkstown as unconstitutional because it violated the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution.   In this case, the town hired a private contractor to build a waste transfer station and enacted a flow‐control  ordinance requiring all solid waste generated within the town be directed to that transfer station.  The basis  of the decision was that solid waste is a commodity in commerce and that the Commerce Clause supersedes  laws that discriminate against such commerce on the basis of its origin or destination.    At the time, this decision was widely viewed as invalidating most flow‐control models, thus the impact on  solid waste management in New York was significant.  The results of a 1995 survey of planning units,  conducted by DEC, indicated that 16 planning units had significant solid waste debt financing, and most  respondents to the survey indicated that they anticipated modifications to several elements of their in‐place  or planned recycling programs because of the decision regarding flow control.  Two‐thirds of the  respondents reported that a decrease in waste receipts of 10 percent or more would occur, with more than  half the respondents reporting a loss of greater than 25 percent of waste flow.    It was reported at that time that few legal challenges to flow control laws had been pursued, but in response  to the Carbone decision and fear of similar action, many municipalities simply chose not to enforce their  flow‐control laws.  Several planning units reported that they would no longer be able to compete with the  private sector due to lower tipping fees offered by private facilities.  Planning units called on the state to re‐ evaluate its solid waste management legislation, regulations and enforcement to ensure a level playing field  with the private sector.  Many planning units claimed that in the absence of flow control, they would be  unable to continue implementing their local solid waste management plans (LSWMPs).  Subsequent to the Carbone decision, private waste collectors challenged both the Town of Smithtown’s and  Town of Babylon’s flow‐control ordinances.  In these cases, after lengthy legal proceedings, both of the  towns’ ordinances were ultimately upheld as constitutional.  In the Town of Smithtown’s case, the town  enacted a local flow‐control ordinance that required any authorized hauler that collected acceptable waste  within Smithtown to dispose of such waste at a designated solid waste management facility.  Smithtown  established municipal garbage collection and disposal for all town residents by contracts with two waste‐

hauling companies to collect residential garbage and deliver it to the designated facility.  In 1996, it was  ruled that the contracts were constitutional as the contractual agreement fell within the “market  participant” exception to the Commerce Clause. This was because Smithtown was acting as a market  participant in the solid waste management market by operating the town’s solid waste facilities and was  merely contracting out private haulers for waste transportation services rather than providing those services  themselves.  Smithtown was not regulating commerce and, thus, could dictate by contract which waste  disposal services must be used.  In the Town of Babylon’s case, the town established commercial garbage improvement districts within  which a private hauling company, under contractual agreement with  Babylon, agreed to collect the  commercial garbage and deliver recyclables to the town’s recycling facility and dispose of the remainder at  the town’s municipal waste combustor.   Babylon paid the private hauler a monthly fee for the collection  and disposal of such wastes.  To finance the collection and disposal services, the town imposed an annual  assessment against each commercial property within the district.  In 1996, it was ruled that  Babylon  participates in the garbage collection market by purchasing garbage collection services from  a private  hauler.  Thus, the court distinguished and upheld the town’s waste management districts as a valid plan of a  local government providing garbage collection services to its residents.  Accordingly, this fell within the  “market participant” exception to the Commerce Clause.  Both the Smithtown and Babylon decisions  cleared the way for contractual flow control.   After years of protracted legal battles, in 2007, in the case of United Haulers Association v Oneida‐Herkimer  Solid Waste Management Authority, the US Supreme Court ruled that local governments are permitted to  engage in flow control to government‐owned and operated facilities in specific circumstances.  In this case,  both Oneida and Herkimer counties’ ordinances required that all solid waste generated within county  boundaries be directed to processing facilities controlled by the Authority.  It is important to note that in the  majority opinion, it was reasoned that the counties had adopted an expensive waste disposal system that  accepted recyclables and household hazardous waste for free to promote separation of these materials, and  that the system they had devised enhanced their ability to enforce recycling laws.  These provided public  benefits that the justices viewed as overriding any burden that had been placed on interstate commerce.    The court found that the challenged ordinances in this case, unlike the ordinance in the Carbone case,  conferred a benefit on a public facility rather than a private one, and that the ordinances treated all private  companies the same.  A significant note in the majority opinion was that local government plays a vital role  in the collection and disposal of solid waste, that the State of New York had adopted a policy of displacing  competition with regulation or monopoly control, and that nothing in the Commerce Clause vests the  responsibility for that policy judgment with the federal judiciary.  Consequently, the court held that flow‐ control ordinances, which treat in‐state private business interests exactly the same as out‐of‐state ones, do  not discriminate against commerce for purposes of the Commerce Clause.   The United Haulers decision is expected to modify the development and implementation of the programs  for several, local, solid waste management programs.  Although some municipalities have begun to again  enforce their flow‐control ordinances, a significant impact has not yet been seen.    

Appendix 5.1

Framework Principles for Product Stewardship Policy
The following principles are intended to guide development of product stewardship policies and legislation that governs multiple products. It is primarily aimed at state legislation but is also intended as a guide for local and federal policy.

1. Producer Responsibility
1.1 All producers selling a covered product into the State are responsible for designing managing, and financing a stewardship program that addresses the lifecycle impacts of their products including end-of-life management. 1.2 Producers have flexibility to meet these responsibilities by offering their own plan or participating in a plan with others. 1.3 In addressing end-of-life management, all stewardship programs must finance the collection, transportation, and responsible reuse, recycling or disposition of covered products. Stewardship programs must: • Cover the costs of new, historic and orphan covered products. • Provide convenient collection for consumers throughout the State.

1.4 Costs for product waste management are shifted from taxpayers and ratepayers to producers and users. 1.5 Programs are operated by producers with minimum government involvement.

2. Shared Responsibilities
2.1 Retailers only sell covered products from producers who are in compliance with stewardship requirements. 2.2 State and local governments work with producers and retailers on educating the public about the stewardship programs. 2.3 Consumers are responsible for using return systems set up by producers or their agents.

Page 1 of 2

Appendix 5.1

3. Governance
3.1 Government sets goals and performance standards following consultation with stakeholders. All programs within a product category are accountable to the same goals and performance standards. 3.2 Government allows producers the flexibility to determine the most costeffective means of achieving the goals and performance standards. 3.3 Government is responsible for ensuring a level playing field by enforcing requirements that all producers in a product category participate in a stewardship program as a condition for selling their product in the jurisdiction. 3.4 Product categories required to have stewardship programs are selected using the process and priorities set out in framework legislation. 3.5 Government is responsible for ensuring transparency and accountability of stewardship programs. Producers are accountable to both government and consumers for disclosing environmental outcomes.

4. Financing
4.1 Producers finance their stewardship programs as a general cost of doing business, through cost internalization or by recovering costs through arrangements with their distributors and retailers. End of life fees are not allowed.

5. Environmental Protection
5.1 Framework legislation should address environmental product design, including source reduction, recyclability and reducing toxicity of covered products. 5.2 Framework legislation requires that stewardship programs ensure that all products covered by the stewardship program are managed in an environmentally sound manner. 5.3 Stewardship programs must be consistent with other State sustainability legislation, including those that address greenhouse gas reduction and the waste management hierarchy. 5.4 Stewardship programs include reporting on the final disposition, (i.e., reuse, recycling, disposal) of products handled by the stewardship program, including any products or materials exported for processing.

Northwest Product Stewardship Council www.productstewardship.net Adopted May19, 2008 California Product Stewardship Council www.calpsc.org Adopted June 4, 2008 Vermont Product Stewardship Council www.vtpsc.org Adopted November 6, 2008 British Columbia Product Stewardship Council www.bcproductstewardship.org Adopted Dec. 9, 2008 Texas Product Stewardship Council www.txpsc.org Adopted January 30, 2009 NYS Assoc. for Solid Waste Management www.newyorkwaste.org Adopted March 11, 2009

Developed with support from Product Policy Institute www.productpolicy.org

Page 2 of 2

Appendix 5.2

444 North Capitol Street, N.W., Suite 315 Washington, DC 20001 tel: (202) 624-5828 fax: (202) 624-7875 www.astswmo.org

ASTSWMO Product Stewardship Framework Policy Document
Prepared by the Product Stewardship Task Force of the ASTSWMO Sustainability Subcommittee

Introduction The following product stewardship policy document outlines many of the components and issues that States are grappling with as they consider how to effectively implement product stewardship for a wide variety of products and materials. The document is meant to serve as guidance in the development of State policy that addresses the environmental impact of products particularly as States transition from a focus on individual products to a more comprehensive and consistent framework approach. During the past decade, individual States have stepped forward to address specific products such as electronic waste or mercury-containing products. While these efforts have laid the foundation for broadening the understanding of product stewardship and illustrating how stewardship programs can function, individual product efforts are often very resource intensive for all stakeholders and may inhibit consistency between individual States. Given this experience to date, several States have stepped forward to propose a comprehensive product stewardship framework. By implementing a framework approach, States can define the product stewardship program structure, set criteria for selecting products and then add products to the stewardship program either by regulation or legislative authorization. A framework approach can streamline the policymaking process to enable States to more efficiently expand their stewardship programs to include products that meet key criteria. While seeking to address the more defined impacts of products in the solid waste system, States are encouraged to examine product stewardship as a strategy that may assist with other policy objectives, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions and stimulating the growth of green jobs. In 2009, several States, including California, Oregon, Washington and Minnesota, saw legislative proposals introduced to enact product stewardship framework programs, and a framework study and recommendations report was proposed in Rhode Island. It is expected that the framework approach will gather momentum in the coming years.

1

Appendix 5.2

Definition of Product Stewardship This document is using the following definition of Product Stewardship: Product stewardship, also referred to as Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), is the extension of the responsibility of producers (often referred to as brandowners), and all entities involved in the product chain, to reduce the cradle-to-cradle impacts of a product and its packaging; the primary responsibility lies with the producer, or brand owner, who makes design and marketing decisions. (California Integrated Waste Management Board, 2007) Argument for Product Stewardship Product stewardship programs extend the role and responsibility of the producer of a product or package to include the entire life cycle, including ultimate disposition of that product or package at the end of its useful life. In these programs, producers must take either physical or fiscal responsibility for the recycling or proper disposal of products. Instead of requiring local governments to fund collection and recovery programs for discarded products, stewardship programs incorporate the cost of disposal or recovery into the cost of the product, so those costs are borne jointly by the producer and the consumer, not by local government and taxpayers. Internalizing the costs of end-of-life management into the cost of the product not only reduces the financial burden on communities, but it also ensures that consumers get proper price signals -- materials that are easier to recycle or dispose of at the end of life should be cheaper. Importantly, stewardship programs reduce the financial burden on local communities. Local governments are required to manage and pay for whatever winds up on the curb, with little or no ability to influence the design of the products or packaging to reduce management costs or improve recovery options. The costs are borne locally for production decisions made remotely, usually without consideration of waste management implications. Product stewardship can be a powerful driver for the reduction of waste volume and toxicity. By placing responsibility for end-of-life management costs on the producer, these programs ensure that producers consider the end-of-life impacts of their product during the earliest stages of design. As such, stewardship programs create incentives for producers to redesign products and packaging to be less toxic, less bulky, and lighter, as well as more recyclable. Reducing material use and toxicity and increasing recycling results in significant environmental, economic, energy and greenhouse gas reduction benefits. Indeed, stewardship programs have led to products and packages that are less toxic, less wasteful, easier to recycle and otherwise less costly to manage. Additionally, product stewardship relies on a performance driven approach where State government’s role is primarily one of oversight and the programs are developed and implemented by manufacturers and the privately run stewardship organizations they employ to assure that performance goals are met. This is a “minimal government” approach which can be efficiently accomplished with relatively few public resources.

2

Appendix 5.2

Criteria for Identifying and Selecting Products There are many criteria that could be used to determine which products or groups of products are selected for product stewardship programs. The list is neither exhaustive nor prescriptive and is not presented in either a particular order or priority. Grouping the criteria by policy questions should assist policy makers in evaluating the relative importance of the criteria. When possible and appropriate, these criteria should be evaluated from the perspective of the total lifecycle of the product (extraction, production, use and end-of-life management). It represents a combination of the criteria either in use or suggested for use in California, Ontario, Oregon and Washington. Does the product present adverse environmental and public health impacts, including: • presence of toxic and hazardous constituents • opportunities for reducing waste and toxicity • total volume being generated or disposed in landfills or waste to energy facilities • climate change impacts Does the product have potential for enhanced resource conservation, including: • potential for energy conservation • potential resource recovery and material conservation • opportunities for increasing reuse or recycling, recycled content, and design for reuse or recycling Does the product significantly burden government solid waste programs and/or offer business opportunities, including: • management costs to governments, taxpayers, and solid waste ratepayers • difficult to manage in traditional recycling collection and other standard solid waste management systems • potential to act as a contaminant in solid waste management programs • existing or potential problems with illegal dumping • opportunities for existing and new businesses and infrastructure to manage products or product categories • level of collection/recycling infrastructure currently in place • opportunities to increase markets for materials • willingness of potential partners • success of other stewardship programs in other jurisdictions Designating Products One of the primary purposes of a product stewardship framework is to establish a consistent and reliable process for identifying and selecting products over time to be managed under a product stewardship approach. To ensure consistency and that priority products are addressed, the framework should articulate a transparent, inclusive and objective process for designating products.

3

Appendix 5.2

Key elements of this process can include: • • • • • Public availability of product evaluation information Advisory process that includes impacted stakeholders Public process with defined decision points and timelines Opportunity for “appeal” of recommendations Identified public body as decision maker

The selection process in the framework can be set up to occur ideally through administrative action, such as rule adoption, if statutory authority is provided or by legislative action. Legislative action may be more appropriate for a particular State but is more resource intensive, less certain and can take more time to achieve. The selection process, to the extent possible and practical, should include input and consultation with other States so that product inclusion in a stewardship program can be more efficiently coordinated. Financing Mechanisms Although there are many variations, the financing for extended producer responsibility systems generally fall into two categories, cost internalization and eco-fees. In cost internalization systems, producers have primary responsibility for the design, implementation and management of a collection and recycling system. The costs of collecting and recycling the product are incorporated into the cost of the product just as all other costs associated with producing and selling the product. There is no visible fee to the consumer or retailer. This allows companies to make their own pricing decisions internally, and to distribute the costs according to their own business model and interests. It also gives producers the option of working independently or partnering with other producers. Some examples of this system are the electronics recycling laws in Minnesota, Oregon and Washington, the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC) and the Thermostat Recycling Corporation (TRC). (For more information on examples of stewardship programs, please see Appendix B.) The other financing mechanism is an eco-fee. An eco-fee is a set amount paid on each item to a third party, often referred to as a stewardship organization. The stewardship organization then uses the funds to establish a collection and recycling program on behalf of the producers. The eco-fee may or may not be visible to the consumer. It may be paid by the producer or by the retailer to the stewardship organization. A set eco-fee ensures that a producer will be able to pass on the cost of managing the product and ensures that the per-item cost to consumers for similar products is the same regardless of brand. An example of this type of funding mechanism is the paint stewardship program that is being implemented in the State of Oregon following enactment of legislation authorizing a two-year demonstration project. The manufacturers of architectural paints will remit a fee to the paint stewardship organization that will then fund leftover paint collection and recycling activities. Eco-fees should not be confused with government-managed consumer fees often referred to as Advanced Recycling Fees (ARF) or Advanced Disposal Fees. In these systems the government

4

Appendix 5.2

agency is responsible for collecting and managing the fees as well as implementing and managing the collection and recycling program. Because the responsibilities lie with the government agency, these fees are not a form of extended producer responsibility or product stewardship, but rather a means to fund a government managed program. One example of this type of system is the tire management fees in place in many States. Stewardship Plans Industry-developed stewardship plans are a key element of a State stewardship program and serve as the vehicle for implementing a program and replacing the programmatic details required by statutes addressing an individual product or material. Stewardship plans submitted by industry-managed and -funded organizations or individual producers are featured in the Canadian stewardship programs in Ontario and British Columbia. For British Columbia’s stewardship plan for paint, please see: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/recycling/paint/plan.htm Stewardship plans are beginning to emerge in the context of the various State stewardship programs in the U.S. including the paint stewardship program enacted in Oregon in 2009. For the State of Washington’s waste electronics plan, please see: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/swfa/eproductrecycle/docs/StandardPlanBaseDocument2009.p df While the plans are developed by the producers and brandowners of the designated products, it is expected that other entities along the product chain such as retailers, local government and recyclers will provide input on the plan and, if appropriate, make specific commitments to their role in the collection and recycling system. To ensure that the proposed stewardship program is consistent with the overall framework policy objectives, State agency review of plans and approval may be warranted. Stewardship plans may include:

List of participating organizations Definition and scope of products to be addressed, including orphan and historic products Roles and responsibilities for key players along the product chain Collection system information, including how a minimum collection service standard may be met; a State can consider if it wants minimum collection services available and pre-set a minimum standard to assure available service Statewide Processing/recycling information, including what steps will be taken to ensure environmentally-sound management Anticipated resources and a financing mechanism to implement the plan Proposed performance goals

• • •

• • •

5

Appendix 5.2

• • • •

Strategies to promote design for the environment (toxicity reduction, recycled content, recyclability, product longevity) for the product as well as any attendant packaging Public outreach and communications plan Public and stakeholder consultation activities in preparation of the plan Reporting and evaluation procedures

Stewardship Organizations Stewardship organizations (also referred to as “third-party organizations”) are often non-profit organizations formed to implement producers’ responsibilities for designated products in a stewardship program. Stewardship organizations often carry out various functions extending beyond the collection and recycling to education and outreach efforts and reporting. While stewardship organizations play an important role in establishing and managing the collection and recycling efforts and offer a defined compliance option for producers, State policy should also ensure that producers have the option to implement individual programs that reflect their business model. State policy should encourage the formation of stewardship organizations, for example through the development of stewardship plans, but also recognize that other State laws and regulations, such as those prohibiting anti-competitive conduct, may need to be amended to support joint activity. Performance Goals Performance goals are essential for good program management, oversight and accountability. Producers and other stakeholders use performance goals to plan activities, track program implementation and verify accomplishments. Performance goals provide feedback to stakeholders so adjustments can be made to improve programs. It is important to note, however, that the specific set of performance goals will vary by product or material in recognition of the differences, among others, in composition, distribution channels and end-of-life management options. While an oversight entity, such as State government, typically establishes performance goals, it is important that the input from stakeholders, especially producers, stewardship organizations and other groups be considered in that process. Important performance goals to consider include: • Product goals, which are qualitative and quantitative goals to reduce the environmental and health impacts of the product over its life cycle. These types of goals could include goals covering topics such as product changes from design to end-of-life management, distribution, reduced use of toxics and hazardous substances, reduced carbon footprint for the product, increased product longevity, and design for recyclability.

6

Appendix 5.2

• •

Collection rates, which quantify the amount of the product collected or captured through the system for reuse or recycling by an established date. Reuse/recycling rates, which quantify the amount of the product that is reused and recycled. This goal may include but is not limited to such things as reuse, recycling rates and other measures.

States may use different approaches for establishing performance goals. For instance, performance goals may be established as part of the product selection and designation process using the best information available to determine reasonable goals. Another approach is to allow producers to establish their own performance goals (based on metrics established by State government in regulation) for a program’s initial years, subject to review as part of the stewardship plan. For example, during the first four years producers report on progress, but the goals are not enforceable. After a baseline is established, producers establish enforceable strategic goals for year five and beyond. Reporting Reporting on progress towards meeting performance goals is fundamental to program oversight and evaluation and provides an opportunity for States to harmonize their programs through the use of similar reporting metrics. From this information stakeholders can learn about what works best and encourage improved performance over time. These will need to be defined once a product has been designated, as measurement metrics must be customized to some degree. In addition to the performance goals identified above, other measures to be addressed during reporting include:
• • • • • • •

Weight of products recovered per capita The savings to local government The percent of product placed on the market that is collected, reused, recycled, recovered for energy or disposed in landfills The greenhouse gas emissions avoided The actions the producer or stewardship organization will take during the next reporting period, if the performance goals were not met A description of the public outreach and education activities undertaken during the reporting period The actions undertaken to manage and reduce the life cycle impacts of the covered products and packaging including energy reduction, from product design to end-of-life management

As part of the reporting mechanism, it is anticipated that the stewardship organization will engage in ongoing evaluation to assess progress towards meeting the objectives of the program. However, this is meant to complement, but not displace, the role of the government oversight agencies to ensure that the stewardship effort is meeting the public policy objectives.

7

Appendix 5.2

Compliance/Enforcement To ensure fairness and a level playing field, States need a way to verify information provided in producer reports and apply some type of penalty for producers who chose not to participate in a product stewardship program, when required by law. For this reason the State, or its designee, needs the right to audit the financial and operational performance of product stewardship programs and to verify information presented in reports. A common penalty is to restrict a product’s market access, i.e., a producer loses the right to sell its product in a State if it is in violation of the stewardship program. Another penalty is to issue a financial civil penalty. A large penalty can serve as a sufficient deterrent that it may never need to be used. Environmentally-Sound Management The stewardship framework should articulate a commitment to the environmentally-sound management of products and create a mechanism to ensure that the management of products and materials is done without posing threats to human and environmental health. While this issue is of utmost concern with products containing toxic and hazardous constituents, it applies to any product or material that is being processed. Stewardship organizations can ensure that collectors and processors are adhering to best management practices by instituting requirements such as the Required Vendor Qualification Program developed by Electronics Product Stewardship Canada (EPSC) and in use in the provincial stewardship programs. Incentives for Design for the Environment Product stewardship seeks to not only increase collection and recycling rates for certain products but to promote the design and manufacture of more sustainable products. By internalizing the environmental costs of products into the sales chain, producers will have a defined economic incentive to reduce toxic and hazardous constituents as well as take steps to promote disassembly and recyclability. For example, automobile product stewardship programs in Europe and Asia have led to the standardization of materials, allowing for greater levels of recovery and much less auto shredder “fluff” requiring disposal. While there are several examples that illustrate the connection between internalization of costs and design change, many factors, such as product lifespan and complexity of the product, impact the effectiveness of this strategy. However, it is important to note that such design changes must be implemented in a broader materials context to ensure that alternatives do not pose a similar or greater environmental harm. Several other tools have been identified as effective in supporting the development of environmentally-preferable products. Materials restrictions, such as the Restriction on Hazardous Substances (RoHS) adopted by the European Union, as well as those referenced in several State electronics stewardship programs, present a potential policy avenue for reducing the use of certain materials of concern. Another strategy gaining acceptance is to integrate product standards, certifications and eco-label programs into product stewardship efforts. Product standards such as Energy Star and the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) have been very effective at reducing certain aspects of a product’s environmental footprint. States examining stewardship

8

Appendix 5.2

policy may want to include provisions to support these and similar product standards that are multi-attribute approaches. Consistency/Harmonization between States As with any new concept or process, it is essential that terms and their usage are universally understood by stakeholders. For example, stakeholders may know the general term “product stewardship” but may have a different perspective regarding its practical application. Governments may consider product stewardship in a waste management compliance sense, such as when producer responsibility laws require that the producer take back its products at their end of life. However, a producer may consider product stewardship in an engineering sense, such as when a producer strives to make their products less toxic. Both stakeholders are correct, though the focus of their efforts may not be the same. As States adopt product stewardship, it is critical that the regulated community, which could include producers, retailers, recyclers and others, understands the terms used. It has become evident -- with the variations in State laws that have been passed related to electronics recycling - that the regulated community is frequently confused by the scopes and provisions of the various electronics recycling laws. The diversity of the State laws complicates the regulated community’s ability to comprehend and act in accordance with many different requirements and can impair States’ abilities to compel compliance, particularly by stakeholders that do not have the means to hire consultants to keep abreast of emerging legislation. Efforts must be made to ensure that product stewardship terms are consistently applied and universally understood; States and the federal government must make efforts to share their concepts and reach consensus as much as possible on product stewardship. In addition, it is essential that governments communicate with the regulated community to address their concerns and target their outreach and education efforts to producers, retailers, recyclers and others to ensure compliance with product stewardship regulations and statutes. Consideration could be given to developing model standard language for product stewardship laws and policies. Recommended Role for the Federal Government While regulated stewardship programs have been the province of State government to date, the federal government is poised to play an important role in facilitating State activity and promoting harmonization and collaboration among the States. This harmonization will benefit the regulated community and can decrease the resources necessary for State and local governments to implement programs. There are also several components of product stewardship programs that may be best addressed by Congress or U.S. EPA regulatory activity such as restrictions on the export of certain products, addressing regulatory barriers to the reuse and recycling of certain products or materials and facilitating the creation of industry-managed stewardship organizations. The U.S. EPA can continue its role in facilitating the coordination and collaboration among States, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations to develop voluntary and regulatory approaches for reducing the environmental footprint of products. Facilitation of

9

Appendix 5.2

product stewardship efforts should be continued and expanded by U.S. EPA through its ongoing emphasis on resource conservation. The U.S. EPA can also support product stewardship through funding research that will: • • • • • • Lead to product design that will extend the life cycle of products and decrease “built-in obsolescence” Provide better data on the flow of materials -- from extraction to disposal -- to identify environmental impacts and opportunities for improved management Determine economic and social drivers that will influence greater public participation in recycling and product stewardship efforts Develop improved technology to increase the efficiency of waste recycling and to safely remove and dispose of hazardous materials Develop more uses for materials captured from recycling and product stewardship programs Lead to product design that will enhance recovery of useful components at the product’s end-of-life

Finally, U.S. EPA can engage the federal purchasing community and other large institutional purchasers to support the development of products with stronger environmental attributes.

Approved by the ASTSWMO Board of Directors, October 28, 2009, Bethesda, MD

10

Appendix 5.2

Appendix A Please see the following web resources that provided background information for the development of this document. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Recommendations Report http://www.pca.state.mn.us/oea/stewardship/study.cfm California Integrated Waste Management Board EPR Framework Overview http://www.ciwmb.ca.gov/EPR/Framework/Framework.pdf Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Draft Framework Legislation http://www.deq.state.or.us/lq/pubs/docs/sw/PSFrameworkLegdrafthandout080916.pdf Washington Climate Action Team - Beyond Waste Implementation Working Group Draft Framework Legislation http://www.ecy.wa.gov/climatechange/2008CATdocs/IWG/bw/10072008_7_product_stewardshi p_bill_draft.pdf Discussion document: Towards a Proposed Canada-wide Action Plan for Extended Producer Responsibility (the Canada-wide Action Plan for Extended Producer Responsibility adopted in principle on 10/29/09 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment is available at http://www.ccme.ca/assets/pdf/epr_cap.pdf) Product Stewardship Institute’s Principles of Product Stewardship http://www.productstewardship.us/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=231 Product Policy Institute’s Joint Framework Principles for Product Stewardship Policy http://www.productpolicy.org/content/framework-principles

11

Appendix 5.2

Appendix B- Case Studies of Product Stewardship Programs Electronics Minnesota On May 8, 2007, Governor Pawlenty signed the Minnesota Electronics Recycling Act to facilitate the collection and recycling of video display devices (televisions, computer monitors, and laptop computers) from households in Minnesota. The brandowners of video display devices (VDDs) must annually register and pay a fee to the State as well as collect and recycle VDDs from households/consumers in Minnesota. The recycling obligation is determined by the weight of video display devices sold in Minnesota. At the end of each program year, brandowners file a report detailing the results of their collections for the year. There are also specified roles for retailers under the Act. Retailers are required to provide manufacturers with sales data for their respective brands as well as provide consumers with information regarding collection opportunities in Minnesota. During the first program year (July 1, 2007–June 30, 2008), 217 collection locations were registered with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, a substantial increase in the number of collection opportunities for Minnesota residents. Registered recyclers and collectors reported managing approximately 34 million pounds of covered electronic devices from households in Minnesota. This translates into approximately 6.5 pounds per capita and represents a substantial increase in the volume of electronics collected from households prior to 2007. Washington Washington State’s Electronic Product Recycling Law (Chapter 70.95N RCW) requires producers to provide recycling services at no cost to households, small businesses, charities, school districts and small governments in Washington as of January 1, 2009. Producers of TVs, computers (desktops and laptops) and monitors must finance the collection, transportation and recycling of these products. There must be a collection site in every county and one in every city with a population of 10,000 or more. The law requires producers to register with the Washington State Department of Ecology and participate in an approved recycling plan in order to sell their products in or into the State by any means including internet sales. The law also created the Washington Materials Management & Financing Authority to administer and operate the Standard Plan for electronics recycling. By default, all producers must participate in the Standard Plan unless they meet the requirements to operate their own independent recycling plan.

12

Appendix 5.2

Rechargeable batteries Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation Following statutory producer responsibility requirements enacted in New Jersey and Minnesota in the early 1990s, producers of nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries and battery-containing products founded the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC) in 1994. The federal Mercury Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act of 1996 allowed for the implementation of the national program to collect rechargeable batteries. Since its inception, RBRC has continued to evolve its program, expanding to include additional rechargeable battery chemistries in 2001 and in 2004 adding cell phones. RBRC currently collects discarded rechargeable batteries at retail locations and other collection locations including household hazardous waste facilities. Mercury-Containing Automobile Switches Maine In 2002, the Maine Legislature enacted a producer responsibility program to increase the recovery of mercury-containing switches from automobiles. The statute prohibits the sale of new motor vehicles with mercury switches and replacement mercury switches while requiring the removal of all mercury switches prior to flattening, crushing or bailing. It requires the auto manufacturers to “establish and maintain consolidation facilities” where the person who removed the switches (the end-of-life vehicle handler) can turn them in for recycling. The end-of-life vehicle (ELV) handler has to maintain a log on switches collected. The manufacturers pay a $4 bounty for each switch turned in with the VIN recorded on the log. Pharmaceuticals British Columbia A program to divert expired and/or unused medications from landfills and sewers, as well as to ensure safe and effective collection, has been in place since 1996. The public can return expired or unused medications at participating community pharmacies across British Columbia. The pharmaceutical industry voluntarily established the Medications Return Program (formally called British Columbia EnviRx) in November 1996 then in 1997 it was regulated under the PostConsumer Residual Stewardship Program Regulation. Brand-owners of pharmaceutical and consumer health-care products are currently regulated under the Recycling Regulation and this program allows consumers to return (at no charge) unused or expired medications to over 95 per cent of participating pharmacies in the province. The Medications Return Program is administered by the Post-Consumers Pharmaceutical Stewardship Association and funded by brand-owners selling medications in British Columbia. This program provides the pharmaceutical and self-care health products industries with a collective means of adhering to the requirements of the British Columbia Recycling Regulation.

13

Appendix 5.2

Packaging Ontario The Waste Diversion Act was passed by the Parliament in Ontario in 2002. The Waste Diversion Act empowers the Minister to designate a material for which a waste diversion program is to be established. The first product category designated under the Waste Diversion Act was “blue box” packaging materials collected in curb side recycling programs -- glass, metal, paper, plastic and textiles. The Waste Diversion Act creates a shared responsibility model for managing “blue box” materials with a 50-50 cost sharing arrangement between industry and the municipalities. The Minister established a 60 percent recycling target for the Blue Box Program Plan. The recycling rate for 2007 was 63 percent. The Act created a non-profit organization, Waste Diversion Ontario, that serves as the implementation entity for the Act and oversees the development of the industry funding organizations to fulfill the stewardship obligations. For traditional recyclables generated from households, Stewardship Ontario was established in 2003 as the industry organization to fulfill responsibility for “Designated Blue Box Waste.” Stewardship Ontario is responsible for collecting fees from the approximately 2,000 stewards and then remitting funds to municipalities for their recycling programs.

14

APPENDIX 6.1  SUMMARY OF DEC FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS                 PROGRAM: HIGH TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE RECOVERY (HTRR) 
Authorizing Legislation: 1972 Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA); Section 51‐0905 of the ECL 

 

 

Summary: This program was created to assist local governments in the planning, design and  construction of municipal waste combustion (MWC) projects, also known as waste‐to‐energy plants,  and other associated solid waste management facilities, such as transfer stations and ash  management or disposal operations. A total of more than $217.6 million in EQBA funds were  originally dedicated to this purpose, including $169 million from the Solid Waste category and more  than $48.6 million from the Air Quality category.  Results: Applications from 25 municipalities totaling more than $215.4 million were originally  selected for funding.  (The remaining approximate $2.3 million was legislatively reassigned for use  toward statewide recycling projects.)    In time, several of these projects were either completed for less than originally estimated or were  discontinued.  The statute required DEC to review project status annually and recommend  reallocation where appropriate, with an emphasis on reallocating for small–scale, low‐technology  resource recovery approaches, such as new material recovery facilities or other recycling  investments.  More than $90 million of these funds were eventually reprogrammed‐‐$77 million for  recycling projects, nearly $11 million for other solid waste disposal/transfer projects, and $5 million  for waterfront revitalization.  Ultimately, this program provided more than $122.3 million in funding toward 19 high‐technology  resource recovery projects.    Status: Not active.

Program: Low Technology Resource Recovery (LTRR)/Municipal Recycling Grants Program (MRGP)    Authorizing Legislation: 1972 Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA); 1988 Solid Waste  Management Act  Summary: The Low Technology Resource Recovery (LTRR) Program was established in 1972 for use  to purchase small‐scale source‐separation equipment.  The initial appropriations were small ($3.2  million) but came at a time when municipalities were encouraged to begin recycling before source‐ separation programs were required.  With the passage of the 1988 Solid Waste Management Act’s  mandatory local source‐separation requirements and accompanying appropriations, the legislature  significantly enhanced the funding available for recycling equipment and facilities to assist  municipalities with the costs of new or expanded programs.    A total of more than $90.5 million was allocated from the following sources: approximately $3.3  million from the 1972 EQBA ($1 million original allocation and approximately $2.3 million through  reallocation); $6 million from the 1988 SWMA, and $81.2 million reallocation of HTRR funds  (generally earmarked for communities that did not use the full allocation of their original HTRR  funds, though some HTRR funding was reallocated for statewide purposes).   Results: The more than $90 million allocated for this program funded 265 recycling projects  between 1972 and 2008.  Typical projects included curbside collection containers, trucks to collect  recyclables, material recovery facilities, composting facilities and processing equipment.  These  investments helped make statewide source separation a reality. Of that $90 million, $67.5 million  was reassigned from the HTRR program to the following 13 municipalities for use on recycling  projects only in those municipalities:    ‐ Town of Brookhaven    $ 6,250,000  $ 1,520,941  $    280,256  $50,967,940  $  2,566,667  $     940,257  $     191,744  $     750,000  $     286,559  $  1,651,875  $  1,300,000  $       37,427 

‐ Town of North Hempstead   ‐ Town of Smithtown   ‐ New York City           

‐ Westchester County   ‐ Albany County    

‐ Oneida‐Herkimer SWMA     ‐ St. Lawrence County   ‐ Broome County     ‐ Monroe County          

‐ Western Finger Lakes SWMA   ‐ Chautauqua County    

‐ Erie County 

 

 

$  7,000,000 

An additional $7.533 million of that $90 million was reassigned from three original HTRR projects  (St. Lawrence County [$5.333 million], Town of Brookhaven [$2 million], and Western Finger Lakes  Solid Waste Management Authority [$0.2 million]to statewide recycling projects.  Status: Not active.                   

Program: Local Resource Reuse and Recovery Program (LRRRP) 

  Authorizing Legislation: Kansas Stripper Well Settlement (Chapter 615 of the laws of 1987,  Chapter 659 of the laws of 1989), Petroleum Overcharge Restitution Chapter 598 of the  laws of 1993), and Solid Waste Management Act (Chapter 70 of the laws of 1988)    Summary: The LRRRP was established to help municipalities meet the requirements  contained in the Solid Waste Management Act.  DEC structured the program to allow  grant funds to be used by local governments to help defray up to 75 percent of the costs  of recycling programs, including public education, information and outreach programs,  salaries of local recycling coordinators and waste reduction projects.  DEC granted  nearly $10 million through the program, including approximately $4 million in  petroleum overcharge funds from the Kansas Stripper Well Settlement and the  Petroleum Overcharge Restitution Act, along with $6 million from the Solid Waste  Management Act.    Results: In total, the LRRRP funded 101 projects between 1987 and 1994, for a total cost of  more than $9.9 million.  The program helped create 60 municipal recycling coordinator  positions, some of which have been sustained by municipalities and others with  additional funds through the Municipal Waste Reduction and Recycling program (see  below).      Although the results of the program were significant, funding was not sufficient to meet the  total statewide need.  Of the 135 applications received and reviewed against criteria  established for the program, 125 were determined to be eligible.  Funding requested by  the 125 applicants totaled nearly twice the available funding.      Status: Not active.

Program: Municipal Waste Reduction and Recycling State Assistance Program (MWRR)     Authorizing Legislation: Environmental Protection Act (chapters 610 and 611, laws of 1993);  Title 7 of Article 54 of the ECL, and 1996 Clean Water/Clean Air Bond Act       Summary: MWRR is the successor program to the LTRR/MRGP and LRRRP programs  described above.  It was established and has been funded annually as a part of the  Environmental Protection Fund (EPF), supplemented by $50 million from the 1996 Clean  Water/Clean Air Bond Act.      Through the MWRR program, DEC provides grants to cover 50 percent of the costs, to a  maximum of $2 million, of capital, planning and promotion for waste prevention and for  capital costs (equipment, structures and facilities) for recycling projects. In 2000, the  definition of “cost” was amended to also include planning, educational and promotional  activities associated with a recyclables recovery program.  This includes the cost of  recycling coordinator salaries.        The MWRR grant program is governed by regulations (Part 369) that include eligibility  criteria and dictate a “first‐in, first‐out” method of distribution.  Under the system,  municipalities submit pre‐applications to ensure eligibility and secure a place on the  waiting list.  As funds become available, DEC requests full applications in the order that  applicants appear on the waiting list and proceeds with contracts as appropriate.     Results: Since the inception of this program, $106.2 million, including more than $55 million  in funding from EPF, has been awarded to municipalities for 432 projects. Since the  expansion of eligibility under the EPF in 2000, it has funded education and coordination  activities in more than half of the planning units, representing more than 85 percent of  the state’s population.  See Table A for a breakdown of these projects.     Table A ‐  Funding From the EPF for Waste Reduction and Recycling    1993 ‐  2008    1993 –  2008  2000‐ 2008  2000‐ 20 08    

($) Recycling equipment & facilities  15.9  milli on  10.2  milli on  21.3  milli on  7.9  milli on 

(%) 28.8%  7.6 

($) 

(%) 19.0% 

milli on  18.4%  7.7  milli on  38.5%  21.3  milli on  3.5  milli on  53.1%  19.2% 

Composting equipment &  facilities 

Recycling education &  coordination 

Waste reduction equipment &  education 

14.3% 

8.7% 

  As of December 31, 2008, 105 projects totaling  a little more than $36 million in pre‐ applications were on the waiting list.  At the average funding level appropriated for this  program during the last two years, this represents approximately three years of waiting.   The projects include:    ‐   82 for recycling equipment, structures and facility projects ($24.5 million)  ‐   22 for recycling education and coordination projects ($11.1 million)  ‐     1 waste reduction project ($0.4 million)    Status: Active.   

Program: Local Solid Waste Management Planning Grant Program    Authorizing Legislation: Solid Waste Management Act    Summary: In 1988, through the Solid Waste Management Act, the legislature appropriated  $7.5 million for a grant program to assist local governments in developing solid waste  management plans.  The plans were expected to implement the solid waste  management hierarchy and ensure environmentally sound and integrated programs  that include waste reduction, reuse and recycling, with ultimate disposal for remaining  waste.    Results: Planning grants were available to cover 90 percent of the costs of preparing a local  solid waste management plan (LSWMP), up to a maximum of $1 per capita or $25,000,  whichever was greater.  DEC received 50 applications requesting a total of $14.9 million.   With the limited grant money available, DEC funded the first 36 projects before funds  were completely obligated by November 1992.  Because no new money was  appropriated for this program, $7.4 million in eligible applications were never funded.    For more on LSWMPs, see Section 5.           Status: Not active.   

Program: Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) State Assistance Program     Authorizing Legislation: 1993 Environmental Protection Act (ECL, Title 7 of Article 54)    Summary: The HHW State Assistance Program provides up to 50 percent reimbursement to  municipalities, to a maximum of $2 million, for the costs related to collection programs  for household hazardous waste.  From 1995 through 2007, program payments have  averaged just under $2 million per year.      The program reimburses municipalities for costs of operating household hazardous waste  collection day programs, as well as costs to construct and operate permitted household  hazardous waste collection and storage facilities.  Eligible costs include: contractor costs  to accept, segregate, prepare for shipment, transport, and recycle, treat, or dispose of  the collected wastes; operational costs for a permitted facility, and costs for publicity,  promotion, and public education.  Collection and disposal of certain items that are  routinely collected by HHW programs but are not, in fact, hazardous (e.g., latex paint  and electronic waste), are not eligible expenses in the program.  When communities  choose to continue collecting these materials due to popular demand, state  reimbursement does not cover a full 50 percent of the program costs.       Results: As of December 31, 2008, DEC had awarded 461 HHW assistance contracts valued  at nearly $30.2 million to 80 municipalities.  Since the program’s inception, the number  of collection events in the state has doubled to serve more than 60 municipalities per  year, and 11 permitted HHW drop‐off facilities have been established.  These municipal  programs have collected, in aggregate,  more than 125 million pounds of HHW since the  HHW State Assistance Program began, with five times as much HHW collected today as  in 1993, amounting to about 8.5 percent of all HHW generated in the state.   During the  same period, costs were reduced by 67 percent.  On average, HHW program costs,  including outreach, education and disposal, are $720 per ton. (For more information on  HHW, see Section 4.2.3).    Status: Active.

Program: Municipal Landfill Closure Program    Authorizing Legislation: 1986 Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA); 1993 Environmental  Protection Act, and 1996 Clean Water/Clean Air Bond Act    Summary: This program provides funding to assist in proper closure of non‐hazardous,  municipallyowned landfills.  Initially funded with $100 million from the 1986  Environmental Quality Bond Act (EQBA), the program provides reimbursement of 50  percent of a municipality’s costs (90 percent for those municipalities with populations of  less than 3,500) for proper landfill closure, up to a maximum of $2 million.  To be  eligible, the landfill must have completed a Closure Investigation Report and must be  closed, or be required to close, within 18 months of the municipality’s state‐assistance  application.      The 1996 Clean Water/Clean Air (CW/CA) Bond Act provided $75 million specifically  dedicated to closure of the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, with additional funding  to be granted through an application process. Money has continued to be available  through annual appropriations from the EPF.  As of early 2009, 226 landfill closure  projects had been completed and nine applications, for a total of $10 million, were on  the waiting list.  Funding for this program has decreased significantly  during the past  three years: only $3 million in FY ‘07‐’08; no appropriations in FY ’08‐’09, and only  $750,000 in FY ‘09‐’10.  This program shares a funding line in the EPF with the Municipal  Landfill Gas Management State Assistance Program, described below, so these  allocations fund both programs.      Results: As noted in the 1987 State Solid Waste Management Plan, in June 1986, there were  358 active landfills in New York State.  Since 1986, $307.5 million in funding has been  awarded for 254 closure projects, including: $100 million from the 1986 EQBA; $121.5  million from the CW/CA Bond Act, and $86 million from the Environmental Protection  Fund (EPF).  As of December 31, 2008, 226 of these projects have been completed.      Status: Active

Program: Municipal Landfill Gas Management State Assistance Program      Authorizing Legislation: ECL Article 54, Title 5, and Article 56, Title 4; 1993 Environmental  Protection Act, and 1996 Clean Water/Clean Air Bond Act    Summary: The landfill gas management program was established in 1996 to promote  improved air quality and to encourage energy recovery from landfill gas. Through this  program, municipal owners or operators of non‐hazardous waste landfills that have  incurred costs associated with the design and construction of an active landfill gas  collection and treatment system  can receive reimbursement of up to 50 percent of  eligible costs, to a maximum of $2 million dollars per project.      Results: Since 1996, $12.3 million in funding has been awarded for 12 landfill gas  management projects.  This total includes: $3.5 million from the Clean Water/Clean Air  Bond Act and $8.8 million from the EPF.  As of December 31, 2008, 4 applications  totaling $8 million remained on the waiting list.      Status: Active 
 

APPENDIX 6.2    HISTORY OF ESD FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND PROGRAMS 
 
In 1987, the Petroleum Overcharge Restitution Act allocated $1 million to Empire State  Development (ESD) to establish “a secondary materials utilization program.”  The legislation  recognized that the amount of solid waste generated in the state was outstripping existing reuse,  recycling and disposal capacity, and that industry reliance on virgin rather than secondary materials  wasted energy that could be conserved with the adoption of secondary materials technologies by  NYS firms.  To implement the program, ESD created the Office of Recycling Market Development  (ORMD).  In 1988, Article 14 of Economic Development Law extended the powers and responsibilities of ESD  to provide financial and technical assistance to build market‐driven capacity to recycle solid waste  materials.  In 1998, Article 14 (sections 260‐264) was expanded to add pollution prevention to  ongoing recycling market development responsibilities and directed ESD to assist businesses with  the development of new technologies and capital investments to expand commercial recycling  capacity, reduce waste and prevent pollution at the point of generation.  ESD was authorized to  provide feasibility studies, technical assistance, public education and recycling market information  to further the development and efficiency of market‐driven recycling and pollution prevention in  New York.    Despite the broad market‐development mandate, early funding was scant.  From 1987 through  1993, ORMD implemented two key programs to facilitate recycling market development:  • Feasibility Study Grants of up to $100,000 (later raised to $200,000) were offered on a  competitive basis to NYS firms to evaluate recycling technologies, processes, systems or  products manufactured from recycled materials.    Recycling Technology Financing (direct loans or interest subsidies) was offered competitively  for the construction of recycling facilities or the acquisition of related machinery and  equipment. 

Through 1993, ORMD awarded nearly $2 million in feasibility study grants, committed $1.4 million in  loans and interest subsidies, and directed an additional $36 million in loans, interest subsidies and  loan guarantees from the Urban Development Corporation and the NYS Job Development Authority  for recycling market development projects.    During this period, ORMD initiated several programs to address specific barriers to recycling  adoption.  Through the Business Waste Prevention Program in 1992, ESD contracted with trade  associations and business service organizations to help businesses achieve waste reduction and  recycling outcomes.  ORMD supported the creation of three recycling market cooperatives, through  which groups of municipalities marketed their recyclables as a single entity to obtain better prices to  support their operating costs.  ORMD established the NY Newspaper Recycling Task Force in the 

early 1990s to persuade newspaper publishers to voluntarily convert to recycled newsprint, thereby  creating a major new market outlet for recycled paper.   

 
ENVIRONMENTAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM  Funding to support the ORMD mandate improved significantly with passage of the New York State  Environmental Protection Act in 1993, creating the Environmental Protection Fund (EPF) as a  dedicated fund to support recycling and other environmental initiatives. Beginning in 1994, ESD  received annual allocations from the EPF.  With a reliable source of funds to support the legislative  mandate, ESD created the Recycling Investment Program (RIP).    In 1998, with the legislative expansion of ESD’s investment authority to include pollution prevention,  the Recycling Investment Program became the Environmental Investment Program (EIP), and ORMD  became the Environmental Services Unit.  The current mission of EIP is to assist New York State  business investment in sustainable production through market‐based recycling, pollution prevention  and the development of new green products and process technologies.  EIP assists projects that  result in substantive improvements to environmental quality and associated economic benefits.    Environmental improvements may be achieved through:  • • • Expanded recycling capacity (which includes reuse, remanufacturing and composting) and  diversion of solid waste from disposal to higher‐value uses  Pollution prevention and waste reduction below regulated thresholds  Sustainable product and technology development and implementation (which must deliver  measurable improvements to environmental quality when compared to existing products  and technologies in the marketplace) 

Associated economic benefits may include:  • • • Cost reductions from improved productivity and reduced regulatory, operating or  purchasing costs  Increased revenues from expanded production output or new product development   Job creation and retention 

EIP assists three types of projects:  • Capital projects assist in the acquisition of machinery and equipment and improvements to  building, property, and infrastructure directly associated with the environmental outcomes  achieved by NYS businesses.  Non‐profit organizations or municipalities apply on behalf of  NYS businesses.  Research, development and demonstration projects answer final questions standing  between product/process prototypes and their commercialization or implementation and  are available to New York State businesses or non‐profit organizations. 

Technical assistance projects assist non‐profit organizations or municipalities that help  groups of NYS businesses to achieve measurable recycling, pollution prevention or  sustainability outcomes. 

EIP operates as an outcome‐based funding program, and applications are reviewed competitively on  multiple criteria, including: how well they compare to EIP investment benchmarks for recycling,  pollution prevention and sustainability outcomes; associated economic benefits; return on  investment; ability of the applicant to successfully complete the project, and the amount of private  investment leveraged by the EIP award.  Applicants must achieve environmentally significant and  measurable results to receive funds.  EIP establishes investment priorities annually based on areas of greatest need and inefficiency in the  marketplace and identifies specific strategies within each priority that receive highest consideration  during competitive review.  In Fiscal Year 2008/09, EIP investment priorities included paper, plastic,  glass, tires, construction and demolition debris/building materials reuse, food processing waste and  industrial pollution prevention.    EIP investment benchmarks grow more diversified and competitive as investment experience  accumulates.  For example, applications that seek to install plastic processing capacity are compared  to all prior plastic processing projects on a per‐ton basis to assess the amount of public investment  needed to induce new processing capacity and the degree of value added to the material by the  process.  Industrial process changes that reduce the generation of SOx and NOx are compared on a  dollars‐per‐ton basis with prior air emission reduction projects.  Applications are also compared to  similar historic projects for the degree of economic benefit they will achieve.    Since 1994, EIP has received $84.3 million in appropriations from EPF.  In recent years (prior to the  fiscal crisis), annual appropriations from the EPF were sustained at $8.75 million, which was  consistent with the level of commercial interest and need for investment in recycling market  development and sustainable production.  However, actual authorization to spend these funds has  lagged behind the appropriations.  As of 2009, ESD spending authorization stands at $62.08 million,  of which ESD has committed $59.74 million and earmarked the remaining $2.34 million to projects  that successfully completed the competitive review process.  EIP staff continue to work with a  significant and growing backlog of additional projects awaiting competitive review once new  spending authorization is granted for the balance of unspent appropriations.    From 1994 through 2008, EIP committed $59.74 million to 399 projects that leveraged $221.05  million in private sector support.  Appendix 6.2.1 provides aggregated economic and environmental  benefits achieved by all ESD environmental investments from 1987 through 2008, grouped by  investment priority areas.  In total these projects have:  • • • • Established new capacity to recycle 3.329 million tons/year of secondary materials  Developed the capacity to recycle 421 million gallons/year of water for beneficial uses   Helped to create or retain nearly 4,800 jobs   Created a recurring economic benefit estimated at $279.63 million per year 

  6.2.3  Pollution Prevention Partnerships 

After the enabling statute expanded its investment authority to include pollution prevention, ESD  sought project development partners that could work directly with manufacturing facilities to  identify pollution prevention projects.  Firms receiving assistance must  comply with all DEC  regulations, and the projects must reduce pollution below regulated thresholds through changes to  the manufacturing process or product formulation.  Pollution prevention (P2) projects must also be  costeffective, ultimately saving the manufacturer more money than they invest through reduced  regulatory, disposal, energy and input costs, coupled with new revenue through expanded  production and improved product quality.  ESD found a ready partnership in the ten Regional Technology Development Corporations (RTDCs),  whose mission is to work directly with small and mid‐sized manufacturers to adopt enhanced  production methods that yield greater productivity and competitiveness.  Adding the  competitiveness benefits of pollution prevention to the RTDC tool kit was a natural next step.   Through EIP, ESD has contracted with multiple RTDCs to deliver on‐site P2 project development  assistance to manufacturers in their regions.  Through these RTDC contracts, EIP has assisted more  than 252 small and mid‐sized manufacturers to adopt sustainable production practices that enhance  their competitiveness and improve NYS environmental quality.  ESD recognized that the RTDCs could deliver greater P2 outcomes if they had more sophisticated  evaluation tools and technical support to research potential solutions.  In 2006, ESD contracted with  the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), Center for Integrated Manufacturing Studies (CIMS) to  create a prototype Pollution Prevention Institute.  ESD directed RIT‐CIMS to develop P2 diagnostic  tools for the RTDCs to use in manufacturing site evaluations. ESD asked RIT to provide training and  technical support to RTDC field staff to enhance the environmental impact and competitiveness of  the P2 projects they developed.  This project married the research and development capacity at RIT  with the technology delivery capacity of the RTDCs to create a comprehensive network for advanced  technology diffusion.  As manufacturers remain essential to economic vitality, helping them to adopt  the most sustainable and competitive practices enhances both environmental quality and economic  growth.    Recognizing the value of the approach embodied in the RIT/RTDC partnership, in 2007 the state  created a dedicated line within the EPF to channel more significant resources to create a state  Pollution Prevention Institute(P2I).  Subsequent to a DEC‐led competitive bid process, the P2I  contract was awarded to a consortium led by RIT and included the University of Buffalo, Clarkson  University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the RTDCs.  ESD continues to work with the P2I on  projects that enhance sustainable production methods that support the competitiveness of  manufacturing in New York to ESD for funding.   

   

6.2.4 

Market Information Resources 

ESD manages the Recycling Markets Database, which provides information about intermediate and  end‐use markets for recyclable materials.  The database is searchable online and available to the  public at: (http://www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle).  It helps generators locate outlets for materials  that can be reused, recycled or composted and helps end users access the raw materials they need  to make new products.  The database enables searches by material type and geographic regions for  brokers, processors, manufacturers, compost facilities, reuse organizations and other recycling‐ related services in the Northeast and Canada.    ESU project managers maintain special expertise within various recycling, pollution prevention and  sustainability sectors that reflect EIP investment priorities.  Their expertise incorporates an  understanding of market forces and technology driving viable business options, as well as networks  of operators, regulators and stakeholders that contribute to business development in their various  areas.     6.2.5  Pollution Prevention and Compliance Assistance 

Since 1994, the Small Business Environmental Ombudsman (SBEO), an integral program of the ESU,  has helped small firms understand their regulatory and reporting responsibilities under the Clean Air  Act amendments and advocates on their behalf when regulation and enforcement become an  undue impediment to business operation.  In 2005, the Small Business Pollution Prevention and  Environmental Compliance Assistance Program extended ESD responsibilities to encourage  enhanced environmental management practices through all of ESD regional incentive projects.  ESD  assists business through the full spectrum of environmental responsibility, from compliance with  regulation to voluntary actions that achieve recycling, pollution prevention and sustainable  production methods.    ESD participates in the work of the Pollution Prevention/Compliance Assistance Council, chaired by  DEC, which helps coordinate various environmental programs offered by DEC, EFC, ESD, NYSERDA  and NYSTAR and strengthens the comprehensive offering of compliance through sustainability  services to business. 

             

       

   

 

 

 
   

EXPLANATION OF TABLE AND TERMS USED 

This table summarizes the investments in recycling, pollution prevention and sustainable product  and process projects made by Empire State Development’s Environmental Services Unit via various  programs (including the Environmental Investment Program, the Recycling Investment Program, the  Waste Tire Management Fund and the Secondary Materials Utilization Program) since 1987.  ESU  makes investments at or on behalf of private sector businesses in New York State.  The majority of  the investments have been made via the Recycling Investment Program and the subsequent  Environmental Investment Program enabled by the NYS Environmental Protection Act in 1993.  Prior  to 1998, ESU was called the Office of Recycling Market Development.    TPY     = Tons Per Year  SW       =  Solid Waste  MGPY = Millions of Gallons Per Year  Priority Investment Area ‐ Each year, ESU establishes a set of investment priority areas.  These are  areas determined to be in greatest need of improvement and support. The set of investment priority  areas changes somewhat so that not every priority investment area in this column is part of the  current set.  Some, however, like paper, plastics and glass, have always been on the list.  ESU also  identifies specific strategies within each priority area that receive highest consideration during  competitive review.  This also changes so that not every strategy or item described within each  priority investment area is part of the current focus. All ESU investments made or committed since  1987 fall into one of these investment priority areas.  ESD Investment ‐ This represents the total amount committed to or expended for projects  supported by ESU (and ORMD) programs.  There are three main types of investments: those that  assist the private sector with the acquisition of machinery and equipment for pollution prevention,  reuse, recycling and/or sustainable products and processes; research and development to help NYS  businesses answer questions that will lead directly to pollution prevention, increased recycling or  reuse, or the manufacture of sustainable products or adoption of sustainable processes, and those  that support the provision of technical assistance to businesses to help with the adoption of  pollution prevention, reuse or recycling practices.    Private Sector Investment ‐ This represents the total amount of private sector support for projects  leveraged by ESU Investments.  ESU commitments require substantial matching funds.  TOTAL ‐ ESU Investment plus Private Sector Investment    Annual Economic Benefit Results or Committed ‐ ESU projects are performance based.  Contractors  (except research and development contractors) must set and achieve measurable environmental  improvements and economic benefits to receive support. Economic benefits are expressed in annual  rates (dollars per year) and are defined as the additional revenue (usually from the sale of a recycled  product or feedstock) and/or savings accruing to one or more New York State companies as a result  of the project.  Savings generally comprise avoided disposal costs, avoided purchasing costs and/or  other operational savings related to resource conservation or efficiency improvements.  Contractors  must verify that a specific annual rate of new economic benefit has been attained by the end of a 

project.  Figures in this column are the sum of the annual rates of economic benefit attained by  completed projects and those estimated by projects currently under contract or in the contracting  process.    Rates attained when projects were completed are assumed to be recurring.  Because of staffing and  resource shortages, ESU has never implemented a process to verify that the economic benefits  attained at project completion have continued, been exceeded or have lapsed years later.  ESU’s research and development projects are performance based but are implemented differently  than others described here. Because they focus on resolving barriers and answering questions, R&D  projects do not yield measurable economic benefits that can be counted in this section (benefits  come later when investments are made to apply lessons learned from the research).  Therefore,  while ESU investment, private sector investment and total investment in R&D projects are captured  in the columns to the left, because they cannot be easily quantified, benefits from ESU’s R&D  investments are underrepresented in this column.   Environmental Improvement Results or Committed ‐ Environmental improvements that result from   ESU projects may take many forms.  In cases where ESU assists with the installation of new recycling  machinery or equipment, environmental improvement is expressed as the rated recycling capacity  (in tons per year or TPY) of that machinery or equipment.  Also captured for all ESU projects (those  that assist with acquisition of new recycling capacity, those that prompt new recycling, reuse or  prevention practices via business outreach as well as research projects) are the tons of material  recycled, reused or prevented as a result of the project.  Contractors must verify that a specific  environmental improvement, expressed as an annual rate, usually TPY, has been attained by the end  of a project.  For example, a project to install a new plastics recycling system must verify the  installed capacity of the new system and must also verify by the close of the project that the system  is up, running and successfully recycling X tons per year. Likewise, a local business assistance  organization that helps 20 firms integrate new waste prevention practices must verify that X tons  per year or gallons per year of material (solid waste, hazardous waste, air emissions or water) has  been reduced or recycled as a result of the project.  Materials measured in tons per year (TPY) are solid waste, hazardous waste (prevented or reused  within the same production process), hazardous materials (manufacturing feedstocks that are  prevented as a result of the project) and air emissions, including BOD, COD, TSS, NOx, SOx, CO2,  VOCs, HAPs and others.  Process water that is prevented, reused or recycled is expressed in millions  of gallons per year (MGPY).  This column also captures the number of jobs created or retained in New York State as a result of  the projects in this priority investment area.  Also captured is the number of companies assisted  from multi‐firm projects.  Environmental improvements achieved when projects were completed are assumed to be recurring.   Because of staffing and resource shortages, ESU has never implemented a process to verify that the  environmental improvements attained or achieved at the time a project was completed have  continued, lapsed or been exceeded years later. 

 

APPENDIX 7.1    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON ORGANIC MATERIALS MANAGEMENT  IN NEW YORK 
 

  1. YARD WASTE COMPOSTING 
Some of the larger yard waste composting facilities are noted on the following map. This map, along  with information about each of the sites can be found at:  http://compost.css.cornell.edu/maps/yardwaste.asp   
 

     

Under New York’s Part 360 regulations, smaller (less than 10,000 cubic yards per year) yard waste  composting facilities are not required to obtain a permit. Of the yard waste composting facilities  that exist in the state, 37 have a permit to operate and are listed in the following table.   

 

Facility Name 

County 

Size (cubic  yards/y ear)    38,000  81,000  20,000  22,000  7,000  20,000  20,000 

  City of Albany  Town of Bethlehem  Town of Colonie  Soundview Park  Village of Endicott  City of Beacon  West Hook Sand &  Gravel  Town of Amherst  Town of Brighton  Town of Greece  Village of Garden City  Oneida‐Herkimer  SWMA  Town of New Hartford  Miller Murphy  Construction  Organic Recycling LLC 

  Albany  Albany  Albany  Bronx  Broome  Dutchess  Dutchess 

Erie  Monroe  Monroe  Nassau  Oneida 

85,000  20,800  45,000  21,000  100,000 

Oneida  Onondaga 

19,000  35,000 

Orange 

325,000 

City of Port Jervis  NYC Dept of Sanitation  Clarkstown – French  Farms  Clarkstown – Rte 59  Organic Recycling LLC  Rockland County SWMA City of Saratoga Springs  Town of Clifton Park  Town of Rotterdam  Schenectady County  Bistrian Gravel Corp.  Town of Brookhaven  Holtsville Park  Town of Islip  Town of Southold  Custom Compost, Inc.  High Acres  Town of Bedford  Town of Eastchester  Town of Harrison 

Orange  Richmond  Rockland 

19,000  50,000  38,000 

Rockland  Rockland  Rockland  Saratoga  Saratoga  Schenectady  Schenectady  Suffolk  Suffolk  Suffolk  Suffolk  Suffolk  Ulster  Wayne  Westchester  Westchester  Westchester 

120,000  110,000  12,000  49,000  60,000  15,000  86,000  5,065  35,000  18,500  200,000  42,000  68,000  70,000  27,000  17,000  50,000 

                                                               

Town of Mount  Pleasant  City of White Plains 

Westchester 

20,000 

Westchester 

38,000 

2. FOOD SCRAPS SOURCES 
There are many sources for food waste. The major sources can be grouped in the following  categories based on the type of generator. NOTE: Additional maps and more detailed information  on individual generators can be found athttp://wastetoenergy.bee.cornell.edu/default.htm    • Industrial – includes primarily food processors. New York State has many dairy processors,  fruit and vegetable processors, and wine‐making operations. The following map shows the  locations of food processors. Most of these processors currently recycle their food wastes  through use as animal feed, direct land application, composting and anaerobic digestion. 

 

Institutional – includes schools, colleges, universities, correctional facilities, and     similar  generators. State‐operated correctional facilities have very active composting systems in  place—more than 40 sites. A few higher education institutions compost food waste, but the  practice has not yet become common. Key: Pink = colleges, Blue = correctional facilities 

   

          

•   •

Commercial – includes restaurants, grocery stores, fast food restaurants, and similar retail  establishments. Very limited food waste recycling activity  results from these generators.  

Residential – includes homes, apartments, etc. This is a plentiful food waste source but can  present obstacles to recycling. The only large‐scale recycling system for residential waste in  New York State is the Delaware County Co‐Composting Facility, which accepts a mixed‐ waste stream, including food waste for composting. 

                   

3. FOOD BANKS 
New York State is fortunate to have very active programs to feed the poor and hungry in all  counties. Food banks serve a crucial role, providing for the collection of edible food and monetary  contributions and the distribution of assets to hundreds of member agencies, including food  pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters for the homeless, residential programs, and other  entities serving needy people. The following figure depicts the members of America’s Second  Harvest in New York State, primarily food banks. In addition to food banks, there are many other  community‐based donation systems in place. 
                                                   

   

One of the food banks shown in the figure is the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York  (Regional Food Bank). This food bank distributes food to 23 counties in eastern New York. The  amount of food (in pounds) distributed to each of these counties in 2006 is as follows: 
 

                         

Albany ‐ 3,066,381  Clinton ‐ 308,886  Columbia ‐ 271,394  Delaware ‐ 119,482  Dutchess ‐ 1,341,502  Essex ‐ 206,797   Franklin ‐ 1,232,096  Fulton ‐ 157,878  Greene ‐ 235,115  Hamilton ‐ 26,299 

                   

                     

Otsego ‐ 638,126  Putnam ‐ 488,749  Rensselaer ‐ 1,327,901  Rockland ‐ 1,528,934  Saratoga ‐ 745,281 

 

 

Schenectady ‐ 1,524,394  Schoharie ‐ 206,748  Sullivan ‐ 772,204  Ulster ‐ 1,567,522  Warren ‐ 981,945  Washington ‐ 173,717 

Montgomery ‐ 311,857    Orange ‐ 2,434,746 

The Regional Food Bank provides food to more than1,000 agencies which assist almost 200,000  people each year. The Regional Food Bank collects wholesale food from food companies, fresh  produce, food in damaged packaging, and individual donations from various sources. One program  that may be very useful in terms of expanding food diversion is the Moveable Feast. The Moveable  Feast, run by the Regional Food Bank, collects donations of prepared and perishable food from  grocery stores, restaurants, schools, and farm stands and delivers it directly to member agencies. 
                         

4. BIOSOLIDS MANAGEMENT IN NEW YORK STATE (DRY‐WEIGHT BASIS) 

1% 25% 48% 26%
Other Incineration Landfill Recycling

Beneficial use options include direct land application, composting, alkaline stabilization, and heat drying.  The figures below depict the breakdown of beneficial use methods, based on quantity of biosolids and  number of treatment facilities. On a dry‐weight basis, most beneficial use involves heat drying and use of  the resultant pellets as a fertilizer. There are only two heat dryers in the state compared to 27 composting  facilities, but the heat dryer located in New York City is so large that it treats about one‐third of the  biosolids beneficially used.   

19% 24%

20%

Land Apply Heat Drying

9% 40% 40%

Land Apply Heat Drying Composting Chem Stab.

37%

Composting Chem Stab.

11%

       Biosolids Beneficial Use                                                     Dry‐Weight Basis                                                     Biosolids Beneficial Use     By Number of POTWs 

There are 57 permitted, biosolids, beneficial use facilities in New York State, including 27  composting facilities, 25 direct land application facilities, 2 heat drying facilities, and 3 alkaline  stabilization facilities. These facilities are listed in the DEC Biosolids Report, which can be accessed  on the department’s website. These 57 permitted facilities receive biosolids from 147 POTWs. 
     

5. OTHER – CARCASSES, MANURE, ETC. 
The map below shows the location of manure composting facilities in New York State. 
   

   

This map is found on Cornell’s website at: http://compost.css.cornell.edu/maps/manures.asp,   which also has links to information about each site.  
   

   

APPENDIX 7.2   VEHICLE DISMANTLING FACILITIES (VDFS) 
  OVERVIEW/STATE OF THE STATE 
On July 26, 2006, Chapter 180 of the Laws of 2006 created Article 27 Title 23: Vehicle Dismantling  Facilities (VDFs).  This law expands the solid waste management requirements for facilities that  dismantle end‐of‐life vehicles (ELVs) and generate used vehicle fluids and other materials such as  mercury switches, PCB capacitors, etc.  Previously, such facilities were exempt from solid waste  permitting requirements under 6 NYCRR Part 360, provided they submitted an annual fluids report.   Under the new law, VDFs are required to submit detailed annual reports and comply with  management practices that are protective of the environment.  
FIGURE 1: NUMBER OF VDF FACILITIES 

 
Vehicle Dismantling Facilities, by Region
Reporting Facilities
250

         
117

Facilities listed in SWIMS Database Total Facilities in SWIMS: 993 215

200

191

150

112
100

83 50 50

86

83 71 55 38 37 70 64 48

92 79

         

50

0 Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Region 9

FIGURE 2: VDF BREAKDOWN BY ELVS RECEIVED   
VDF Size Distribution by Annual Throughput - 2007
Greater than 5000 ELVs 16 facilities

 

1000 to 5000 ELVs 64 facilities

500 to 1000 ELVs 46 facilities

Less than 25 ELVs 146 facilities

100 to 500 ELVs 158 facilities

25 to 100 ELVs 85 facilities ELVs Received: 399,218
No response from facility: 33

    FIGURE 3: ELVS RECEIVED BY SIZE OF VDF 
ELVs Received, by VDF Size Groupings
Less than 25 ELVs 817 0% 25 to 100 ELVs 4,988 1% 100-500 ELVs 40,839 10% 500-1000 ELVs 34,110 8%

   

       

Greater than 5000 ELVs 189,704 46%

1000-5000 ELVs 144,460 35%

   

VDFs are located in each region of the state, and regional inspectors perform VDF  inspections in addition to their other solid waste responsibilities.  The multi‐media nature of  these facilities often leads to the involvement of other DEC divisions, most notably the  Division of Environmental Remediation.  The data submitted in the required VDF annual reports for 2007, the first full year in which  Article 27, Title 23 was enforceable, have been summarized in DEC’s report, which is  available on the website http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/58165.htmlOf the 993 VDFs  currently listed in the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) database, 548  facilities (55 percent) submitted annual reports.  See Figure 1. Almost 400,000 vehicles were  reported recycled in New York State in 2007. 

  FACILITY SIZE 
Data indicate that almost half of VDFs are small operators taking in less than 100 ELVs per  year. (See Figure 2.)  High numbers of small facilities increase the difficulty and expense of  inspection, compliance enhancement, and enforcement.  In areas where low‐throughput,  high‐storage area facilities are located, department staff focus on facilities’ leak inspection  procedures, continuing leak observation procedures and timely decommissioning of ELVs  because long storage times could lead to increased soil and water contamination in the  storage areas.    Data also suggest that the majority of ELVs are handled by a few high‐throughput facilities.   (See Figure 3.)  The top 16 facilities of the 548 that reported handle 46 percent of New  York’s ELVs, while the top 80 facilities handle 81 percent.  Clearly, increased focus on  compliance and operating procedures at these high‐throughput facilities could lead to  increased material collection volumes and compliance rates on a per‐car basis.  High‐ throughput facilities are directed toward improved and enhanced decommissioning  operating procedures to maximize fluids and material recovery.  High‐throughput facilities  are located in almost every region; however, most operate in regions 2 and 9. 

   

  STORAGE TIME 
Annual report data indicate that during 2007, the number of ELVs stored at dismantling  facilities did not increase significantly.  DEC concludes that favorable economic conditions  and scrap metal markets drove this condition of high throughput and low storage buildup.   However, since mid‐2008, the vehicle dismantling industry has seen huge drops in scrap  metal values.  Falling scrap values may lead dismantlers to store vehicles for longer periods  with the hope of increasing prices.  Longer storage times will increase the potential of  environmental impact from spilled automotive fluids, especially if fluids are not removed  from vehicles soon after receipt.  Further, lower profit margins may lead some dismantlers  to improperly store or handle ELVs and/or automotive residuals to reduce operating costs.   Lower scrap values may lead to improper storage and handling of end‐of‐life vehicles and  related environmental impacts across the state. 

APPENDIX 7.3    WASTE TIRE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING ACT IMPLEMENTATION     
    BACKGROUND 
To ensure the proper management of waste tires in New York State, the legislature enacted the  “Waste Tire Management and Recycling Act,” which became effective on September 12, 2003.  The  act established waste tire management priorities for the state, created a Waste Tire Management  and Recycling Fund derived from a recycling fee of $2.50 on each new tire sold, and required DEC to  prepare a comprehensive plan designed to abate all non‐compliant waste tire stockpiles in New York  State by December 31, 2010.  Consistent with the requirements of the act, DEC released the New York State Waste Tire Stockpile  Abatement Plan (Plan) in August 2004.  This Plan established the framework to eliminate all non‐ compliant waste tire stockpiles in the state by the statutory deadline using a combination of  voluntary site owner/operator effort and DEC actions, should the site owners/operators fail to abate  the non‐compliant waste tire stockpiles in a timely manner.  The Tire Management and Recycling Act also required the NYS Department of Economic  Development (dba Empire State Development, ESD) to prepare an annual analysis of markets and  market trends for New York State’s annually generated waste tires and to implement a  comprehensive program to expand value‐added markets for those tires. 
Waste Tire Stockpile Abatement Program Status 

In August 2004, there were an estimated 29 million waste tires stockpiled in 95 sites throughout the  state. A priority list for abatement of each stockpile was developed by establishing criteria to assess  potential adverse impacts on public health, safety or welfare, the environment, or natural resources.   Since then, 51 additional non‐compliant waste tire stockpiles have been identified, bringing the total  to an estimated 36.3 million waste tires stockpiled at 146 non‐compliant sites.    Since 2004, 16 contracts for the cleanup of 14 larger waste tire stockpiles have been issued by the  Office of General Services (OGS) on behalf of DEC.  To date, of those 14 waste tire stockpiles, 11  have been completely cleaned, and work is underway at the remaining 3 sites.  In addition, OGS  issued three regional contracts for cleanup of the smaller waste tire stockpiles for which the state  has had to assume abatement responsibility. Currently these contracts include provision for 33  waste tire stockpiles.  Of these stockpiles, 21 have been completely abated. 

 

In addition to the direct efforts of the state, approximately two million tires at 78 sites have been  cleaned up by the owner/operator as a result of enforcement actions taken by DEC.  Of those 78  sites, at least 62 have been completely cleaned up by the owner/operator. 

 
TABLE 1  SUMMARY OF SCRAP TIRE ABATEMENT ACTIVITIES 

 

# of  Sites 

# of Tires 

# of Tires  Removed 

# of Tires  Remaining  on Sites 

% of Total  Tires  Cleaned Up   24%  43% 

Cleaned Up by State  Cleanup by State in  Progress  Cleaned Up by  Responsible Parties  Cleanup by  Responsible Parties in  Progress  Remaining to be  Addressed  Total   

33  3 

8,543,555  18,922,400 

 8,543,555  15,377,441 

              0  3,544,959 

62 

1,177,981 

 1,177,981 

              0 

3% 

16 

1,567,472 

    771,894 

   795,578 

2% 

32 

5,749,600 

               0 

5,749,600 

0% 

146 

35,961,008 

25,870,871 

10,090,137 

72% 

The vast majority of tires removed by the state through the scrap tire abatement program were  processed into a product and used in a number of beneficial applications.  The largest uses were in  landfill construction and operation and in road construction activities in cooperation with DOT and  the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA).  

           

TABLE 2  SUMMARY OF SCRAP TIRE ABATEMENT TIRE USE 

 
  # of Tires    14,1758,296  5,140,100  1,196,000  3,426,600  23,920,996 

Landfill Use  DOT & NYSTA Road Construction (7 projects)  Crumb Rubber Processor   Whole Tires Removed for Processing  Total 

 
Total costs for the abatement portion of the program charged to the Waste Tire Management and  Recycling Fund (Fund) by December 31, 2008 was approximately $81 million.  This includes  $8,350,000 sub‐allocated by DEC to ESD for market research and development activities and  $3,820,000 sub‐allocated to DOT for use for their road construction efforts.   

 
Waste Tire Market Analysis 

As in previous years, 2006 markets for New York State‐generated scrap tires were relatively  diversified and strong.  R.W. Beck documented the flows of 203,528 tons (which equals 20.3 million  passenger tire equivalents or PTE) of scrap tires generated in New York in 2006.   The 2008 market  analysis update indicated that by 2006 (the year on which the report focused),   a little more than 80  percent of all tires generated annually in NYS flowed to in‐state, end‐use markets.  The remainder  flowed to other states and Canada.  In general, use of NYS annually generated tires in tire‐derived  fuel and ground rubber applications steadily grew, while use in tire‐derived aggregate applications  and, to a lesser degree, other recycling steadily declined.  Ground rubber grew from the fourth‐ largest use in 2003 to the second‐largest use in 2006, more than doubling in size.  Reuse has held  steady.             

COMPARISON OF 2003 – 2006 NEW YORK SCRAP TIRE MARKETS 
80,000 70,000 Uses of Scrap Tires (Tons) 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Reuse Ground Rubber Tire Derived Aggregate Tire Derived Fuel Other Recycling Other Unspecified

Market Category 2003 2004 2005 2006

   
The table indicates trends for four years, showing tires flowing into five broad‐use categories:     • Driven by higher costs for conventional power generation fuels, tire‐derived fuel demand  grew by 10 percent from 2005 and was the largest market for NYS annually generated waste  tires.    Ground rubber markets were growing ‐ Within this market, athletic surfacing (sports turf  infill) and horticulture (mulch) and playground cushioning products showed the largest  increases.  Tire‐derived aggregate, mostly used in landfill engineering applications, continued its four‐ year decline (down 15 percent from 2005) but remained a significant use.  Reduced landfill  cell expansion activity and strong demand from tire‐‐derived fuel markets were likely causes  for reduced demand by this market.  The Reuse category is likely underestimated since the response rate from tire re‐treaders  was low.  The Other Uses category is dominated by a New York steel mill using tires as a carbon  source in its electric arc furnace. 

• •  

ESD began investing in New York State waste‐tire markets many years prior to enactment of the  2003 Waste Tire Management and Recycling Act.  ESD has invested in ground rubber production  expansion projects, the promotion of tire‐derived aggregate and strengthening and expanding scrap  tire markets in general.  As shown in the following table, these investments and market trends are  resulting in a greater amount of value‐added recycling, with the estimated total value (based on the  assumed typical values shown in the table) increasing from $11.1 million in 2003 to $20 million in  2006. 

 
ESTIMATED VALUE‐ADDED FOR NEW YORK SCRAP PROCESSING ACTIVITIES  Typical Value to Processors [1] ($/ton) Reuse Ground Rubber TireDerived Aggregate TireDerived Fuel Total $300 $220 $31 2003 Tons Value ($M) 8,140 23,938 67,883 $2.4 $5.3 $2.1 15,441 46,485 57,302 2004 Tons Value ($M) $4.6 $10.2 $1.8 17,507 39,800 44,062 2005 Tons Value ($M) $5.3 $8.8 $1.4 15,231 55,901 38,107 2006 Tons Value ($M) $4.6 $12.3 $1.2

$25

49,834

$1.2

64,737

$1.6

71,801

$1.8

78,074

$2.0

149,795

$11.1

183,966

$18.3

173,171

$17.2

187,313

$20.0

 
A summary of investments made by Empire State Development under the authority of the Waste  Tire Management and Recycling Act of 2003 to strengthen and expand markets for tires generated  in New York State can be found below.   In  the 15 years prior to the act, ESD committed an  additional $5.8 million to 34 tire recycling projects.    Information on tire recyclers and end markets can be found in ESD’s Recycling Markets Database at  http://www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle.  

     

INVESTMENTS IN SCRAP TIRE MARKET EXPANSION 
Following is a summary of investments made by Empire State Development under the authority of  the Waste Tire Management and Recycling Act of 2003 to strengthen and expand markets for tires  1 generated in New York State .  To locate a tire recycler, use the ESD markets database at  http://www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle.    
NIAGARA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $499,800 

 

Total Project: $1,045,075 

Capital project to assist RubberForm Recycled Products, LLC, Lockport, NY, to purchase additional  machinery and equipment to increase the production of recycled rubber molded products. The  project will increase current production to 5.25 tons per day, increase recycled crumb rubber usage  by 425 tons per year, manufacturing several new value‐added rubber molded products. (March  2008)   http://www.rubberform.com/    
RE‐TREAD PRODUCTS, INC. 

Award: $200,000 

 

Total Project: $250,000 

Research project to assist Re‐Tread Products, Inc., Great Valley, NY, to develop an automated  manufacturing process for its Tire Log™ retaining wall component system. (March 2008)  http://www.retreadproducts.com/    
COLONIE (TOWN OF) INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $410,000 

 

Total Project: $1,920,000 

Capital project to assist CRM, LLC with the purchase of equipment to expand its cryogenic tire  recycling facility in Colonie, NY.  Success of this project will result in additional tire recycling capacity  of one million tires per year, bringing the total throughput the facility to 5.5 million tires annually.  (February 2008) http://www.crmrubber.com/NewSite/index2.asp  

     
                                                                 
1

 Prior to the act, ESD committed $5.8 million for fifteen years to 34 tire recycling projects.  The act enabled  ESD to accelerate investments. 

 

RUBBER PAVEMENTS ASSOCIATION 

Award: $14,800 

 

Total Project: $14,800 

Seminar to educate key members of the road paving community in NY State, including DOT, paving  contractors, asphalt producers and tire recyclers, about the benefits of modifying liquid asphalt with  ground tire rubber to improve product properties. (October 2007)  http://www.rubberpavements.org/  

 
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION 

Award: $300,000 

 

Total Project: $600,000 

Demonstrate the use of an improved asphalt chip seal that incorporates recycled tire rubber to  create an improved binder, extending the 2006 program to three additional DOT regions, continuing  to provide local DOT regions with exposure to the technology. (Summer 2007) 

 
NEW YORK STATE FAIR 

Award: $100,000 

 

Total Project: $110,000 

Demonstrate the use of an improved synthetic horse arena surface at the Coca Cola Equestrian  Arena at the State Fairgrounds.  The surface material incorporates recycled tire rubber and tire fiber  as components of the highly engineered surface.  Fair staff will evaluate the effectiveness of the  surface, and the installation will increase exposure of New York tire recycling companies to the  equestrian market. (Summer 2007) 

 
AMSTERDAM (TOWN OF) 

Award: $271,500 

 

Total Project: $1,014,272 

Capital project to assist BCD Tire Chip Manufacturing, Inc., Hagaman, NY, to purchase tire‐shredding  equipment.  Success of the project will increase capacity to 38,000 tons per year; process at least  10,956 tons of tires per year; increase revenue by $250,000 per year; retain six jobs, and create six,  new, full‐time positions. (June 2007) 

 
NIAGARA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $53,650 

 

Total Project: $108,802 

Capital project to assist Rubbersidewalks, Inc., Lockport, NY with the purchase of molds and  associated tooling to produce rubber sidewalks  from recycled crumb rubber.  Success of this project  will enable Rubbersidewalks, Inc. to manufacture its product in New York State, using a minimum of  469 tons of recycled crumb rubber while producing a minimum of 15,000 units per year. (March  2007) http://www.rubbersidewalks.com/  

   
COLONIE (TOWN OF) INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $675,000 

 

Total Project: $2,500,000 

Capital project to assist CRM, LLC to expand its Colonie, NY tire recycling facility with the addition of  an ambient ground rubber line.  Success of this project will result in additional tire recycling capacity  of 2 million tires per year, producing 24 million pounds of ground rubber per year with a sales value  of $3.6 million annually. (November 2006) http://www.crmrubber.com/NewSite/index2.asp  

 
NEW YORK STATE DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION 

Award: $200,000 

 

Total Project: $400,000 

Demonstrate the use of an innovative new technology that incorporates recycled tire rubber to  create an improved asphalt chip seal. The project will place the improved chip seal on four stretches  of road within New York State.  If adopted as regular practice, this technology would create  additional demand for finely ground rubber from New York State. (Summer 2006) 

 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK  UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO CENTER FOR INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Award: $1,823,667   

Total Project: $1,823,667 

Five‐year project forming the New York State Tire Derived Aggregate Program.  Will expand the  acceptance of recycled tire‐derived aggregate (TDA) in civil engineering applications in New York  State.  Civil engineering applications for TDA include septic system leach fields, insulating layers for  road base, lightweight fill behind bridge embankments and backfill for building foundations and  similar uses. Program activities include developing a central information clearinghouse on the   Internet and conducting targeted research. (January 2006) http://www.tdanys.buffalo.edu/  

 
COLONIE (TOWN OF) INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $750,000 

 

Total Project: $5,000,000 

Capital project to assist CRM, LLC with the purchase of equipment to establish a cryogenic ground  rubber recycling facility in Colonie, NY.  Success of this project will result in additional tire recycling  capacity of 2.5 million tires per year, producing 30 million pounds of ground rubber per year with a  sales value of $6 million annually. (December 2005)  http://www.crmrubber.com/NewSite/index2.asp  

 

NIAGARA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award:  $485,000   

Total Project: $1,004,991 

Capital project to assist RubberForm Recycled Products, LLC, Lockport, NY to purchase the  machinery and equipment necessary to manufacture molded rubber products out of crumb rubber  (processed from scrap passenger tires).  Success of this project will result in the manufacture of new  products made from 625 tons of crumb annually and the creation of eight full‐time jobs. (October  2005) http://www.rubberform.com/  

 
NIAGARA COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

Award: $265,500 

 

Total Project: $531,500 

Capital project to assist High Tread International, Lockport, NY to purchase equipment to increase its  passenger tire recycling capacity and significantly increase the value of its products.  This project will  increase passenger tire recycling by 1,800 tons per year, realize an annual economic benefit of  $975,000, and create three new jobs. (September 2005) http://www.hightread.com/  

 
SCHENECTADY METROPLEX DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Award: $500,000 

 

Total Project: $1,744,000 

Capital project to assist New York Rubber Recycling (formerly RTG ‐ New York), Schenectady, NY  with the purchase and installation of a new grinding system to increase the volume and quality of its  ground rubber production.  Success of this project will increase throughput by 1.5 million tires per  year. (April 2005) NYRR is now a unit of Permalife Products, LLC. http://www.permalife.com/  

 
RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK  UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO CENTER FOR INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Award: $200,000 

 

Total Project: $297,080 

Research, development and demonstration project to identify ways to overcome the remaining  barriers (technical, practical and economic) to  using tire‐derived aggregate (TDA) in septic system  leachfield applications. (March 2005) http://www.tdanys.buffalo.edu/  

 
AN‐COR INDUSTRIAL PLASTICS, INC. 

Award: $200,000 

 

Total Project: $249,094 

Research, development and demonstration project to assist this North Tonawanda, NY company in  evaluating the manufacture and testing of a new "tire log" made from scrap tires.  The project will  determine the cost to manufacture as well as demonstrate its use in a retaining wall application. 

(March 2005) This project later led to the formation of Re‐Tread Products, Inc.  http://www.retreadproducts.com/  

 
NP & G INNOVATIONS, INC. 

Award: $194,310 

 

Total Project: $616,310 

Research, development and demonstration project to assist this Cazenovia, NY company with  completion of engineering design, process development and construction, testing and certifications  required by the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance of Way Association for its  innovative railroad cross ties made from recycled tire strips and steel. (November 2004)  http://www.npginnovations.com/  

 
R.W. BECK INC. 

Award: $544, 181   

Total Project: $544,181 

Contractor is assisting Empire State Development to carry out its mandates under the Waste Tire  Management and Recycling Act of 2003,  by creating a comprehensive tire recycling market analysis  for New York State and up to four annual updates. (July 2004) The initial report and annual updates  completed to date can be found at: http://www.empire.state.ny.us/recycle   

Appendix 8.1

Appendix 8.1

Appendix 8.1

Appendix 8.1

Appendix 8.1

Appendix 8.2

Pay-As-You-Throw
Lessons Learned About Unit Pricing of Municipal Solid Waste

Prepared by Janice L. Canterbury U.S. EPA Office of Solid Waste

Acknowledgements
The following state, county, and local officials and private consultants contributed their expertise in unit pricing programs to EPA’s Unit Pricing Roundtable and to the development of this guide:

Nancy Lee Newell, City of Durham, North Carolina Peggy Douglas, City of Knoxville, Tennessee Barbara Cathey, City of Pasadena, California Bill Dunn, Minnesota Office of Waste Management Nick Pealy, Seattle Solid Waste Utility Jody Harris, Maine Waste Management Agency Jamy Poth, City of Austin, Texas Jeanne Becker, Becker Associates Lisa Skumatz and Cabell Breckinridge, Synergic Resources Corporation Lon Hultgren, Town of Mansfield, Connecticut Greg Harder, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources Thomas Kusterer, Montgomery County Government, Maryland Robert Arner, Northern Virginia Planning District Commission

Their assistance is greatly appreciated.

ii

Contents
About This Guide Key to Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi viii

PART I: Is Unit Pricing Right for Your C ommunity? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
What Is Unit Pricing? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 4 5 6

Potential Benefits to Unit Pricing Potential Barriers to Unit Pricing

Types of Communities That Can Benefit From Unit Pricing Making a Decision About Unit Pricing . . .

PART II: Building Consensus and Planning for Unit Pricing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Goals and Establishing a Unit Pricing Team Addressing Barriers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10
11 12 13 15

Building a Public Consensus

Scheduling Your Planning Activities

PART III: Designing an Integrated Unit Pricing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Building Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Volume-Based Versus Weight-Based Programs Container Options Pricing Structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

19 20
20 22 24 26 26 27 29 30

Billing and Payment Systems Accounting Options .

Program Service Options Multi-Family Housing

Residents With Special Needs

iii

Putting the Blocks Together
Step 1: Estimating Demand Step 2: Choosing Components Step 3: Estimating Costs . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

34
35 36 37 37 38 38

Step 4: Developing a Rate Structure Step 5: Calculating Revenues .

Step 6: Evaluating and Adjusting the Program

PART IV: Implementing and Monitoring Unit Pricing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Implementation Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45
46 47 50 52 52

Public Education and Outreach

Reorganizing Your Solid Waste Agency’s Administration Developing a Schedule . . . . . . . .

Program Monitoring and Evaluation

APPENDIXES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A: Unit Pricing Roundtable Discussion: Questions and Alternatives Appendix B: Putting the Blocks Together: Additional Examples Appendix C: Definitions Appendix D: Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

63
63 79 83 85

iv

About This Guide
In December 1992, as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) efforts to disseminate information about potential solutions to solid waste management issues, the Agency organized a gathering of experts and local officials involved in unit pricing programs. The Unit Pricing Roundtable resulted in a wide-ranging discussion of the benefits and barriers associated with unit pricing programs. This guide is based on the insights gained from that meeting. Pay-As-You-Throw: Lessons Learned About Unit Pricing of Municipal Solid Waste is designed to help local solid waste administrators and planners, elected officials, community and civic groups, environmental and business organizations, and others find an answer to the question, “Is unit pricing a viable option for our community, and, if so, how do we implement it?” Since communities differ in size, demographics, governing jurisdiction, and other factors, this guide presents lessons learned in a variety of communities that have implemented unit pricing. As such, decision-makers can use the guide to chart a course through the issues and potential obstacles involved in launching a unit pricing program and tailoring it to meet the specific needs and goals of the community. In addition to information drawn from the Roundtable, the guide is derived from data on dozens of existing unit pricing programs in communities of varying sizes and demographics. Case studies showcase differences in the types of collection systems, fee structures, and complementary programs that can accompany unit pricing programs. The guide also reflects information extracted from available literature, as well as direct advice from experts in the field.

v

The process of considering, planning, and implementing a unit pricing program is a process of moving from general to specific notions of addressing waste management issues. After considering long-term solid waste goals and options and how unit pricing might help achieve them, decision-makers must move on to broad system planning and finally to specific details. This guide is designed to mirror that process of increasing specificity. It is divided into four parts:

Part I: Is Unit Pricing Right for Your Community?
Part I offers an introduction to the concept of unit pricing, helps readers decide whether unit pricing holds enough promise for their communities to merit continued investigation and study, and provides an overview of the organization of the guide.

Part II: Building Consensus and Planning for Unit Pricing
Part II focuses on creating a framework for a successful system. It describes how to establish goals, build a consensus for change within the community, make a decision to pursue a unit pricing strategy, and perform basic planning tasks for the new program.

Part III: Designing an Integrated Unit Pricing Program
Part III introduces solid waste officials to unit pricing program options, including container type and size, pricing structures, and billing systems. It also presents a six-step process for selecting options and designing a rate structure that will best address the community’s unit pricing goals.

Part IV: Implementing and Monitoring Unit Pricing
Part IV guides communities through the process of launching their unit pricing program. While implementation often requires an ongoing series of tasks, this part focuses on the central issues: providing public education and reorganizing the solid waste agency’s administrative office. Part IV also discusses ways to collect and analyze data regarding the performance of the program. To meet the needs of many decision-makers, this guide has been designed to be modular in approach. Solid waste officials with little experience with unit pricing will want to read the entire guide carefully. Decision-makers who are somewhat familiar with unit pricing might want to skim Part I, while carefully studying the remainder of the guide. Those individuals with a good understanding of the pros and cons of unit pricing might proceed directly to the design and implementation guidelines offered in Parts III and IV.

vi

Key to Symbols
To help readers focus on key issues, symbols are used throughout the guide to indicate the themes and concepts that are central to unit pricing. These are:
TR ADEOFFS

There are no universally applicable guidelines that must be followed when developing a unit pricing program. All unit pricing options offer their own set of advantages and disadvantages. When designing a unit pricing program, decision-makers need to weigh these factors and choose the course of action that best suits the needs of their communities. Involving and educating the public is key to the success of any unit pricing program.

EDUCATION

One of the biggest issues associated with unit pricing programs concerns the costs to design and implement a program. Residents also will be concerned about waste collection fees.
COSTS

HIER ARCHY

EPA has established a hierarchy identifying the preferred methods for managing solid waste. At the top of the hierarchy is waste prevention. Recycling (including composting) is the next preferred technique, used for managing the waste that cannot be prevented. Finally, landfilling and combustion can be used to dispose of the remaining waste. Decision-makers will need to address some potential hurdles to implementing unit pricing. These include recovering expenses, increased administrative costs, perception of increased costs being passed on to citizens, and illegal dumping.

BARRIERS

vii

PART II RT
Is Unit Pricing Right for Your Community?

O

ver the past several years, many communities across the United States have found it increasingly diff icult to effectively and economically manage their municipal solid waste (MSW). Against a backdrop of steadily rising waste generation rates, many communities have seen their local landf ills closing, tipping fees rising, and prospects for siting new disposal facilities diminishing. Other demands on waste management systems include growing public awareness of general environmental issues, as well as state and locally legislated waste prevention and recycling goals. In response, many communities have begun adopting new approaches to waste management, such as collecting materials for recycling; composting yard trimmings and other organic materials; and conducting education programs intended to help residents understand the need for waste prevention and recycling. In addition, recognizing that market-based approaches are proving to be important tools in dealing with environmental issues, some communities have turned to economic incentives to encourage residents to prevent waste whenever possible and recycle or compost the remainder. One such incentive system is unit pricing.

IS UN IT PR IC I NG RI G HT FO R YO UR CO MMUN IT Y?

1

PART I

What Is Unit Pricing?
Unit pricing is not a new concept. Berkeley, California, began its unit pricing program in 1924, and Richmond, California, launched a unit pricing program in 1916!
Traditionally, many communities in the United States have paid for waste management services through property taxes or through an annual fee charged to each household. The cost per residence remains constant regardless of differences in the amount of waste generated. This creates the mistaken impression that MSW management is free. Unit pricing, also known as variable rate pricing or pay-as-you-throw, is a system under which residents pay for municipal waste management services per unit of waste collected rather than through a fixed fee. Unit pricing takes into account variations in waste generation rates by charging households or residents based on the amount of trash they place at the curb, thereby offering individuals an incentive to reduce the amount of waste they generate and dispose of. Unit pricing programs can take two basic forms. Residents can be charged by:

• Volume of waste, using bags, tags or stickers, • Weight of waste, with the municipality
or prescribed sizes of waste cans. measuring at the curbside the amount of waste set out for collection.

While they operate differently from one another, these systems share one defining characteristic: residents who throw away more pay more. If the basic concept of unit pricing is straightforward, however, the decision to adopt such a program is far from simple. To help communities considering unit pricing as a solution to their mounting solid waste management difficulties, EPA convened a Unit Pricing Roundtable, attended by representatives from communities that had implemented unit pricing or were actively considering it. EPA then organized the resulting wealth of ideas and advice to produce this guide. EPA designed the guide to help readers determine whether unit pricing is a viable option for their community and, if so, which factors to consider when planning and implementing such a program.

By encouraging residents to prevent waste and recycle whenever possible, unit pricing is helping communities to better manage their solid waste.

2

PART I

Potential Benefits to Unit Pricing
Communities that have adopted unit pricing programs have reported a number of benefits, ranging from reductions in waste generation to greater public awareness of environmental issues. These benefits include:

Waste reduction. Unit pricing can help substantially reduce the
amount of waste disposed of in a community. Some communities with unit pricing programs report that unit pricing helped their municipality achieve reductions of 25 to 45 percent in the amount of waste shipped to disposal facilities.

Reduced waste disposal costs. When the amount of waste is reduced, communities often find their overall MSW management costs have declined as well. (A portion of the revenues previously spent on waste disposal, however, may need to be dedicated to recycling, composting, or other diversion activities.) Increased waste prevention. To take advantage of the potential
savings that unit pricing offers, residents typically modify their traditional purchasing and consumption patterns to reduce the amount of waste they place at the curb. These behavioral changes have beneficial environmental effects beyond reduced waste generation, often including reduced energy usage and materials conservation.

COSTS

Increased participation in composting and recycling programs.
Under unit pricing, new or existing recycling and yard waste composting programs become opportunities for residents to divert waste for which they otherwise would pay. Experience has shown that these programs are the perfect complement for unit pricing: analysis of existing unit pricing systems shows that composting and recycling programs divert 8 to 13 percent more waste by weight when used in conjunction with a unit pricing program.

Support of the waste management hierarchy. By creating an incentive to reduce as much waste as possible using source reduction and to recycle and/or compost the waste that cannot be prevented, unit pricing supports the hierarchy of waste management techniques defined by EPA. More equitable waste management fee structure. Traditional
waste management fees, in effect, require residents who generate a small amount of waste to subsidize the greater generation rates of their neighbors. Under unit pricing, waste removal charges are based on the level of service the municipality provides to collect and dispose of the waste, similar to the way residents are charged for gas or electricity. Because the customer is charged only for the level of

HIERARCHY

IS UN IT PR IC I NG RI G HT FO R YO UR CO MMUN IT Y?

3

PART I
service required, residents have more control over the amount of money they pay for waste management.

Increased understanding of environmental issues in general.
EDUCATION

Through unit pricing, communities have the opportunity to explain the hidden costs of waste management. Traditional waste management systems often obscure the actual economic and environmental costs associated with waste generation and disposal. Once individuals understand their impact on the environment, they can choose to take steps to minimize it.

Potential Barriers to Unit Pricing
BARRIERS

While there are clearly benefits associated with unit pricing programs, there also are potential barriers. Communities considering unit pricing should be aware of the costs and possible community relations implications associated with the following issues:

Illegal dumping. Some residents have strong reservations about unit
pricing, believing it will encourage illegal dumping or burning of waste in their area. Communities can counter this fear with an effective public education program. Since most communities with unit pricing programs have reported that illegal dumping proved to be less of a concern than anticipated, providing residents with this information can help allay their concerns over illegal dumping.

Recovering expenses. Since unit pricing offers a variable rate to
COSTS

residents, the potential exists for uneven cash flow that could make it harder to operate a unit pricing program. To address this, communities must be sure to set prices at the appropriate level to ensure that, on average, sufficient funds are raised to pay for waste collection, complementary programs, and special services.

In all unit pricing programs, residents who throw away more pay more.

Administrative costs. Effectively establishing rates, billing residents, and collecting payments under a unit pricing program will likely increase a waste management agency’s administrative costs. Communities need to set waste collection prices at a level that can cover these costs. Perception of increased costs to residents. While a unit pricing
program offers residents greater control over the cost of collecting their waste, it could initially be seen as a rate increase. An effective public outreach campaign that clearly demonstrates the current costs of waste management and the potential reductions offered by unit pricing will help to address this perception.

Multi-family housing. Extending direct waste reduction incentives to residents of multi-family housing can present a challenge. Since waste generated by these residents typically is combined in a central

4

PART I
location to await collection, identifying the amounts of waste generated by individual residents in order to charge accordingly can be difficult. Communities must experiment with rate structures and collection systems to encourage residents of multi-family housing to reduce waste.

Building public consensus. Perhaps the greatest barrier to realizing
a unit pricing program is overcoming resistance to change, both among citizens and elected officials. Informing residents about the environmental and economic costs of current waste generation patterns can help overcome this resistance and build support for unit pricing. Careful planning and design of a unit pricing program to meet specific community needs is the best solution to these potential difficulties. In particular, an effective public education program designed to communicate the need for unit pricing and address the potential concerns of residents will help meet these challenges. (Public education programs are discussed in detail in Part IV of this guide.)

EDUCATION

Types of Communities That Can Benefit From Unit Pricing
Unit pricing programs work best when tailored to local needs. All types of communities can design unit pricing programs that will help achieve the goals of reducing waste generation and easing waste management difficulties; large, medium-sized, and small communities in every region of the country have realized these benefits. Local officials indicate that unit pricing programs also work well whether solid waste services are carried out by municipal or by private haulers. As a result, unit pricing has grown significantly over the last few years. In the 1980s, only a handful of communities in the United States operated unit pricing programs. Now, over 1,000 communities have unit pricing programs in place. By January 1994, over 1,800 programs are scheduled to be in operation. In addition, laws in 10 states currently mandate or encourage unit pricing programs.

Unit pricing is a familiar concept for businesses. For years, many companies have been paying for waste removal services based on the size of their dumpsters and the frequency of collections.

IS UN IT PR IC I NG RI G HT FO R YO UR CO MMUN IT Y?

5

PART I

Making a Decision About Unit Pricing
After considering this overview of the benefits and barriers to unit pricing programs, decision-makers who believe unit pricing could work in their community can turn to Part II of this guide and begin the planning process. Decision-makers should carefully consider key factors such as the types of services to offer, the associated costs, the potential for complementary programs, the level of administrative change necessary, and the extent to which residents will support or oppose unit pricing.

TRADEOFFS

6

PART I

questions
Will this guide tell me what system to use and how to implement it?
No. This guide is intended to provide essential information about unit pricing and to help you think about how well such a program would work in your community. It will provide many suggestions borne of successful programs of all types and sizes around the country. However, f inal decisions about whether to adopt unit pricing, what type of system to use, and how to implement it should be made based on local needs and circumstances.

& answers

How expensive is it to implement unit pricing?
The cost of implementing a unit pricing program is directly related to how complex the selected system is, how it is f inanced, and how different it is from the current waste removal system. Many communities have implemented unit pricing with minimal upfront and ongoing costs. Over the long term, communities with unit pricing programs have generally reported them to be cost-effective methods of achieving their waste management goals.

Our community has had significant fiscal problems. Would unit pricing be appropriate?
A community introducing unit pricing may choose to use fees either to supplement or to replace current revenue sources. While a community with a tight waste management budget may choose to use unit pricing fees to supplement current revenue sources, the public may resist such fees as simply an additional tax. Other communities stress that local acceptance of a unit pricing program is greater if current taxes, such as general or property taxes, are reduced by the amount of the new solid waste fees.

IS UN IT PR IC I NG RI G HT FO R YO UR CO MMUN IT Y?

7

PART I

Points to remember
Unit pricing requires residents to pay for each unit of waste that they dispose of. This billing arrangement is similar to fees assessed on other essential services (such as water and electricity), where the charge is based on usage.

Unit pricing has been effective in reducing the amount of solid waste disposed of in all types of communities across the country.

Communities using unit pricing in tandem with recycling and composting programs have found these programs increase each other’s effectiveness.

This guide is designed to provide basic information about planning and operating a unit pricing program. Decisions regarding the actual program you adopt will be based on your community’s unique circumstances.

8

PART I

Case Studies
All Types of Communities Are Adopting Unit Pricing
Rural areas. Unit pricing is found in a number of rural communities. For example, it has been implemented in High Bridge, New Jersey, which has a population of 4,000, and in Baldwin, Wisconsin, which has a population of under 2,000. Larger communities. While unit pricing is not yet common in the largest cities, it has been working successfully in Anaheim, Glendale, Pasadena, and Oakland, California; Aurora, Illinois; Lansing, Michigan; Seattle, Washington; and a number of other communities with populations over 100,000. In addition, state laws in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Washington either currently or soon will require implementation of unit pricing programs in communities statewide, regardless of size (with some exceptions). County-wide. Unit pricing also can be implemented on a county-wide basis. Tompkins County, New York; Hennepin County, Minnesota; and King County, Washington all have implemented unit pricing programs.

Unit Pricing Cuts Down on Waste Volume
Unit pricing can result in dramatic declines in the amount of waste set out for collection. The Village of Hoffman Estates, Illinois, noted a 30-percent reduction in waste volume after implementing a unit pricing program. Seattle, Washington, reported a decline in waste generation from an average of 3.5 waste cans to 1.7 cans per household per week after unit pricing was launched. This amount was further reduced to just one can per household per week after complementary curbside recycling and composting programs were introduced (see the discussion of complementary programs in Part III). Most communities, however, cannot delineate what percentage of waste reduction is directly attributable to unit pricing and what percentage is due to other factors, such as new recycling programs, consumer education, or even economic recession. Nevertheless, studies conducted over the last few years indicate consistent waste reductions in unit pricing communities. For example, a study at Duke University by Dr. Daniel Blume examined 14 cities with unit pricing. The waste reductions in this study ranged from 18 to 65 percent. The average waste reduction was 44 percent.

IS UN IT PR IC I NG RI G HT FO R YO UR CO MMUN IT Y?

9

PART II
Building Consensus and Planning for Unit Pricing

U

nit pricing involves many important decisions regarding how to perform and pay for solid waste services. To be sure that their communities are choosing the best options, many solid waste agencies have initiated a planning process that helps lay the groundwork for sound decisions and coordinated implementation. This process helps clarify the community’s solid waste needs and goals, identify likely barriers and methods of overcoming them, and inform and educate residents about unit pricing and how it can improve solid waste management in the community.

10

PART II

Setting Goals and Establishing a Unit Pricing Team
Solid waste management can be a confusing business, with success measured against standards as varied as recycling diversion rates, total costs, or even quality of media coverage. For this reason, the first step when planning for unit pricing is to determine the goals of the program based on a review of your community’s solid waste management needs and concerns. While goal-setting can at first seem like an abstract exercise, clearly defined and measurable objectives for your program are invaluable when deciding which unit pricing options would work best in your community. Goal-setting can help build community consensus and facilitate efficient monitoring and evaluation of the unit pricing program’s progress. Although you will want to solicit input from local residents and other interested parties before coming up with a final list of goals, it is useful to first examine and prioritize goals internally before introducing them to the community. Consider holding an internal brainstorming session to establish a preliminary list of goals. This session could last anywhere from one hour to half a day, depending on the size and makeup of your community, the issues that need to be addressed in the session, and the needs and structure of your agency. A shorter, followup session to revisit, refine, and prioritize goals also might be useful. Prioritizing goals also is important since the weight that you assign to goals now will help you design the rate structure for the program. (Setting rate structures is described in Part III of the guide.) In addition, achieving every objective on a community’s list can be difficult. Consider the tradeoffs among program costs, citizen convenience, staffing changes, and other factors as you prioritize your goals. Circumstances often require compromise in one area in exchange for progress in another. Specific goals and objectives can vary significantly among communities. Examples include:

TRADEOFFS

Encouraging waste prevention and recycling. A community
should set unit prices at levels high enough to encourage households to reduce waste generation and to recycle and compost. This helps to achieve existing recycling goals and to conserve landfill space.

HIERARCHY

Raising suf ficient revenue to cover municipal solid waste management costs. A unit pricing program should bring in enough
revenue to cover both the program’s variable costs and its more stable or fixed costs. Variable costs, such as landfill tipping fees, are the expenses that fluctuate with changes in the amount of solid waste collected. Fixed costs are costs that change only rarely, such as rent for agency offices, or that change only after large-scale waste collection changes, such as the number of collection trucks needed.
COSTS

B U IL DI NG C O N S E NS U S A N D P L A NN I NG FOR U N IT P R I CI N G

11

PART II
Subsidizing other community programs. A community might
wish to generate revenues in excess of the actual costs for solid waste collection and then use those funds to enforce antilittering or illegal dumping laws, or to improve its recycling and solid waste infrastructure. Once your agency has established a list of preliminary goals, consider setting up a unit pricing team or citizen advisory council to help you refine and prioritize these goals. A unit pricing team typically consists of solid waste staff, interested elected officials, civic leaders, and representatives from affected businesses in the community. Team members may be solicited through advertisements in local newspapers and on radio and television stations. Including these individuals in the planning process gives the community a sense of program ownership. In addition, team members can help other residents in the community understand the specifics of the program as it evolves and can provide your agency with valuable input on residents’ concerns about the program. Members of the team also can serve as a sounding board to help ensure strong community participation throughout the planning process.

Establishing a clear set of goals for your unit pricing program is invaluable when deciding which program options will work best in your community.

Addressing Barriers
The team or council also can help your agency identify potential barriers to implementing unit pricing in your community and consider ways in which these barriers can be addressed. Illegal dumping and burning of waste is one of the mostly frequently cited barriers to unit pricing. Yet participants at EPA’s Unit Pricing Roundtable and communities with unit pricing programs report that illegal dumping has occurred prior to implementing a program and tends to persist at some level, regardless of the way in which residents are charged for solid waste management. The key is to design a unit pricing program that significantly deters illegal dumping and burning. Public education and enforcement policies are the most effective tools in addressing this barrier. Informing residents of the experiences of communities with unit pricing and setting up fair but aggressive enforcement policies to respond to incidents of illegal dumping also are essential.
A unit pricing team composed of residents, civic leaders, and town off icials can help ensure the development of a successful unit pricing program.

BARRIERS

Other potential barriers to unit pricing include recovering expenses, covering administrative costs, ensuring that unit pricing is not perceived as a rate increase by residents, implementing unit pricing in multi-family buildings, addressing physical or financial difficulties for senior citizens, and overcoming resistance to changing

12

PART II
the status quo. (Part III of this guide provides an in-depth discussion of barriers and specific strategies for overcoming them.) Once both the municipal solid waste agency and the unit pricing team or council have evaluated specific goals and barriers, it is time to unveil the program to the city at large. The team or council might consider developing a preliminary proposal with several program options. This proposal can serve as a basis for public discussion and help illustrate what changes might occur.

Building a Public Consensus
Public education is critical to the planning, design, and implementation stages of a unit pricing program. In fact, education is the linchpin holding all of these phases together. While educating the public might at first seem unnecessary and expensive, the experiences of communities that have implemented unit pricing programs indicate that a good public relations program more than pays for itself. Such a program is effective at developing a general consensus among residents on the need for unit pricing. Community support is vital to the long-term success of a unit pricing program. In fact, communities that have implemented unit pricing programs are nearly unanimous in listing education and community relations as the most important elements of a successful unit pricing program. Public education can combat fears and myths about unit pricing (such as the fear of increased illegal dumping) and help avoid or mitigate many potential implementation problems. When first reaching out to residents during the planning stage, don’t be surprised if many residents react with skepticism to the idea of unit pricing. Initial opposition is often related to a perception that unit pricing will result in an additional financial burden. Opposition also might be due simply to a natural resistance to change. Resistance to unit pricing is especially prevalent in communities where solid waste management fees are hidden in general or property taxes. To counter this opposition, municipal officials can inform residents of the current difficulties associated with waste collection and management. In particular, officials can explain the costs to residents of the current system of waste management. Next, they could present the goals for improving the management of solid waste in the community. In this context, officials can introduce unit pricing, discuss its potential for meeting these objectives, and address any questions and concerns that residents have expressed about the new program.

EDUCATION

In Austin, Texas, solid waste off icials included school visits in their public outreach program.

B U IL DI NG C O N S E NS U S A N D P L A NN I NG FOR U N IT P R I CI N G

13

PART II
Winning community support for unit pricing often hinges on explaining how the program can achieve certain critical objectives. Discussions at EPA’s Unit Pricing Roundtable revealed that residents tended to support unit pricing if the program achieved the waste management principles about which they cared the most. Residents often develop a sense of civic pride in programs that meet these objectives. Roundtable panelists strongly recommended that solid waste officials devote a significant amount of attention to communicating these basic principles:

Equity. The program should be structured so that people who
generate more waste pay more, while residents who prevent waste, recycle, and compost are charged less.

Waste reduction. The program must significantly reduce the
community’s generation of waste, increase the rate of recycling, and, therefore, reduce the amount of waste requiring disposal in landfills and combustors.

At EPA’s Unit Pricing Roundtable, panelists ranked education and community relations as the most important elements of a successful unit pricing program.

Reductions in waste management costs. By helping to alter
household waste generation patterns, the program should help reduce the cost of collecting and disposing of the community’s solid waste.

Municipal improvements. The program should contribute to improvements in the quality of life in the community, such as resource conservation and land preservation.
In addition to deciding what information needs to be communicated, solid waste officials also should consider how best to reach residents in the community. An unspecified change in waste management services scheduled to occur at some future date is not likely to capture a community’s attention. The following activities represent some of the ways in which officials can explain the benefits of unit pricing:

Hold public meetings. Interactive public meetings offer solid waste
officials the opportunity to present the case for unit pricing. Such meetings also give citizens the sense that their concerns are being heard and addressed in the eventual program.

Prepare brief ing papers for elected of f icials. As both shapers
and followers of public opinion, elected officials tend to be at the center of public policy debates. Because well-informed leadership can raise issues in such a way as to attract residents’ interest, solid waste officials might want to provide elected officials with brief summaries of the issues associated with solid waste management and the likely benefits of a unit pricing program.

Issue press releases. Press coverage of a change in the way that a community pays for its solid waste collection services is inevitable. Keeping key radio, television, and newspaper outlets well informed of the reasoning behind the move to unit pricing can make the press a valuable participant in the decision-making process and prepare the community for an upcoming change.

14

PART II
Work with retailers. Grocers and other retailers in your community can help educate citizens by displaying posters and other information about the new program in their stores. In addition, retailers can help customers generate less waste by displaying information about choosing waste-reduced products.
Part IV of this guide explains additional steps that communities can take to communicate their ideas to the public.

Scheduling Your Planning Activities
Even before the final decision is made to pursue unit pricing, some basic planning issues can be addressed. Chief among these are legal/jurisdictional issues and timing. Generally, states extend to local jurisdictions the authority to provide waste management services and to charge residents accordingly. During the planning process, however, many communities have the unit pricing team research the municipality’s legal basis for implementing a new solid waste service pricing mechanism rather than risk discovering a problem unexpectedly during implementation. Since unit pricing programs often involve a number of steps and some complex decision-making, consider developing a timeline for planning, designing, and implementing your program. Based on the experiences of communities that have successfully implemented unit pricing, planning for unit pricing should begin at least a year in advance of your targeted start date. You can establish goals for the unit pricing program and begin explaining the program to the community from 9 to 12 months before program implementation. Public education should continue throughout the months prior to the program and, to some extent, after the program is underway. You can identify the legal framework for the program at least six months before the start of a program. A detailed suggested timeline for a unit pricing program is provided in Part IV of this guide.

B U IL DI NG C O N S E NS U S A N D P L A NN I NG FOR U N IT P R I CI N G

15

PART II

& answers

questions
Everyone agrees we should prevent waste and recycle more. Why do we need to spend so much time thinking about specific goals and objectives?
It will probably be easy to get a broad consensus that some things are “good,” such as saving money or reducing disposal rates. But solid waste management in general and unit pricing in particular often involve a series of tradeoffs. For example, a community may decide to sacrif ice some convenience for households to cut costs or to create a stronger waste-reduction incentive. Establishing goals and priorities early in the planning process can make it easier to make diff icult choices as they arise.

Why is public input so important? We have already consulted with many solid waste experts, who know a lot more about solid waste issues than residents.
Municipal off icials and experts agree—no unit pricing program is going to work if local residents oppose it. Since improved solid waste management requires a good faith effort from residents to reduce the amount of waste they dispose of, it makes sense to include residents as equal partners.

16

PART II

Points to remember
Establish realistic goals for your unit pricing program that address your community’s most pressing waste management needs.

Involve the community in the planning process. Representatives from community organizations can increase acceptance of unit pricing and facilitate implementation.

Plan for the possibility of illegal dumping or burning. In addition to explaining other communities’ experiences with illegal dumping, let residents know about legal alternatives for managing and disposing of solid waste. Also explain that concrete steps, such as assessing penalties for violators, will be taken.

Public education cannot be stressed enough. Promoting the strengths of unit pricing and addressing residents’ concerns is critical to the success of your program.

Provide elected officials with information on the benefits of unit pricing programs to help them address residents’ concerns. Also, keep local of ficials informed of decisions made about the program as it evolves.

Be sure to carefully research your legal authority to establish and enforce a unit pricing program. Based on this research and on the advice of your municipality’s legal counsel, ordinances may be necessary to establish the program.

Plan ahead by establishing a timeline for your program.
B U IL DI NG C O N S E NS U S A N D P L A NN I NG FOR U N IT P R I CI N G

17

PART II

Case Studies
Three Cities Report on Illegal Dumping
In Mansfield, Connecticut, officials report that illegal dumping did not increase significantly with the introduction of unit pricing. To prevent illegal dumping, Mansfield has relied primarily on public education. When necessary, however, the solid waste department also has worked with the police department to track license plates and identify violators.

In Seattle, Washington, unit pricing also has not been associated with an increase in illegal dumping. In fact, 60 to 80 percent of the illegal dumping incidents in the city are associated with remodeling waste, refrigerators, and construction debris— waste that the city suspects comes from small contractors who do hauling on the side and dump the refuse. Seattle officials are considering licensing these haulers or requiring remodelers to verify that their material has been properly disposed of.

The city of Pasadena, California, reports similar findings. A survey done at the city’s landfill indicated that Pasadena was disposing of one-third more trash than was indicated in a waste generation study completed in the city. Pasadena suspects that this waste is made up of construction and demolition debris dropped off by small contractors. In the future, instead of contracting with small individual haulers, Pasadena may require those applying for a building permit to use licensed haulers to take construction and demolition materials to the landfill.

18

PART III
Designing an Integrated Unit Pricing Program

T

o this point, this guide has presented an overview of the major benef its and barriers to unit pricing, followed by suggestions on how to def ine the objectives of your program and begin building a consensus for unit pricing in your community. This portion of the guide introduces issues relating to the exact structure of your community’s unit pricing program. The f irst half of Part III, “The Building Blocks,” discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the specif ic program components and service options from which you can choose. This is followed by “Putting the Blocks Together,” a six-step process to help you design a successful unit pricing program.

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

19

PART III The Building Blocks
While unit pricing is based on the simple concept that households pay only for the waste they generate, designing a working program requires that you consider and decide on a range of specific issues. You may have already examined many of these issues, such as the potential for complementary recycling and composting programs, the types of solid waste services to offer, and the means by which you can provide these services to residents with special needs. During the development of a unit pricing program, however, viewing these issues in the context of how they might affect the success of your program is important. The process of selecting program components and service options can begin as much as nine months before the start of a program. This part of the guide points out the kinds of decisions you need to make during this process, including:

• Choosing a volume-based or weight-based system • Selecting containers • Examining pricing structures • Considering billing procedures • Determining service options and complementary programs • Including multi-family buildings • Accommodating individuals with special needs
Communities also need to consider other factors, such as the remaining life of existing containers, the cost of container replacements, the preferences of customers, and the impact of assessing additional taxes or fees on households. Later in this section of the guide, a six-step process for designing an actual unit pricing rate structure is presented. This process should help you tailor a rate structure to local conditions.

Volume-Based Versus Weight-Based Programs
One of the first decisions to be made when designing a unit pricing program is to determine how solid waste will be measured. Based on your unit pricing goals, local budgetary constraints, and other factors, you need to decide whether your system will charge residents for collection services based on the weight or the volume of waste they generate. The two systems have very different design and equipment requirements. Under volume-based systems, residents are charged for waste collection based on the number and size of waste containers that they use. Households are either 1) charged directly for waste collection based on the number of bags or cans set out at the curbside, or 2) required to purchase special trash bags (or tags or stickers for trash bags) that include the cost of waste collection in the purchase price.

20

PART III
Under weight-based systems, the municipality weighs at the curbside the waste residents set out for collection and bills for this service per pound. The program can either require residents to use standard, municipally supplied cans or allow them to continue using their own cans. Weight-based systems offer residents a greater waste reduction incentive than volume-based systems since every pound of waste that residents prevent, recycle, or compost results in direct savings. This is true no matter how much or how little waste reduction occurs. In addition, residents can easily understand this type of system and perceive it as fair. Weight-based systems also provide a more precise measurement of waste generation than volume-based systems. On the other hand, weight-based systems tend to be more expensive to implement and operate than volume-based systems because special equipment is required and more labor typically is necessary to handle the more complex billing system. In addition, some of the equipment used to weigh the waste, record the data, and bill the customer is still experimental. Startup costs for these systems can include truck-mounted scales for weighing waste and some type of system (such as bar-coding on waste cans) for entering this information into a computer for accurate billing. While volume-based systems are less costly to set up and operate, a potential disadvantage associated with these systems is that residents might be tempted to compact their waste. Some residents will compact more than others, perhaps even using mechanical compactors. This reduces the ability of unit pricing to offer more equitable charges for waste collection services and complicates the task of identifying the impact of unit pricing on the community’s rate of solid waste generation. Additionally, depending on the system chosen, there can be less of an incentive to reduce waste since such reductions might not translate into direct savings for the resident. Although over 1,000 communities nationwide have unit pricing programs in place, very few have fully implemented weight-based programs. Accordingly, the remainder of this guide focuses predominantly on the process of designing and implementing a volume-based unit pricing program.
. . . and record the weight and resident information on an onboard computer for later billing.

For its weight-based unit pricing program, the city of Farmington, Minnnesota, has invested in collection trucks that weigh the waste as it is lifted . . .
TRADEOFFS

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

21

PART III
Container Options
Communities that decide to design a volume-based unit pricing program must consider the type and size of waste collection containers on which to base their rate structure and billing system. Keep in mind that choices about containers, rate structures, and billing systems all go hand in hand. In some cases, container type will dictate the rate structure and billing system. In other cases, an established billing system (that cannot be drastically overhauled) can govern container type and rate structure.
Austin, Texas, provides residents with either 30-, 60-, or 90-gallon cans as part of its unit pricing program.

A unit pricing program can be designed around the following container options:

Large cans. Under this system, households are provided with single, large waste cans, often with a capacity of 50 or 60 gallons. Each household is then charged according to the number of cans that they use. Small or variable cans.This system uses a set of standard, graduated can sizes, often ranging from approximately 20 to 60 gallons in capacity. Typically, these systems operate on a subscription basis, under which residents choose in advance the number and size of cans they wish to use. Prepaid bags. This system uses colored or otherwise distinctively marked standard-sized trash bags, typically 20 to 30 gallons in capacity. Residents purchase the bags from the solid waste agency through outlets such as municipal offices and retail stores. Only waste that is placed in the bags is collected. Prepaid tags or stickers.Residents purchase tags or stickers
from the solid waste agency and affix them to their own trash bags. The tag or sticker specifies the size of bag it covers. Each system has its own specific advantages and disadvantages related to such issues as 1) offering a system that residents view as equitable; 2) creating as direct an economic incentive for waste reduction as possible; and 3) assuring revenue stability for the solid waste agency. Other issues to consider when weighing the pros and cons of different container types include simplicity of billing, compatibility with existing waste collection services, ease of collection for work crews, sanitation and aesthetics, budgetary constraints, and community solid waste goals. The primary benefit of a single, large container size is revenue stability. When communities use large containers, the number of cans set out each week tends to remain fairly constant, and so do revenues. The primary disadvantage associated with this container choice is that households that don’t generate much waste have no economic incentive

22

PART III
to reduce waste. Such households are billed the same amount whether they fill a 60-gallon can halfway or completely. Conversely, the principal benefit of using variable can sizes is that even modest reductions in waste generation (for example, one less 10-gallon waste container) can clearly translate into savings. A disadvantage of variable cans is that they can be inconvenient for customers who generate large volumes of waste. In addition, to realize savings from reduced waste generation, households must request a change in the number of cans for which they are being billed. The solid waste agency might need to establish an inventory and distribution system that could be expensive to set up and maintain. Additionally, billing for this method can be more complex in some communities. Like variable cans, prepaid bags encourage greater waste reduction than large cans if the bag size is configured so that residents that generate less waste pay less. Additionally, since residents pay for waste collection through the purchase of the bags, there is no billing, which means this type of system is relatively inexpensive to implement and maintain. The primary disadvantage associated with bags is that there is greater revenue uncertainty than with can systems. An individual might, for example, buy several months’ worth of bags at one time and then none for many weeks. Also, semiautomatic collection vehicles that require residents to use a rigid container might not be able to adapt to bag collection. Bags also can tear or be torn open by animals, resulting in scattered trash. Prepaid tag or sticker systems offer many of the same advantages as bag systems. Chief among these is that such systems directly encourage waste reduction, since different stickers can be used to identify different amounts of waste “set-outs” (the waste residents set out for collection). This means, however, that the solid waste agency must establish and enforce size limits for each type of sticker. As with bags, waste collection is paid for upfront, so no billing needs to be done. Also like bags, stickers or tags offer less revenue stability. In addition, stickers can fall off in rainy or cold weather, and both tags and stickers can be counterfeited or stolen. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these container options are described in more detail in Table 3-2 at the end of this chapter. You don’t have to be locked into one type of system, however, if you plan for the possibility of change. Some communities conduct a pilot program in one part of the municipality before implementing unit pricing communitywide. In this way, difficulties can be worked out early in the process, when modifications are still relatively easy.

Large, clearly marked tags and stickers will help eliminate confusion and speed curbside waste collection.

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

23

PART III
While the details of the pricing structures used in unit pricing programs can vary greatly according to local conditions and needs, four basic types are currently in use. These pricing structures are described below.

Pricing Structures
The main consideration in choosing among the types of pricing structures is their impact on the stability of the community’s revenues and on residents’ waste reduction efforts. In addition, some pricing systems are more complex than others to administer. 1. The proportional (linear) rate system is the simplest rate structure. It entails charging households a flat price for each container of waste they place out for collection. This rate structure provides a strong incentive for customers to reduce waste. It also is easy to administer and bill. Careful consideration is often required, however, to select a price per container that avoids cash flow difficulties that can hinder a new program. While setting too high a price will increase resistance to unit pricing, setting too low a price may cause periodic revenue shortfalls (and can lessen the waste reduction incentive). In addition, when setting rates, decision-makers should assume that some level of waste compaction will occur. They also should plan for success, since as people begin to reduce the amount of waste they set out, the solid waste agency will see a corresponding drop in revenues paid for waste collection.

TRADEOFFS

Weighing the Tradeof fs When Setting Pricing Structures
Decision-makers considering such issues as container choices, rate structures, and service options quickly realize that all of these choices are closely related. Decisions in one area will influence, or even determine, how your community responds to the remaining choices. When considering container options, for example, a smaller community with fewer resources might favor a bag-based system because of its generally lower implementation and administrative expenses. Such systems, however, have the potential for revenue gaps that the community might not be able to bridge. As a result, a community might prefer a two-tiered or multi-tiered rate structure, whose base fee would help prevent such instability. By contrast, a larger community interested in providing a stronger incentive to reduce waste might favor a proportional or variable container rate and higher per container fees. To avoid significant revenue fluctuations, such communities might choose a can-based subscription system that ensures a steady cash flow. There is no one best approach to unit pricing. Throughout the design process, you will need to determine the specific combination of container choices, rate structures, and service options that will maximize efficiency and enable your community to meet its solid waste goals.

24

PART III
2. With a variable container rate, a different rate is charged for different size containers. For example, a solid waste agency might charge households $2 for every 60-gallon can of waste set out and $1.25 for every 30-gallon can. While this system creates a strong incentive for residents to reduce waste, it requires that communities carefully set their rates to ensure revenue stability. Because different rates are charged, this system can be complicated to administer and bill. 3. Both of these systems use a per-container fee to cover the fixed and variable costs associated with a community’s MSW management. Other unit pricing rate structures address fixed and variable costs separately. Two-tiered rate systems assess households both a fixed fee and a per container fee. Under this system, a monthly flat fee is set for solid waste services to ensure that fixed costs are covered; a separate, per-container charge is then used to cover the variable costs. In Pennsburg, Pennsylvania, the solid waste agency charges residents a flat $65 per year plus $1 per 30-gallon bag of waste placed at the curb for pickup. This system provides more stable revenue flows for the community but offers less waste reduction incentives than proportional or variable container rates. Some communities use the two-tiered rate structure as a transition system. Once decision-makers are able to gauge customers’ response to unit pricing, a proportional rate structure could be introduced to encourage greater waste reduction. 4. Multi-tiered rate systems charge households a fixed fee plus variable fees for different container sizes. For example, a community might charge a basic $10 monthly service fee plus $2 per 60-gallon can, or $1 per 30-gallon bag. This rate structure offers similar advantages to two-tiered rates and also encourage waste reduction. This type of rate structure is the most complex, however, and could be difficult to administer and bill.

Table 3.1. Pricing Options
System
Proportional (linear) Variable container Two-tiered Multi-tiered

Rate
Flat rate per container Different rates for different size containers Flat fee (usually charged on a monthly basis) and flat rate per container Flat fee (usually charged on a monthly basis) and different rates for different size containers

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

25

PART III
Billing and Payment Systems
Traditional solid waste programs typically assess households a fixed fee, raised through property taxes or periodic equal billing of all households. Unit pricing programs use various billing/payment systems, such as direct payment for containers, actual set-outs, and payment for advance subscriptions. With a direct payment system, residents pay for solid waste services by purchasing bags or tags from the solid waste agency. Containers can be sold at the courthouse or city hall, at local retail stores, or at the hauler’s office. Care should be taken to ensure that a sufficient number of easily accessible outlets are available for residents. Under subscription systems, residents notify the solid waste agency of their “subscription level,” or the number of containers they anticipate setting out each collection cycle. The customer is then billed on a regular basis for these containers. If customers are able to reduce the amount of waste they generate, they can select a lower subscription level and save money. In many programs, these subscription fees are set at a level that covers the purchase of a designated number of additional bags or cans for any waste that a customer disposes of above their subscription level. This system offers fewer fluctuations in revenues, although the waste reduction incentive is lower 0because residents who reduce their waste generation rate only receive a reduction in their waste collection bill after requesting the municipality to change the number of cans for which they pay. An actual set-out system bills customers based on the actual number of containers set out for collection. This approach requires the hauler to count the number of bags, tags, or cans set out and to record the information so that households can be billed later. To address citizens’ concerns about “hidden” or “double” fees, some communities that implement unit pricing either reduce the household tax rate commensurate with the unit pricing fee or decide not to raise the tax base proportionately with the revenues received from unit pricing. Meet with the citizens advisory council to work out the details for a pricing system geared to your local needs and circumstances.

Accounting Options
Regardless of how they collect payment, most communities tend to manage the finances of their solid waste activities as one item in the municipal budget. A few communities, however, are using alternative accounting approaches to complement their unit pricing programs. One such approach is the use of “full cost accounting.” Using full cost accounting enables a community to consider all costs and revenues associated with a task such as solid waste management, including depreciation of capital costs, amortization of future costs, and a full accounting of indirect costs. This method can help a community

COSTS

26

PART III
establish a unit pricing rate structure that will generate the revenues needed to cover all solid waste management costs. Another approach that can be used in conjunction with a unit pricing program is the development of an “enterprise fund.” Also referred to as special districts, enterprise funds are entities that can be used to separately manage the finances of a municipality’s solid waste activities. In this way, the costs and revenues of unit pricing are accounted for under a separate budget, enabling a community to better anticipate revenue shortfalls and, when appropriate, invest surplus revenues in beneficial waste management projects that can reduce the cost of MSW management in the future.

Program Service Options
The next step is to determine which solid waste services are most important to residents. Successful programs offer an array of solid waste services that citizens need and appreciate. The goal-setting process described in Part II of this guide identifies many of these services. Offering different services does add layers of complexity to a unit pricing program, especially to the billing component. Yet providing such service enhancements greatly increases overall citizen acceptance of the program. A carefully selected and priced service array allows a community to offer premium municipal solid waste services to households that want them, while generating sufficient revenues to support core solid waste collection services. The following sections highlight some of the most popular service options, many of which are complementary to basic trash removal.

TRADEOFFS

Complementary Programs
Complementary programs are those that enhance the unit pricing program and encourage residents to prevent and reduce waste. The most common complementary programs are 1) recycling and 2) collection of yard trimmings for composting. Providing recycling and composting collection services enables both types of programs to reach their maximum effectiveness. In fact, in many cases, recycling and composting are major contributors to the success of a unit pricing program. Many communities already have some type of curbside collection or voluntary drop-off recycling program in place. Linking recycling and composting with unit pricing provides customers with an environmentally responsible way to manage their waste. In addition, since the cost of these programs can be built in to unit pricing fees, communities can recover these expenses without creating an economic disincentive to recycle. The extent of the recycling program is an important factor, as

Providing a recycling program in conjunction with unit pricing can further decrease the amount of waste your community must dispose of.

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

27

PART III
well. A community will more fully realize the benefits of offering recycling in tandem with unit pricing if the recycling program is geared to collect a wide range of materials (although the availability of local markets can constrain the types of materials a community can accept). Providing for removal of yard trimmings such as leaves, branches, prunings, and grass clippings, and promoting backyard composting and “grasscycling” (leaving grass trimmings on the lawn), also will enhance the unit pricing program. For example, the community of Austin, Texas, mixes the yard trimmings it collects from residents with sewage sludge to produce compost called “Dillo Dirt,” which is sold to nurseries as fertilizer, and Durham, North Carolina, makes landscaping mulch from brush. Distributing “how-to” materials can help increase the amount of organic waste residents compost, and some municipalities even provide their residents with free compost bins. In communities where weekly recycling or composting is too costly, curbside collection can be scheduled every other week or once a month. In addition, municipalities can encourage haulers to provide recycling services by including a risk-sharing clause in their contracts. Such clauses require the municipality to share with the hauler the risk of fluctuations in the price of recyclable materials. If a recycling company requires payment to process a certain collected material whose value had dropped substantially, for example, the hauler and municipality would bear these costs together. Some communities, however, might not feel their budget would allow them to incur additional, unexpected costs.

Complementary programs also can benefit from a strong public education effort.

COSTS

Backyard Collections
Backyard collection of waste and/or recyclables can be considered as a service enhancement that complements a unit pricing system. With this service, haulers remove residential waste and recyclables from backyards, garages, or wherever residents prefer, rather than requiring them to haul the material to the curb. Residents might pay extra for this service. When setting a price for backyard collection services, a community should consider costs to collect waste from the curb, transport it, and dispose of it. The higher charge for backyard waste removal should reflect the added municipal resources required for such a service.

Curbside Collection of Bulky Items
Curbside collection of large items, such as refrigerators and other major appliances, is another service that complements basic trash removal. In some communities with unit pricing, residents pay extra to

28

PART III
have bulky items picked up and disposed of by the municipality. The disposal of bulky items, which cannot fit into most unit-pricing programs’ cans or bags, can be charged for within a unit pricing system by using printed stickers or tags that are attached to the item. To establish fair prices, the solid waste agency can use the same collection, transportation, and disposal cost considerations that apply to establishing prices for standard unit pricing waste collections. The price could be set in advance of collection, based on the owner’s description of the item, or after collection, based on the collection agency’s observations.

Multi-Family Housing
One of the biggest challenges for communities implementing unit pricing is how to include multi-family (five units or more) residential structures into the program. Such buildings can house a large portion of the population, particularly in densely populated areas. Because waste often is collected from residents of such structures per building, rather than per unit, it might be difficult to offer these residents a direct economic incentive to reduce waste with unit pricing. To compound this problem, because many multi-family buildings receive less convenient recycling services than single-family housing units, residents of multi-family buildings might have fewer avenues for waste reduction. There are several possible options to resolve multi-family barriers. One option is to have the building manager sell bags or tags to each resident. When households use these tags or bags, those that generate more waste end up paying more for waste collection. Problems arise

BARRIERS

Tips for Accommodating Residents of Multi-Family Households
A number of ideas were presented at EPA’s Unit Pricing Roundtable to help extend to residents of multi-family households the direct economic incentives inherent in unit pricing. One suggestion was to request that building managers pass on trash collection savings to residents in the form of cash rebates, rent reductions, or some free building services, although the impact of the incentive would be diluted since it is spread over all the tenants in the building. New technologies, such as a bar code reader to identify the tenant and a scale at the bottom of the chute to record the weight, also were suggested as possible solutions. These technologies offer the potential for accurately recording the exact waste generation for each tenant. In addition, building codes for new and renovated buildings could be amended to require the installation of separate chutes for recycling and for garbage disposal. Residents also could be required to use a trash token or some type of identifying code to gain access to a garbage chute.

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

29

PART III
when households do not comply with this system, however. In many cases, residents can easily place waste in the building dumpster without paying for a bag or sticker. Another approach is to modify the system of placing waste out for collection in multi-family buildings. For example, dumpsters or garbage chutes could be modified to operate only when a magnetic card or other proof of payment is used. Such modifications can be expensive, though. Communities with unit pricing systems in place are experimenting with other possible solutions to the multi-family barrier. If extending unit pricing service to multi-family buildings is a concern in your community, consider contacting other cities or towns that have addressed this issue for additional ideas. (A listing of these communities is provided in Table 3-2 at the back of this section.)

Residents With Special Needs
Many communities considering unit pricing are concerned about the special needs of physically limited or disabled citizens and those living on fixed or low incomes. For example, some senior citizens and disabled residents may be physically unable to move trash containers to the curb. Communities may wish to consider offering such residents backyard collection services at a reduced rate or at no extra charge. Such special considerations should be factored in to your unit pricing rate structure. While the fees associated with unit pricing could represent a potential problem for some residents, unit pricing systems can be structured to allow everyone to benefit. To provide assistance to residents with special financial needs, communities can reduce the per-household waste collection charges by a set amount, offer a percentage discount, or provide a credit on the overall bill. In some cases, communities with unit pricing programs offer a certain number of free bags or stickers to low-income residents. Some communities charge everyone equally for bags or tags but reduce the base service charge for low-income households. Assistance also can be offered through existing low-income programs, particularly other utility assistance efforts. These techniques allow low-income households to benefit from some assistance while retaining the incentive to reduce their bill for waste services by practicing source reduction, recycling, and composting. Communities will need to determine how to identify the amount of assistance they will offer based primarily on the program’s anticipated revenues. As a basis for establishing eligibility for assistance, some communities with unit pricing programs use income criteria such as federal poverty guidelines.

In some communities, backyard collection can be arranged as a service for disabled or elderly residents.

30

PART III
Table 3-2 . Advantages and Disadvantages of Unit Pricing Container Systems
System Option Advantages
Revenues are fairly stable and easy to forecast. Unlike bags, cans often work well with semiautomated or automated collection equipment (if cans are chosen that are compatible with this equipment). If residents already own trash cans of roughly uniform volume, new cans might not be required.

Disadvantages

Communities Using This System

Cans often have higher implementation Hennepin County, MN costs, including the purchase and distribution of new cans. Seattle, WA Customers have a limited incentive to reduce waste. Since residents are usually charged on a subscription basis, there is no incentive not to fill cans already purchased. In addition, no savings are possible below the smallest size trash can. Anaheim, CA King County, WA (in unincorporated areas) Marion County, OR Pasadena, CA Glendale, CA Oakland, CA

Relatively complex billing systems are Cans may be labeled with addresses to needed to track residents’ selected assist in enforcement. subscription level and bill accordingly. Cans prevent animals from scattering the waste. Complex storage, inventory, and distribution systems are required to provide new cans to households that change their subscription level. A method of collecting and charging for waste beyond subscription levels and for bulk waste collections needs to be established. At the outset, residents may find it difficult or confusing to select a subscription level. Nonautomated can collections tend to require greater time and effort than collecting waste in bags.

Bellevue, WA Santa Monica, CA Duluth, MN Richmond, CA Walnut Creek, CA Santa Clara, CA Auburn, WA Hastings, MN

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

31

PART III
Table 3-2 (continued). Advantages and Disadvantages of Unit Pricing Container Systems
System Option Advantages
Residents find bag systems easy to understand. Bag systems might offer a stronger waste reduction incentive than can systems because fees typically are based on smaller increments of waste. Accounting costs are lower than with can systems, since no billing system is needed. Bag systems have lower distribution, storage, and inventory costs than can systems when bags are sold at local retail establishments and municipal offices. Bag collections tend to be faster and more efficient than nonautomated can collections.

Disadvantages
Greater revenue uncertainty than with can-based systems, since the number of bags residents purchase can fluctuate significantly. If bags are sold in municipal offices, extra staff time be will need to be committed. Residents might view a requirement to buy and store bags as an inconvenience. Bags are more expensive than tags or stickers. Bags often are incompatible with automated or semiautomated collection equipment. Animals can tear bags and scatter trash, or bags can tear during lifting.

Communities Using This System
Grand Rapids, MI Reading, PA Lansing, MI St. Cloud, MN Darien, IL Carlisle, PA Quincy, IL Oregon, WI Fallbrook, CA

Bags can be used to indicate that the proper fees have been paid for bulky Unlike cans, bags are not reused, items or white goods, since fees for adding to the amount of solid waste pickup of these items (above the entering the waste stream. subscription level) often are assessed by communities. Communities can ask residents to attach a certain number of bags to the items according to the cost of disposal (for example, two bags for a couch and three bags for a washing machine).

32

PART III
Table 3-2 (continued). Advantages and Disadvantages of Unit Pricing Container Systems
System Option Advantages
Tag and sticker systems are easier and less expensive to implement than can systems. Residents often find tag or sticker systems easier to understand. These systems offer a stronger waste reduction incentive than can systems because fees are based on smaller increments of waste. Accounting costs are lower than with can systems, since no billing system is needed. Selling tags or stickers at local retail establishments and municipal offices offers lower distribution, storage, and inventory costs than can systems. The cost of producing tags or stickers for sale to residents is lower than for bags. Stickers can be used to indicate payment for bulky items or white goods, since fees for pickup of these items (above the subscription level) often are assessed by communities.

Disadvantages

Communities Using This System

There is greater revenue uncertainty Tompkins County, NY than with can-based systems, since the number of tags or stickers residents Aurora, IL purchase can fluctuate significantly. Grand Rapids, MI To avoid confusion among residents, the municipality must establish and Lansing, MI clearly communicate the size limits allowable for each sticker. If tags or stickers are sold in municipal offices, extra staff time will need to be committed. Residents might view a requirement to buy and store stickers or tags as an inconvenience. Tags and stickers often do not adhere in rainy or cold weather. Extra time might be needed at curb for collectors to enforce size limits. In addition, there may be no incentive for strict enforcement if haulers are paid based on the amount of waste collected. Stickers left on trash at curbside could be removed by vandals or by other residents hoping to avoid paying for waste services. Tags and stickers are not as noticeable as bags or other prepaid indicators.

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

33

PART III Putting the Blocks Together
Now that you have identif ied the components of unit pricing programs in general, you are ready to design a program that meets your community’s specif ic needs and goals. “Putting the Blocks Together” presents a six-step process that can assist you in designing and evaluating your preliminary rate structure. This process should begin approximately six months before the start of your program.

Performing the Six-Step Process...
As you are completing these steps, be sure to keep a few basic objectives in mind: Raise sufficient revenues to cover fixed costs and variable costs. Possibly raise revenues beyond the cost of the program to cover other waste management costs. These revenues might be used for antilittering campaigns or to discourage illegal dumping. Send clear price signals to citizens to encourage waste reduction. Charge appropriate fees to cover the costs of 1) recycling and other complementary programs, 2) providing services (such as backyard collection) for physically limited or disabled people, and 3) any discount pricing provided to low-income households. Compile accurate MSW baseline data to be used when evaluating your unit pricing program. Design a program simple enough to keep administrative costs low and to make it easy for people to participate in the program, thereby reducing both their waste generation and their waste collection bill. Also, don’t forget to consider your unit pricing goals, community-specific conditions, and the most promising suggestions from municipalities with existing unit pricing programs to ensure a program tailored to the waste management needs and concerns of your community.

34

P U T T I N G T H E B LO C K S TO G E T H E R

PART III

1

Demand: Estimate T Amount of Waste Generated in the “Steady-State” otal
Because the amount of waste your community generates affects the level of resources (including trucks, labor, and administrative support) required to manage it, you need to accurately estimate what the community’s waste generation rate will be after your unit pricing program is fully established. This period is referred to as the “steady-state.” In the steady-state, residents have accepted unit pricing and reduced their waste generation rates accordingly, and the municipality’s waste management operations have adjusted to new, lower waste collection requirements.
TRADITIONAL SYSTEM Planning

STEP

Transition Period Implementation

S T E A DY- S T A T E Program Monitoring

Ensuring that the revenues received under the unit pricing program will cover the program’s costs is a critical factor for most communities. As a result, accurately estimating the amount of waste collected in the steady-state is an important first step in determining how much money unit pricing will actually generate. To develop such an estimate, perform the following calculations:

± Current

demand. Using your waste hauling records, estimate the amount of waste collected from residents last year. growth. Next, estimate the population growth trends and other demographic patterns in your community. Use this information to estimate the demand for waste management services over the next one or two years. This information can be developed in several ways; the box entitled “Forecasting Community Growth Trends” on page 31 discusses some different approaches. (Note: If you are planning special programs for low-income, elderly, or multi-family households, you should estimate the population trends of these residents or households as well.)

± Community

of unit pricing. Then, estimate the likely impact (i.e., household responsiveness) of unit pricing on this demand for waste services. Other communities with unit pricing programs in place might be a good source of information on the degree of waste generation reduction to be expected. Some communities have achieved 25 to 45 percent reductions in waste generation rates, depending on such factors as the use of complementary programs, the design of the unit pricing rate structure, and the effectiveness of the public education effort. Be sure not to underestimate the potential success of your unit pricing program, especially if strong public education and complementary programs are planned. Underestimating waste reduction will cause you to overestimate potential revenues.
35

± Impact

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

PART III
Use this information on current demand, community growth, and the impact of unit pricing to estimate the total amount of solid waste you expect will be generated once the unit pricing program has been established.

Forecasting Community Growth Trends
Forecasting trends in the growth of a community’s population is an important step in accurately estimating the amount of waste generated under an ongoing unit pricing program. Typically, the degree of sophistication a community brings to this process will vary with the information and resources available. For example, if your community is small and you expect no change in population trends, per capita waste generation, and commercial or industrial growth, you could use a simple trend analysis to forecast growth. Your estimation of current waste generation amounts might be based on a waste characterization assessment, historical records from collection services and disposal facilities, or estimates based on similar communities’ analyses. Extending these trends can provide an estimate of future demand for solid waste services. If you base your estimates on other communities’ analyses, be sure to choose communities that are similar to yours in size, population, income distribution, urban/rural distribution, and economic base. In addition, using the most recent analyses available will increase the accuracy of your estimation. In contrast, if your community is large and you expect a change in current trends, you probably will need to use a sophisticated forecasting equation that will account for all the variables you identify. Your solid waste agency may have collected data on a number of factors that previously have influenced the amount of waste generated by the community (such as housing construction, plant closings, household income, economic growth, and age distribution of the population). You could base projections of future demand for solid waste services by introducing these data into your

2

Services: Determine the Components of Your Unit Pricing Program
After clarifying your community’s goals and considering the pros and cons of the unit pricing program options described earlier in this section of the guide, you will be ready to determine the methods your solid waste agency will use to collect waste from residents and other details of your unit pricing program, including:

STEP

± Containers. After considering their practical implications, decide whether your unit
pricing program would be most effective using cans, bags, tags or stickers, or some type of hybrid system. Determine the volume of the containers to be used.

± Service Options. While most unit pricing programs will include curbside collections, decide whether your program would benef it from such additional services as backyard collections and picking up bulky items such as white goods.

36

P U T T I N G T H E B LO C K S TO G E T H E R

PART III

± Complementary waste management programs. If your community is not already operating programs like recycling or composting, consider whether you might implement them to enhance the effectiveness of your unit pricing program and to help meet other community goals. ± Residents
of multi-family buildings and low-income residents. Determine how your community plans to extend the economic benefits of unit pricing to residents of multi-family buildings and deal with the needs of low-income residents and the elderly.

3

Costs: Estimate the Costs of Your Unit Pricing Program
Having determined the structure of your program and the services to include, list all associated costs. Categories of costs can include:

STEP

± Start-up

costs. Estimate the one-time costs your community will incur when implementing the unit pricing program, such as training personnel, purchasing new containers, and designing and implementing a new billing process.

± Ongoing costs. Estimate the costs your program will incur on an ongoing basis. These costs include variable costs (such as landfill tipping fees) and more stable or fixed costs (including rent and utilities for agency offices and office supplies) that remain relatively constant despite fluctuations in the amount of waste collected. Be sure to consider any extra costs from providing special services to certain groups. (Some communities might find it useful to employ full cost accounting procedures to better understand the exact costs of the different projects planned as part of the unit pricing program.)

4

Rates: Develop a Tentative Unit Pricing Rate Structure
Having determined the components of your program, you can now set a tentative rate structure. At this point, the rates should be considered merely rough estimates to be revised and refined in light of the overall revenues they will generate and how acceptable the costs will be to residents. The rates you start with can be borrowed from the figures used by neighboring unit pricing communities offering similar services or adapted from price ranges found nationally. As you work through the remaining steps in the process of setting a rate structure, you can determine whether the rates are appropriate and make adjustments accordingly. Be sure to specify any lower rates that you plan to make available to some portions of your community (such as discounts for low-income households).

STEP

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

37

PART III

5

Revenues: Calculate the Revenues From Unit Pricing
You now have the information needed to estimate the revenues that your unit pricing program will generate once it has been established and residents have adjusted their waste generation rates accordingly. Divide the total amount of waste generated per month in the steady-state (estimated in Step 1) by the volume of containers, such as bags or cans, you established in Step 2. This provides an estimate of the number of containers of solid waste you expect to collect per month. Then multiply the estimated number of containers by the unit charge you have tentatively established in Step 4. This yields an estimate of the total revenues per month generated under unit pricing. Depending on the number of services offered and the unit pricing structure itself, these calculations can be simple or complex! For example, communities using cans of varying sizes and offering additional services (such as backyard waste collection) must estimate the revenues produced by each component of their solid waste program. In addition, if low-income households are subsidized under your program, be sure to calculate the size of the subsidies and subtract from the expected revenues.

STEP

6

Balance: Evaluate and Adjust Your Preliminary Unit Pricing Program
For most communities, comparing the anticipated costs of their unit pricing program (Step 3) against expected revenues (Step 5) will provide the critical indication of whether the program is viable. (It is important in this step to be able to rely on accurate baseline data for gauging the viability of your program.) If this comparison indicates that the costs of your unit pricing program might not be fully covered by its revenues, you need to review both the design of the program (Step 2) and the rates you plan to charge (Step 4). Several revisions of program options and rate structures may be required to achieve a unit pricing program that most closely meets the goals established by the community in the planning phase (see Part II). Once you feel that your program strikes a working balance between costs incurred for services provided and the prices residents will be charged, it might be appropriate to submit the program design to other municipal officials or community leaders for additional input. This process of review and comment can continue until a balanced program agreed upon by community representatives has been established.

STEP

38

P U T T I N G T H E B LO C K S TO G E T H E R

PART III

0

The Six Steps in Action: Designing a Rate Structure for Community A
To illustrate the steps in action, we will follow Community A, a hypothetical town, as it designs a rate structure for its new unit pricing program based on its own particular goals and concerns.

Estimating waste generation rates. Community A’s records show that it collected 480,000 cubic yards of solid waste from its residents last year. Municipal officials realize that the population of the town is likely to increase next year after a large multi-use building complex is completed. Based on population projections prepared by town planners, officials estimate that, at the current rate, residents will generate nearly 600,000 cubic yards of solid waste annually two years from now. Within this two-year period, however, officials hope their unit pricing program will have reached its steady-state and residents will be generating less waste. Using data from three nearby, demographically similar towns that have established unit pricing programs, municipal officials estimate that two years after implementation of the unit pricing program the community will generate about 410,000 cubic yards of waste annually. Establishing rates. At this stage in the design process, municipal officials in Community A decide to use the median rate of the prices charged by other communities across the country ($1.75 per 30-gallon bag). In addition, this rate is very close to the price adopted by the three nearby unit pricing communities for their 30-gallon containers. Calculating revenues. Dividing the annual amount of solid waste Community A expects to generate in the steady-state (410,000 cubic yards) by the size of their waste container (30 gallons or 0.15 cubic yards) shows that the municipality can expect to collect over 2,733,000 bags each year. By multiplying this figure by the price per bag ($1.75), officials calculated that Community A should receive about $4,780,000 in revenues from its unit pricing program each year. Calculating costs. Community A estimates that the annual steady-state cost of its program will include approximately $1,000,000 in f ixed costs, such as public education efforts, computers and other office materials, and enforcement efforts, and approximately $2,700,000 in tipping fees and other variable costs. Combining these figures produces an annual steady-state cost of approximately $3,700,000 for the program. Additional start-up expenses also would be incurred. Comparing costs and revenues. While recognizing that their program must cover the town’s waste management costs completely, officials in Community A agreed the town should cover any start-up costs that exceeded revenues during the initial transition period. Therefore, when a comparison of the expected revenues against the costs of the unit pricing program showed that the program would generate excess revenues, municipal officials decided to lower the price charged per bag to $1.35. This new price would yield a projected $3,690,000 annually, closer to the town’s actual costs of maintaining the program.
DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

39

PART III Balancing Costs and Revenues
Costs
A community can select from an impressive array of service options when mapping out a unit pricing program. After estimating the demand for services in STEP 1, communities can plan for the services they will offer in STEP 2. Some communities will want to offer services such as backyard collections, comprehensive recycling programs, and assistance to residents with special needs. Bear in mind, however, that while these projects can help promote source reduction and increase citizen enthusiasm, they also can increase the cost of your program significantly. Use STEP 3 to help estimate the costs of the services you are planning to offer.

Revenues
The flip side of costs is revenues. Unit pricing allows communities to generate the revenues needed to pay for solid waste management services under the new program. In fact, when developing a rate structure in STEP 4 and calculating the resulting revenues in STEP 5, communities might decide to set prices at a level above the cost of their unit pricing program. This would further encourage source reduction among residents and ensure that revenues could cover any shortfalls. Since residents will only support a program they feel charges a fair price for solid waste services, however, there are limits to this strategy.

Balance
To be successful over the long term, your unit pricing program will need to carefully balance the services you want to include against the revenues that residents provide. The exact formula will depend upon local conditions. Use STEP 6 to help you compare the costs of your planned program against anticipated revenues. Keep revising your rate structure until you feel that you have a program that offers the services you need at a price residents can support.

40

PART III

questions & answers
How small should our smallest can or bag be?
Unit pricing communities agree that planning for success is important during the design process. Some communities have found that cans as small as 10 to 20 gallons are needed! For example, Olympia, Washington, offers residents a 10-gallon can and Victoria, British Columbia, uses a 22-gallon can as the base service level. A number of communities using large containers (such as 60-gallon cans) are f inding that these containers are too large to offer customers meaningful incentives, but purchasing and delivering new, smaller cans later in the program is very expensive. In the short run, a broader range of service can be provided by using several smaller cans. This also helps keep the system f lexible for future changes.

What pricing rates are communities charging?
For bag systems in the Midwest and Pennsylvania, communities charge about $1 to $2 per 30-gallon bag. For variable can programs in the Northwest and California, towns charge $9 to $15 for the f irst level of service (20 to 40 gallons), with charges for additional cans of service ranging from 30¢ to $15.

We have an existing variable rate can program. How can we increase the incentive for waste reduction?
The key change to make is to base your billing on actual set-outs rather than using a subscription approach. Offer smaller cans to encourage waste reduction, and consider a bag-based system. Upgrading composting and recycling options (including plastics collection, for example, if you don’t already) also will provide an incentive for customers to reduce waste. Communities also universally state that education is critical to helping customers understand and work with the system. Finally, consider a weight-based program. You might f ind that the cost of implementing this type of program is not prohibitive and that it can work in tandem with your existing cans.

How can we improve source separation of recyclable materials?
Some residents may tend to be sloppy about source separation regardless of the type of solid waste pricing system. As people learn to reduce their costs by recycling more, however, they may become more inclined to introduce nonrecyclables in their recycling bins. Many communities have found the best solution is a good education and enforcement program that creates a sense of ownership among residents, supported by peer pressure against such behavior. Some also impose a small charge for recyclable materials in their rate structure design.
DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

41

PART III

Points to remember
Remember that container options, complementary programs, rate structures, and billing systems are all interrelated. As you consider the different options, keep in mind the need to cover costs, keep the system simple and convenient, encourage waste reduction, and minimize administrative burdens on your agency.

Tradeoffs must be considered as you make decisions about rate structures and program options. Balance, for example, the need to generate revenues against providing incentives for waste reduction.

Consider complementary programs, such as recycling and collection of yard trimmings, to increase the effectiveness of unit pricing.

Consider how to ensure that unit pricing’s economic incentives to reduce waste can be extended to residents of multi-family housing in your community.

Design your program to be flexible enough to allow for groups with special needs. Discount pricing or assistance programs might be necessary to ensure that the program encourages waste reduction without imposing physical or financial burdens on handicapped or low-income members of your community.

Refer back to your unit pricing goals when making rate structure decisions. While information from other communities with unit pricing programs is helpful, your own community’s solid waste concerns should be the overriding factor.
42

PART III

Case Studies
Establishing a Rate Structure A View From Seattle
Unit pricing structure. Seattle has established a two-tiered, variable subscription can unit pricing program. To ensure support for the program from our City Council and residents in general, we needed to design a program that keeps rates low and revenues stable. To accomplish this, Seattle chose to adopt a two-tiered rate structure. The mandatory base charge (called a minimum charge) is $5.85 a month. We also charge $15 for each standard size (30-gallon) can per week. The Council pushed for this structure, believing it would keep overall rates down and send a strong environmental message to the community at the same time. There tends to be broad support for the single price per can.
We also have introduced smaller can sizes. About 30 percent of our customers use minicans (19-gallon capacity), which cost $1 1.50 per week, and we soon will be providing microcan service (a 10-gallon container) for $9.35 per week. After talking with customers and observing their waste disposal habits, we found a lot of customers could fit their waste into a micro can. We expect about 10 percent of all customers to use the micro cans.

Complementary services. After electing to collect yard trimmings as part of our
program, we decided to set a flat fee of $3 per household per month for this service, believing that a more complicated system would only make the program’s administration prohibitively costly. We offer bulky item pick-up for $25 per item. The price was set to cover hauling and administrative costs. For waste that is generated above the subscription level, residents must attach a trash tag, marketed through local retail outlets, to garbage bags. The trash tag system has been one of our less successful programs, partly because customers just don’t know about it. In addition, our haulers do not always enforce the tag system. Since they get paid per ton of waste they pick up, they have no incentive to leave the waste at the curb. We estimate we forfeit anywhere from $500,000 to $1 million dollars a year on fees not paid on this additional waste.

Tags and Stickers A View From Illinois
One of the major advantages of tags and stickers is that, since residents pay for them at various outlets in the community, there is no billing at all. They also are applicable to different types of services, containers, and waste, and they are easy to purchase and hold on to until needed. Multiple tags or stickers can be used on bulky waste items, too. Tags and stickers also are easy for collection personnel to use. Since every second they spend at a stop costs money, the more data collection or enforcement that a community

DE S I G NI N G A N I N T EG R AT ED U NI T P R IC I NG P RO G R A M

43

PART III
requires haulers to perform per stop, the less likely they are to do it. In addition, the tags and stickers are still useful even in cases where collection personnel can’t read or write . But tags and stickers are not perfect. The hauler might not be able to find them. People can steal them off other residents’ garbage bags and put them on their own bags. A special problem for stickers is that they can fall off in rainy or cold weather. Furthermore, people may buy a large number of tags in January, and then none for the next several months. Not only does this create an uncertain revenue supply, it also makes predicting solid waste volume very difficult.

Experience With Weight-Based Systems A View From Farmington, Minnesota, and Seattle, Washington
In Farmington, Minnesota, we worked for two years to develop and implement a weight-based unit pricing program for our town of 5,000 residents. Our new system uses fully automated trucks that require just one person per truck to hoist and weigh the garbage can. The truck’s weighing system reads a bar code on the can that identifies the resident’s name and address. The truck then empties the can and the information is fed automatically into the billing system through an onboard computer. This provides a reliable system for charging residents for waste collection by weight. One issue we have to resolve is establishing an appropriate regulation for the weighing mechanism used in our system. After Minnesota’s Weights and Measures Agency decided it did not have the authority to verify the scales on the trucks, the state legislature adopted standardized weight and measure legislation establishing regulations covering weighing equipment for garbage collection trucks. One issue that remains, however, is that the degree of calibration required is too precise (the same as that for grocery store scales). We are now in the process of petitioning for changes to make the regulation more consistent with practical needs. In Seattle, Washington, we tested two different weight-based systems: a hand-dumped weight-based system and a semi-automated weight-based system. The hand dump system, designed around a “hook scale” and a bar code, was tested over the course of three months. The collector hung the can on the hook and used a scanner on the bar code. The weight and number were recorded in a portable calculator-sized computer and downloaded to a personal computer for calculating and mailing mock bills to customers. The second system we tested during a six-week trial used a retrofitted semiautomated tipping arm and a radio-frequency tag. The weight and customer identification number were automatically recorded during the dumping cycle. Both approaches worked extremely well. The first system took about 10 percent longer for collection; the second system operated exactly as the standard semiautomated variable can system and took no extra time. Surveys of customers participating in the hand-dump system trial showed that it was very popular. Participating residents reduced waste 1 percent by weight over the course of the testing. 5 In our research, we found that with the weight-based system, there are advantages to customers buying their own containers. The cost is lower and, if the garbage is hand-dumped, you do not need standardized containers. Under a semiautomated system, however, you might have to require customers to buy specific containers. 44

PART IV
Implementing and Monitoring Unit Pricing

H

aving carefully planned and designed a unit pricing program that best ref lects the needs and concerns of your community, you can now get started. Implementing a unit pricing program is an ongoing process, requiring persistent attention to a wide range of details. This part of the guide focuses on the central issues concerning unit pricing implementation, including public education, accounting, and administrative changes. Suggestions also are included for collecting data and monitoring the program once it is in place. There are two distinct schools of thought about the timing of unit pricing implementation. One maintains that unit pricing should be implemented within a specif ied time frame and that rate adjustments, complementary programs such as recycling, and any other changes be made all at once. The other believes that households respond better when they are asked to make changes in small, manageable increments over time. The f inal decision about which path to follow is a local one based on the views of your agency, the local government, community organizations, and the households themselves. In most towns, residents will prefer to modify their habits as infrequently as possible. In this case, it might be easiest to implement a package of changes all at once, rather than ask for a series of adjustments six months apart.

I MP L EM E N T IN G A N D M ON I TO R I N G U N I T PR I CI N G

45

PART IV Implementation Activities
Many tasks need to be performed during unit pricing implementation. While the exact activities vary from community to community based on program design and local conditions, certain tasks pertain to nearly all unit pricing programs. These include conducting public relations and reorganizing your solid waste agency’s administrative office. (Both of these activities are discussed in detail below.) Other common tasks include:

Establishing legal authority. Generally, to implement a unit
pricing program, your solid waste agency needs the authority to set and approve waste collection rates and bill accordingly, establish an ordinance mandating the use of the waste collection service,